Another Abracadabra Moment

In 2018 the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) won all 30 seats in parliament. It created what pundits described as a political dilemma for the government because the Barbados Constitution recognizes the role of the Leader of the Opposition.

At the eleventh hour Reverend Joseph Atherley who was elected to the House of Assembly on a BLP ticket decided to cross the floor and like magic the constitutional crisis was averted. Before Atherley saved the day there was a move afoot to amend the Constitution to provision for two senators to be appointed by the Governor General from the losing political party winning the most votes. The Democratic Labour Party (DLP) would have been the beneficiary of the amendment. However, we recall campaign manager Robert ‘Bobby’ Morris criticized the move to manufacturer an opposition presence in the Upper House. His reason – a political opposition should earn its place in parliament.

…Robert “Bobby” Morris, said they would rightfully reclaim their seats in the legislature in time and there was no need to take up the offer.

However, George Connolly, one of the new candidates who ran in St James Central and who lost his deposit, took an opposing view. I’ve heard the comments of ‘Bobby’ Morris and I have a lot of respect for him, but I disagree vehemently with the position that he took on that. I think we need a voice, and a senatorial voice is as good a voice as any. You can’t effect any major changes, but certainly you can have a voice. So I am in total agreement if the offer is made that it should be accepted, he told Starcom Network yesterday.

Nationnews.com

In hindsight given the outcome of last week’s general election the government should have amended the Barbados Constitution to address the lacuna in the improbable event a political party again won all the seats. A discussion being had across Barbados is whether there will be another convenient crossing of the floor by a ‘disgruntled’ BLP member days after campaigning successfully on a BLP ticket in the mold of Atherley or if the shelved 2018 amendment to the Constitution will be dusted off.

Whether there is the convenient crossing of the floor by a member of parliament to create a leader of the opposition in the Lower House or amendment to the Barbados Constitution to create same in the Upper House, it is unfortunate a dissenting voice has to be created arising from the first past the post system we practice. In this regard the blogmaster does not agree with Morris that the DLP should refuse to participate in the Upper House if the opportunity is created to do so. There are commentators like Dr.Kristina Hinds who posit a view there are avenues outside of parliament to make ones voice heard. 

The blogmaster’s view is that parliament provides a prominent space for an opposition voice in our system of government. It gives the opposition earned exposure that helps to create a national profile for the political party given the credibility it adds through participation from in the bowels of the parliamentary system. The country witnessed how former Senator Caswell Franklyn did it with good effect. We should not trivialize the optics of opposition participation in parliament by the public.

There is concern two unprecedented 30 to 0 mandates pave the opportunity for the Mottley led government to run roughshod over the views of members in civil society. Especially given her rambunctious leadership style. Decisions taken by the government of Barbados in the coming days have deep implications for our way of life to come. 

God Bless Bim!

130 comments

  • The leader of the opposition does not pick himself/herself.

    Atherly was no more the leader of the opposition than I was.

    He needed to be chosen from those who oppose the Government.

    Proposer/Seconder/Candidate

    Minimum 3.

    We’ve had a mock parliament since 2018 and that’s a fact jack.

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  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    It gets worse, information now circulating shows the level and lengths governments would go to undermine the populations who elect them…in the name of having access to money which they tief anyway and pretending they are accepted in some innnercirlce that no one wants them in but they so want to belong, that being traitors is the only way they see themselves accepted although they NEVER WILL BE INCLUDED..

    but since i dont get into local or global politics, everyone will have to wait until the info reaches them or they stumble on to it on other platforms……certain things i don’t touch on anymore, certain things i don’t touch at all…never did.

    William….it’s started.

    John…they will still try to force it, even though it CANNOT GO ANYWHERE..and given what is now revealed, mock does not even begin to describe what the taxpaying public is and will be subjected to going forward…

    it is now clear how much time people are WASTING…but it’s their time, and they are the ones wasting it…all i can say is happy wasting to them.

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  • Critical Analyzer

    The equitable solution to the opposition conundrum in our new multiple party system where supporters of loser parties with significant support but no seats stand to be disenfranchised would be to restructure the Senate to apportion seats based on proportional representation:

    1) To political parties based on proportional representation where the overall percentage of votes the various parties got determines the number of seats allocated to each party.
    2) A fixed number of independent seats offered to interest groups or persons solely determined by the president.

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  • ” that the DLP should refuse to participate in the Upper House ”

    DLP was not the only opposition party to score 0 seats and have no god given right over the other losers to oppose government in parliament

    UK style: the upper house should be retired oldies who if once were politicians are deemed more neutral now acting in interests of nation

    US Style: Upper house is elected senators, but system fails due to partisanship political gaming

    Liked by 1 person

  • God is pleased with the results of this election
    BLP 30
    Rest 0

    Liked by 1 person

  • No problem’ over Opposition Leader

    By Colville Mounsey
    colvillemounsey@nationnews.com

    With the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) winning all 30 seats in last Wednesday’s General Election, questions are being asked about how the Mia Amor Mottley administration will address the constitutional provision for two Opposition senators to make up the full slate of 21 in the Senate.
    However, according to constitutional lawyer Garth Patterson QC, no constitutional conundrum exists, as the law provides that in a case where there is no elected Opposition the President would have to select nine senators instead of the allotted seven.
    On Friday, first vice-president of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP), Steve Blackett, who is leading the party in the interim after president Verla De Peiza stepped down the same day, said the DLP has been giving thought to the 2018 offer by Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley – should she extend it again – which would have allowed them to have two senators despite not having any seats in the House of Assembly.
    He added this was something the Government will need to consider again, given that the Constitution makes reference to two Opposition senators to make up the Senate.
    However, Patterson told the Sunday Sun such reasoning was far off the mark.
    “The Leader of the Opposition is required to give advice or be consulted in respect of the exercise of certain powers vested in the President or the Prime Minister by the Constitution. One such function is the appointment of senators to the Senate.
    Section 36 of the Constitution states that the Senate shall consist of 21 senators, two of whom must be appointed by the President acting in accordance with the advice of the Leader of the Opposition.
    “If there is no Leader of the Opposition, however, then Section 75 of the Constitution contemplates that the power of appointing those two senators will be exercised by the President acting in her own discretion. Hence, in the absence of a Leader of the Opposition, the Senate will be comprised of 12 persons appointed by the President acting on the advice of the Prime Minister, and nine persons appointed by the President acting on her own discretion,” he added.
    When this scenario first occurred with the first BLP sweep of the polls in 2018, Mottley had offered to amend the Constitution to allow for two Opposition senators to be chosen by the party with the second highest number of votes.
    Before the change could be made, the issue was resolved when Bishop Joseph Atherley crossed the floor to become Leader of the Opposition.
    Thus far, Mottley has not indicated any intent to extend a similar olive branch and if none of the current Members of Parliament is prepared to follow Atherley’s lead, then there will be no Leader of the Opposition.
    Patterson added: “No constitutional conundrum exists, notwithstanding the fact that there will likely be no Leader of the Opposition because the BLP has won all 30 seats in the Lower House. The office of the Leader of the Opposition is created by Section 74 of the Constitution, which provides that the President must appoint as Leader of the Opposition the member of the House of Assembly who, in her judgement, is best able to command the support of a majority of those members who do not support the Government; or if there is no such person, the member of that House who, in her judgement, commands the support of the largest single group of such members who are prepared to support one leader.”


