Donville Inniss Incarceration Exposes a Culture of Corruption

The dent to reputation suffered suffered by Barbados when former Minister Donville Inniss was jailed in the USA for money laundering should make for interesting commentary. To be expected a gullible population continues to focus on the obvious. Why was a former minister charged over a measly USD36,000.00?

What Barbadians should be more concerned about is the incarceration of Inniss should bring into focus how business gets done in Barbados. We have so many examples whether Cahill under the former administration or the Radical vaccine scam under the current administration to finger only two.

White collar corruption and malfeasance is always hard to ringfence in any country because the gatekeepers of justice are the powerful in society. Unfortunately in island states like Barbados, it becomes more difficult because of the incestuous nature of the beast resulting in incompetent watchdog agencies as a result of nepotism.

The following insightful comment was posted by Northern Observer. We need to lift our game as citizens in a democracy showing fissures.

@David I cannot comment on AT (Alex Tasker), I don’t know the person. What can be observed is the senior management at ICBL did not appreciate the finer points of what they were doing. What none of know is the inner workings.

Did BF&M have other issues with IRS/DOJ?

What was the relationship between the CEO-CFO at BF&M, and that CFO/others and ICBL personnel.

I mean, even after discovery, it did not have to be disclosed. Who actually found it? It was two relatively small amounts…somebody could have created paperwork after the fact. Yet, somebody also decided that wasn’t going to happen.

Imagine somebody at BF&M was upset they didn’t get the ICBL CEO job. Let’s face it, II (Ingrid Innes) wasn’t particularly well qualified, and an outsider at BF&M. The decision to disclose may have been to sink her. In the myopic Bajan view it was to get DI (Donville Inniss). But the intent may have been to get II fired, and it ends there. Maybe they were after AT. Sometimes when you don’t appreciate the ‘big picture’ a decision is made, which has ramifications one didn’t foresee.

Northern Observer

Donville Inniss’ File Missing from Mottley’s Red Bag

BREAKING: Alex Tasker ordered extradited https://www.nationnews.com/2021/09/08/breaking-alex-tasker-ordered-extradited/

 


It is also a different version of how the story got out than what our own Attorney-General said last Thursday after the verdict was handed down. He said: “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.” The AG added: “This is something that is required at all levels in Barbados’ society whether dealing with the scourge of corruption or the scourge of gun violence.

Donville Inniss Case Points to Endemic Corruption in Barbados

The traditional media is off and running with the big headlines about the sentence federal District Court Judge Kiyo Matsumoto is scheduled to deliver today in New York in the Donville Inniss matter. It is the story traditional media will have a healthy appetite for because of flagging circulation.

Mia’s Red Bag has come up empty so far

 

The concern of the blogmaster confirmed in the deliberations during the Donville Inniss trial is the strong inference there is pervasive corrupt behaviour in the way business is conducted by some PUBLIC and PRIVATE officials in Barbados. Successive governments over the years have paid lip service to unearthing and punishing corruption even in the face of obvious indications of wrong doing. The Mia Mottley government is better placed than her predecessors given the unprecedented mandate handed to her government to do something about it. It is no secret however to those in the know that Donville and Mia are bosom buddies.

The following is a blog repost from January 20, 2020 which captures key concerns by the blogmaster, the late journalist Patrick Hoyos and the BU family.


Donville Inniss Case Points to Endemic Corruption in Barbados

The blogmaster found the Patrick Hoyos article to be – without prolix – a good summary of the Donville Inniss matter. Especially as it pertains to the inference other payments were made to Donville Inniss and that bribery by elected officials was commonplace in Barbados. Although we have the Attorney General et al saying that local laws would not have permitted prosecution of Inniss this position was challenged during the Inniss trial.

The blogmaster’s wish is that we have a dispassionate debate in Barbados and a call to action by our officials regarding the honest prosecution of public officials. It is ironic former Speaker of the House MICHAEL CARRINGTON and Adriel Brathwaite, former Attorney General showed support for Inniss by attending the trial in New York. CARRINGTON’s legacy will be that a High Court judge had to issue a court order for him to release monies due his client 70+ John Griffiths, the blogmaster will remember Brathwiate for promising to report to parliament the status of Mia Mottley’s qualification (LEC) to practice before the Courts of Barbados. He never did.

The time has come to arrest the moral and ethical rot- add criminal. We have started to experience the negative fallout of pushing our heads in the sand.

Time for the authorities to do a job.

Time for the Prime Minister, Attorney General and stakeholders to lead the charge.

Importantly, time for John Citizens to hold officials accountable.

