Barbados Medical Schools

Submitted by Dr. Georgie Porgie

BARBADOS AND OFFSHORE MEDICAL SCHOOLS DO W REALLY NEED THEM?

Elombe Mottley – The Next FIFTY YEARS of PRIDE and INDUSTRY! – may be a progressive thinker to many in Barbados, but in my mind he demonstrates his ignorance as a supreme illiterate in matters of medicine, and medical schools when he suggests that there should be medical schools here…there and everywhere in Barbados.

  1. During the years I hung around offshore Medical schools, there are at least two things that I learned.

    These schools find it difficult to bring in teachers from overseas because of the COST OF PAYING FOR WORK PERMITS FOR TEACHERS FROM OVERSEAS.

  2. Producing the most excellent website, whereupon thy can spew lie upon lie to lure unwary would be students and wannabe doctors to train at these schools.

I would enjoin commenters here to go to the websites of both AUB, and WUB and notice that not only are the websites very poor (suggesting that we are dealing with very poor con artists) but that there are no medical teachers at any of the schools who are Barbadians, and ask why? This at a time where several other offshore schools are now forced to employ locals to teach.

Why is it that WUB (see faculty and staff webpage) have few well qualified teachers listed on their site but yet they list 7 chefs and 7 security guards.

Who is collecting all the money for the WORK PERMITS for these staff members, I wonder?

I would invite you to go to this webpage on the valueMD site and follow the discussion on the thread

new medical school in Barbados in trouble already.

Notice that the valueMD moderator has tried to shut up the poster. Then try to use ctrl and C to try to download anything from this website and note that they have disabled ctrl and C

Then let us start a blog entitled BARBADOS AND OFFSHORE MEDICAL SCHOOLS DO W REALLY NEED THEM? Then let us try to understand and thrash out whether our Government has really sold out our medical education for thirty pieces of silver.

Please also read this thread on valueMD.

WUB website is http://www.wubmed.org/

AUB website is http://www.aubmed.org/

160 comments

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ Dr. GP

    You said and I quote

    “… I wonder if the laity and clergy of the local Anglican church knows anything about the dalliances of the Government that has been recently forced out of office in approving this fiasco and deception…”

    De ole man shall try to answer this question in parts because to answer in its complete format does a serious injustice to the many questions therein contained

    First off “…I wonder if the laity and clergy of the local Anglican church knows anything about …this fiasco?”

    Mine is the purposed scapula on your sentence

    The laity and clergy know about the organisation BECAUSE THEY GET A BENEFIT FROM HOSTING THE ENTITY ON ITS GROUNDS.

    As to whether they know about it being a fiasco you dun know thst the laity neither know nor care bout dat cause as long as de white massah paying some bills dem is quite happy and content to close dem eyes and let these mysteries coexist.

    I wonder if the laity and clergy of the local Anglican church knows anything about…former Minister WeJonesing’ association and sanction of the facility?

    Yes they do but de ole man going say dat while dem know about WeJonesing’ reputation dem certainly ent care bout nothing else

    In fact, as one of the contracts dat need to be examined dem should review this contract and it’s enablers both administrative and facilitators

    Now which brings de ole man to this final question which ensues from your question

    If the laity and clergy knew and were complicit in this crime did the laity and clergy sin?

    Why after all Dr. GP dese is men of the cloth who being imbued with some sort of spirits did in fact perpetrate these crimes

    But de ole man wants to know if clergy and laity can commit sin or effect crimes?

    You see how these fellows does try to bring shame and disrepute on the Name of The Lord while collecting their their 30 pieces of silver while renting out Codrington College to shysters?

    Steupseee

    Like

  • THANKS PIECE FOR YOUR INFO

    IT SEEMS THAT THE CASH STRAPPED ANGLICAN CHURCH HAS RENTED OUT CODRINGTON COLLEGE GROUNDS AND THEIR PROPERTY AT SOCIETY FOR ONE SCHOOL

    AND THE CASH STRAPPED FORMER GOVERNMENT LICENSED AND CHARTERED SEVERAL BOGUS SCHOOLS TO ENTER THE COUNTRY.