    Source: Nation

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  • The winner takes it all

    The January 19, 2022 General Election in Barbados resulted in the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) winning and taking it all, that is, all 30 available seats.
    For their success, all candidates from the BLP and their teams should be congratulated.
    Contrastingly, “the loser takes the fall”, as the Abba song goes. The principal loser in this situation has been the Democratic Labour Party (DLP), once more unable to gain a single seat despite its legacy. It is true, too, that the candidates of all newer political parties, and all independent candidates also took a fall and were left “standing small”, to continue drawing on the Abba song.
    Despite their lack of success, we should also congratulate them for their courage, willingness to serve and for their efforts.
    The winner taking all is indeed a feature of our electoral system. In this system, the candidate with the single largest share of the vote wins. Further, the party with the most successful candidates emerges victorious.
    This system, also known as the first-past-thepost system, offers benefits in its simplicity but comes with pitfalls. One pitfall is that candidates and political parties that perform relatively well can go completely unrewarded for their efforts.
    Additionally, voters who have selected candidates from parties that have been unable to win constituencies may end up feeling that their votes do not count.
    If we take the St Philip West constituency in Wednesday’s poll, we can observe that although Kay McConney secured 50 per cent of votes cast in the constituency, the remaining 50 per cent of electors who opted for a combination of the three other candidates may feel slighted. Similarly, the 2013 contest for St Michael South East resulted in a 51 per cent to 49 per cent split between two candidates: Santia Bradshaw and Patrick Tannis.
    Popular support
    The issue of voters whose preferred candidates do not win is compounded at the national level in situations in which parties can end up with no representatives in the House of Assembly despite receiving some popular support. So, the winner can monopolise the House of Assembly without monopolising the vote.
    A system of proportional representation would address this concern by assigning seats based on the proportion of the votes won by political parties.
    In a system of proportional representation, the 2018 General Election would have seen 23 BLP representatives, six DLP representatives and one Solutions Barbados representative in the House. This system is more complex than first-past-the-post and comes with its own difficulties but is unlikely to result in any one party gaining all seats.
    Head-to-head races Apart from the winner-take-all system being disappointing to parties and to electors whose preferred candidates are unable to win individual head-to-head races, the 2022 General Election throws up another issue with our system: that of voter turnout.
    In this election, though final numbers are not yet available, it appears that less than 50 per cent of electors (preliminarily estimated at 45 per cent) cast their ballots.
    Hence, the winner has been able to take all seats in the absence of the will of more than half of registered electors being expressed.
    As such, we end up with
    a Government representing the will of a minority of registered electors.
    Is this the will of the people? Well, it is! It is the will of the people who voted.
    Undoubtedly the COVID-19 pandemic, and the lack of provisions being established to allow those who tested positive for COVID 19 to exercise the hard-won right to vote, played a role in low turnout. Nonetheless, we may wish to ponder the other factors that may cause the people not to express their will in elections and we should reflect on what this means for the quality of this country’s democracy.
    Additionally, the winner that takes all seats in conditions of low voter turnout should exercise prudence in governing, contemplating what it means to win “nuff of a little bit” and recognising that many persons abstained from voting and voted against them.
    In essence, winners may be wise to recognise that they do not represent the will of “the majority” but the will of “a majority”. When “the winner takes it all” in our system of government, the winner should ensure that the losers neither “take the fall” nor are “standing small”, for the losers in this win-lose scenario are not solely political parties.
    More importantly, the real losers may be the many ordinary people of Barbados who want to live in a country in which they can be heard and valued, to which they can contribute, and in which they can both survive and thrive.
    Dr Kristina Hinds is a enior lecturer in political science and head of the Department of Government, Sociology, Psychology and Social Work at UWI Cave Hill. She is also a moderator of VOB’s Down To Brass Tacks.

    Source: Nation

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  • The people have spoken

    The three weeks of election frenzy and debates have ended and the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) has once again emerged the victor and secured all 30 seats.
    Many expected the BLP to win, myself included, but had considered the possibility that one or two seats may have been secured by the Democratic Labour Party (DLP). Although three seats were relatively close, that did not occur.
    It seems the people have spoken and Prime Minister Mia Mottley has received the new mandate from the people she had sought. However, the low voter turnout makes me question just how many of the people have truly spoken. Based on the number of votes recorded per candidate, it appears that just over 40 per cent of the electorate turned out to vote.
    Regarding the low voter turnout, Dr Kristina Hinds, political scientist and senior lecturer at UWI was quoted in this newspaper as saying, “When you do win an election with a low voter turnout, again I believe you have to be very careful and attuned to the population in general because it is that less than 50 per cent of registered electors turn up for the vote, it means you have the majority of the minority. So there are many people out there whose voices are not represented in this vote and the Government has to be very careful with how it treads, so power has to be managed very carefully”.
    Were the calling of a snap elections and three weeks of campaigning, debates and super spreader political events worth it to secure one more seat when most of us would have been just fine had the Government continued to rule for the full five-year term?
    I am particularly concerned by the double standard that was displayed at the political rallies, where videos showed crowds packed tightly together at the BLP rally the night before elections and on election night despite the presence of the highly contagious Omicron variant in Barbados. There was no requirement for the attendees to show proof of vaccination, a recent negative test or that safe zones be created for these events. Yet holders of fetes, concerts and horse racing have this is as a mandatory requirement.
    In a video interview with reporters after casting her vote, Prime Minister Mottley dismissed concerns raised of the risk of COVID transmission at the previous nights’ packed rally. In response, the Prime Minister stated that as far as she could see, everyone was wearing masks. But public health officials have emphasised for the last two years the importance of social distancing along with mask wearing since no mask is 100 per cent effective. Cloth masks are even less effective against the highly contagious omicron variant and the
    Centre for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends N95 masks.
    Safe zones
    Since this administration held rallies where vaccinated and unvaccinated alike were allowed to attend without restrictions or segregation, how can they justify implementing safe zones or vaccine mandates for employment? The Omicron variant has proven highly transmissible even among the vaccinated. There have been a few weeks where there were more vaccinated individuals in isolation than the unvaccinated. Currently the difference in the numbers is marginal. Up to January 19, 2022, there were 18 vaccinated persons in secondary isolation versus 22 unvaccinated and 19 vaccinated in tertiary isolation versus 33 unvaccinated.
    A month into Israel’s trial of the fourth dose as a booster against Omicron, Prof Gili Regev-Yochay, lead researcher in the experiment said “We see an increase in antibodies, higher than after the third dose. However, we see many infected with Omicron who received the fourth dose…the bottom line is that the vaccine is excellent against the Alpha and Delta, for Omicron it’s not good enough.” Last week England announced the removal of vaccine passes and even the WHO recently recommended the abolition of vaccination as a requirement for international travel.
    Given that vaccination and testing were not required for participating in election activities or voting, it would be a double standard for the Government to move forward with the proposed safe zones or any vaccine and/or testing mandates for employees.

