Where is the Leadership?

Submitted by Paula Sealy

General elections were held on 19 January. Today is 19 May. It has been over 100 days since the elections. Up to now the secondary schools have no boards of management. This is affecting the schools.  

So when will the boards be put in place? Will the Minister of Education explain what is going to the public? Does she or the government understand the problems this is contributing to? Is the delay because of education reform? 

Answers are needed not more empty talk. 

Is the 11+ the only thing the ministry is looking at? How much longer will the 11+ be used?

167 comments

  • Where is the leadership? What a funny question! Leadership is where our Supreme Leader resides and commands state, party and subjects.

    We should have more confidence in our Supreme Leader. Once she solves the Corona crisis and the economic recovery is here, she will personally take care of all these problems.

    Until then, we should work alongside our Supreme Leader and await her orders.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu at 9 :25 AM

    The abolition cannot be rushed. We need to have a consensus of our expectations from our education system.What the Education system should not do is to foster mediocrity but should promote the need to put in the effort that leads to success.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Where is the leadership? Internalised in each citizen of this country. He must own it and make his inputs into building a fair and just society.

    Like

  • @ David,

    Dame Billie Miller creaated a ” zoning plan ” circa 1981 that would have allowed children to go to school close to their homes.

    It called for an upgrade of school buildings and better allocation of good teachers.

    Like

  • @Hants

    Several plans, project documents are on shelves. Intervening period probably makes some of them redundant.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    Will we ever get consensus on a large topic like education? We operate in a divisive environment. The challenge for our leadership is to shift through the deadwood to get it done.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    A little idealistic this comment? We come from all backgrounds, it required leadership to bring people of different minds and perspectives together.

    Like

  • This current BLP administration has given us two (2) Ministers of Education.

    But, where is a new comprehensive, innovative, progressive education policy?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    They will tell your Bradshaw got sick and there was covid and McConney has on training wheels. Just saying.

    Like

  • What happened to the project called Hyatt the PM promised that come JANUARY the project would hit the road up and running
    Four months later dead silence
    Where is the leadership
    The only people seems happy is the IMF

    Like

  • @Hants@Vincent

    One has to measure the success and relevance of our education system by our (in) ability to solve our problems. Definition of ‘problems’ – maintain ownership of our lands, effectively manage the socioeconomic landscape etc.

    Like

  • “They will tell your Bradshaw got sick and there was covid and McConney has on training wheels. Just saying.”

    @ David

    A reasonable response would be, taking into consideration what you mentioned above, remember, Ambassador at Large, Dame Antoinette ‘Billie’ Miller and Mottley are both former Ministers of Education.
    And, the BLP had 10 years in Opposition, which is more than enough time to formulate a comprehensive e0ducation policy, with input from both ladies…… as well as teachers who are also members and supporters of the BLP and non-partisan special interest groups.

    In fact, we haven’t heard of any policies being articulated as it relates to the economy, crime, tourism, agriculture, social services, health, housing or alternative energy.
    Which, to my mind, clearly suggests, the BLP did not have any alternative policy initiatives whilst in Opposition.
    ‘Government’s’ response to crime was appointing a former Commissioner of Police as a consultant to the AG and Police Service.

    Additionally, we cannot continue using COVID-19 as an excuse to hide our incompetence.
    Yes, the world was surprised by the virus and pandemic.
    But, innovative ‘governments’ would’ve been ‘thinking outside the box,’ to formulate post-COVID policies aimed at, for example, restructuring the economy or analyzing tax revenues and NIS remittances. As you’re aware, COVID exposed the weaknesses of the NIS.
    The pandemic provided an excellent opportunity for us to experiment with ‘greenhouse farming.’

    But, here we are lamenting the schools don’t have any boards of management, which should not be a surprise, based on how we’re ‘drifting along.’

    Like

  • @Artax

    Sadly much of what you stated is correct. How many times the blogmaster made the point we have allowed another crisis to go to waste.

    Like

  • “One has to measure the success and relevance of our education system by our (in) ability to solve our problems.”

    I’ve seen that argument being advanced on BU.

    That we are qualified to solve the problems of other countries and International organizations…. but are somehow unqualified and incapable of solving our own.

    But, I often wonder what is the basis of those arguments, after reading, for example, Barbadian Hadley Bourne was recently the CEO of St. Vincent’s newly constructed Argyle International Airport; or Sinckler taking a job at the World Bank, or Dr. Kevin Greenidge working at the IMF?

    And, the same education system we’re questioning, is the basis for the success of those gentlemen and others.

    Like

  • How about Atherley response to the PM glad tidings news of meeting IMFtargets
    He certainly hit that one straight out the ball park so fast and hard that not even the blp footsoldiers could move fast enough with a good response
    Where is the leadership

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    Have we really come from different backgrounds ? Barbados as a society is less than 400 years old We are densely populated. We share a common culture. These facts do not betray any diversity.
    I think it is time to redefine leadership that is reflective of an aware citizenry. The leadership style that led us from crown colony to independence may be unfit to lead us into the Republican era.. So there should be no backward looking unless we want to be fossilized into a pillar of salt.

    Like

  • We do have “Tron” styled Supreme leader, I saw evidence of it yesterday at the St. Joseph Parish meeting when poor sap Halliday didn’t respond to a constituent’s question in a manner approved by the leader whereupon she got him back on his feet and made him repeat the answers to questions she had asked him prior to the meeting. It was akin to a Principal grilling a third form student. At the end Halliday seemed to shrink about six inches, Halladay is a holdover from the previous BWA regime and he must be walking on eggshells.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    There will be outliers/exceptions.