    THE MORE STUDENTS THAT ENTER THE COUNTRY WILL TEND TO CAUSE RENTAL PROPERTY TO INCREASE THEIR RENTS. THIS WILL CAUSE INCREASED HARDSHIPS ON THE LOCALS TO OBTAIN LOW COST RENTAL PROPERTIES.

    I SAW THIS HAPPEN IN ST KITTS BETWEEN 2002 AND 2008

    Like

  • I LAUGH at GP. DAILY GIGGLES

    Praise the moderators for removing the filthy racism spewed by GP. A man maligned by the prejudices of his youth is no model for the youngsters.

    Like

  • I LAUGH at GP. DAILY GIGGLES

    Is this the cavalry?

    The fact remains- you haven’t addressed any of the legit facts thrown your way. Of course i want to know about tenure- do you only measure yourself by your region or people you come across in your small pond? Aren’t you from the days when tenure was a thing for MD’s? Your attempts to dismiss my comments as trivial actually reflect your lack of knowledge and your bias on the topic. As I said, TRUMP, is that you? Trumpedy Trump.

    These are some facts:
    AUIS placed students into US and Canadian Residency’s- look into it
    AUIS is owned by a black gentleman whose father was from SC, USA and Mother, Rose Blaize, emigrated from Grenada- look into it
    AUIS has partnered with an HBCU to offer medical education scholarships to black students- look into it
    AUIS is not Indian owned- look into it
    AUIS employs Bajans- look into it
    AUIS offers tuition discounts to Bajans that apply- look into it
    AUIS does free community health stuff in Barbados- look into it
    AUIS wants to teach integrative med, herbs, nutrition, exercise, mental health as a core component- not just teach pharma-push
    AUIS wants to partner with the people or government of Barbados. Maybe even a group of Bajan MD’s if possible?- from Pinckney’s mouth

    That last one is common knowledge. Look at the stuff they put out. Pinckney isn’t doing this just for profit- that man wants something else. He is not busing them in from India as I am sure he can like all the others.

    https://www.avweb.com/news/features/190597-1.html

    What if AUIS was the same cost as UWI and was able to train students just as well? What if Bajans start matching at UBC or LSU or DUKE coming through AUIS? Is this not a reality worth aiming for?

    Again… same fears that struck in 1984 strike again, and another generation, through their own fear, cut off their arm to spite their hand. And future.

    Like

  • Yet another bogus offshore school.
    This time in Dominica, and online!
    BLUE MARBLE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL
    Read all about it here! Murdah!

    Like

  • I HAVE LOOKED INTO YOUR SO CALLED “FACTS” AND THIS IS WHAT I KNOW

    AUIS placed students into US and Canadian Residency’s-

    SO WHAT? IS THAT NOT WHAT ALL BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS ARE DESIGNED AND HOPING TO DO? IS THIS NOT YOUR GOAL?

    AUIS is owned by a black gentleman whose father was from SC, USA and Mother, Rose Blaize, emigrated from Grenada-
    SO WHAT? UHSA WAS RAN BY A BLACK MAN FROM NIGERIA AND BURNETTS BY A BLACK MAN FROM HAITI

    AUIS has partnered with an HBCU to offer medical education scholarships to black students-
    WHO CARES? ITS ANOTHER BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOL

    AUIS is not Indian owned

    WHO CARES? SEVERAL OTHER BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOL ARE NOT INDIAN OWNED EITHER

    AUIS employs Bajans-

    YES TO DO MENIAL JOBS. ALL OTHER BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS EMPLOY LOCALS TO CLEAN THE PLACE. HOW IS AUIS ANY BETTER IN THIS REGARD

    AUIS offers tuition discounts to Bajans that apply

    WHY SHOULD ANY SANE BAJAN APPLY TO ATTEND A BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOL WHEN TUITION IS FREE OF COST AT THE SUPERIOR UWI—ESTABLISHED 70 YEARS AGO. look into it

    AUIS does free community health stuff in Barbados

    GOOD . YOU OUGHT TO SING FOR YOUR SUPPER, AND SEEK TO PROVE THAT YOU OUGHT TO BE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN BIMSHIRE