Read full text of BU blog https://barbadosunderground.net/2020/01/24/donville-inniss-case-points-to-endemic-corruption-in-barbados/

Donville Inniss Sitting Alone in the Dock

Submitted by Caleb Pilgrim

Dear Blogmaster:

Re Inniss, a reasonable person might acquaint himself with any relevant rules of engagement.   Such rules will inevitably vary from jurisdiction (e.g Barbados)  to jurisdiction (e.g Florida or New York).   But, familiarity with them can be instructive if not edifying.  It can even save the inattentive and the unwary aggravation in terms of time, money, emotional anxiety and even personal liberty.

Donville’s case is important, not only because it represents a stunning reversal of fortune, a reckoning for him personally, as well as any possible harm to Barbados and its image abroad.   

It is also important to Caribbean politicians as a whole, not just those a previous P.M described as a bunch of “wild boys”, or those who would kill and feast on “the fatted calf”.  (Some may recall that the U.S once sought the extradition of a certain Sir. Lynden Pindling – the Bahamas – to face trial In the U.S.  Mr. Bouterse’s – Suriname – problems may also come to mind.   Others routinely excoriate Dr. Gonsalves – St. Vincent – in this blog).  

But, certainly everyone knows that the U.S, despite the fact that it has only 4% to 5% of the world’s population, leads the world in terms of the number of prisoners with some 2.3 million incarcerated (25 %).  In Barbadian vernacular this is a sort oBig “Dodds”.

(See -incomplete – List of American federal politicians convicted of crimes – Wikipedia

List of American federal politicians convicted of crimes – Wikipedia

See also List of American state and local politicians convicted of crimes – Wikipedia

List of American state and local politicians convicted of crimes – Wikipedia

The late Judge John Sirica, a Watergate Judge, was remembered as having said that if a jury had voted to convict President Nixon, he (Sirica) would have sent him to jail.   The Reader will therefore understand why President Ford hastily pardoned Nixon.

Even as of the time of this writing, there are at least a few Prosecutors (e.g James, Vance, Racine et al) patiently waiting in plain view to rendezvous with Trump just after high noon come January 20, 2021.  He (Trump) is well aware of this fact.   Hence all the increased chatter about pardons for his henchmen, political supporters, family and friends, and even pardoning himself).   

(See: NY Prosecutor Hires Forensic Accountants as Criminal Investigation Into Trump Organization Escalates

NY Prosecutor Hires Forensic Accountants as Criminal Investigation Into Trump Organization Escalates

Re Inniss’s prospects, a lawyer once related to me how he had had a case before the Eastern District Court of New York (E.D.N.Y).  An elderly West Indian client passed.  Her Executor, following certain stereotypes, retained NY counsel to settle the Estate.  A problem arose when NY counsel sold a brown stone building and simply forgot to pay the proceeds to the Estate.  (As an aside, it is gratifying to read of the new Chief Justice, Cheltenham, cautioning new members of the Bar to refrain from borrowing their clients’ funds). Proceedings ensued thereafter.  

The matter came before the E.D.N.Y Chief Judge, the late David Trager, Judge in the Crown Heights case where Lemrick Nelson was accused of murdering a Rabbinical student, Yankel Rosenbaum, presumably in retaliation for the murder of a black child, Gavin Cato.   

My lawyer friend advised me that his matter only resolved after some intense legal skirmishing and the lawyer was persuaded to disgorge the proceeds.   His impression was that the EDNY, at least in his opinion, constituted a hostile work environment.  

Thus, Mr. Inniss, metaphorically, finds himself like a man with a glock cocked against his temple, as he sits in anticipation of sentencing scheduled for Jan 23, 2021(?).

Mr. Inniss apparently fired his trial counsel, for whatever reason(s).  He may not have agreed with his lawyers.  He may now pursue his right to appeal and draw out the process.   

However, claims such as “ineffective assistance of counsel” have typically been rejected in the overwhelming majority of cases (1 in 5, according to some sources).   Similarly, the Judge’s Jury Charge will most likely have followed standard instructions in similar such cases.  It might even be argued that Inniss, the Former International Business Minister, did not have a jury of his peers.   Yet, none of these arguments may prevail on appeal.   Hopefully, Inniss, Tasker and/or any possible corruptocrat will emerge sadder, wiser and chastened, by experience.