    Why are we unable to retain local local businesses from falling into foreign hands as one example?

    Why have we not managed our economy from hitting base?

    What about waste management solutions?

    Improve public transportation to address 150k vehicles in the roads?

    Poor customer service to the public? Delayed justice from the courts etc etc.

    Some will say put a system to regulate lawyers and escrow payments. As well as penal and rehabilitate care for those in need?

    What about better care for the elderly?

    We are suppose to use our education to provide solutions for life.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @David Bu

    In an era where the Earth is one Global Village is it not more rational to have an Education System that produces graduates that can find employment worldwide, An education system that allows them to master the evolving technologies.and follow and contribute to the growth in scientific knowledge? Education cannot be parochial/nationalistic/ cultural . It must fit the coming generation for the world. By the way, that has been always the national philosophy in education. Any other policy that wants to hold back the highflyers so that the low flyers can catc-hup is counterproductive to our national objectives..

    Like

  • PM Responds to the CCJ message of getting Barbados justice system in order in the heels of last week CCJ order of a murderers sentence whereby the courts of Barbados did was not justified in not taking into account time served by the accused
    Everything in Barbados seems to be living in a time warp and the need to understand good goverance is irrelevant

    Like

  • David May 19, 2022 2:11 PM

    RE: “Why are we unable to retain local local businesses from falling into foreign hands as one example?”

    You seem to be implying “local businesses fall into foreign hands” because Barbadians lack the requisite managerial qualifications and skills to retain them.

    The reality is, the owners and shareholders of BS&T, Nation Group, M.E.R Bourne, SOL, Simpson Motors, Collins Ltd., etc, made a decision (known only to them) to sell those businesses to whomsoever they chose to.
    There isn’t anything we could say or do to change that reality.

    All the other examples of inefficiencies you gave doesn’t have anything to do with our educational system.
    It has more to do with incompetence of our policy makers.

    The National Assistance Board was established in 1980. Forty-two (42) years later, in 2022, we’re discussing the lack of legislation or policies for elder abuse and care of the elderly.
    But, I’ve heard of former NAB employees who used their qualifications and experience to established their own senior citizens homes.

    We’ve also seen public sector employees being hired by the private sector.
    For example, the former Director of the Financial Services Commission is now the CEO of a major, local insurance company.
    Police Officers resign from the service to take positions as Chief of Security at hotels and security firms.

    Like

  • @Artax

    We are discussing ‘where is the leadership’ not managerial ability.

    Like

  • Patience!!!!

    “Is the 11+ the only thing the ministry is looking at? How much longer will the 11+ be used?”

    Xxxxxxxxc

    I’m only human, I’m just a woman help me believe in what I could be and all that I am. Show me the stairway I have to climb Lord for my sake, teach me to take one day at a time..That’s all I’m asking of You Just give me the strength
    to do everyday what I have to do yesterday’s gone sweet Jesus and tomorrow may never be mine Lord help me today..

    Amor Amor Amor…

    Like

  • @ David

    Perhaps you may want to explain the correlation between “leadership” and “local businesses falling into foreign hands.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    The educational system is the production line. The system is producing the failure in leadership at all levels.
    What really innovative or creative qualities either Greenidge or Sinckler has demonstrated ? They are a dime a dozen variety technocrats. And even as that, they have no real track record.
    We get what we produce.

    Like

  • @Artax

    Leadership is required to establish a vision that will underpin success in anything we want to do.

    Like

  • @ David Bu at 9 :25 AM

    The abolition cannot be rushed. We need to have a consensus of our expectations from our education system.What the Education system should not do is to foster mediocrity but should promote the need to put in the effort that leads to success.

    Xxxxxxx

    THE 2X3 ISLAND IS FULL OF SHIT AND HOT AIR.

    ENGLAND THE FORMER WHITE COLONIALS MASTERS GOT RID OVER 50 YEARS AGO BECAUSE THEY RECOGNIZED WAS NOT WORKING EFFECTIVELY.

    THE BLACK JACKASSES 50 YEARS ………… LATER SAYING NO NEED TO RUSH.

    NO WONDER THE ECONOMIC FAILURES ARE IN THE HANDS OF ANOTHER SET OF WHITE MASTERS THE IMF.

    Liked by 1 person

  • OVER 50 YEARS AGO IN ENGLAND

    Why was the 11 plus exam abolished?

    The idea was to abolish the three school system and introduce a more “comprehensive” system where all children were to be treated fairly and would all attend the same type of secondary school. Children would no longer have to take the 11 Plus examination to see which secondary school they would go to.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I thought this year’s 11+ was supposed to be the last??????

    Is this another false start?????

    Like

  • @ David

    Okay. Sinckler and Greenidge were only simple examples.

    How about Hadley Bourne, Oliver Jordan, Walter Blackman, Professor Eudine Barriteau, Dr. Jeffery Elcock, Ralph ‘Bizzy’ Williams, Rudy Grant and the late Dr. Oliver Headley, who pioneered solar energy for heating purposes and crop drying? And, there are several others.
    Surely those persons can be considered among those who “have track records.”

    Like

  • Is this another false start?????

    Xxxxxxxx

    THE WORLD FAMOUS COPIERS FIND IT TOO HARD TO FIGURE OUT.