    AUIS wants to teach integrative med, herbs, nutrition, exercise, mental health as a core component- not just teach pharma-push

    THIS IS PART OF THE CURRICULUM IN OTHER BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS- look into it

    AUIS wants to partner with the people or government of Barbados. Maybe even a group of Bajan MD’s if possible?- from Pinckney’s mouth

    YOU MEAN PICKNEY LOOKING FOR PARTNERS TO HELP HIM FLEECE UNWARY STUDENTS AS IS DONE IN MOST OF THE OTHER BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS.
    DID SOMEONE IN BARBADOS BESIDES JONES JOHN BOYVE AND MS MCCLAEN TELL PICKNEY THAT THEY LOOKING TO PARTNER HIM?

    WELL THE THREE OF THEM OUT OF WORK NOW. LET HIM APPROACH THESE THREE JOKERS NOW-

    That last one is common knowledge. Look at the stuff they put out. Pinckney isn’t doing this just for profit- that man wants something else.

    REALLY? REALLY? ARE YOU SAYING THAT PICKNEY NOT RUNNING HIS BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOL AS A NON PROPIT VENTURE? YOU ARE EITHER A NASTY STINKING LIAR…OR HE GOT YOU FOOLED REAL GOOD.-

    He is not busing them in from India
    THAT’S BECAUSE THE INDIANS NOT LISTENING TO ANY BLACK MAN

    as I am sure he can like all the others.
    NO HE CAN NOT—IF NOT HE WOULD. HE WOULD BE GLAD TO IF HE COULD.
    THE INDIANS NOT LISTENING TO ANY BLACK MAN

    What if AUIS was the same cost as UWI
    IT IS NOT
    and was able to train students just as well?
    IT CAN NOT

    What if Bajans start matching at UBC or LSU or DUKE coming through AUIS?
    WE DO NOT WANT TO DO THAT
    I
    s this not a reality worth aiming for?
    WHY SHOULD IT BE?.. WE ARE SATISFIED WITH OUR WELL RECOGNIZED MEDICAL SCHOOL

    Again… same fears that struck in 1984 strike again, and another generation, through their own fear, cut off their arm to spite their hand. And future.
    NO FEARS AT ALL
    I AM JUST TELLING FOLK WHAT HAPPENS IN THE STANDARD BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS

    jUST TELLING FOLK WHAT I HAVE WITNESSED IN BOGUS OFFSHORE SCHOOLS

    Like

  • Posted via contact form in error.

    What is the catalyst driving your consistent negativity relative Medical Education on Barbados? I have read your thread and don’t understand what is driving it. Are you interested in fixing something or is it just to be contrarian? I welcome a productive dialog

    Milo Pinckney

    Like

  • pickney boy

    THERE HAS BEEN PROPER MEDICAL EDUCATION IN BARBADOS SINCE 1967 WITH THE ONSET OF THE EAST CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHEME, WHICH ALLOWED STUDENTS OF THE UWI TO COMPLETE THEIR FINAL YEAR IN BARBADOS………..AND TRINIDAD

    THE ADVENT OF UWI IN 1948, ENABLED BARBADOS AND OTHER ENGLISH SPEAKING CARRIBEAN ISLANDS TO HAVE WELL TRAINED PHYSICIANS IN ADEQUATE, AND NOW IN BARBADOS OVER SUPPLY.

    WE REALLY DONT NEED OFFSHORE BOGUS CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS IN BARBADOS.

    What is the catalyst driving your desire to have more “Medical Education on Barbados” BESIDES GREED AND AVARICE ?

    HOW MUCH DID THE CHARTER COST?
    HOW EASY WAS IT TO OBTAIN?
    HOW WAS IT OBTAINED?
    TO WHOM OR TO WHICH GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT WAS THE MONEY PAID?
    WAS IT UNDER THE COUNTER, AS IS THE NORM IN OFFSHORE BOGUS CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS?

    DO YOU HAVE WORK PERMITS FOR ALL OF YOUR OVERSEAS STAFF?
    WHY ARE THERE NO LOCAL DRS TEACHING AT YOUR BOGUS SCHOOL?
    WHY DID YOU ERASE THE TEACHING PERSONNEL FROM YOUR WEBSITE WHEN THIS WAS POINTED OUT HERE?

