Integrity in Public Life Bill Fails to Pass

Since the 1970s both Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and Democratic Labour Party (DLP) have  been promising Barbadians that integrity legislation. Fifty years later Barbadians fully appreciate the adage a promise is comfort for a fool.

Can the BU intelligentsia explain to this blogmaster why the Integrity in Public Life Bill 2020 failed to pass the Upper House today?

#askingforafriend

239 thoughts on “Integrity in Public Life Bill Fails to Pass


  1. Cackle Cackle another smoke and mirror plan fuh govt to say deh did something
    Too late cause nuhbody believing wunna now
    Cackle Cackle notice how she had to kick George Payne in the buttocks (ouch) but his name was spawned across social media as a crook and liar toooo long
    Mia bit the bullet and had to do something
    Bye bye George cackle cackle


  2. So present govt want to screw the little man and save the mcguffie heads off the chopping block
    Boy uh tell yuh ” one day coming soon”
    Glad to see that the bill was placed on a pile of dung and left for the blp yard flies to swarm on
    Only in Bubadus


  3. @ David August 6, 2020 4:11 PM

    This consistent clarion call for good and transparent governance is nothing more that a cliché of a promise made in both political parties’ manifestoes.

    It’s nothing but a trite (and long overdue) piece of legislation which would be of relevance only when it is proclaimed and put into operation.

    Like the previous piece of legislation passed under the ‘last’ DLP administration there is all likelihood it would end up being another stillborn election promise made to comfort the voting fools.

    We shall soon see how much the current administration is serious about dealing with corruption when it acts upon the recommendations of the Auditor General contained in the recent report into the financial operations of the BWA.

    With such boldfaced corruption taking place there is no wonder the BWA is in such a parlous financial and operational state.

    All the rate increases granted during the David Thompson years to make the BWA fit for purpose have ended up in Maxwell pond containing deep pockets belonging to the politicians and their friends.

    Why is the BWA being treated in such fashion?
    Is it being purposely run into the ground to make it available for sale for a song to private sector players as mandated by the IMF Bert?

    The accessibility to potable water is the prerequisite for any economic and social development; but more importantly for the good health of the people.

    If you want to invite people to live in and work remotely from your much touted Covid-controlled oasis in the Caribbean then you must have clean and easily accessible water in the oasis as a reality to the virtual nomads and not just as a mirage of PLT’s imagination.

    No society can prosper without access to clean water.


  4. “Is it being purposely run into the ground to make it available for sale for a song to private sector players as mandated by the IMF Bert?”

    covetous bizzy has long cast his envious eyes on the people’s water supply..remember “gimme the BWA and 60 million dollars” that bizzy,, the old dried up crook, was salivating to get from Fruendel the Fool… and of course the black faces in the parliament would be more than happy to accomodate for the right bribe if they had at hand, but there is currently not enuff money to tief from the treasury and pension fund to give to covetous bizzy so he can pay the bribees for the BWA utility as is standard operating procedure where ministers tief from the people, give to minority parasites as pretend loans, then get their cut, of course those multimillion dollar “loans” are never repaid, another reason for the economic collapse, which cannot only be blamed on the plague, that collapse was pending for at least 2 decades..

    but it’s difficult to pull of those decades old hustling scams in these times, especially not with IMF watching their every movement to make sure they all don’t tief those IMF loans….60 million dollars is going to be hard to tief for a very long time….that is their favorite number, the bevy of parasitic private sector social partners…


  5. The blogmaster is reasonably sure from the debates and other observations that the 2 Opposition members and 7 Independents had a problem with the Bill as proposed and the leader of government business would have been aware. Why foist the Bill on the Upper Chamber in the circumstances? Is Senator Moe so sick she could not have made the effort to attend the sitting?


    Haynes clears air on ‘drama’ in Senate over bill

    Drama from the walkout in the Senate on Wednesday went all the way to the radio call-in programme yesterday with Goverment Senator Dr Crystal Haynes calling in to respond to a statement made by a caller to the Voice of Barbados programme Brass Tacks.