Happy New Year, y’all!y

Donville Inniss Matter Raises Questions About Unwillingness of Local Authorities to Unmask Corruption in High Places

The conviction of former Minister Donville Inniss in the United States of America an his upcoming sentencing has been smothered by news of the Covid 19 pandemic in 2020. The matter blipped twice in the newsfeed this month when first it was reported Inniss fired his lawyer Anthony Ricco and replaced him with Joel Hirschhorn to challenge how he (Inniss) was represented in the matter heard by Judge Kiyo Matsumoto. Second, co-defendants INGRID INNES and ALEX TASKER are currently facing extradition requests from the USA to answer charges in the indictment (see link below).

The question observers continue to ask is why has the local authority not grasped the opportunity to pursue criminal action against local parties if there is agreement Barbados is the source of the charge of money laundering currently being pursued in a US court.

The other question the blogmaster has floated is to what extent the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) suffers collateral damage from the matter IF Inniss has to do jail time.

Discuss for 25 marks

Donville Inniss Denied!

On January 16, 2020, a jury in the Eastern District of New York found Donville Inniss (“Mr. Inniss”) guilty of one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1956(h), and two counts of substantive money laundering, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 1956(a)(2)(A). Mr. Inniss now moves for a judgment of acquittal on all three counts of conviction, pursuant to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 29(c)(2) (“Rule 29(c)(2)”). For the reasons set forth below, Mr. Inniss’s motion is respectfully DENIED.

-Judge Kiyo A. Matsumoto

On the 24 July 2020 Judge Kiyo A. Matsumoto of the United States District Court Eastern District of New York in the matter United States of America v. Donville Inniss denied Inniss’ request for acquittal on all three counts of conviction – see Donville Inniss GUILTY as Charged. As a human being AND Barbadian the blogmaster feels some sympathy for the disgraced former member of parliament for St. James South. It is reported Inniss could be sentenced to a maximum of 25 years for crimes committed.

A read of Judge Matsumoto’s Summary of the Matter raises again the question about the local players fingered in the corruption which originated at ICBL. Will they ever have to face trial in the USA or Barbados? It seems incomprehensible to the average John Citizen that a former minister in the Barbados government was arrested and found guilty in a foreign land for a crime that had its incubation in Barbados and no punitive action taken by local authorities.

The blogmaster anticipates the communication machinery of the Barbados Labour Party is already being tuned – three years before the general election is constitutionally due – to take full advantage of the incarceration of former minister Inniss. It is interesting to note this week the Integrity in Public Life Act (2020) was passed in parliament and prime minister Mottley indicated she expects the Integrity Commission to be established by next year. If it is one thing the blogmaster is sure about is that the commission will be established before the bell rings to call the next general election.

The blogmaster’s calender has been updated with the 23 November, 2020 at 11AM. What ever happens it will be a date that will admit Barbados officially to political infamy.

Leroy Parris Arrested

On the 22 June 2020 the Nation newspaper published a story with the headline $35m ICBL deal in works.

#donvilleinniss

On the 24 June the media reported that former Chairman of CLICO Holdings was being questioned by police.  He has since been charged with fraud and released on bail.

#corruption

While some people love to do crossword puzzles, the BU blogmaster enjoys connecting dots!

 

Donville Inniss Case Points to Endemic Corruption in Barbados

The blogmaster found the Patrick Hoyos article to be – without prolix – a good summary of the Donville Inniss matter. Especially as it pertains to the inference other payments were made to Donville Inniss and that bribery by elected officials was commonplace in Barbados. Although we have the Attorney General et al saying that local laws would not have permitted prosecution of Inniss this position was challenged during the Inniss trial.

The blogmaster’s wish is that we have a dispassionate debate in Barbados and a call to action by our officials regarding the honest prosecution of public officials. It is ironic former Speaker of the House MICHAEL CARRINGTON and Adriel Brathwaite, former Attorney General showed support for Inniss by attending the trial in New York. CARRINGTON’s legacy will be that a High Court judge had to issue a court order for him to release monies due his client 70+ John Griffiths, the blogmaster will remember Brathwiate for promising to report to parliament the status of Mia Mottley’s qualification (LEC) to practice before the Courts of Barbados. He never did.

The time has come to arrest the moral and ethical rot- add criminal. We have started to experience the negative fallout of pushing our heads in the sand.

Time for the authorities to do a job.

Time for the Prime Minister, Attorney General and stakeholders to lead the charge.

Importantly, time for John Citizens to hold officials accountable.

David, Blogmaster

PS. Blame the blogmaster for paragraphs highlighted blue.


patrick hoyos

Patrick Hoyos, journalist and publisher specialising in business

Four little words that spell prison

It was a four-word text that probably took only a few seconds to write and send, but the events it set in motion led to a guilty verdict on all three counts for former Minister of Industry and Commerce, Donville Inniss.