    HOWEVER EASIER TO BEG AND BORROW FROM THE WORLD BANK, CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK CDB AND IMF.

    SIGN OF TRUE FAILURE AND EASY ACCESS TO FUNDS TO BE MISAPPROPIATED.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    My apologies.

    I now realized my comments should have been addressed to Mr. Skinner, and not you.
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    @ Mr. Skinner

    As I mentioned, Sinckler and Greenidge were simple examples.

    You’ve ignored Mr. Bourne.

    However, I’m not going to join you in ‘saying’ “the education system is producing the failure in leadership at all levels.”

    I totally disagree…… but, respect your opinion.

    Like

  • @Artax

    The measure of leadership is based on questions asked in previous blogmaster’s comment. We must move the needle in a significant way to achieve results.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    Saying that the system has produced failures at all levels does not mean everybody who have led are failures.
    We can’t ignore the kind of educational system we have and not attribute some blame to the kind of citizen/ leaders we have produced and are producing.
    This really is throughout the region. Are we really impressed or should we be impressed?
    There will always be exceptions to any rule.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing (c) 2022. All Rights Reserved.

    The biggest dumbest asses in the world. Can’t draft their own republuc constitution, cant remove a slave system, dont want to, can’t abolish a demoralizing 2 subject colonial test devised by slave masters test who dont use it anymore …and running around the place talking about how great they are….their fowls and pimps are a reflection of them…useless breathers…

    i know people who have accomplished so much in the last 3 years with all that’s happening and without IMF loans…..these can’t even make it to first base. Hellbent on destroying Black children….but when ya digging a grave for others,….ALWAYS DIG TWO..

    “THE 2X3 ISLAND IS FULL OF SHIT AND HOT AIR.

    ENGLAND THE FORMER WHITE COLONIALS MASTERS GOT RID OVER 50 YEARS AGO BECAUSE THEY RECOGNIZED WAS NOT WORKING EFFECTIVELY.

    THE BLACK JACKASSES 50 YEARS ………… LATER SAYING NO NEED TO RUSH.

    NO WONDER THE ECONOMIC FAILURES ARE IN THE HANDS OF ANOTHER SET OF WHITE MASTERS THE IMF.”

    Like

  • Angela Coxyou really scraping the bottom of the barrel quoyting Rev Atherley.Where is he today or his sidekick Mr Franklyn?Rev Atherley is yesterday, s news who in my view betrayed the people of St Michael West by winning his seat under the BLP and decided to jump ship to become opposition leader.The people showed him what they thought of him.Therefore you keep quoting Rev Atherley and see how fsr that gets you or the dems.You sound just like the in my view idiotic Ms Undecided on brasstacks who rather thsn be happy for the upgrades questioning why we getting all these upgrades.The answer is simple it has to do with proper leadership something neither Mr Stuart, Mr Thompson nor Mr Sinckler in my view possesseI wonder if these dems like Straker,s, Alvin, MsUndecided or yoy AC are bajans or care anything sbout Barbados?Everyday you lot on Brasstacks nitpicking and repeating the same nonsense .No wonder the dems suffered two 30 to 0 defeats with persons like you up front.Pick sense from nonsense or more defests coming your way in my view.I gone.

    Like

  • The Minister of Education and senior Cabinet member must have missed the memo from the PM that all things must pass through her when she announced that the 11+ was in its final stages.

    Like

  • Any ah wunna led or lead anyone? Maybe y’all should start and talk yes. Yaaawn.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Enuff yours @9.45pm

    We are taking our cue from Ezra, he writes about leadership in a national publication and he has never led anything but I don’t see you criticizing him

    Like

  • The first 30 -0 was done under a democratic process with an emphasis to guarantee fair election as well as a citizens Constitutional rights
    The second election could as well be called for what is a fraud perpetrated on the citizens on barbadians
    A fraud which in itself was held during a pandemic whereby many citizens Constitutional rights were all but taken away
    Lorenzo the voters turn out of about 39 percent is nothing to be proud about as well as to boast of having a 30 – 0 victory when the Mia Mottley only received about 15percent of a vote from a nation of two hundred and seventy thousand people
    So yes the IMF is happy because Barbados has a slave driver doing their nasty work and the IMF receiving the desired results
    Meanwhile the backsides of barbadians are being down graded to a level below poverty
    Let that sink in

    Like

  • @ Lorenzo

    I’ve been seeing all types of ‘election figures’ being bandied about.
    Perhaps we should ‘separate fact from fiction.’

    The registered voters for the 2022 general elections were 266,330, of which 114,035 (42.82%) voted.

    The BLP secured 78,720 (69.03%) votes, as opposed to the DLP’s 30,273 (26.55%).

    Additionally, let’s assume Barbados’ population is 275,000.
    But, remember, those who are ineligible to vote, (e.g. people below the legal voting age, unregistered and incarcerated) must be subtracted from the total population to determine eligible voters.
    As such, to suggest the total population (i.e. 275,000) votes, is far from the truth.