    The caller made reference to a “Government Senator” allegedly abstaining from the vote effectively killing Government’s efforts to pass the long-mooted Integrity In Public Life Bill 2020.

    In response, Haynes rejected the claim and said contrary to reports suggesting all the Independent Senators walked out, “two were sick, two abstained, three walked out and the two Opposition Senators alsowalked out”.

    She pointed out the Senate comprised seven Independent, 12 Government and two Opposition senators, adding there were ten Government senators present at the sitting and they voted in support of the bill. The President does not vote.

    Bill failed

    “If anyone had been following from the week prior, you would be aware that the Bill actually failed to get support from either Opposition Senators (Caswell Franklyn and Crystal Drakes)” and from most Independent senators,” Haynes said. She explained the Independent senators had indicated during the debate that “they did not have the will for whatever reason to support the bill”.

    Haynes also reminded of Franklyn’s concern that judges were excluded and his stating that unless judges were included and public servants excluded, “he would not support the bill”. She went on to explain one other Independent senator “had indicated that she felt that it went too far, it was too intrusive”.

    “You may be aware that some of the terms of the bill would require us to literally expose our families including our spouses and our children”. She referenced her own situation with “a three-year-old with a small account at the credit union” and the requirement for that information to be submitted to the proposed Integrity Commission.

    “Some people felt it would leave them too exposed and they were uncomfortable. That is the reason that the bill was actually not taken to a vote last week because even then with all of the warm bodies present, the support was not there and we were really hoping that this week would have been the week to get that done.”

    Haynes pointed out the legislation could not be brought back to the Senate since yesterday was the final sitting before Parliament is prorogued.

    (GC)


  6. “…….. as is standard operating procedure where ministers tief from the people, give to minority parasites as pretend loans, then get their cut, of course those multimillion dollar “loans” are never repaid……”

    Hmmmmmm…

    A very interesting comment. Unless I’m mistaken, I can’t remember reading an Auditor General’s report in which he mentioned anything “loans” being disbursed to private sector businesses and remaining unpaid.

    For the purpose of clarity, perhaps the author of the comments quoted above may want to refer BU to any Auditor General’s report or supporting documentation to substantiate their claim.


  7. ‘Government,’ through the NHC, has commenced construction of 20 houses at Parish Land, St. Philip, to relocate 20 squatters who were illegally residing in Rock Hall.

    Residents have expressed concerns about squatters and have obtained the services of QC and former minister of housing & lands, Michael Lashley, to represent them.

    Parish Land residents acquired their properties through the legal process of obtaining mortgages, while the Mottley administration has rewarded squatters with houses and land for breaking the law.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/08/07/homeowners-want-answers/


  8. “Haynes also reminded of Franklyn’s concern that judges were excluded and his stating that unless judges were included and public servants excluded.”

    There are people waiting on judge’s decision long past the standard waiting period for when they are supposed to hand them down, some have been waiting and are still weeks or months shy of the end date waiting period, why can’t they be completed within the specified time, exactly what could take judges years and many months to give a decision in simple cases, especially since there is a GODDAMN PLAGUE and they had been home for months with nothing much to do but CATCH UP ON BACKLOGS..what would cause judges to take 4 years, 10 years, 20 years to hand down or refuse to hand down any at all, unless there is some element of interference or corruption, case in point, the wishy washy excuse given by Marston Gibson for him, Sandra Mason and the dude now at CCJ for taking 4 years to hand down a decision, then they had to be publicly SHAMED and FORCED TO DO IT…they all just left the decision pending and two of them walked away..

    ……judges need to be held accountable for their actions or lack thereof…

    .re civil servants, not sure if they take instructions from ministers or chain of command above them, but if they do, they are at risk of being held accountable for the crimes of their supervisors etc….which is counterproductive.. a total waste of time if they can prove that they were only taking directions…

    these shit bills are just like the people who draft them….merely instruments of corruption protection.