    Michelle M. Russell is an attorney at law with a passion for Employment law and labour matters. Email: mrussell.ja@gmail.com

    Source: Nation News

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  • Checks and balances necessary

    On a radio call-in programme leading up to the republican transition, I made a point which drew some criticism. I argued that no matter what system or form of government we have, it is the consciousness of the people which is their main line of defence and protection.
    The critics did not get the point. But this point is even more pertinent today. The Barbados Labour Party (BLP) once again takes the reins without the checks and balances which an Opposition in Parliament is supposed to provide.
    It is always the case, but even more so in this case, that the consciousness and the culture of the people must itself be a check and balance to the powers of government.
    Centuries of human history teach us that no matter how good and effective the leadership, checks and balances are always necessary.
    As long as the leadership is human, it will make mistakes or questionable decisions, make wrong turns and head down poorly chosen paths. It will be open to temptation and corruption. A strong Opposition in Parliament is meant to act as a watchdog, a kind of oversight committee, helping to keep the government on track. And if it goes too far off track, the opposition should be ready to step up and step in.
    Instead, we have a situation where the political party which many expected to step into the Opposition position is forced to take a step back and do some serious reflection. Again, this is not to take anything away from the BLP and its strategists. But, one can’t help but feel, especially with such a low voter turnout, that the result reflected as much a lack of confidence in the alternatives as it did a vote of confidence in the incumbent. And so, absent a strong Opposition party, the people of Barbados must be their own oversight committee.
    Always be a check
    My critics didn’t like the way I put it in terms of consciousness.
    They may prefer the framing of Dr Kristina Hinds as quoted in the Nation newspaper. “The citizenry of Barbados must always be a check . . . We really must now be active citizens to ensure that our rights are not trampled on and that our affairs are properly managed.”
    This is nothing for the Government of Barbados to fear or be concerned about. In fact, a good government will encourage an alert, active and involved citizenry. A major task of this Government, in
    moving forward and building a strong republican civilisation, will be educating and empowering citizens to take a greater interest and play a greater role in their own governance.
    Strong integrity legislation, a freedom of information act and a transparent process of constitutional reform would go a long way in this regard. Those days of voting and then leaving the government to do whatever it wants to do should be done with.
    Easier said than done, though.
    A large number of Barbadians did not even bother to vote, and I don’t believe that fear of COVID-19 was the only factor. Many Barbadians are fed up with Barbadian politics altogether, and not just fed up with one party.
    Barbados is a divided society, divided along class, race and ethnic lines. The Barbadian private sector and owners of capital seem largely uninterested in the development of society beyond facilitating the extraction of wealth for themselves.
    The professional or middle class has seemingly bought into an ideology of personal success and upward mobility without regard for the nation which facilitates their success. The so-called working class grows increasingly distrusting of government and the private sector. It took us decades and gouptmuh to get a Barbadian head of state. We can’t take so long to transform Barbados into a nation in which every citizen feels that they have a stake.

    Adrian Green is a communications specialist. Email: Adriangreen14 @gmail.com

    Source: Nation

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  • DLP’s failure to settle leadership problems

    By Ezra Alleyne

    The recent political history of this country is ripe for serious analysis. We may well be witnessing the death by a thousand cuts of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP). It is as serious as that. Now to the recent election.
    The other party in any two-party Westminster system has a permanent political duty to be always ready for an election. Why else are they described as a government-in-waiting?
    So, by definition, no election should be truly described as “snap”. Some analysts’ excoriation of the prime ministerial right to call elections exposes ignorance of the duties of the office of prime minister as opposed to those of the president of the United States.
    In our system, the biblical parable of the ten virgins has deep political lessons. Five were wise, five were foolish! Please do not tell me the biblical parable is not about politics.
    Does not the Sermon on the Mount qualify as a magnificent manifesto for the poor? And is not the story of Judas Iscariot and the 30 pieces of silver the clearest political proof that, as the Great Carew sang, there are “snakes in the grass, dirty and slimy”?
    Yet the roots of the present DLP problems go deeper. What is now developing is the end result of non-observance of political tenets far more fundamental than not being ready for any election.
    After Errol Barrow’s death in June 1987, no DLP leader has had an easy time leading that party.
    On his death, the “choice” of the new Prime Minister, Lloyd Erskine Sandiford, became embroiled in controversy.
    The constitutional proprieties were, it seems, in order, but a newspaper article published by young David Thompson as general secretary confirmed that the approval of Sandiford as political leader came after his swearing-in. I saw this as a serious problem and wrote three articles on the issue.
    In 1988, Dr Richie Haynes resigned as Minister of Finance after alleging disagreement with Sandiford. He formed the National Democratic Party (NDP), taking three sitting MPs with him. Prime Minister Sandiford lost four of his backbenchers. He held on and won the 1991 election.
    By 1994, trouble seemed to be brewing within the DLP camp, mainly concerning the exercise of aspects of prime ministerial authority. Sir James Cameron Tudor became concerned. He wondered how Prime Ministers Barrow and Adams could rule so easily, but Prime Minister Sandiford could only advance his policies by “hotly contested inches”.
    My private response to myself was that the political capital which accrues to the office by prior approval of the leader before he is anointed Prime Minister was absent.
    The 1994 no-confidence motion proved two things of relevance here: Opposition parties must always keep their lamps trimmed and burning, and they must always examine the generational relevance of their leadership and their leader.
    Here is why. In September 1993, about three years before the expiration
    of the 1991 to 1996 Parliament, the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) handed its leadership to young Owen Arthur. Unexpected events within eight months saw the Prime Minister having to call an election in 1994. The wise virgins (BLP) were ready – oil was in their lamps, wicks were trimmed and burning.
    The BLP won the election and were back in office under Arthur, who for the next 14 years restored the Barbadian economy. And note this: Arthur appoints young females to full ministries, and Mia Amor Mottley and Liz Thompson joined Billie Miller in the Arthur Cabinet. Without that kind of vision, political parties perish.
    Hear this: David Thompson led the Dems in the 1994 campaign even though Prime Minister Sandiford was still Prime Minister. What a contrivance!
    In 1999 Arthur further trounces Thompson and the DLP secures only two seats: Thompson in St John and Kellman in St Lucy.
    Mascoll takes over
    Clyde Mascoll is chosen to lead the party as political leader and leads it in the 2003 elections, increasing the number of MPs to seven. Thereafter he is thrown under the bus so that Thompson can get his third bite at the prime ministerial cherry. Verla De Peiza gets only one.
    Thompson wins the 2008 election – which is another story – and dies within two years of assuming office and Freundel Stuart becomes Prime Minister. Within a year on his first trip abroad, news of an Eager 11 plotting Stuart’s removal makes the headlines.
    The DLP shows a curious inability to cease and settle under any single leader. When the party loses the 2018 elections, not winning any seats, De Peiza is elected president and is getting on with the job, when out of the blue a challenger, Rev. Guy Hewitt, is encouraged and throws his hat in the ring . . . and is beaten off.
    Rumblings continue and reports surface of the meeting at a house near the Psychiatric Hospital…to remove De Peiza from the political leadership. A General Election is called, and inevitably, you know the rest.
    But wait, can the DLP afford to wait until April before dealing with this problem?
    Ezra Alleyne is an attorney and a former Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly.