    Like

  • Truth Mia calls an election during a pandemic
    Truth the Constitution tenets provides citizens a guaranteed right to vote
    Truth guarantees allowed to citizens by the Constitution to vote were unceremoniously denied or taken away
    Truth the many issues and concerns which called upon by govt to.correct so that all citizens right to vote was done and observed was denied by the court and govt
    Truth end result a govt received 15 percent of the vote a small percentage and nothing to boast about

    Like

  • Why should any citizen of a country that belives in the democratic process within the Constitution appreciate or accept an election were citizens Constitutional rights to vote where denied
    How in all truthfulness and good conscience does a denial.of citizens rights under any circumstance outside of a citizen legal issue can a voting process be called democratically sound and fair
    The Constitution is like a manual which drives and dictates citizens right and a govt who refuses to follow those laws frustrates the process and replaces the laws with self interest
    Such govt cannot be trusted
    Moving further along govt promised that within 100 days of Barbados becoming a Republic measures along with the voices of the people would be instrumental in framing the new Constitution a hundred days later and silence
    Meanwhile govt seems self observed and without concern continues passing laws rewriting legislation under the old Constitution which were written under British law
    Govt has indicated that good governance would be necessary only when govt says so
    Meanwhile the fraud continues with thick black smoke to close the people’s eyes

    Like

  • @ Lorenzo

    I’ve read that the voter turnout was “about 39 percent.” Assuming this meant 39% of 270,000, then:

    270,000 x 39% = 105,300

    Remember, an entire population is not eligible to vote.

    “Mia Mottley only received about 15percent of a vote from a nation of two hundred and seventy thousand people:

    270,000 x 15% = 40,500

    Lorenzo, what would you call an individual who intentionally manipulates the truth for political purposes…… and continues to do so, even after the truth have been revealed?

    I too, was “waiting and watching.”

    Like

  • Artex, now really, what kind of fundamental changes can Billie Miller and the PM bring to bear on the educational system of Barbados?
    We obviously need young people with new ideas, and different ways of looking at the educational system of Barbados, in order for there to be meaningful change. For example: the antiquated teaching methodology or ideology of segregating students who are having difficulty absorbing the material is no long an effective Teaching Strategy because it stigmatizes those underachieviers, the modern teaching ideology, is to bring all of resources in the classroom ( instead of segregating those slow students) in order for them to reach their full potential along with the rest of the class.

    Like

  • LAST/LAST

    “Last/ last my back side u don’t know the meaning of the word last
    In true form u would be back swinging with yuh usual diatribe and calling people liars narcissist
    Will be waiting and watching….”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I too, “was waiting and watching.”

    Didn’t have to “call people liars” or wait too long for them to expose themselves. They usually do.

    I may not “know the meaning of the word last,” but, I definitely know what ‘having the last laugh’ means.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dompey May 20, 2022 6:13 AM

    It’s clear you do not recognize ‘SARCASM.’

    Like

  • Well I going a step further and ask is our education system even relevant in today’s world? Yep I asking dat. How well does our system even prepare young people to progress in the real world and its economy?

    For instance why does our system prepare persons to find a job instead of open a business?

    Why don’t we have a higher rate of entrepreneurs in this country, as opposed to qualified workers seeking a paycheck?

    Why isn’t real world economics taught in our schools? Most students leaving a school know nothing about how inflation affects lifestyle, or how if inflation exceeds the growth of their earnings they are in fact getting poorer by the day.

    Why do our well educated book learnt citizens have $14 billion on the bank earning o.o5% in interest, with inflation running in excess of 3%?

    My point is that our education system does little to prepare anyone for the real world. It fills our people with book smart but zero street smart. Entrepreneurs are built on street smart and that is why we are being colonized by Trinidad. We are a lazy unqualified for reality people willing to accept a pay check monthly and then run and put it at the bank for less than 1 cent on the dollar in return. We are not taught investment in the schools nor do we encourage true entrepreneurs in this country. For the few that want to be entrepreneurs we offer no soft financing for projects. We are therefore our own worst enemy.

    My point is our education system is archaic and our start up capital base practically none existent. What then do you expect as an end result? All we do is produce every year thousands of well booked taught young people looking for a little pic at Massy or Ansa.

    Who I offend by saying this well wunna have my sympathy, but I tired with this half ass approach that leads no where. I also have no doubt in 5 years time we will be having this same discussion again as little would have changed, except of course we would be closer to being called ” le petit Port of Spain.”

    Like

  • What about teaching civics to build awareness at an early age?

    What about basic law to assist with avoiding the pitfalls of a consumerist?

    and so on.

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  • What about teaching civics to build awareness at an early age?
    ~~~~~~~~~
    ‘Awareness of what?’
    How to kowtow to white people?
    That comes naturally to BBBs, there is therefore no need to waste money and effort in schools.
    Just play with the 11+

    Liked by 1 person

  • Manipulation
    How about dealing with the Constitution and the people right to vote by a free and unblemished democratic process
    How about having an election during a pandemic within a short period of notice for all before all Constitutional practices rights and privileges are placed in the right manner as so deemed by governing laws and the Constitution
    Howabout a govt ignoring such laws rules and guidelines and proceeding without first having respect for the people’s right
    Truth Yea the PM might have won the election but the smell.of corrupt and undemocratic principles remains and will.remain in the minds of others except govt footsoldiers
    Applauding a 15 percent win although a win comes with a smell of disrespect for.law order and the Constitution founded on citizens rights
    Let that sink in

    Like

  • “For instance why does our system prepare persons to find a job instead of open a business?”

    “My point is that our education system does little to prepare anyone for the real world. It fills our people with book smart but zero street smart.”

    “Entrepreneurs are built on street smart and that is why we are being colonized by Trinidad.”

    “We are not taught investment in the schools nor do we encourage true entrepreneurs in this country.”

    “For the few that want to be entrepreneurs we offer no soft financing for projects. We are therefore our own worst enemy.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~

    @ John A

    Please review your above comments.