A United States jury last Thursday found Inniss guilty of two counts of money laundering stemming from two money transfers to the bank accounts of a dental office in New York, and one count of conspiracy to launder money. Prosecutors said Inniss arranged for the money to be transferred through the bank accounts to conceal the bribes. According to the Wall Street Journal, Anthony Ricco, a lawyer for Inniss, didn’t dispute the money transfers, but argued the government’s evidence didn’t support its view that there had been bribes in 2015 and 2016.

According to the Nation newspaper’s Maria Bradshaw, US Prosecutor David Gopstein, in his summation to the jury, said that Inniss was not performing consulting services for Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited, but was taking bribes and laundering money.

The prosecutor said that up to 2014, ICBL held 50 per cent of the Barbados Investment and Development Corporation’s (BIDC) insurance contract, while Consumers’ Guarantee Insurance had 30 per cent and Trident Insurance 20 per cent.

When the time came for renewal in 2015, the BIDC board of directors recommended that the contract remain the same way, but on June 30, 2015, Alex Tasker, who was the senior vicepresident of ICBL, sent Inniss a text message saying: “We have to talk”.

This four-word message, the prosecutor told the jury, led to the bribery, which was arranged in a week and a half. The day after that text message, Inniss sent a letter to Sonja Trotman, chief executive officer of BIDC, inquiring about the insurance renewal.
As a result, ICBL increased its share to 70 per cent share, leaving CGI with 30 per cent, and Trident Insurance with zero.

The Wall Street Journal said that ICBL, which allegedly paid the bribes, “received a publicised letter in 2018 from the US Justice Department saying it was closing a probe into whether the company had violated the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.”

That letter said, in part, that “the Department’s investigation found that ICBL, through its employees and agents, paid approximately $36 000 in bribes to a Barbadian government official in exchange for insurance contracts resulting in approximately $686 827.50 in total premiums for the contracts and approximately $93 940.19 in net profits”. The WSJ’s Dylan Tokar wrote in Friday’s edition that “ICBL had voluntarily disclosed the bribes, enhanced its compliance program and fired the individuals involved in the misconduct, the Justice Department said.”

He added that the Justice Department had sent the letter to ICBL under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act’s Corporate Enforcement Policy which, he said, “offers leniency to companies that disclose potential foreign bribery violations to prosecutors”. This means that Donville, Ingrid [Innes] and Alex had their conspiracy exposed by the parent of the company on whose behalf the latter two were working to increase sales, or at least make budget.

Isn’t it ironic?

It is also a different version of how the story got out than what our own Attorney-General said last Thursday after the verdict was handed down. He said: “It is significant that the conviction came about because individuals who had knowledge of the events were prepared to speak out and to give evidence about wrongdoing.” The AG added: “This is something that is required at all levels in Barbados’ society whether dealing with the scourge of corruption or the scourge of gun violence.”

Meantime, Tokar noted that the Justice Department last year charged ICBL’s former chief executive officer, Ingrid Innes, and its former senior vice- president, Tasker, “who prosecutors said acted as Mr Inniss’ co-conspirators. The two remain at large, a spokesman for the department said.”

As far as I can see, the response in Barbados among the average citizen has been that it’s about time somebody was charged for all of the perceived corruption that went on under the last administration. I haven’t heard much, if any, sympathy for Inniss or his alleged co-conspirators.”

Patrick Hoyos is a journalist and publisher specialising in business. Email: bsjbarbados@gmail.com
Patrick Hoyos

 

Donville Inniss GUILTY as Charged

Millar told the court that in August 2015, she attended a meeting with former chief executive officer (CEO) of ICBL Ingrid Innes and former senior vice-president with responsibility for business development and marketing Alex Tasker.

Following that meeting, she said Innes instructed her to make “an urgent payment” of a referral bonus to Inniss.

She said she was uncomfortable with the request made by Innes as he was “politically exposed” and she enquired if she Innes had cleared such a transaction with the company’s chairman John Wight, to which Innes responded, “It’s fine”.

Barbados Today

The Donville Inniss Sub Story

Ingrid Inness

Two of the most newsworthy and jaw dropping events to have rocked the local political scene in the last 18 months were – the decimation of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) in the last general election, AND, the arrest of former DLP minister Donville Inniss in the United States.