    Source: Nation

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  • Errol Barrow dies – again?

    By Ralph Jemmott
    The newspaper of June 2, 1987, announced that Mr Errol W. Barrow had died. In the early morning of January 20, 2022, it became obvious that his Democratic Labour Party (DLP) had suffered two consecutive 30-0 defeats at the hands of the Mia Mottley-led Barbados Labour Party (BLP).
    It seemed as if Errol Walton Barrow had not only died again but that his vision was being finally laid to rest. The irony of it all was that it was on the eve of the celebration of Errol Barrow Day.
    As I have written before, even in his heyday, I was not a Barrow fan. This was largely because, following my father, I grew up an admirer of Grantley Herbert Adams. In my early memory, my father voted for Orrie Bryan and Mencea Cox of the BLP in the double member constituency in which Lower Bank Hall/Eagle Hall fell.
    In September 1970 I joined the staff at Harrison College, where Lady Adams was the geography teacher. I may be flattering myself, but somehow Grace Lady Adams seemed to have taken a liking to me. One morning she arrived at school and came to me and asked, “Ralph, is that your car I see downstairs with a BLP sticker on it?” I replied that it was, to which she replied, “I am happy that you are on the right side, but remember that you are a civil servant”. Later I asked Lady Adams if she would care to sign my copy of F.A. Hoyos text Grantley Adams and the Social Revolution. In the most beautiful penmanship, she signed it, “With Regards, Grace Adams”.
    Tom Adams’ intellect
    Few could not admire the intellect of Tom Adams although I must admit that I did not always take to aspects of his political persona.
    The demise of the DLP may be grossly overestimated. However, it would be a tragedy of tremendous proportions if that party ceased to exist as a viable political entity.
    Barbadian democracy rests on a number of pillars. One is the separation of powers between the executive, the legislature and the judiciary. Another is the right of every person over the age of 18 to vote. Both of these are enshrined in the Barbados Constitution. The third is an efficacious multi-party system, which is not constitutionally required but which has served Barbados reasonably well in affording Barbadians the option of choice.
    I am not enthused by political parties and have deliberately chosen not to join any. Two great political parties have governed this country since 1951…. the BLP and the DLP. Our country’s development represents a continuum; each Government has built on the foundation left by the preceding administration. There have been no sharp rifts in ideology or praxis. The prevailing mantra has been a pragmatism that eschews the extremes of the left and the right. In the now popular phrase, it represented the kind of people that we are.
    Ignorant caller
    A supremely ignorant caller to Brass Tacks one day stated that Errol Barrow “ent do nuffin fuh Bubadus”. Another equally ignorant caller stated that the only person who benefited from Independence
    was Barrow himself. We like to consider ourselves an intelligent people with “one of the best educational systems in the world”.
    Most of my adult life I have supported the BLP though I have never been a registered member even when the late Rudolph Hinkson offered me a form that would have afforded me membership. Errol Walton Barrow’s and the DLP’s contribution to Barbados is manifold. The contribution to education stands out.
    The four most progressive endeavours in schooling in Barbados have been a consequence of Barrow’s vision. Firstly, there is the abolition of the fee-paying structure in the old Grammar schools from January 1, 1962. Secondly, the establishment of the University of the West Indies as the College of Arts and Sciences in 1963 and, thirdly, the founding of the Barbados Community College in 1969. In relation to social security very little beats the establishment of the National Insurance Scheme, which has been a godsend to Barbadians.
    It would be a grievous fault if Barbadians would allowed the legacy of Mr Barrow and the DLP to languish. Much has gone wrong within that party since Barrow passed away. For one reason or another, it has not produced a leader of comparable intellectual gifts and political acumen. Some might contend that the DLP without Barrow was never much of a party.
    Now is the time for some good men and women to come to the aid of the party, not in their own narrow self-centred interests but for the sake of the future of our beloved country, its heirs and descendants yet unborn.
    The memory and vision of Errol Walton Barrow should not be allowed to die.

    Ralph Jemmott is a retired educator and social commentator.

    Source: Nation

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  • Critical Analyzer

    Our constitution needs to be amended to prevent MPs from changing allegiance after they have been elected.

    Any MP wishing to switch party allegiance or go independent must be required to resign triggering a by-election to get a new mandate from the MP’s constituents to determine if they still desire that representative.

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  • “There is concern two unprecedented 30 to 0 mandates pave the opportunity for the Mottley led government to run roughshod over the views of members in civil society. Especially given her rambunctious leadership style. Decisions taken by the government of Barbados in the coming days have deep implications for our way of life to come.

    God Bless Bim!”

    Words from a man who over these last four years has used BU as a platform to promote the cult of Mottleynism. Take note of his employment of the word “concerned”.

    When Mia achieved her historic first whitewash. The constitution should have been altered to ensure that such an unlikely event should never be repeated. Mia repeated this feat from three and a half years ago. We learnt nothing during the interim. The BLP will probably allow one member of the DLP to become the singular member of the opposition. Should this fail we would – once again – see a member of the BLP become the opposition. Is this a democracy that will serve the interests of all its people?

    BU’s chief archiver stated how Barbados along with Grenada were the only two democratic countries in the hemisphere to have achieved such obscene electoral results. Both countries are within the Caribbean region!

    Mia pulled every trick in the book to reassure her reelection. Added to this mix we now need to investigate voter intimidation, votes for payment, and dodgy voter electoral register lists. Is there an outside force dictating politics and general elections within our region? Let’s except we are now living under a dictatorship.

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  • @CA

    How effective is crossing the floor laws? How has it worked for Trinidad?

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  • Dr Kristina Hinds is a enior lecturer in political science and head of the Department of Government, Sociology, Psychology and Social Work at UWI Cave Hill. She is also a moderator of VOB’s Down To Brass Tacks.

    she has poor taste in music for types of deep analogies
    Sunday News Reporting standards have sunk real low

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  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    “Is there an outside force dictating politics and general elections within our region?”