    Yuh know I ‘ain’t too bright,’ but, it SEEMS as though you’re contradicting yourself.

    Like

  • John A

    Great point about the inability of our educational system to prepare students to think in terms of opening their business, rather than finding a job. Nevertheless, I am not quite sure if you have any friends that are of Indo-Caribbean or Chinese- Caribean, but I have had, and I can say to you void of equivocation that they have a totally different mindset than the Afro- Caribean, because as the Afro- Caribbean thinks about working for others, the Indo and Chinese-Caribbean are thinking in terms of starting their businesses.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, you are marshalling some robust stuff here … seems like quite a bit of rather strange data points as well!

    I am taken by : “We obviously need young people with new ideas, and different ways of looking at the educational system of Barbados, in order for there to be meaningful change.” Oh wow, quite disarmingly insightful!!!

    And then this other gem: “For example: the antiquated teaching methodology or ideology of segregating students who are having difficulty absorbing the material is no long an effective Teaching Strategy because it stigmatizes those underachieviers, the modern teaching ideology, is to bring all of resources in the classroom ( instead of segregating those slow students) in order for them to reach their full potential along with the rest of the class.” SERIOUSLY!

    We really need to get off this level of BS ‘expert’ palaver that permeates many levels of the education industry. We can use whatever PC terminology we like so I’ll say ‘learning challenged disorder’ youth … it’s absurdly non-productive to attempt to force a child that can be so described whether they have (the much maligned ADHD, dyslexia, dysgraphia or other) to sit and compete completely in a class room with kids who do NOT have such issues just as it’s ridiculous to not allow the very sharp kids to take advanced classes as early as possible beyond the work of the regular students. …. Neither just does NOT make any practical sense!!!

    Anyhow, to more balanced points …. @John A your 6:47AM goes rather deeply into what I term the ‘absolutism’ I see often on these BU pages … I don’t see the problem as deeply rooted as you suggest.

    First of all, what exactly does a “higher rate of entrepreneurs” actually mean in real terms. It should mean that folks are developing NEW and DIFFERENT businesses or processes to improve life and society ideally in a for profit model. Of course, we accept many entrepreneurs will also simply develop a better ‘mouse trap’ which of course if successful will eventually cannibalize current similar businesses but ideally spur more overall growth.

    My counter-point is that we tend to make this point about new entrepreneurs as if there is no ‘limit’ to resources and there is an endless economic vista that can be attacked without related shifts and tumbles.

    I get it that we want independent developmental doers and not automation drones being programed for a lifetime of working for the corporate Borg but we 1) sell ourselves short in what many have achieved as entrepreneurs over the years and 2) also oversell the construct that everyone can develop a patent proof awesome idea!

    Lata.

    Liked by 1 person

  • And to you Artax stop trying to convince me of being a Liar
    As according to your political book all are liars when views and opinions differ
    So Liar I am so be it
    No.apoligies

    Like

  • @ Artax

    Hi Artax what i am saying is that we do not foster entrepreneurs in this island we create workers. For the few who want to be entrepreneurs though we have no facilities in place to assist them. So yes we are a contradiction. Every politician gets on their soap box and says ” we need more entrepreneurs ” buy what have we structured for them?

    I had a young guy come to me a few weeks back to help him formulate a projection for the bank. When all the spreadsheets and paper work were presented you know what the outcome was? He was asked for the sake of $5000 in a loan if there was no one in his family that could deposit $5000 as security against the loan in his account.

    So wait if he could of raised $5000 from family you think he would be in a bank to begin with?

    My point is we preach one thing and deliver another.

    Like

  • @ Dompey

    Yes i agree with you the Chinese and Indian as well as others have a different outlook for sure. Thing is though their kids grow up seeing their family business around them. From young if those kids want money there is no handout you work for it. So if you want $50 there is no I want $50 and daddy opens his wallet. No sir you will come to the store Saturday and work for it.

    Truth is we have raised professionals while Trinidad has raised business people who want to expand. Look at what happened here recently. A family business Collins Limited after 165 years is sold to a Trini company because the children don’t want to carry it on. That is the story over and over here. The current generation are eith too lazy or just incapable of taking it forward hence the for sale sign goes up. We have seen this over and over again here. They do not want to diversify the business either just sell it and get the cash.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ DPD

    Yes we must find balance. Not everyone can be an entrepreneur but we can definitely do more as a people. This ideology however must be taught from young. In other words the fact that you did poorly at school does not mean you are a failure. Also families with cash sitting on the banks earning nothing need to come to the assistance of these young entrepreneurs. Lend them the money at a decent rate of interest so both can benefit. All this needs to be part of our school experience and only then will we see change on this rock. Ask yourself this. With $14B in savings on the bank why are we as a people being recolonised by T&T?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Why couldn’t a Bajan or group of banana but collins?
    It’s a proven business so the should have been no problem with getting a loan ( if needed)

    Like

  • Bajans. Not banana

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @John A, not to belabour this point about what is learned in school but I look at the situation starkly differently. Undoubtedly the modelling in our society and the focus on academic success does gives rise to your point that doing “poorly at school” equates to some level of failure. However, that’s more an old trope than it is a valid PROBLEM.

    I say that for these basic reasons. The owner of ‘Popular’ or the other millionaire businessman of ‘Popular Pork’ fame are not (as far as I know) academic stars by the Bajaneque snobbish standards alluded to above. Clearly, however, they are academically gifted in business management and today are more successful than many of the colleagues who sat next to them in school and who may have gained supposed academic stardom!

