Diaspora Corner

Barbadians who live abroad navigate to BU to share experiences, search for news about what is happening on the Rock.

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1,267 comments

  • Jerry Jeff Walker a country singer died recently, he wrote the lyrics to this song but Sammy Davis Jr. owned it

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  • Awesome voice and great stage presence. Piece de Prophet would appreciate.

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  • African queen! Electrifying! Mesmerizing!

    Reminds me of another South African I saw at our Jazz Festival twenty years ago. Can’t remember her name and it really annoys me.

    Thanks, Hants.

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  • I should learn Dutch.lol

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  • In my lane.

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  • Filed under you learn something new
    +++++++++++++++
    It was a warm and cloudless Saturday afternoon. Officer Howard, 31 years old and on the job three years, was driving a patrol car with a rookie he’d just met that day, Officer Philip Romano. A call came over the radio: There was a disturbance at Blumstein’s department store in Harlem.

    They arrived to find chaos on the second floor. At its center, in a dark suit and tie and sitting still as stone in a chair, was the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., then 29. There was a letter opener jutting out of his chest. He had been signing copies of his book “Stride Toward Freedom,” about the Montgomery bus boycott, when a young woman approached and stabbed him.
    An advertising executive for The Amsterdam News, a prominent Black newspaper, grabbed the woman and restrained her until a security officer took over. Stunned local leaders and politicians looked on as another woman, fearing for Dr. King’s life, reached to pull the blade out. “She was hysterical,” Officer Romano said later. The officers, knowing that the blade might have been saving Dr. King from bleeding to death, stopped her in time.

    Dr. King was taken to Harlem Hospital, where a team of doctors worked to pull the blade from his chest. Outside the operating room, 40 people offered to give blood. A doctor told reporters that the blade “impinged on the aorta, a blood vessel near the heart,” and that a puncture would have caused “instant death.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Elsewhere in the article for those unable to access it…
    +++
    Dr. King’s career and stature soared over the decade that followed that afternoon at Blumstein’s. During a speech in Memphis in 1968, he would reflect on that day.

    “You know, several years ago I was in New York City, autographing the first book that I had written. And while sitting there autographing books, a demented Black woman came up,” he said. “The next minute I felt something beating on my chest. Before I knew it I had been stabbed by this demented woman.”
    He continued: “The X-rays revealed that the tip of the blade was on the edge of my aorta, the main artery. And once that’s punctured, you’re drowned in your own blood, that’s the end of you.

    “It came out in The New York Times the next morning that if I had merely sneezed, I would have died.” He repeated the phrase over and over, “If I had sneezed,” while naming the Civil Rights milestones he had accomplished since then — the lunch-counter sit-ins, the march on Selma, the “I Have a Dream” speech — and then concluded, “I’m so happy that I didn’t sneeze.”

    The following day, Dr. King was shot dead

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  • G G continues to sing sweetly.

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  • Watch the “we gathein” and the cynic in me was impressed despite the politicians getting their two cents in. Kudos to the organisers who put together a good show in getting Bajans from all over the world to participate and to the hosts and the entertainers including the Police Band – a very good show.

    Congrats

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  • @Sargeant

    Agree it was a good show Created a good feeling as a Bajan.

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  • Police Band was outstanding. First time hearing them in years.

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  • Hope Babados liason officers in Toronto representing.

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  • Congratulations to Cultural Ambassador Dr The Most Honourable Anthony Gabby Carter and his new wife.

    See front page of Barbados Today online.

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  • Charlie Pride will be kissing a lot of Angels

    RIP

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  • Fuh true ? Fuh real ?