    …there is a video floating around today that answers your questions….

    if you do not remove yourself ENTIRELY from all of it, not only WILL IT CONTINUE TO CONSUME YOU… but it will never bode well going forward…not in THIS lifetime or SEVERAL..

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  • Critical Analyzer

    @ David January 23, 2022 7:40 AM

    I don’t know about what goes on in Trinidad but what I do know is if you canvas as a party candidate or an independent and get elected on that basis, the correct thing to do is to go back to your constituents, state your case and determine if you still have their support.

    Liked by 1 person

  • TLSN
    Vote buying aside
    Why didn’t the Dlp supporters turned out to vote as the blp supporters did
    The story of vote buying cannot overlook the majority of Dems that stood away
    What if this majority had do their Civic duty
    The election results would have been different
    Looking away from what took place during the Verla election as President can be a mistake for the Party when trying to rebuild and rebrand it’s image
    The fact states that their is a hardline group within the Dlp party who takes self-interest serious enough to make their presence known during election time
    Time is of the essence for the high ranking officials in the party to make corrections necessary in order to maintain a full functioning and effect party
    However would not be surprised if this group withdraw it’s support and start another party

    Like

  • Allow the blogmaster to intervene: there was reports of vote buying. Every election this is raised but those people who are alleged to have witnessed it never come forward. Lastly, we have citizens who willingly, blatantly sell a vote for $100 or a bottle of rum. Who to blame?

    Liked by 2 people

  • “Why didn’t the Dlp supporters turned out to vote as the blp supporters did
    The story of vote buying cannot overlook the majority of Dems that stood away
    What if this majority had do their Civic duty
    The election results would have been different”

    a handful of seats would have meant the Parliament muppet show would be shown

    but a handful of seats makes no difference anyway in debates and votes

    why bother voting for a minority party who cannot implement any promises

    Liked by 1 person

  • Critical Analyzer

    There is nothing I can see to stop any one of the 30 elected MPs from approaching the DLP and saying make me your new president, I will become leader of the opposition and you will be able to regain access to the annual party subvention.

    Like

  • @CA

    This is true but are they men and women of ‘calibre’ outside of Mia to make that move realistic.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    For one…voters who are STARVED, disenfranchised and OPPRESSED through the years until THE NEXT election DEMANDED MORE MONEY and got it…$100 is too cheap and can hardly buy anything….they are determined if yall going to tief their tax dollars and pension money….YA GOTTA PAY FOR THEIR VOTES…lol..no free lunch to climb parliament steps to commit more corrupt acts……

    so bags and bags of money appeared or THE VOTER TURNOUT would have been LESS THAN 20%…

    but the bizsy crooks who are causing all of this with their parliament sidekicks are being talked about EVERYWHERE…

    Like

  • Critical AnalyzerJanuary 23, 2022 8:16 AM

    There is nothing I can see to stop any one of the 30 elected MPs from approaching the DLP and saying make me your new president, I will become leader of the opposition and you will be able to regain access to the annual party subvention.
    Xxxxxxc
    For that move to occur the Blp.MP have to get pass the internal politics of the dlp
    A faction which help to deliver the crushing defeat

    Like

  • Is this ac posting?

    LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    In the absence of honesty and integrity, these island elections must be monitored by whomever, don’t know anymore, before they all start devolving into violence because of vote buying and intimidation…it will eventually DESTABLIZE THE REGION….but maybe that’s the intent…

    i would be royally pissed if some asshole from parliament or their imps or pimps try intimidating me to vote, can just see how i would go all nuclear on them…..violently so..

    it’s time that the criminals who help raid the pension and treasury creating the environment to BUY VOTES and intimiate people into voting are watched, monitored and eventually held accountable…..PUBLICLY…

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @David January 23, 2022 8:12 AM

    I think the way they are trying to curb this practise is to prevent any attempts to take picture taking devices into the voting booth.

    I would love somebody to offer me money to vote because I would take the money and go vote for whoever I want to vote for.

    I have also heard people playing both sides where they marked an X for one party, took a picture, requested a second ballot, marked an X for the other party, voted for whoever they wanted to vote for and collected money from all sides.

    Vote buying takes many forms other than overt offers of cash, what about infrastructural work or unscheduled house repairs done during the campaign period. Is that not also vote buying?

    I doubt vote buying has as large an impact as people are thinking on the overall outcome unless things are close like the 16-14 election but it definitely make our turnout percentages look better.

    Liked by 2 people

  • “Is this ac posting?”

    her punctuation and spelling has matured

    Like

  • @African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved,

    I know you, W.S, Miller, and the one or two progressives still remaining on BU will be extremely interested in the link below.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jan/23/eighty-years-late-groundbreaking-work-on-slave-economy-is-finally-published-in-uk

    Like

  • This result has exposed a party in crisis
    A crisis that must be taken with all seriousness before a final meltdown occurs one which can split the party into two
    Having one side making a decision to start over under a banner with a decision intentionally to lead the country away from despotic attitudes and back to a form of democracy in tuned with social and economic reform

    Like

  • @ TLSN. What foolishness you talking about some man promoting a cult just because he wrote the following. The man wrote pure nonsense. There is no cult or Maximum Leader in our country. This is what was written;

    “There is concern two unprecedented 30 to 0 mandates pave the opportunity for the Mottley led government to run roughshod over the views of members in civil society. Especially given her rambunctious leadership style. Decisions taken by the government of Barbados in the coming days have deep implications for our way of life to come. “

    Really ? The people voted exactly like that three years ago and there was no threat to our democracy. How can we have threats to democracy when the government strengthened it by having integrity legislation passed along with the freedom of information act. It also locked up several members of the DLP who were corrupt as hell.
    Everybody knew the country was divided . Everyday you had people writing and criticizing the government for not paying nurses, when everybody knows that civil servants never get paid on time. Everything was done to keep down prices and although prices were decreasing, a lot of people were stirring up trouble talking about the high cost of living. Ours was the only country that had our children back in school yet they kept saying that the govt was doing nothing. The country is no longer divided and the government has been given a clear mandate, Now wunnuh want to divide the country again .
    I can’t believe that anybody will say that our democracy is under threat or that the current prime minister has any such traits in her personality. I am yet to hear anybody accuse her of such.
    All wunnuh so just like to throw shade.
    There is no threat to the democracy at all. We just had an election where every single citizen was allowed to vote. The government went to great lengths to ensure even those isolated with COVID voted . The turn out was higher than any other election.
    To come here and talk about democracy under threat and the PM ( government) running trod over citizens is nonsense. You have to be some disgruntled Dem living overseas , who don’t know what’s going on in Barbados.
    You have no damn shame.
    I gone

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    TLSN….many more /thesis/publications by our writers previously banned within the last 50 plus years are suddenly making an appearance…they have now become useful when once before they weren’t…i also see it as making sure the newer publications are UPSTAGED and hidden to also become USEFUL in another 50-100 years but not wanted now to upset any selfish plans……..that’s always the pattern..