  9. Imagine the IL bill got full support of all the members that were present in the Lower House, including that of the Opposition Leader. The bill goes to the Senate and opposition senators and an independent are opposing the bill because Judges are not included and public servants are captured in the bill. Independent senators worry about their finances being known and seek exemption. Yet some are questioning the government’s motives? If the government intention was not to pass the bill, Lisa Cummins would have stayed home. How the LOTO supports IL and his senators opposing? The first thing out of the goodly Senator Franklyn’s mouth was that the government was allowing Senator Cummins to enter just because it wanted to pass a bill. The Independent senators are to be given a pass? Are they suggesting the compromise was to remove public servants and opposition and independent senators? Should one part of the political class curry favour with the other? Wouldn’t that be corruption? This is the same BU that few weeks ago blue blister the BWA and before that for years Transport Board, UDC, RDC, NHC and every C? We are ALL RH talk until the the mirror is placed in front of use. All yuh pass me BS!


  10. Another act of musical chairs that backfired…as Caswell said the bill was supposed to be specifically designed TO CAPTURE GOVERNMENT MINISTERS…and high level officers eg who are Judges etc…in their insidious activities ….not civil servants….who are more or less worker ants….yall fowl slaves are too corrupt..


  11. That’s what i can’t stand about having others insult people’s intelligence…many of us have been on the Blog for many years, some of us have had some sort of legal exposure, some of us have various levels of special skills and gifts, some of us have intimate knowledge of certain things that others have not yet been exposed to….then there are the garden variety as*holes that believe somehow they are after these many years….STILL TALKING TO GODDAMN FOOLS….steuppss.


  12. David
    So do what, let it die with the end of the parliamentary session? No one can accuse the government of not attempting to implement IL. Rev. Rogers stayed after Cummins joined and abstained. Go listen to his contribution.🤣


  13. Here is an excerpt from a column written in 2017 titled – Government Turns a Blind Eye to Endemic Corruption in the Public Service

    “Paragraphs 11 and 12 of the Code of Conduct and Ethics, the Second Schedule to the PSA, originally gave me hope that the the authorities were finally going to do something about the endemic corruption and other misbehaviour among many senior public officers.”

    In the last Sunday Sun a Judge made this comment: “More recently, Parliament instituted a six-month time frame for judgements to be delivered. The failure to observe the six-month deadline exposes a judge to the possibility of disciplinary action.”

    We need not continue to misinform and conflate.


  14. i am on record as fully supporting this bill but opposition in senator Franklyn was well known. he opposed the exemption for Judges and the inclusion of civil servants.

    i dont oppose the inclusion of civil servants. i know that lots of corruption emanate from civil / public servants. some high level some low but corruption nonetheless.

    i also believed that Judges should have been included and by judges i also mean Magistrates because they are judges. i withdrew my opposition to that yesterday when David pointed out that there will be separate but comparable legislation for Judges.

    it is incumbent upon the leader of govt business in the senate to ensure that he has a majority to get bills through and a bill as important as this, more so. it would appear he fell down on the job. it is interesting that he has not addressed the issue.

    procedural foul-up is plaguing this govt. what a ting with 30 MPs and numerous lawyers!!!


  15. “Government Turns a Blind Eye to Endemic Corruption in the Public Service.”

    So why did governments…BOTH OF THEM..turn a blind eye to corruption in the public service for 4 DECADES…we know of the corruption….we also know…as embedded in the constitution that there EXISTS laws and procedures to PUNISH civil servants for any corruot activities…so why were they NEVER used….wuh they are still sitting there…

    I remember Straughn out of the customs was accused of money laundering money into Switzerland etc….where is the FBI report that one government claimed to have misplaced and the other one claimed to have never seen….i would bet 1000 dollars that FBI can still issue Mia with a copy…so why dont she ask…..cause ya sure can’t ask Owen now.


  16. Ultimately it is the Gov’ts responsibility to get its Bills passed and if it can’t get all of its Senators to attend and vote and if it can’t coerce a meagre 2 Independent senators to vote to pass the Bill it is representative of ignominious failure.