    WHY IS IT NEGATIVITY TO TELL THE TRUTH ABOUT WHAT I KNOW AND HAVE EXPERIENCED ABOUT OFFSHORE BOGUS CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS?

    WHY IS IT NEGATIVITY TO SAY WHAT I EXPERIENCED AT OFFSHORE BOGUS CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOLS WAS FAR INFERIOR THAN WHAT I EXPERIENCED AT UWI, IN CONTENT, INTENT AND EXTENT?

    YOU SAY “I have read your thread and don’t understand what is driving it.” IS IT MY FAULT THAT YOU CAN NOT UNDERSTAND, OR YOURS?
    AM I ALLOWED TO SPEAK OUT ABOUT THINGS HAPPENING IN MY COUNTRY THAT I DISLIKE?
    DO I REALLY NEED TO ANSWER TO TO A GREEDY FOREIGNER? REALLY?

    YOU SAY Are you interested in fixing something
    TELL ME WHAT CAN I FIX?
    NO ONE ELSE SEEMS TO KNOW OR CARE HOW BOGUS OFFSHORE BOGUS MEDICAL SCHOOLS OPERATE IN THE ISLANDS? I CANT FIX THAT, CAN I?

    THE MEDICAL ILLITERATES AND MORONS IN THE LAST CASH STRAPPED ADMINISTRATION ALLOWED YOU TO WALK INTO BARBADOS WITH YOUR OFFSHORE BOGUS CARRIBEAN MEDICAL SCHOOL. I CANT FIX THAT, CAN I?

    WHY IS IT A THING TO CONSIDER A NATIVE OF BARBADOS “contrarian” FOR PRESENTING THE TRITH HE EXPERIENCED ABOUT BOGUS OFFSHORE BOGUS MEDICAL SCHOOLS, AND HOW THEY OPERATE?

    HOW ARE YOU BETTER THAN THE OTHERS.

    WHO ARE YOU? YOU ARE NOT JESUS.

    WHERE IS GIGGLES? HAS HE FINISHED GIGGLING NOW?

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    WHY I COULD NEVER APPRECIATE BOGUS OFFSHORE MEDICAL SCHOOLS IS BECAUSE I NEVER MET ANY TEACHERS THERE LIKE THIS