    Moreover, they have been ‘mentoring’ and guiding folks for well over 30+ years now and so too many others who took that route to success. Surely therefore one can argue that this matter of ‘failure’ because they didn’t have lots of certificates would have been proven to be BS.

    I would surmise further that this wanton sell off to T&T has less to do with that $14B on-hand you cite and more to do with other reasons. Simply stated if the intent were to retain the businesses in local hands then that would have been achieved. There are too many well-set millionaires (like those mentioned and many more) in Bim who have the ‘Shark Tank’ business skills and contacts who could have achieved ownership equity in any or all of these ‘going concerns’ if that was DESIRED!

    On this matter of lending etc … again I have a different perspective. Obviously $5K is a very small stake and thus a very nascent business concept. 1) They were small business loan options available years ago so not sure why those avenues are now non existent. 2) There is nothing wrong with either a) pushing hard to get a family and friend round of business investment and or b) working and earning seed capital to later develop your startup.

    Ideas are formed by the scores and fail by the dozens! So I don’t dispute that independent developmental growth or ‘entrepreneurship’ should be a guiding light – just as we need to focus on programing and related shills in making electronic devices – but it seems to me that many of our colleagues have shown themselves to be skillful entrepreneurs and have gained great success over the years despite the obstacles (some of which are still likely the genesis to the sell out) so I really am not convinced that our system has FAILED that miserably!

    I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Why couldn’t a Bajan or group of bajans buy collins?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    As Bushie has explained now for more than a decade, back in the days of Allan Fields, these people sell their businesses to foreigners IN ORDER to ensure that black Bajans NEVER inherit their assets.
    So as soon as they run out of local ‘acceptable’ inheritors, they LOOK for foreign ones… ANYTHING but local BBs.
    (If you want to know why, you can ask that too…..)

    What else do we need? Al Jazeera to come and do a documentary….?
    What a place…!!!

    Like

  • so I really am not convinced that our system has FAILED that miserably!
    ~~~~~~~
    Mediocracy and lukewarmness at its zenith…from the usual dribbly source.

    Like

  • NO chipped on this point before. Locals will have the opportunity to weigh in to buy if the sale is made known. These deals are not advertised in the way some are thinking.

    Like

  • “As according to your political book all are liars when views and opinions differ..”
    ~~~~~•~~~~~
    1/1

    There isn’t anyone in this forum who is more political than you.

    Whenever people’s “views and opinions differ” from yours, your usual response is to ‘call’ them “BLP foot soldiers and operatives.”
    That’s because you POLITICISE all issues into a DLP versus BLP scenario.

    You continuing to argue the BLP received 15% of the votes during the January 2022 general elections, when the FACTS indicate otherwise, is NOT a DIFFERENCE of OPINION, but an INTENTIONAL MISREPRESENTATION of the TRUTH.

    “Let that sink in.”

    Like

  • @John A,
    “He was asked for the sake of $5000 in a loan if there was no one in his family that could deposit $5000 as security against the loan in his account.”

    I will not get into how large an amount like $5,000.00 is. I am quite certain that some here would be willing to cover or put a part of the money if they convinced that will share in the profit just as well the possible loss.

    The project need not die.

    Like

  • @John A,
    if they were convinced that they would share in the profits just as well the possible loss…

    Like

  • Truth and Facts are with accordance to those that are writing them
    The truth being that any govt who can be dishonest in practices against people Constitutional rights cannot be trusted
    Hence anything which comes out of their mouth as to election results would be placed under a magnifying glass
    Because govt officials present a result to give govt a better edge as to people voting unless under independent inclusion anything said about the voting
    Population percentage would be giving the highest grade if scrutiny
    The initial voting population count was 39 percent and that is the one I am sticking to
    Like it or lump it
    Don’t care less yuh start wrong yuh end wrong
    Here four months later the issue of voting and voting count sticks out like a sore thumb and some footsoldiers rather not see the forest but for the trees
    Go on holler again

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Bush Tea at 9 :15 AM
    A group of Bajans did not buy Collins because it was not put on the open market as available for sale.
    Secondly Bajans do not want to put in the effort required to own and manage a business. Most just want money to spend on high value consumer items. They want rewards without the work.
    Most business owners sell businesses to those who share their business philosophy. Those with best fit. The latter is to ensure retention of staff. And staff pension rights. Yes. Sellers do care.

    Like

  • Kevin Greenidge on Brasstacks now.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    In days of yore the first grade schools Education Model was based on leadership training. Somewhere along the way the switch to Socialism added the responsibility for upward social mobility. Where we want to go ( vision) will determine our future Education Model and our leaders. The leaders will “submerge to the top”. If I am allowed to borrow one of EWB’s famous sayings. Do you not yet see them? Lol!!!

    Like

  • @ John A

    The majority of Indians in Barbados are Muslims.
    And, they “have a different outlook” not only because “their kids grow up seeing their family business around them,” but, because Islam teaches a culture of self-employment.
    You may have noticed that the younger generation is moving slowly away from the traditional itinerant salesmen and into real estate, used cars, car parts, electronics, computers,doctors and lawyers.

    The Indian owners of ‘A&A Auto Parts’ opened an outlet in Tweedside Road, which is patronized by Black people, mainly because their car parts are cheap.