    For those who were “sick” I wonder how long the “Integrity flu” lasts and what are its side effects, as always Barbados one step forward and two steps back as the elected representatives pass a Bill and unelected representatives stymie it.


  17. WURA August 7, 2020 6:25am

    “re civil servants, not sure if they take instructions from ministers or chain of command above them, but if they do, they are at risk of being held accountable for the crimes of their supervisors etc….which is counterproductive.. a total waste of time if they can prove that they were only taking directions…”

    WURA August 7, 2020 8:04am

    “I remember Straughn out of the customs was accused of money laundering money into Switzerland etc….where is the FBI report that one government claimed to have misplaced and the other one claimed to have never seen….i would bet 1000 dollars that FBI can still issue Mia with a copy…so why dont she ask…..cause ya sure can’t ask Owen now.”


  18. INTEGRITY LEGISLATION is the political equivalent to personal SUICIDE, only someone mentally challenged or confused would contemplate. BAJAN politicians are not to brite/bright, however their not totally numb neither.


  19. Neither government has ever used the legal framework that exists to punish civil servants nor each other for corruption in 4 decades nor since these laws existed before their time nor afterward when they got the greenlight to enter the parliament after slave masters left…..as Donville said, had he been in Barbados he would not even have to worry about being charged for money laundering under the 1929 Act of BARBADOS that US used to convict him….but somehow fowl slaves are busily trying to make us believe……blacklist notwithstanding, that this administration is gungho to lock up themselves and civil servants for corruption, while excluding judges..


  20. Wily…they are well aware that neither the average Bajan nor fowl slaves would carry the thought as far as articulating that all cases of corruption will have to go before the minister’s handpicked judges who are their friends, family, keptness and business partners….

    the blighted plight of brain damaged and brainwashed fowl slaves/yardfowls,


  21. After the opposition decided against the anti-corruption law, we should change the state budget:

    Citizens pay no more taxes, but have to bribe politicians, judges and public servants for government services. What do you think about that?

    I think it is not racism to say that the wild and untamed senators of the opposition have legalised the corruption that is rampant in Barbados and is partly responsible for the decline of the island. These figures really confirm and even exceed all prejudices. Or is it prejudice at all? We are simply talking about the reality on this island, not about fiction.


  22. @ Greene

    To use an old cricketing analogy, in the old days when you were batting and you thought you were out you did not wait for the umpire to give you out. You walked.
    The same if a batsman (they are now called batters) was given out caught and the fielder knew s/he had not caught the ball, they called back the unfortunate victim.
    But in the new ethics, you wait for the umpire or technology to make a decision. We are now all professional crooks. You do not need legislation to be honest.


  23. So the fowl slave is blaming Owen for the accusations against Straughn…yall think this is some kinda joke….don’t worry, most of yall will end up just like Donville…even if corruption and money laundering laws on the statute books are not geared to work in Barbados…they sure as hell work in US….ask Donville.


  24. So who gives a shit what fowl Enuff brought, i posted it already and never asked Blogmaster to remove it, it’s still sitting there, so what’s the fowl slave’s point…

    just to bring some reality into alyuh delusional lives, ya see what the years of corruption, incompetence and neglect caused in Lebanon, because of wicked uncaring leaders….yall are not far behind, a ton of them are now under house arrest.

    that is what negligence, incompetence and corruption breeds..

    last time i checked, i never once presented myself to any electorate and told them barrels of lies to be elected.


  25. As a matter of fact, ah nearly forgot, someone sent me a whatsapp video circulating since about 4 am this morning, starring Mia….and outlining nothing but lies….yall should check it out…ya may have to wade through quite a few, i don’t even bother to open most of them anymore.


  26. @Hal,

    of course you cant legislate honesty and integrity but that is hardly the point, is it? the point is there must be legislation that capture the behaviours of those who dont live up to such lofty standards.


  27. NO

    Thanks. i follow anything that will make me some greenbacks.

    Puts i stary away from. I tried them out to learn. I sell a call instead of buying a put – u get the same results (profit on the down) but is but less risk if you know what you are doing .