    https://www.barbadosadvocate.com/columns/things-matter-sir-ken-stuart-%E2%80%93-illustrious-west-indian
    THINGS THAT MATTER: SIR KEN STUART – AN ILLUSTRIOUS WEST INDIAN
    Sun, 11/26/2017 – 12:00am Barbados1
    BY:
    SIR HENRY FRASER
    Sir Kenneth Stuart, a founding father of the University of the West Indies’ distinguished Medical Faculty, passed away on November the 11th in London, at the noble age of 97. He played a major role in the achievement of that distinction by the university during his tenure there from 1952 to 1976, when he was appointed Medical Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretariat.
    When I flouted my headmaster’s advice in 1962 and chose the young University of the West Indies to study medicine, my father gave me the names of three Barbadians at the Mona Campus in Jamaica who he said I must “report to”. One of them was the then Dr. Ken Stuart, who had already made a name for himself in ten short years as a medical researcher. But even before I could seek him out in his office I met him across the tennis net in the Freshmen versus Faculty tennis match in the first week. We were beaten – he was good! And he advised me to work on my backhand …
    He was one of the world leaders in the field of hypertension, and although I didn’t anticipate it at the time, his inspiration in understanding and managing hypertension was to play a major part in my own medical specialty and career. And so it was a great privilege to present him for an Honorary DSC from our University in 1999. Here is a shortened version of my citation then:
    “Chancellor, I present Sir Kenneth Stuart, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Science (Honoris Causa) of Queen’s University, Belfast, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh and of London, Fellow of the American College of Physicians, Fellow of the Faculty of Public Health Medicine, Fellow of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine … He SURELY is a jolly good Fellow! He receives fellowships the way other men get haircuts.
    Kenneth Lamonte Stuart was born on June 16th, many, many years ago, into a deeply religious home in Bank Hall. He learnt his three Rs at the famous Wesley Hall Boys’ School under the legendary Charles F. Broome, and proceeded to Harrison College. There he was part of that sixth form galaxy that included Sir Roy Marshall, Sir Carlisle Burton, Sir James Tudor and National Hero the Right Excellent Errol Walton Barrow. He played cricket and football, of course, but his great physique was acquired by swimming for miles off Brighton Beach, in the company of Sir Carlisle.
    He won the Barbados Scholarship of 1940 in classics, and after a BA at McGill in classics and philosophy, he went on to study medicine in Belfast, paving the way for other great classical scholars like Sir George Alleyne, Dr. Richie Haynes and Dr. Oscar Jordan to transmutate from arts to science. He graduated in 1948 and wasted no time gaining a diploma in Tropical Medicine and the Royal College Memberships. In “two twos” – four years to be exact – he was appointed Senior Registrar at the new University College Hospital of the West Indies in Jamaica, in 1952. A year later he became Lecturer in Medicine and was promoted at great speed, to become the first West Indian Professor of Medicine, in 1966.
    His career as researcher, teacher and international consultant can be divided, like Gaul, into three parts. The first is the glorious early period of UWI, the founding years, from 1952 to ‘66. He relished the challenge of blazing a trail and the wealth of research to be done. Like a medical King Midas, everything he touched turned to gold. First came the description, with Bras and Jelliffe, of Veno-occlusive Disease of the liver, or V.O.D., an aggressive liver disease killing Jamaican children. It was caused by a popular bush tea made from the herb crotalaria retusa – one of the many popular cure-alls of our grandmothers!
    This was followed by the discovery of a toxin, hypoglycine A, in the UNRIPE Jamaican ackee, cause of the feared vomiting sickness. Sir Ken tells how Lady Standard, then Sister Francis, arranged a special bedroom on the paediatric ward for him, so he could do emergency liver biopsies on these babies, at any hour of night. A Ministry of Health education unit was set up to educate the public about these two dreaded diseases, finally solved. There is no better demonstration in the world of the impact of research on public health, of the benefits of health education, and of partnership between medical researchers and Ministry of Health.
    The next ten years saw a steady flow of papers on malnutrition, rheumatic fever, cardiomyopathies and high blood pressure, and recognition on the world scene. He criss-crossed the globe with the medical jet set. I remember an issue of the medical student magazine, the Stethoscope, which reported under News: “Professor Ken Stuart visited the Department of Medicine this month”.
    The second part of his career combined that international reputation abroad with his role at Mona, as Dean and Head of the Department of Medicine. He promoted teaching in Barbados and Trinidad, and led the development of our own postgraduate programmes. Abroad, he was made a member of the WHO Expert Panel on Cardiovascular Disorders, Chairman of their Committee for Control of Hypertension, Honorary Lecturer at Harvard and Member of the Board of the London School of Hygiene.
    And so in 1976 it was a natural step to move fully on to the World Stage, and into the third phase of his career, first as Medical Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretariat and then Consultant Adviser to the Wellcome Trust, Chairman of the Court of Governors of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical medicine, and member of the Board of Governors of the IDRC, Chairman of the Caribbean Health Research Council, consultant to the World Bank, and prestigious Gresham Professor of Physic, to name just a few of his many important roles. He was knighted by Her Majesty the Queen in 1977 for services to medicine in the Caribbean and the Commonwealth.
    Sir Ken’s secret of success has been his canny ability to convert thought into action and action into words. Many an academic career has foundered at the mere thought of action, or at the effort of writing well. Many have the urge to write but lie down until the urge passes. Sir Ken has taken to heart the lines of both W.H.Auden and the Elizabethan poet Francis Bacon. Auden wrote:
    “Those who will not reason perish in the Act –
    Those who will not act perish for that reason.”
    Bacon wrote:
    “Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.”
    These are the marks of scholarship, which Sir Ken mastered in full measure, and the third phase of his work continues at the same pace as 20 years ago. He is re-writing the message of health promotion, which he takes to heart himself, and which gives him the gift of eternal youth. He has taken his messages to all corners of the globe – and although quintessentially Barbadian, he is now very much a citizen of planet Earth, crossing oceans more easily than most of us can find our way to Boscobel. Chancellor, I beg you to receive a distinguished doctor, a celebrated scholar, a renowned researcher, a Brighton boy, a Bajan Bard and Caribbean luminary, a light out of the West, and confer on Kenneth Lamonte Stuart the degree of Doctor of Science, honoris causa.”
    Sir Ken continued his many activities – academic, consulting and even tennis well into the last decade of his life. The passing of this illustrious Bajan, West Indian and Citizen of the World at the glorious age of 97 is testament to a life of extraordinary energy and passion – physical strength and activity combined with mental creativity of the highest order. The sympathy of his thousands of colleagues and former students goes out to his wife Lady Barbara and his three brilliant children – Andrea, Steven and Lynda.
    Andrea, a well-known writer and cultural historian (and author of Sugar in the Blood), shared with me a delightful story of Sir Ken: “Many years ago, he met a man whose last name was Flynn. My Dad immediately said “Ah I know that name.” The man sighed and said, ‘you probably have heard of my son Errol Flynn, the film actor.’ My Dad replied, “No. But I do know an illustrious biochemist of that name.” The man put his arm around him and said, “That is the first time anyone recognised my name rather than that of my son.” The pair remained friends for many years.”
    (Professor Fraser is Past Dean of Medical Sciences, UWI and Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Clinical Pharmacology. Website: profhenryfraser.com)