BU pages must record Donville Inniss entered a plea of NOT GUILTY and the case is scheduled to be heard in October 28, 2019. He is charged with laundering USD36,000 derived from a bribe offered by former employees of Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited (ICBL) Alex Tasker and Ingrid Innes. Said monies were wired by ICBL to the principal of a dental company domiciled in New York with Inniss the beneficiary. Disclosures in documents filed by the United States Attorney Office revealed Inniss’ troubles were said to be linked to political rivals trying to frame him.

Since the news of Inniss arrest there is a sub story that has not been subjected to the full glare of public scrutiny. We have our moribund traditional media to hold accountable for reneging on its mandate to pursue truth. A reminder the media is referred to as the guardian of truth:-

The purpose, ‘raison d’être’, of this fourth element is to act as an counterbalance, a systemically opposite force that is to report, verify and question matters of governance, public matters as well as commercial ones, conducted by the powers, we the people, have entrusted it with and bestowed upon – On the role of journalism: facts vs

The Commissioner of Police (CoP) Tyrone Griffith is on the record he will not investigate the matter involving ICBL – a company incorporated in Barbados – identified as the source of Donville’s legal trouble. The CoP’s position was supported by Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACoP) in charge of crime Eucklyn Thompson who was also quoted in the press:

We can only deal with what is available to us. We can’t go by any speculation or that kind of thing. We will deal [with] whatever comes before us in terms of evidence… and the investigative process . . . . We will definitely do our part. But in terms of names mentioned and that kind of thing so being put on the table, that’s not what it is – Barbados police won’t touch case involving former gov’t minister Inniss

Alex Tasker

The substance of the police position is that they must have a complaint lodged in order to pursue any matter. The idiocy of the CoP and the ACoP declared position is that AG Dale Marshall urged the police chief to launch an investigation into bribery allegations involving Inniss and the Bermudian-owned, Barbados-based ICBL. However, as an independent body, the RBPF cannot be legally instructed by a Cabinet minister to undertake investigations; that role is reserved for the Crown’s Director of Public Prosecutions. Another WTF moment.

If you have information you prefer to share with only the blogmaster use the following form:

 

We know that US court documents implicate former ICBL employees Alex Tasker and Ingrid Innes. We know that the local employee implicated in the alleged bribing of Donville Inniss  was fired by ICBL and also had to part ways from Digicel as Executive Chairman. To the blogmaster’s simple way of thinking there is enough for the police to initiate an investigation. Instead what we have is business as usual with the authority class closing ranks in BIM.

 

Nation Newspaper Closes Comments Under Donville Inniss “Others Bribed” Article

Dear Owner of Barbados Underground

I would appreciate it very much if you would allow a submission I wrote on the nationnews blog to be featured here. It has to do with the nationnews paper decision to close the comments section of their June 23rd article entitled, ”Others Bribed.”

Although the nationnews paper has a right to close comments to any of their submissions for whatever reasons, I found the closing of comments on this particular article to be in poor taste.

My reason for saying this is that there is corruption in public life and, as a newspaper whose fourth estate committent should be to expose and highlight the damning matters with truth and without fear, the nationsnews choose to represent the fourth estate with dithering and tactics. One can only conclude that the caution shown by this paper relates to some type of servitude for which masters are pulling strings and puppets at the receiving end are fearful that they will get pop up.

This is why I can no longer submit my comments there. If the Donville Inniss matter is not enough for the nationnews to challenge the new regime to dig deeper into the political pit that has enabled many in political life to prosper far beyond their dreams, what purpose is a fourth estate if it comfortable with halfway functioning.

All the evidence points to less than stellar practices in the political spectrum of things. Yet, the parties that dominate the political landscape of our illustrious little rock continue to hoodwink the nation with loud- No Corruption- cries.

Even in the face of confessions as recent as business persons opening up to paying scratch-me- back campaign donations for favours in returned; even when a prominent journalist in the form of Roy Morris stated that he refused to sell his soul for a $20,000.00 bribe; even in the recent dilemma surrounding the discoveries of Donville Inniss indictment on possible money laundering charges, and even in the recent disclosures surrounding the latest Auditor General Report, the nationnewspaper remains subjective to subdued, tentative instead of tenacious.

Donville Inniss is now the face, and the proof, that corruption is no stranger to politicians. He is now the first politician in the history of Barbados to be indicted for money laundering charges. If found guilty, he should be the reason for all news outlets to step up their game and demand that investigative journalism be supported by legislation that would allow all media houses the freedom to expose corruption on to stamping it out.

The fact that an article highlighted that others similar to Donville Inniss could have also been bribed is additional proof, if found to be true, for a development such as this to be investigated thoroughly.