    Ask yourself if the owner of ‘Mark’s Auto Spares’ would enjoy a similar level of patronage from the Indians, if he opened an outlet in George Street or Belleville.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    There is a buzz phrase of recent- fit for purpose. The education system is no different, it must fit what is required to be competitive in local and international arenas. Instead we have people debating the issue based on entrenched positions. The pass mark we have to reach is are we there yet with the economy, social landscape, robust physical infrastructure etc…

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    Are we there yet?
    I thought we answered that question already. My answer was yes. We are at the point where we are searching for both vision and the best social and physical infrastructures on which to build it. It is a work in progress. Have patience . Mistakes will be made . And missteps will be taken. Rome was not built in a day NOR will Barbados. Block out the “engineering noise.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Artax at 10 :AM

    Did we not have n auto parts business owned , managed and patronized by Afro Barbadians on Bank Hall Road in the 19&0s and later? What point do you intend to make with the cited intervention above?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ DPD

    exactly my point because you did poorly at school or are a drop out, doesn’t mean you have failed. Actually in many cases far from as names like Branson, Dell and others are proof of.

    Many of the richest people in the region never went further than 6th form as is the case with fellows like old Mr Sabga and Butch Stewart. The truth is most entrepreneurs do not like structure. They hated school because it all revolved around structure and stiffled their spirit of freedom.

    We need to understand that post 2007 and then Covid business has changed. The old teachings which lead to a carreer Civil servant or Massy worker are no longer the dream of many. The idea of working for a company for a lifetime to retire with a gold watch or relaxer are long gone. The younger people measure success by the freedom to work how or when they want.

    So the question is this who was most successful The young guy that left UWI qualified and is now working in middle management for $6000 a month in collar and tie, or the coconut seller that left school at 16 and now earns $10,000 a month working 4 days a week? Who is the successful one the bank employee or the body work man the bank guy carries his car to who earns twice what he does?

    Success is measured differently by people. Some see it as social status and having “arrived” while others see it in dollars and cents. We as a people have to make some decisions as to what we want going forward.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Many of us left the island years ago. We may have left behind a very small stake that we would willingly risk in a business venture.

    How do we make these unused funds available to others?

    After all that we have seen here, the fear may not be the risk of a legitimate business loss, but in getting tripped up by a smart.ss

    Everything is connected. A lot of what we discuss here may seem unconnected, but eventually having so many different ongoing issues destroy trust in people and systems.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright (c) 2022. All Rights Reserved.

    “Awareness of what?’
    How to kowtow to white people?”

    Let them keep rebuilding a 400 year old Slave Society over and over in the same image and see how much further from the 1800s and FOREVER repeating the 1930s, that gets them.

    Now that the truth about that timeline and the history has been put in its correct context, those aware know it”s time to abandon the resident haunting.

    Like

  • @ Mr. Codrington

    RE: “Did we not have n auto parts business owned , managed and patronized by Afro Barbadians on Bank Hall Road in the 19&0s and later?”

    Does not have anything at all to do with the point I made.
    And, I’m not at fault if you missed it.

    What I will ‘say’ is George Street and Belleville are dominated by Indians and some Pakistanis.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, re “NO chipped on this point before. Locals will have the opportunity to weigh in to buy if the sale is made known. These deals are not advertised in the way some are thinking”

    This is very misleading. The sale of a business such as a Collins or BS&T is NEVER advertised on ‘Broad St’ to every Tom and Mary. However, it is absurd to suggest that a Hall or a Bynoe or an Ellock or any other well heeled money man in Bim would NOT have known of such an possible divestiture or desire to cash out from their various banking, legal and other business contacts. TOTALL ABSURD!

    Let’s get real.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Artax at 11:04 AM
    Yes. I missed the point. That is the reason I asked for clarification. Obviously it was not meant for my edification nor consideration . Thanks all the same.

    Like

  • “Locals will have the opportunity to weigh in to buy if the sale is made known.”

    @ David

    John A gave an example of the $5,000 loan.

    Do you believe “locals” would’ve been able to raise the amount of capital required to purchase ‘Simpson Motors,’ its franchise and regional subsidiaries?

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    You are speculating -the main point by some here is the lack of opportunity for employee ownership.

    Like

  • And they are off and running.
    They will buy large firms but will not figure out how we can help small businesses off the ground ….

    Like

  • Conversation too high for me.
    But we will have again at the next big sale
    Have a great day …

    Like

  • @ Mr. Codrington

    Let me put it another way and in simple terms.

    An Indian could open a shop in Deacon’s Road, for example, and will enjoy a level of patronage from the Black community that would sustain his business.

    All I’m asking is, if a Black man opens a shop in Belleville or George Street, if he would enjoy a similar level of patronage from the Indian community, as his Indian counterpart in Deacon’s, since Indians are known to support their own.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @John A , quite correct the truism that “Success is measured differently by people’. That said nonetheless, anyone making $10K/month is successful in most definitions of the word.

    If you are earning that on a long term, ongoing basis by selling products like coconuts etc then you are an absolute genius businessman to manage the work of growing/farming/buying your inputs; preparing your products for sale; defying competition/maintaining your competitive advantage.