  28. @ Greene

    At the FT people work in a multi-trillion pound industry. However, reporters must register if they have any shares in companies they write about; if they are invited out to lunch, or even the pub by any of their contacts; and, an improper offers. The system works.
    If someone wants to be dishonest no laws, registers, spying, nothing will stop them.


  29. And i proved that a fowl slave is full of shit…i clearly explained what happened, maybe instead of trying to shift any blame to a dead man ya can vacillate and tell me who was deputy PM under Owen when the affair with Straughn and the FBI investigation happened..


  30. @August 7, 2020 6:31 AM “Independent senators worry about their finances being known.”

    Our political class so rich then that they worry about people seeing their finances? Stupssseee!!!! I was under the distinct impression that some of them don’t have a po to piss in nor a window to throw it thru.

    We know that some of them end up in the almshouse if their final illness lasts for more than 6 months.

    I heard a Senator worrying about having to declare the $3 or so her toddler has in the credit union. My question to her is why would you object to declaring your minor children’s assets. We know that toddlers don’t work nowhere, so “yes” if they have $3 or $3 million “yes” we the people want to know where it come from:

    Granny, godmother, who?

    If it has come from a GODFATHER we would be really, really worried.


  31. Ah did not hear that Fowl Enuff, maybe the post got lost, so i will make it easier in case ya forgot who was deputy PM under Owen, so who was Attorney General before Dale Teets put in his all teeth appearance then…before Glendairy Prison mysteriously burnt down…..ah gotta tell ya though, that fire like it ain’t so mysterious anymore yuh.


  32. @Hal,

    that is carrying a joke too far, banna. many Bim politicians have duel and sometimes triple passports i myself have 4 but i only used 1 consistently and sometimes another one depending on where i am travelling. please dont conflate issues.


  33. @Hal Austin August 7, 2020 4:39 PM “Should Barbadian parliamentarians have dual nationality? Is this an integrity issue?”

    One of my grandchildren is a citizen of 4 countries by birth or descent. The toddler who may well become Prime Minister [in order to keep him safe, likely long after Hal is dead though, lol!] did not ask for any of the citizenships.

    Alas none of us get to chose our parents, nor our grandparents, nor our place of birth

    Should this be an integrity issue?

    Which citizenship to discard?
    The place of birth?
    Mummy’s place of birth
    Daddy’s place of birth?
    The places of birth on any of the 4 grandparents?

    Help we here nuh!

    P.S. Actually maybe 5 citizenships since one granddad was born in a non English speaking, non Commonwealth country.

    In our family, we like marrying out, just like Hal has.

    Lol!!!


  34. @Enuff August 7, 2020 3:23 PM “Cuhdear. Or she could just resign from the Senate.🤣”

    Nah.

    No resignation required by me.

    I just wanta know how much money li’l willie has in the bank.

    That’s all.

    After all WE pay mummy’s salary. Right?


  35. I suspect dual citizenship may have been the cause of Donville’s fall.
    Life in the USA did not turn out as expected.


  36. asset declarations will be known only to the Integrity Commission unless there is a court matter necessitating release of such info


  37. he United States on Thursday issued a Level 3 Travel Advisory for Barbados.

    The advisory asked US citizens to reconsider travel to Barbados due to “health and safety measures and COVID-related conditions”.

    “Barbados has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options, and businesses operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Barbados,” the advisory said.

    The advisory was posted on the website of the US State Department. Level 4 is the highest advisory.


  38. Theo…Donville had said he had US residency only, not a dual.

    Jamaica got the same advisory from US as Barbados….Mariposa


  39. @TheOGazerts August 7, 2020 6:19 PM “I suspect dual citizenship may have been the cause of Donville’s fall.
    Life in the USA did not turn out as expected.”

    With all due respect, TheOGazerts your statement is complete nonsense.

    Donville’s downfall is entirely Donville’s responsibility. It has nothing to do with his citizenship(s). After all he did not commit treason against Barbados for the United States.