    Like

  • David

    I was asking the same

    Now that the way she should be going instead of being preoccupied with Mia

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    Yep…people turned up to vote and were turned away with flimsy excuses, it’s all on video…….a shameful pappyshow…

    Like

  • William tell us why your former leader abandoned the NDP project by returning to the fold.

    Here is a reminder- there is a reason politics is referred to as ‘the are of the possible’.

    Like

  • [Sarcasm ON]

    Willy you are so intelligent and wise a true leader and inspiration to the nation and the young generation in this dispensation.
    If people cloned you into an Army then you could be weaponised for Victory.

    Like

  • It would be of interest to see who would represent the leadership.of the dlp
    Noted is Verla statement of the word unity and her inability to deliver that cushion of loyal support
    Interesting very interesting times ahead for the party as the number one goal of Unity would be the deciding factor
    A job but not an easy task for a leader thrown into a crisis for rebuilding and reconstructing from the ground up
    Barrow did so hopefully some one having a vision.which can send messages of country first to.memberdship.and supporters putting all hands on deck

    Like

  • @ TLSN
    Thanks. The great tragedy is that region to can produce such brilliance and now is in the decline of leadership that we are experiencing.
    Eric Williams educated his people in Woodford Square. Today, we have leaders who tell them to “wuk up Brek loose.”
    I doubt they know a book such as that exists. Why write books like that ; it’s easier to make fashion statements……..,,,,
    #throwashade

    Like

  • @ac

    Given your clingy association with the DLP who do you favour to take up the mantle of leadership?

    Like

  • “A job but not an easy task for a leader thrown into a crisis for rebuilding and reconstructing from the ground up
    Barrow did so hopefully some one having a vision.which can send messages of country first to.memberdship.and supporters putting all hands on deck”

    Using the genre of Bajan Sport Analogies wisdom, pedestrian DLP Cricketers should retire and replace them with UFC fighters

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    @angela cox January 23, 2022 8:23 AM

    Critical AnalyzerJanuary 23, 2022 8:16 AM

    There is nothing I can see to stop any one of the 30 elected MPs from approaching the DLP and saying make me your new president, I will become leader of the opposition and you will be able to regain access to the annual party subvention.
    Xxxxxxc
    For that move to occur the Blp.MP have to get pass the internal politics of the dlp
    A faction which help to deliver the crushing defeat

    I didn’t agree with the republic move we made but it does give us the prime opportunity to re-examine our constitution and plug the holes that would never have been exploited before now. Despite all the robust debate politician of old had, there were certain lines that were not crossed based solely on morals and decorum.

    Before Joe Atherley, I would never have thought anyone would have the nerve to leave their party so soon after the election to form an opposition and I personally still believe Mia secretly had a meeting after the DLP was wasting time accepting the 2 senate seat offer and Brother Joe decided to fall on the sword and take up the opposition mantle so the government could get on with saving the country.

    The days of gentleman agreements and standing by your word are gone and must now be backed by effective controls, rules and laws where necessary to keep our politicians in line.

    Like

  • The number of times BU posters have saved the world in a single thread with infinite wisdom knowledge and understanding is numberless. We are wonderful and strong like a lion humble like a lamb clean in hands and pure in heart like a lily white dove, the true prophets of this age.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    William…they are TRAPPED and don’t even know it….but no one is taking on any self sacrificing roles of a Harriett Tubman…so they better learn HOW to FREE themselves…no one got the time….nor the inclination.

    Like

  • William is your head hard like moon rock also?

    In 2018 many felt comfortable chalking the 30-0 BLP victory to a violent reaction to Stuart’s unpopular administration which eclipsed Sandiford, an anomaly. A second 30-0 victory for the BLP signals the system has not corrected for reasons we have to be more concerned.

    Like

  • @ WURA
    The apologists and detractors can pretend that all is well but history shows that those who are despised and undermined , are usually the ones who are speaking truth to power.
    There are people who to this day are supporting white supremacy right here on the rock but they can’t see it.
    The struggle continues
    Enough said for now.
    Peace

    Like

  • @ David
    I don’t know where you are living but the system is working better than any system worldwide. You claim you are a pragmatist but you have just not mastered that politics is the art of tge possible.
    Only this morning I heard on a radio station that the government of Barbados has been very successful in getting the appeals of several corrupt ministers from the Stuart administration squashed. It means that at least seven of them will not get out of prison under twenty years.
    The Commissioner of Police said yesterday , that the nightly gunfire of opposing political parties has ceased and the country, once divided had returned to a state of normalcy and a big ecumenical church service is planned to express the new spirit of unity after three long years of rioting and divisiveness.
    The tourism minister just this morning reported that more tourists are coming and that at least three or four hotels will be constructed in very quick order.
    As you know both the Hyatt and Sam Lords are opened and fully booked.
    I don’t know what you want me to say. I just came back from my daily walk
    along the beach; I’m about to have my tea and sweet bread. My breadfruit tree is falling down with bounty; I just had a lovely clean glass of water from my pipe .
    Now tell me what is it I need to know. My Prime Minister is a part of the world’s most revered leaders and we are now members of G7; NATO and so on.
    You just like throwing shade.
    Man, I gone.

    Like

  • I shall be announcing the Best of BU influencers in a Top 10 List
    We know some want to make their own shortlists
    But this will be the definitive list and will be impartial and not partial like a marshall
    If you want to considered it will be $100 Bajan / USD for Tier 1 / Tier 2, but people will get a 20% discount if they apply today

    Open Again
    Slam

    Happy Earthday Marijuana Lambs Bread Collie
    We have received a message from Dub heaven

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    “The struggle continues”

    the struggle is ALL THEIRS my friend….and they are MORE THAN WELCOME to keep it among themselves…some of us removed ourselves YEARS AGO…

    knew this day would come, but if you weren’t paying attention would have completely missed everything…..as MOST HAVE

    “Now tell me what is it I need to know. My Prime Minister is a part of the world’s most revered leaders and we are now members of G7; NATO and so on.
    You just like throwing shade.”

    🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • @ Critical Analyzer January 23, 2022 8:08 AM

    That’s a ‘reasonably’ objective position to take and indeed worthy of serious consideration in the consultative process promised before the new Constitution is instituted.

    But in making such a legislative amendment the Constitution would have to be revised to make it abundantly clear that political parties are recognized as legitimate organs of the country’s democratic process and subject to the same legal reporting requirements as any other public institution benefiting from any form of State/taxpayers’ funding.

    Like

  • DavidJanuary 23, 2022 9:44 AM

    @ac

    Given your clingy association with the DLP who do you favour to take up the mantle of leadership?