    Sir Kenneth Stuart: a Caribbean medical trailblazer
    Added by Barbados Today on December 5, 2017.
    Saved under Features

    4Save
    It is with sadness but a profound sense of both respect and responsibility that I pen this appreciation of one of the several senior medical academics and teachers who had a profound influence on the health of Caribbean people as well as on my own life and career.
    Sir Kenneth Stuart, MB, BCh, FRCP, FRCPE, FACP, DTM, a founding father of the University of the West Indies’ distinguished Medical Faculty, passed away on November 11 in London, at the noble age of 97. He played a major role in the achievement of that distinction by the university during his tenure there from 1952 until 1976 when he was appointed Medical Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretariat. His passing represents the end of an era.
    Kenneth Lamont Stuart was born on June 16, 1920, into a deeply religious home in Bank Hall. He learnt his three Rs at the famous Wesley Hall Boys’ School under the legendary Charles F. Broome, and proceeded to Harrison College. There he was part of that sixth form galaxy that included Sir Roy Marshall, Sir Carlisle Burton, Sir James Tudor and National Hero the Right Excellent Errol Walton Barrow.
    He played cricket and football, of course, but his great physique was acquired by swimming for miles off Brighton Beach, in the company of Sir Carlisle. And it has no doubt been the combination of great genes and an extremely active and healthy life style that enabled him to long outlive these other brilliant contemporaries.
    He won the Barbados Scholarship of 1940 in classics, and after a BA at McGill in classics and philosophy, he went on to study medicine in Belfast, Northern Ireland, paving the way for other great classical scholars like Sir George Alleyne (MBBS UWI), Dr Richie Haynes and Dr Oscar Jordan (both graduates of the University of Edinburgh) to transmutate from arts to science. He graduated in 1948, having been awarded the Coulter Scholarship for Clinical Medicine and Surgery and wasted no time gaining a Diploma in Tropical Medicine and the Royal College Memberships.
    After several attachments to hospitals in Britain, Sir Ken returned to the Caribbean in “two twos” – four years to be exact –as Senior Registrar at the newly opened University College Hospital of the West Indies in Jamaica, in 1952.
    A year later, he became Lecturer in Medicine and was promoted at great speed to Senior Lecturer in Medicine, 1958-1962; Reader in Medicine, 1962-1966; Professor of Medicine, 1966-1978; Dean, Medical Faculty, 1969-1971; and Head of the Department of Medicine, 1972-1976, becoming the first West Indian Professor of Medicine in 1966.
    His career as researcher, teacher and international consultant can be divided, like Gaul, into three parts. The first is the glorious early period of what began as the University College of the West Indies, established as a college of the University of London. These were the founding years, from 1948 when the first 33 medical students entered the Mona Campus in the serendipitously available Gibraltar Refugee Camp at the old Mona Sugar Estate near Kingston in 1948, and the opening of the University Hospital of the West Indies in 1952, until the beginning of the expansion plans for the medical faculty in 1966.
    Sir Ken relished the challenge of blazing a trail and the wealth of research to be done in a country with poor colonial health services, widespread poverty and a range of diseases that he would never have encountered during his training in Belfast or in his postgraduate years in Britain. Like a medical King Midas, everything he touched turned to gold. First came the description, with Bras and Jelliffe, of Veno-occlusive Disease of the liver, or V.O.D., an aggressive liver disease killing Jamaican children. It was caused by a popular bush tea made from the herb crotalaria retusa – one of the many popular cure-alls of our grandmothers, who had no idea how toxic it was.
    This was followed by the discovery of a toxin, hypoglycine A, in the unripe Jamaican ackee, cause of the feared vomiting sickness. The Jamaican ackee, which came originally from West Africa, is a staple in Jamaica, but no one knew that there was a toxin in the unripe ackee which broke down once the ackee was ripe and the outer shell opened up. Many children who were poorly nourished were very susceptible to this toxin and were admitted to hospital seriously ill – with very low blood sugar.