    Nobody, including nobody in the United States sent him to do what he has been convicted of doing. If he held solely Barbados citizenship he could have done the exact same deeds and been arrested, tried and convicted when he went to the United States on business or holiday or to attend a graduation, wedding or funeral there. Also nobody sent him to the United States. Going to the United States was entirely his own VOLUNTARY action.


  40. @WURA-War-on-U August 7, 2020 6:57 PM “Theo…Donville had said he had US residency only, not a dual.”

    Furthermore, now that he has “earned” himself a criminal conviction it is unlikely that he will ever get the “opportunity” to become a U.S> citizen, since the U.S. like most countries typicaly refuse to grant citizenship to convicts.

    So once the Americans are finished with him, it is home sweet home for him, since home is the place where when you go, they HAVE to take you in.

    But Barbados int a bad place to live, once you have a bit of change, although I know that Tron would like to deport all of us whose navel strings are buried here. Mine under a banana tree in a copse of banana trees on family land.


  41. Three more nurses tested positive for the virus today
    Sorry to be the messenger of bad news
    Cant help but remember how Mia insulted bajans in her news conference who dare crticized govt policy that allowed the Ghana nurses on barbados soil without proper health procedures done or knowing about their health history
    Her insane utterances was as horrible as not doing due diligence on behalf of these nurses before they left Ghana
    Words to the effect as saying if they nurses were European nothing would have been said
    Now watching the dominoes effect from the testing of these nurses and the results makes for wonder what is she thinking


  42. For some people you have to dot the i’s and cross the t’s.
    Perhaps as a citizen/permanent resident, Donville thought he could spend some post-election time in the US. The outcome would have been different if he stayed in Barbados,

    Is that a little clearer?


  43. @ Enuff August 7, 2020 7:14 AM
    “So do what, let it die with the end of the parliamentary session? No one can accuse the government of not attempting to implement IL. Rev. Rogers stayed after Cummins joined and abstained. Go listen to his contribution.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Despite the political game of “Little Bo-peep”, this is one ‘G.O.A.T’ of a Bill which will have to be resurrected in any ‘new’ Parliament.

    Don’t forget that the EU, OED and FATF have you guys on the radar.

    After the confessions in the Donville affair No proper “IL” legislation and its implementation will mean, automatically, no removal from their blacklisting.

    The international financial regulators are quite aware of the clear-cut recommendations contained in the Auditor General’s recent report into the ‘alleged’ financial infelicities at the BWA.

    We wait to see if your administration will act as the ‘necessary’ complainant and, armed with the requisite evidence contained in your Queen Bee’s red portmanteau, ‘demand’ that investigations be conducted in the BWA’s financial reservoir contaminated and corrupted by a DLP cesspool of managerial vice.


    • The question remains on the table. Why vote on the BILL if the amended BILL had to be sent back to the Lower House for validation and knowing parliament will be prorogued which means the legislation dies. What are we missing Leader of Government Business Jerome Walcott?


  44. Dat apology was disgraceful. Cummins had no business apologizing. Very disappointed! Ms Mottley is wrong pun dis one. Dat was ball less and cowardly. Uh cahn support yu pun dis one Mia. Lisa did nuttin wrong. Not one RH wrong. How could she give a “win” to those dastardly traitors Caswell Twitter and de rest uh dem fools. I am so angry right now.


  45. David

    Wuh difference it mek? It woulda die anyhow when Parliament get prorogue. De guvment just get a chance to show de country de nature uh dese traitors who din vote fuh de bill.


  46. @ Miller At 7:24 PM
    Is that a red herring you are trying to introduce? Do you not recognize that it is about tax avoidance; not about corruption. No IL will remove the black listing. We need to remove corruption from Public life because it causes an unnecessary high costs of managing public services. As Hal would say cut out the optics. Let us deal with the real issues.


  47. @ Vincent Codrington August 7, 2020 7:38 PM

    But Bim already had legislation to deal with corruption in “Public life”. Was it ever enforced?

    This anti-corruption baby has been too long in the legislative womb of implementation.