    Nation Update: Water Park woes at Brandon’s

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  • Caribbean Christmas music sweet
    I ain’t nuh Christmas person. My last name Green seems appropriate because every December certain friends is call me de Grinch. I wouldn’t get into why I feel this way about Christmas because, despite how I feel, I enjoy the fact that other people get joy out it. And I tekking it easy fuh de winter solstice, so I ain’t got energy to get into the historical, economic and cultural imperialism of Christmas now.
    One bright spark for me during this time though, is always Bajan and Caribbean Christmas music. I am not dreaming of a white Christmas, I doan care if grandma got run over by a
    reindeer, and I am no longer moved by
    Christmas shoes.
    I do, however, want to ask Santa Claus if he ever comes to the ghetto and am thankful I don’t have anyone confusing me ’bout wuh I gotta gih dem fuh Christmas. If you don’t recognise the Jacob Miller and Sach Moore references you ain’t nuh real Caribbean Christmas person.
    Or maybe you are a Caribbean
    Christmas music newcomer. This is quite possible. The new all-Bajan radio station is introducing a new generation of Barbadians to the great music Barbados has produced, of all genres.
    If a tree falls in the forest and there is no one around to hear it, does it make a sound? Another way of asking the same question used to be: “If you produce a non-soca song in Barbados, did you really make a sound?”
    Increasingly the any is, “Yes!”
    It feels like there is a little bit of a Bajan artistic renaissance going on.
    Not only in music, but in the visual arts as well. Thanks to the Internet with websites like Gineon.com, and a new tide of national consciousness, we have access to many formerly hidden gems of Barbadian creativity.
    When I echo Bumba and ask, “Why can’t this Christmas feeling go on?”, I am not talking about that feeling of peace and goodwill to all, though that is good too. I am talking about the feeling of pride and energy that I feel when I hear the vibe of Christmas Caribbeanised and expressed as in Tony “ Rebel” Bailey’s “ Show Love”
    or his “ My Sweet Lord.” Talk ’bout sweet! Even a Christmas dissenter like me is start to feel a sorta way.
    Christmas has always felt fake, artificial and out of place to me.
    Kinda like the impostor Santa that RPB caught Maizie kissing. The Christmas music from Barbados and the region brings an indigenous authenticity to the season that was missing in the days of pelting marl round the house to simulate snow. If I ever get a Christmas tree it will be a real, authentic Caribbean one, maybe a piece of stick tied up with breadfruit leaves as Madd suggested.
    Nobody is ever going to mistake me for Santa Clause, the way they do Eric Lewis. Especially not the people who read Richard Hoad’s column.
    He has a habit of misunderstanding or misrepresenting what I write and taking it totally out of context. But I don’t fret about it because I trust that the readers will come over to this column to read and think for themselves. And I also appreciate the right of comedians to free speech. If you like Hoad’s comedy articles, Gibzy Dan’s “ Christmas Scam” will really milk your goat. Brilliant comedic writing and social commentary right there.
    But Christmas in 2020 is no joke for many people. And it is not because they’ve been naughty like Pong that they “ Ain’t Getting Naffin.”
    They are not like the people in De Devil’s new song, “ Hiding from Santa Clause.” A globalised virus, an inequitable global economic system and decades of short sighted local politics have combined to lick nuff people fuh six this Christmas.
    This Christmans, there is a beautiful new version of Bumba’s Christmas classic, produced by Nicholas Brancker and featuring new singers. Likewise and more than ever this Christmas feeling must also be new and renewed. It cannot be a fleeting, flighty, overly commercialised, superficial feeling any more. The Christmas feeling in this region has to be a deep, lasting and transformational feeling. A feeling of the birth of a new spirit and era as it was meant to be.
    Adrian Green is a communications specialist. Email: Adriangreen14 @gmail.com

    Source: Nation

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  • Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to David and family and to all BU bloggers.

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  • Thanks Hants and for keeping this space active.

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  • Merry Christmas to all.

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  • Merry Christmas 🎄☃️ to all. For those who partake, the LCBO has a limited supply of Bajan rum from Foursquare.

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  • Merry Xmas to all, enjoy some peace and tranquility with family.

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  • awesome drummer lady.

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  • Still my favourite singer. Sweet like lugduname.

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  • Just saw this on Caribbean Vibrations TV in Toronto

    https://www.bajanshakk.com/

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  • Preparing for my Old year’s night fete with me myself and I. Entertainment by G G

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  • @Hants

    Many house parties planned in Barbados now that covid has flared. The blogmaster will be attending one of them. Enjoy your old year’s night and wishing you et all the best for 2021.

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  • Finding great music played by Bajan musicians is worth the effort.

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  • Happy New Year to you and yours David.

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  • Home alone and loving it.

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  • Sister and brother. Good performance

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  • Chuck Berry

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  • https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-restrictions-state-of-emergency-rules-jan-12-1.5870215

    Ontario will be placed under a stay-at-home order, which will require everyone to remain at home with exceptions for essential purposes, like going to the grocery store or pharmacy, accessing health-care services, for exercise or for essential work.

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  • My daily distraction.

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  • Lari Basilio guitar sweetness.

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  • Cheating on G G lol but this Brit can sing.

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  • Couldn’t resist. G G pure sweetness.

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  • World class. Minister John King take note,

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  • Who knew that “Midnight Train to Georgia” started as “Midnight Plane to Houston” or that Cissy Houston mother of Whitney recorded it first?

    Jim Weatherley the song writer just died and the heading of his obit reads “Jim Weatherly, whose song ‘Midnight Train to Georgia’ started with a plane to Houston, dies at 77”

    Some people here may have heard of “ slow grind”, a few here (present company included) would have been “grinding” to Gladys Knight and the Pips back in the day.

    Here is a refresher

    Liked by 1 person

  • Alanna White on drums is awesome. All female band.

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  • Shhhhhh

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  • @ Sargeant

    I interviewed Gladys Knight and the Pips in the early 1980s at the Dominion in Tottenham Court Road. I had asked for an interview for ages and it was not granted. When I met her I told her about the delay. She was genuinely shocked. Her manager had not told them.
    She was apologetic and kind.

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  • I used to frequent a used music/book store owned by an acquaintance (he acquired most of his inventory from Estate sales, (it’s amazing people die and their family sell off their complete record collection that the deceased had spent a lifetime collecting) . I would purchase music that caught my fancy, but I missed out on purchasing the Mills Brothers greatest hits on on CD.

    The Mills Brothers was the longest lasting black singing group, I believe they sang together for over 50 years, originally there were 4 brothers and after one brother died their father replaced him.

    This song is from The Nat King Cole show

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  • desperately seeking Bajan music videos lol

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  • Bajan queen still got it.

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  • G G still sweet

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