    After these problems were solved, a Ministry of Health education unit was set up to educate the public about these two dreaded diseases. There is no better demonstration in the world of the impact of research on public health, of the benefits of health education, and of successful partnership between medical researchers and Ministry of Health.
    The next ten years saw a steady flow of some fifty papers on malnutrition, rheumatic fever, cardiomyopathies and high blood pressure, with the development of a hypertension special clinic at the University hospital, and Sir Ken’s recognition on the world scene.
    The second part of Sir Ken’s career combined that international reputation abroad with his role at Mona, as Dean of the Medical Faculty and Head of the Department of Medicine. He promoted the development of medical teaching in Barbados and Trinidad, and he led the development of our own postgraduate programmes, in response to a group of us (calling ourselves the Action Group) who protested the continuing need for West Indians to emigrate to North America for specialty training.
    Abroad, he was made a member of the WHO Expert Panel on Cardiovascular Disorders, Consultant to the Pan American Health Organization, Chairman of their Committee for Control of Hypertension, Honorary Lecturer at Harvard and Member of the Board of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.
    In 1976, he began the third phase of his career, first as Medical Adviser to the Commonwealth Secretariat and then Consultant Adviser to the Wellcome Trust, Chairman of the Court of Governors of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, member of the Board of Governors of the IDRC, member of the Council of Governors of Guys’, Kings and St. Thomas’s Hospitals Medical School, London; Honorary Lecturer in Medicine at the Royal Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital in London, Honorary Medical and Scientific Adviser to the Barbados High Commission, Chairman of the Caribbean Health Research Council, Consultant to the World Bank, member of the Academic Board of St. George’s University and a member of the Board of Directors of the UK Trust for the Windward Islands Research and Education Foundation (WINDREF), among others.
    Sir Ken was knighted by Her Majesty the Queen in 1977 for services to medicine in the Caribbean and the Commonwealth and in 1986 he received an Honorary DSc from his alma mater, Queen’s University in Belfast. He never lost his love for his Barbados, and his roots. He invested in an alternate home here in Paynes Bay, and had a share in the Discovery Bay Hotel, while his interest in tourism was elegantly expressed by his mother, the owner and proprietress of the Blue Caribbean on the corner of St. Lawrence Gap.
    Sir Ken’s secret of success has been his canny ability to convert thought into action and action into words. Many an academic career has foundered at the mere thought of action, or at the effort of writing well. Many have the urge to write but lie down until the urge passes. Sir Ken has taken to heart the lines of both the English poet W.H.Auden and the Elizabethan poet Francis Bacon.
    Auden wrote:
    “Those who will not reason perish in the Act –
    Those who will not act perish for that reason.”
    Bacon wrote:
    “Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man.”
    These are the marks of scholarship, which Sir Ken mastered in full measure, and the third phase of his work continued at the same pace as during his main academic career. He re-wrote the fundamental messages of health promotion, which he took to heart himself, and which gave him the gift of eternal youth. He took his many messages to all corners of the globe – and although quintessentially Barbadian, he became very much a citizen of Planet Earth.
    He was one of the world leaders in the field of hypertension, and although I didn’t anticipate it at the time, his inspiration in understanding and managing hypertension was to play a major part in the development of my own medical specialty and career – because as a clinical pharmacologist, I recognised the huge problem of hypertension in the Caribbean and the challenges to control it, leading ultimately to the founding of the now renamed the George Alleyne Chronic Disease Research Centre.
    The passing of this illustrious Bajan, West Indian and Citizen of the World at the glorious age of 97 is testament to a life of extraordinary energy and passion – physical strength and activity combined with mental creativity of the highest order. The sympathy of his thousands of colleagues and former students goes out to his wife Barbara, Lady Stuart, and his three brilliant children – Andrea, Steven and Lynda.
    May he rest in peace!