    Xxxxx
    One who could unite the party
    Party loyalist and supporters say they want fresh blood
    I did mention Sinckler for reasons that Mia had used a method of redemption by placing him on the finance committee
    His popularity has not dwindled he was well liked and his charisma amongst the people was one much appreciated
    Guy Hewitt was given the boot
    Rumors of his return seems to be welcomed with open arms
    If so that would be a new beginning to build a foundation for unification if all agree on him

    Like

  • We have always spoken about a tipping point (abacadabra moment), when people take their affairs into their own hands and change the status quo for the better. One may be moved to believe that two 30-0 drubbings represent such a tipping point but two keys are missing.

    Someone to tip (a la Rosa Parks, Obama’s convention speech, Sir Roy in the 90’s) and a supportive mass following to keep the tip going. None of these currently exist.

    Unfortunately, we have a situation where more than 60% of persons saw it fit NOT to participate in the process. We have a system that where the “X” of 78,000 people, determines the fate of the other 200,000 for the next five year. We have a structure where systemic corruption, cronyism, capitalism at the expense of labour, hypocrisy and double standards (blatant and otherwise) are now our accepted norm and where the two Barbadoses are becoming the four.

    As leaders Mia and David were outliers. Persons for a specific time and a specific generation. As a country we now have to find other outliers to get that change that we “claim” we need. A healthy democracy demands it.

    Just observing

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    “a la Rosa Parks,”

    certainly not, that happened before and there should be NO NEED for a repeat, and they don’t deserve it, a way must be found to save the young generations and their minds from this degradation..it is being worked on…consistently with a lot of success in other jurisdictions, including Barbados.

    Like

  • Why do you come to the blog to obfuscate? It is know the charter is non binding and that the government pledged to open a conversation with the public regarding a new constitution.

    Like

  • @William

    You need to manage that big ass chip on your shoulder.

    Like

  • There is so much knowledge on BU
    but, we must combine all the knowledge
    and practice it with maximum strength

    Like

  • @Miller

    Looking forward to considerable input when/if the consultative process starts.

    Like

  • @ac

    The blogmaster asked your for YOUR opinion.

    Like

  • @Observing

    Fair enough. Are you saying the tail is waging the dog and if yes why?

    Like

  • Pingback: Another Abracadabra Moment…Barbados with a one party Parliament-January 23, 2022 – Jamaica: Political Economy

  • DavidJanuary 23, 2022 10:45 AM

    @ac

    The blogmaster asked your for YOUR opinion
    Xxcx
    If u read with understanding you would find your answer in full with reasons given

    Like

  • @ac

    Thanks for nothing.

    The best answer is that you are clueless given the dearth of talent on display.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “We have always spoken about a tipping point (abacadabra moment), when people take their affairs into their own hands and change the status quo for the better. One may be moved to believe that two 30-0 drubbings represent such a tipping point but two keys are missing….”

    abacadabra refers to magic tricks

    but nobody finds magicians sexy

    Like

  • blame Artax for the misspelling of abracadabra when I copied and pasted

    Like

  • @David
    Are you saying the tail is waging the dog and if yes why?

    Yes. Because too many good dogs are afraid to let their barks be heard!

    Liked by 1 person

  • DavidJanuary 23, 2022 11:01 AM

    @ac

    Thanks for nothing.

    The best answer is that you are clueless given the dearth of talent on display

    Xxxxx
    Will.wait and see if u are right
    Hope u apologise if u are wrong

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    “Yes. Because too many good dogs are afraid to let their barks be heard!” ✔

    Like

  • Could someone please provide the constitution Garth Patterson is quoting?

    Does it mention the word president?

    Like

  • David

    Her choice is sinckler.

    Her reason……………… o well …..are her reasons

    U said before I think she is a blp under cover agent.

    #lookingfor91-0

    Like

  • Brasstacks Sunday streaming now.

    Christina Hinds Phd. , Ronnie Yearwood Phd. ,Hartley Henry and Peter Wickham.

    The creme de la creme of Barbados political commentators.

    Like

  • @Hants

    To be expected they want to browbeat Kristina.

    Like

  • There are no Abba records in my box
    They are the DLP of old pop music

    Baby Don’t Do It

    Like

  • The Constitution of Barbados is the supreme law under which Barbados is governed. The Constitution provides a legal establishment of the Government of Barbados, as well as legal rights and responsibilities of the public and various other government officers.
    Original title: Barbados Independence Order, 1…
    Head of state: President, elected by Parliament
    Executive: Prime minister–led cabinet respons…

    Constitution of Barbados – Wikipediahttps://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Constitution_of_Barbados

    Like

  • Even de GOB Website says we have a constitution!!

    https://www.gov.bb/Government/barbados-constitution

    Like

  • @ WURA
    The apologists and detractors can pretend that all is well but history shows that those who are despised and undermined , are usually the ones who are speaking truth to power.
    There are people who to this day are supporting white supremacy right here on the rock but they can’t see it.
    The struggle continues
    Enough said for now.
    Peace

    Xxxxxxxx

    HAVE NEVER VOTED IN THE USA OR ON THE 2X3 ISLAND.

    WILL NEVER UNDERSTAND HOW PEOPLE CAN BECOME SO STUPID AND WRAPPED UP IN POLITICAL PARTIES WHO REALLY DON’T GIVE ONE SHIT ABOUT THEM WITH MOST LIVING ON THE BOTTOM OF THE TOTEM POLE.

    HITLER AND OTHERS HAD MASSIVE STUPID FOLLOWERS SEEMS BLACK IGNORANT BAJANS TO BE FOLLOWING SAME TREND ALSO NO DIFFERENT TO THE TRUMP BLINDED FOLLOWERS.

    THE IMF WILL HAVE THE LAST WORD FOR THEIR BLINDED FAITH FOR OVER 50 YEARS WITH UPCOMING HARSHNESS.

    Like

  • If I go to de OAS website and download the Barbados Constitution I get this.

    Click to access the_constitution_of_barbados.pdf

    There is absolutely NO mention of any president.

    So if we no longer have a GG, then nuffin can’t get done!!

    The World According to Garth seems not to match reality.

    Like

  • Here you again. An amendment was made to transport the old constitution with amendments to recognize a president to replace GG along with other name changes.

    Like

  • Hartley Henry is vehemently defending the non existence of vote buying.

    Like

  • Hartley Henry will be rewarded for his loyalty.

    Like

  • @Hants

    Henry is a regional political strategist.

    Liked by 2 people

  • This is why this politician is trusted.

    ——————

    Covid: New Zealand PM Ardern cancels wedding amid Omicron wave – BBC News

    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-60100369

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    William…we can now rest easy..the people did what had to be done, by withholding their votes what goes on is no longer hidden…Mia now has free rein, people like myself will never get in her way..

    am only interested in human rights violations, nothing else..

    the older ones will deserve what they get let them fight their own battles after drinking elaborate amounts of koolaid laced with exotics lies, they are on their own, our interests lay in saving the young..

    lying about vote buying when there is supporting evidence, they will LIE NEXT TIME TOO, lied previously…political strategists/scientists…..well paid frauds and liars……and their time too shall come…all the money they make from deceiving and misleading the public don’t save them when they get deathly ill.