One, therefore, have ask: What is the nationnews trying to protect or stop by closing the comments to this article, when others exist, besides Donville Inniss, who might have take the bribe?

All the nationnews paper have have done is open up the doors of speculation and assumption for them to be regarded as a news outlet who practice double standards and a news outlet who have provided reason for more assumptions to advance a notion that they appear to have a protective agenda in place concerning political interests, and other interests in which they reap significant benefits.

I hope you will feature my comment on your blog so the nationnews would understand that their representation as a fourth estate is seriously lacking, and the people of Barbados have a right to comment to this issue, since it was featured by them.

Below is my comment to the nationnews closing of the ” Others Bribed” article. Thank you

Yours sincerely

Lloyd P Gulston

Insurance Corporation of Barbados, which allegedly bribed former Cabinet minister Donville Inniss to secure contracts, possibly made illegal payments to other “Government officials”, say prosecutors in the United States.
Prosecutors are contending they have evidence to support the allegation but don’t plan to present it when Inniss faces a Brooklyn, New York judge and jury in October.
However, it’s not known who are the “other Government officials”.
The assertions are contained in a document filed earlier this month in a federal district court and made available to the Sunday Sun. (TB)

Nationnews, why are the comments for the above on Donville Inniss closed? Why present the article if you do not want commentary on the matter? This is a serious development that needs the people say! We have corruption in political life and the people of Barbados want it stop. Why publish it if you do not want persons to comment about it? You know by doing this you have set up yourselves as a newspaper for serious criticism.

Inniss, Tasker, Innes Matter Filed Under DROSS by Barbados Authorities

The following report is reproduced by BU for many reasons. At the top of the list is the lingering curiosity by some Barbadians questioning whether local authorities will pursue this and other matters. The expectation is not meant to slur the character of anybody but to satisfy a reasonable expectation that justice must be seen to be done..

Barbadians have become increasingly cynical about the inability or inaction of local authorities to charge local prominent officials for white collar offenses. It is a naive person who believe white collar crimes “doan happen hey”.

 

New York News: BROOKLYN, Former Chief Executive Officer and Senior Vice President of Barbadian Insurance Company Charged with Laundering Bribes to Former Minister of Industry of Barbados

New York News: BROOKLYN, Former Chief Executive Officer and Senior Vice President of Barbadian Insurance Company Charged with Laundering Bribes to Former Minister of Industry of Barbados

BROOKLYN, N.Y. – Ingrid Innes, the former chief executive officer, and Alex Tasker, a former senior vice president of Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited (ICBL), a Barbados-based insurance company, were charged in a superseding indictment unsealed on January 18, 2019, with laundering bribes to the former Minister of Industry of Barbados in exchange for his assistance in securing government contracts for ICBL. Innes and Tasker are not in U.S. custody.

Richard P. Donoghue, United States Attorney for the Eastern District of New York, Brian A. Benczkowski, Assistant Attorney General of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, and William F. Sweeney, Jr., Assistant Director-in-Charge, Federal Bureau of Investigation, New York Field Office (FBI), announced the charges.

Innes and Tasker were charged with one count of conspiracy to launder money and two counts of money laundering in the superseding indictment. The former Minister of Industry of Barbados, Donville Inniss, a U.S. legal permanent resident who resided in Tampa, Florida, and Barbados, was charged with the same crimes in an indictment unsealed on August 6, 2018, and as a co-defendant of Innes and Tasker in the superseding indictment. Inniss is scheduled for trial on June 24, 2019, before United States District Judge Kiyo A. Matsumoto.

The superseding indictment alleges that in 2015 and 2016, Innes and Tasker participated in a scheme to launder into the United States approximately $36,000 in bribes that they paid to Inniss, who at the time was a member of the Parliament of Barbados and the Minister of Industry, International Business, Commerce and Small Business Development of Barbados.

The charges in the superseding indictment are allegations, and the defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

ICBL voluntarily disclosed to the government the payments to Inniss and received a prosecution declination under the FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy. ICBL disgorged to the government $93,940.19 in illicit profits that it earned from the scheme.

The FBI’s New York Field Office and International Corruption Squad is investigating the case. In 2015, the FBI formed International Corruption Squads across the country to address national and international implications of foreign corruption.

Assistant United States Attorney Sylvia Shweder of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York and Trial Attorney Gerald M. Moody, Jr., of the Criminal Division’s Fraud Section are in charge of the prosecution.

The Fraud Section is responsible for investigating and prosecuting all Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) matters. Additional information about the Department’s FCPA enforcement efforts can be found at http://www.justice.gov/criminal/fraud/fcpa.