    The amazing thing about that level of hard work is that you invariably will pass it on to your children and there is a very good chance that they inculcate those skills and became academic successes and strive to be a lawyer or doctor or high earning corporate drone and NOT a ‘hands dirty’ entrepreneur like Dad/Mum… 😎🤦‍♂️

    So coming full circle to the concept: ‘Success is measured differently by people. Some see it as social status and having “arrived…’ … Or said differently the awesome contradictions of life I suppose!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ TheOGazerts. at 10 52 AM
    You are correct. Savings can remain liquid for the purposes which the depositors want. Investment can be done by others who are not risk averse. The Bank is the intermediary between the two different economic agents. Both economic functions will/can be satisfied. This call for small savers to invest in high risk adventures is irrational. Small savers within the last three decades have lost their life savings through some thinly veiled Ponzi Schemes. They have a right to be cautious. Let those who think they understand financial risks take those risks. BUT they should not expect the Taxpayers to bail them out when they fail. When they get high returns they try to avoid paying taxes.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    No @David, I am NOT speculating. I have been around the block, brother. Sat in enough meetings and listened to enough of those high-roller corporate chieftains to know the difference.

    In our society the only way that folks at the top of the corporate pyramid here would NOT know of a possible sale of the type noted above is if they were NOT intended to know … and to achieve THAT good sir it would require a level of COMPREHENSIVE secrecy that I deem IMPOSSIBLE in a corporate society as small as ours (and T&T)!

    Just consider that 1) are we talking about investors making a buyout of a business or 2) the business owners seeking to sell! At case 1, yes a very quiet offer can be made but even then lots of lawyering and stuff needs to be done before finality.

    In either case are we to assume that the owners are content with the price being offered and do not want to ‘speculate’ on possible higher offers from others thus putting out feelers to other investors!!

    So NO brother, I don’t buy the ‘no one would have known’ palaver.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu at 10 :21 AM

    Yes , the phrase ” fit for purpose” was birthed in the BU Maternity Ward ,and I was present at the Christening as far as I can recall. And so were many others. Just hang in there.

    Like

  • We can disagree. It does not address employee getting the opportunity to own. By the way the blogmaster has an idea as well.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Artax
    Your position can’t be seriously questioned. The Indian community or more politely the IndoBarbadian, does not support black owned businesses.
    This is an issue that was addressed back in the 70s and 80s.
    I suspect that they are now about to look at venturing into politics in a more pronounced way.
    . It’s a known fact that they do bank roll some black politicians and quite frankly that is transactional and no different from the Barbadian Whites and other minorities,who also bank roll black politicians.
    Perhaps the younger generation will be more visible , and from what I read in the press, are as Barbadian ,and so they should be , as anybody else.
    We may see our Indian community supporting Black businesses in the future.
    But fuh rite now, you are on very solid ground. They really don’t support Black businesses.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Artax re “Do you believe “locals” would’ve been able to raise the amount of capital required to purchase ‘Simpson Motors,’ its franchise and regional subsidiaries?” SERIOUSLY.

    As a finance professional you are one of the last people I would expect to frame the question of such an investment purchase in that way!!!

    And @David, your response of “No” is just as shocking 😎😂😒

    Isn’t there a role for Banks or Financial Institutions in deals such as that … or are you guys suggesting that the locals didn’t have the wherewithal of smarts and investment banking skills to lead such an exciting attempt!!

    Anyhow, I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ dpD

    I interpreted David’s use of the word, “locals,” to mean employees, since previous discussions were more focused on employees being given the opportunity to purchase businesses, rather than them being sold to foreign investors.

    It would take much more than a group of employees going to a financial institution and saying they ‘want to borrow money to buy Simpson Motors,’ without collateral and a comprehensive business plan.

    I recall when a small group of LIAT employees left that airline to join ‘Carib Express,’ which had to cease operations a few years after it was established.
    The employees sought to take over the airline and experienced difficulties in raising enough capital to sustain the venture.
    Eventually, they sought financial assistance, through the Treasury………from the Arthur administration……. which they received. The airline subsequently ‘went out of business.’
    The Antiguan government at that time admonished Arthur for investing Barbadian taxpayers money in Carib Express, to assist a Barbadian venture, rather than investing in LIAT.

    Another fact is, small businesses are operating in a very unfriendly and complicated environment as it relates to banks….. even to open a business account.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ dpD at 12 :04 PM

    Go to the head of the class.
    Most of the funds used to buy the shares in these transactions are done through Commercial Banks or their investment bank subsidiaries. This is why there is a domino effect in a Financial Meltdown.It is too simplistic or untrue to say that deposits of savers are idling in the commercial banks, They are not.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Many left the island years ago and with purpose
    International countries were wise enough to invest on people from foreign soil who were academically and skilfully ready and unable to produce
    Are there any barbadians having the financial wherewithal to buy large companies in Barbados
    I suppose so few at home and others living in the diaspora

    Like

  • William Skinner May 20, 2022 11:54 AM

    You understood ‘the point I intended to make.’

    I made a simple observation that the Indian owners of ‘A&A Auto Parts’ opened an outlet in Tweedside Road, which is an area predominantly inhabited by Black people.

    Then, “ask yourself if the owner of ‘Mark’s Auto Spares’ would enjoy a SIMILAR LEVEL of PATRONAGE from the INDIANS, if he OPENED an outlet in George Street or Belleville.”

    Surely the point I made, did not have have anything to with an “auto parts business owned, managed and patronized by Afro Barbadians on Bank Hall Road.”

    What I’ve noticed is that the car parts ‘industry’ is now dominated by Indians. They have opened outlets in rural areas of the island.
    And, there’re also into wholesale as well. A shop owner could purchase goods from an Indian to stock his shop, and pay on a weekly basis…… a facility not offered by the established wholesalers.

    Like

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