    Like

  • And they’re off! Everybody on his favourite hobby horse, whipping hard yet going nowhere, around and around the nursery!

    See you next time!

    Happy Sunday, David!

    Like

  • The only thing that seems sensible is for Ms. Mockley to resign in shame.

    The scheme did not work.

    Like

  • @ David,

    Hartley Henry is a very influential man if what he says is true. Talks to PM Mottley every day.Talks to Dominica PM Roosevelt Skerrit every day.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    and why should she resign if she hasn’t previously….it will get much worse, and there is no one to fix anything…so let it get worse as expected…they will hopefully survive…

    “The World According to Garth seems not to match reality”

    why do you think some of us said we will NOT get involved in this particular mess, let it play out to its logical conclusion..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    besides,,,Caswell is still very much on the job…lol

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, the Sunday articles posted are good reading… at a minimum they show that many here are no less astute than the articled experts… Ah well the wonders of it all!

    Ezra Alleyne’s was the best for its historical data which gave solidity to a lot of what has been said here…. the depths of writings are clearly manifest:

    1)–“The DLP shows a curious inability to cease and settle under any single leader [since Errol Barrow].”

    2)–“What is now developing is the end result of non-observance of political tenets far more fundamental than not being ready for any election [..] The 1994 no-confidence motion proved two things of relevance here: Opposition parties must always keep their lamps trimmed and burning, and they must always examine the generational relevance of their leadership and their leader.”

    That must be tied to these other NUGGETS which one hopes wise DLP heads (for their sake and that of this proud nation) can grasp. The dynamics are OBVIOUSLY different but the context is even more daunting for the Dees as they HAVE to get their act together in a similar way…they clearly KNOW this and MUST find the path.

    ‘In September 1993, [..] the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) handed its leadership to young Owen Arthur. Unexpected events within eight months saw the Prime Minister having to call an election in 1994. The wise virgins (BLP) were ready – oil was in their lamps, wicks were trimmed and burning.’ Fortuitous undoubtedly but they managed their infighting… the DLP did NOT!

    I hope we all note that the “Arthur appoint[ed] young females to full ministries [..] Mia Amor Mottley and Liz Thompson’ are now the one(s) in charge…DESPITE his subsequent ‘denial’ of her! Infighting was again ‘managed’ well!

    Moral of that story… contrivances like Clyde Mascoll is ‘thrown under the bus so that Thompson can get his third bite at the prime ministerial cherry’ although Mascoll led the party to a 300% electoral increase (7/2) is BAD… remember earlier chat about Greaves’ role in that change!

    I agree with all those who say this is a very serious moment in our politics because as Jemmont points out “For one reason or another, [the DLP] has not produced a leader of comparable intellectual gifts and political acumen’ … to Barrow since Thompson he is implying. Yet that also says that this cult of personality which we seem to crave desperately in Barbados must change … or otherwise the DLP are doomed for at least two more election cycles.

    BTW not to put a hex on the young man (as I wish him very well) but I couldn’t help but notice how Khaleel Kothdiwala’s political exposure here is so similar to star-boy DT…even his academic scholarship and such. That to say: the BLP have their possible young heir getting ready…. ideally the other party has theirs too!

    Lata

    Liked by 1 person

  • angela cox January 23, 2022 10:31 AM #: “I did mention Sinckler for reasons that Mia had used a method of redemption by placing him on the finance committee.”

    My friend

    Please ‘tell’ BU what was the name of the “finance committee,” which according to you, Mottley placed Sinckler on?

    You continue to purposely mislead the forum.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David you insult 😂 the man’s pedigree with “Henry is a regional political strategist.”…. you KNOW that he was (is) a PREMIER winning political strategist/consultant..

    You also know his comments denying vote buying is total BS…but then again so is the commentary from many here who seem to see that as something esoteric and abstract when it’s a FUNDAMENTAL aspect of politics… it’s normally and legally so – in most nations – called campaign financing.

    But if we want to show no decorum … then label contracts that any corporate donor like a COW GETS as vote buying plain and simply… the governing party get large legal donations from the cash COWs’ of this world to fuel their operations at the front end…so let’s just call the thing decently as Campaign Financing and stop all this, do!

    It happens, has been happening forever in various ways.

    I gone.

    Like

  • Under no circumstances should we tolerate any opposition in Parliament or the Senate.

    The outspoken ex-senator has mocked and dragged the nation, state and people through the mud by his disgraceful conduct at the inauguration of the New Republic. The outspoken ex-senator Senator has sided with anti-vaccinationists. The outspoken ex-senator senator boycotted the vote on the anti-corruption bill.

    So there are very many reasons to storm the Senate if another illegitimate, anti-democratic, despotic opposition rages there as it did from 2018 to 2021. Almost four years of despotism by the opposition is enough.

    The people have spoken. The people want to shake off the tyranny of the opposition.

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    Good comment. There is a reason for the saying, the rich gets richer and the poor gets poorer.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights ReservedJanuary 23, 2022 1:06 PM

    and why should she resign if she hasn’t previously….

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    NB .. I said the sensible thing would be to resign in shame.

    Since when are politicians sensible, especially ones with their necks out.

    Yup, things will get worser, they’ve sown the wind.

    Like

  • So you would look at the MP’s that resigned before the elections and realise some politicians can actually be sensible.

    They are out of the unfolding mess.

    Like

  • “Hartley Henry will be rewarded for his loyalty.”

    I agree.

    But, wasn’t Hartley handsomely “rewarded for his loyalty” to the DLP with a consultancy pick as ‘Chief Political Adviser and given the title ‘King Maker,’ immediately after they won the 2008 general elections?

    Or, is it because he’s now in the BLP’s camp that any reward for him should be frowned upon?

    Yet, Lucille Moe and Dr. Ronnie Yearwood left the BLP only to be FULLY EMBRACED by the DEMS.

    Another Mark Maloney moment?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2021. All Rights Reserved

    “Yup, things will get worser, they’ve sown the wind”

    whirlwind is right behind.

    the MPs who resigned may have had some prior warning, like some of us got. i tend to listen when people warn….but it was indeed the sensible move to make. Ya want no part of this..

    nope not everyone is sensible..

    was warning some in UK years now about what is likely to unfold, ya should have heard the contradictions and the “i don’t agree with that”…now they are SCRAMBLING….all i can do is tell them what they don’t agree with, tell it to the Home Office…lol

    Like

  • Those politicians were encouraged to leave to permit the BLP to inject new blood with an eye to the next general election. This is what positions Mottley ahead of the rest.

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