The Defendants:

DONVILLE INNISS
Age: 52
Barbados

INGRID INNES
Age: 63
Canada

ALEX TASKER
Age: 58
Barbados

E.D.N.Y. Docket No. 18-CR-134 (S-1) (KAM)


SOURCE: news provided by JUSTICE.GOV on January 31, 2019.

Connecting …

The map below is meant to connect dots based on a ‘relationship’. There are no rules to the request. Simply suggest images to add to the map and if the blogmaster agrees they will be updated. The blogmaster added a few to get things started.

 

Thanks NO and John.

Inniss - Innes.png

ICBL Bribe Case in Limbo

The following was posted as a comment to BU blog – The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – On the Prevention of Corruption by Peter Lawrence Thompson – David, blogmater

ICBLFrom the INNISS indictment:-

3. Barbados Company Executive 1, an individual whose identity is known to
the Grand Jury, was a citizen of Canada and a resident of Barbados. Barbados Company
Executive 1 was the Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) of the Barbados Company.
4. Barbados Company Executive 2, an individual whose identity is known to
the Grand Jury, was a citizen of Barbados and a resident of Barbados. Barbados Company
Executive 2 was a senior vice president of the Barbados Company.
5. Barbados Company Executive 3, an individual whose identity is known to
the Grand Jury, was a citizen of Barbados and a resident of Barbados. Barbados Company
Executive 3 was the Chief Financial Officer of the Barbados Company.

Ingrid Innes was the CEO of ICBL in 2015 and there is a reference in the 2016 ICBL Annual Report that she had “resigned from the company.”

Alex Tasker was the Senior Vice President Business Development and Marketing of ICBL in 2015 and 2016 according to the ICBL Annual Reports for those years. His LinkedIn page pointedly omits any reference to his tenure at ICBL and attempts to create the impression that he has been working at Digicel from 2006 to the present.

Kamante Millar was the CFO of ICBL in 2015 and 2016 according to the ICBL Annual Reports for those years. Her LinkedIn page shows that she left ICBL at the end of 2017.

If these are indeed the individuals mentioned in the INNISS indictment, When are they going to be charged in Barbados? The clock is ticking because the DPP has only six months to press charges from August 6th 2018, when the alleged crime came to public notice.

ICBL Receives Declination with Disgorgement

Credit to The FCPA Blog

Barbados insurance company receives declination with disgorgement

The Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited (ICBL) received a declination with disgorgement from the DOJ Thursday for FCPA offenses related to bribing a Barbadian official.

Under the terms of the declination pursuant to the DOJ’s Corporate Enforcement Policy, ICBL paid the DOJ about $93,900 in disgorged profits.

The DOJ said agents and employees of the Barbados-headquartered company paid around $36,000 to a Barbadian government official, Donville Inniss, in exchange for $686,000 worth of insurance contracts.

Inness was a member of the parliament of Barbados and the Minister of Industry, International Business, Commence, and Small Business Development at the time.

The DOJ said Inness laundered the money in the United States through a New York-based dental company owned by his friend.

The DOJ gave ICBL credit for its timely and voluntary self-disclosure, thorough investigation, and remediation through firing of the individuals involved, among other factors.

ICBL is the first declination with disgorgement under the FCPA Corporate Enforcement Policy (pdf) that went into effect in November 2017.

The new policy made the FCPA Pilot Program permanent and incorporated it, with some changes, into the U.S. Attorneys’ Manual.

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Harry Cassin, pictured above, is the managing editor of the FCPA Blog.

The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – A Clock Striking Thirteen

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” –George Orwell -“1984”

I frequently use the phrase at caption to suggest that an event is not only extraordinary in itself but that it also calls into question the assumed objective reality of previous similar events. I mean, if a clock is going to strike thirteen when there are twelve hours only in the forenoon and the same number after noon in one day, then one is entitled to query what time was it exactly when that clock chimed eight times for instance.

I had cause to use the expression again last week when the news was reported that former Cabinet member in the recently outgone Democratic Labour Party administration, Mr Donville Inniss, had been arrested, charged and indicted in the US with the offence of money laundering the proceeds of a crime committed in Barbados. Of course, under the system of law that prevails in both of the relevant jurisdictions, an accused is to be presumed innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt.

Hence my retort was not occasioned by any assumption that Mr Inniss had indeed committed the offences that led to his indictment but, rather, by the allegation itself therein that that a local private sector concern had colluded corruptly with a state official to benefit unfairly from a commercial transaction. Muted whispers apart, to what extent is this prevalent in our society and for how long has it been? Or was this merely the misinterpretation of a perfectly legitimate transaction and thus simply an aberration in contemporary Barbados politico-commercial life?