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    where has GIGGLES gone?

    Copied this thread from ValueMD about the History of IUHS
    Originally Posted by acedoc123

    Are there any past IUHS students who are practicing in New Jersey/New York?

    Blackwolf

    Your question should be: Are there any past IUHS students who are practicing?
    Lumc621

    I would say that you will be hard pressed to find anyone who has recently completed this program and is actively practicing in the United States. I challenge any one of them to come forward and describe their US residency and there US licensing process and the specialty which they’re practicing in.

    Med grad
    NJ has a rule to keep online schools out. It says you have to complete the basic sciences portion of the program in the location where the school is chartered. This excludes online schools or those that conduct classes in locations other than the country that issued the charter. These rules are becoming more frequent in many states. WA, AL, NJ, VA have all enacted similar rules. There may be more states but the ones I listed are the ones I know of for sure.

    There was a time when IUHS was conducting classes on the Island. This was before it went entirely online. There are IUHS grads who are licensed. But you have to be careful and must makes sure if they got licensed after completing the online program. The school claims there are licensed grads( that’s true) but it makes no mention of if they graduated from the early days of IUHS or they are grads from the purely online program. This makes a big difference.

    The new Caribbean accreditation agency won’t give accreditation to online schools. Hence the future of IUHS is somewhat up in the air. Unless they pull a rabbit out of their hat at the last minute or change their model of education to allow them to receive accreditation from the Caribbean accreditation agency, I don’t see this school as a viable option for anyone who is interested in actually practicing medicine.
    By the way I have nothing against IUHS because it gives student the opportunity to have basic sciences with better quality faculty who might be difficult to recruit to the islands on full time basis. I also have nothing against technology based teaching because basic sciences can be taught online and spending time in the anatomy lab dissecting cadavers is becoming a thing of the past in many N. American schools. But the medical establishment hasn’t caught up to the benefits of technology and finds online schools unacceptable. Until they do, these schools are not viable options.
    Atlantoaxial
    But the medical establishment hasn’t caught up to the benefits of technology and finds online schools unacceptable. Until they do, these schools are not viable options.
    It’s true the “medical establishment” is rather conservative no matter the country. But on the other hand, this thing (IUHS) has no credibility at all (they produced some doctors in the past but on their brick and mortar campus).

    Give a try by yourself: email the admission office…just to see if they will reply.

    At the end maybe the current owner of this thing, is a kid living with his mother, collecting money from a few people and giving them access to some videos he/they call “courses”. It’s just an hypothesis….but probably impossible to refute with proofs.

    Anyway, the fact that this school is not approved by the CAAM-HP should close the discussion. It’s a dead end, probably even for someone who would like to practice in a 3rd world country.

    That being said, do I believe in online education for the basic sciences years?
    Yes.
    But not for everyone.
    Not by any med school.
    And probably with a different “format”. For instance, online students could be required to make some arrangements with their local university to at least participate to an anatomy class with cadaver dissection, etc.
    Also, if they do their clinicals in the US, pass successfully their UMLEs….it means they have the same level of knowledge and skills as any US MD, right? Otherwise it’s a disavowal of the entire system (clinicals + USMLE).

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