So the hall clock struck thirteen, giving cause to wonder whether all public contracts over the years have been fairly won by private concerns. And to wonder whether other state officials have ever been corruptly active in the award of these contracts and whether it will even be possible to stymie the practice, if it does exist.

Much has been made of the fact that a responsible Minister was allegedly able to play such a primary role in the selection of an insurer for an enterprise governed by a board of directors. I should disclose in his favour, for what it is worth, that Mr Inniss was my line Minister for the three years [2015-2018] I served as Chairman of the Fair Trading Commission and never once in that time did he attempt to influence or interfere with any of the decisions of our Board of Commissioners, not even when we were called upon to deliberate on the compliance with the Fair Competition Act of the proposed purchase of BNTCL by a private concern; a transaction on which the administration of which he was a part then appeared to hang so much hope for Barbados’ short term economic recovery.

The indictment accuses Mr Inniss of money laundering. Essentially, this offence entails in layman’s terms, an attempt to launder “dirty” money by concealing the criminal source of its acquisition and by pretending that it has been lawfully acquired. The strict legal definition is not so limited, at least locally, however. According to section 5 of the Money Laundering and Financing of Terrorism (Prevention and Control) Act 2011-

(1) A person engages in money laundering where

(a) the person engages, directly or indirectly, in a transaction that involves money or other property or a benefit that is proceeds of crime; or

(b) the person receives, possesses, conceals, disposes of, or brings into or sends out of Barbados any money or other property or a benefit that is proceeds of crime.

For the purposes of this section, a person engages in money laundering where he knows or has reasonable grounds to suspect that the property or benefit is derived or realised directly or indirectly from some form of unlawful activity or, where the person is

(a) an individual other than a person referred to in paragraph (b), where he fails without reasonable excuse to take reasonable steps to ascertain whether or not the property or benefit is derived or realised, directly or indirectly, from some form of unlawful activity; or

(b) a financial institution or a non-financial business entity or professional, where the financial institution or non-financial business entity or professional fails to take reasonable steps to implement or apply procedures to control or combat money laundering.

So far as local law is concerned therefore, money laundering would appear to include any type of dealing with the proceeds of crime so that the perpetrator of any predicate offence from which money or other property is alleged to have been derived may be charged with the offence of money laundering even though he or she did not attempt to conceal its source but simply used those proceeds in an otherwise lawful transaction.

It is at least ironic that the predicate offence on which the Inniss indictment is based is located in the hoary Prevention of Corruption Act 1929 that was much scoffed at earlier this year when suggested as affording adequate protection against corruption. While this in no way to argue that that statute is indeed fit for contemporary purposes, it nevertheless provides for a criminal offence that may be utilized for any proceeds emanating from it to be treated as the basis of a money laundering charge.

I have followed with interest the public discussion of some of the legal issues pertinent to this matter. For instance, some have opined that Mr Inniss was arrested and charged in the US only because he had lost his diplomatic (sic) immunity together with his membership of Parliament on May 24. In fact an MP here enjoys no diplomatic immunity in respect of criminal acts, although he or she is entitled to immunity from arrest or imprisonment on any civil process while Parliament is in session except in certain limited circumstances -see section 5 (1) of the Parliament (Privileges, Immunities and Powers) Act.:

No member shall, during a session, be liable to arrest or imprisonment on any civil process, except for a debt the contraction of which constitutes a criminal offence.”

Another is the degree of calumny heaped, in my view unfairly, on the Commissioner of Police, Mr Tyrone Griffith, for his assertion on the matter, as reported in another section of the press, that “We only pursue matters where we have a complaint and, as far as I am aware, no report has been made to us….”

I do not need or intend to speak for the Commissioner, but I consider that his comments have been regrettably drawn out of context. The offence, on the basis of which Mr Inniss has been indicted in the US, is indeed criminal locally, but given its nature, there is no objective basis for the local constabulary reasonably to suspect that such an offence has indeed been committed here. Clearly, the indictment is based on intelligence to which the charging authorities in the US are privy. However, in the absence of this intelligence having been shared with the local authorities, itself an unlikely prospect since it would amount to an admission of criminal conspiracy from the party best able to do so, the Commissioner’s remarks are understandable. Perhaps the Commissioner could have expressed himself more clearly, but in light of the fact that the crime under the Prevention of Corruption Act is by nature victimless, the reference to a complainant was arguably legally and hopelessly misplaced.