    Didn’t the previous administration get full Parliamentary approval for their version of the anti-corruption child?

    Didn’t that child- which could neither walk nor talk- die from a diet of starvation called implementation deficit disorder (IDD)?

    This is just the current administration’s way of trying to deal with the fallout from the Donvillegate affair.

    At least the new ‘onerous’ legislation might keep away a few crooks with intentions of making a career out of politics.

    BTW, what would you suggest the current administration do about the Auditor General’s recommendation that legal action be taken against those “public” officials involved in the BWA’s financial infelicities?


  48. @ Silversleeves August 7, 2020 7:29 PM

    Poor SS, you are getting your red political knickers in a twist just because a few termites have disturbed the hive.

    You took the same bull-headed attitude when the AG had to apologize for the ‘legal’ oversight in the two DCoPs cock-up.

    The up-and-coming ‘new’ deputy queen bee has a ‘red’ bright electoral future.

    Why follow your ‘black’ counsel and sully her chances?

    The miller is making a ‘front-loaded’ apology to you, SS!

    “An apology is a good way to have the last word.”


  49. @David August 7, 2020 7:31 PM “Why blame Lisa Cummins, did she issue hersel a medical certificate?”

    No.

    But did she a Cabinet Minister request one from a civil servant?

    In our system are Cabinet Ministers powerful?

    I am only a simpleton so I do not know the answers to to these questions.


    • @Simple Simon

      Hope you are not suggesting that a rookie Minister made the decision all by her lonesome to request a medical certificate from the Acting Chief Medical Officer?


  50. @David August 7, 2020 7:27 PM “parliament will be prorogued”

    My question is “why prorogue Parliament now?”

    Why not tomorrow, or next week or next month, or October?


  51. @Vincent Codrington August 7, 2020 7:38 PM. “We need to remove corruption from Public life because it causes an unnecessary high costs of managing public services. As Hal would say cut out the optics. Let us deal with the real issues.”

    Thanks Vincent for being clear as day, for getting straight to the point.

    We the people HATE paying unnecessarily high taxes, while pols, their families, friends, party members school mates and lodge buddies live high on the hog, spending OUR money as though it is theirs.

    It is OUR money.


  52. @Silversleeves August 7, 2020 7:29 PM “Dat apology was disgraceful. Cummins had no business apologizing.”

    She may at some time in the future wish to run for political office.

    So…


  53. Barbardos is a third class banana republic. In a first-class banana republic, the government would simply have bribed the opposition in the Senate to vote for the bill. Because at present, corruption is virtually unpunished. So government could have openly offered any senator $10,000 as a bonus.

    If it had been me and not these amateurs in government, all the senators would have voted for the bill. Whoever has 30:0 votes in parliament and still fails, secretly doesn’t want anti-corruption legislation or is just plain stupid. From my perspective, both alternatives are equally possible.


  54. “In the last Sunday Sun a Judge made this comment: “More recently, Parliament instituted a six-month time frame for judgements to be delivered. The failure to observe the six-month deadline exposes a judge to the possibility of disciplinary action.”

    We need not continue to misinform and conflate.”

    hope this one don’t return to bite the fowl, with me doing the BITING….we have always known what is supposed to happen…..let’s hope that recent implemented procedure works, or yall will certainly hear about it and so will THE WHOLE WIDE WORLD.


  55. @ Greene

    Are you curating passports? I said parliamentarians. You cannot be responsible for passing legislation in one jurisdiction when you are a citizen of another, maybe even a benefiting one. That is basic conflict of interest. On this the US is right as far as the presidency is concerned.
    I was always confused as to how a Brit of Guyanese heritage could become prime minister of Barbados, simply on the basis of his grandfather being a panboiler at Buckley.


  56. @Hal,

    nonsense Hal. there is nothing in the history of Bim to suggest that those with multiple passports have been disloyal to Bim or more so than those who hold only a Bim passport / citizenship. the USA is full of shiite. this is just another example of that.


  57. ALL of you are full of shite…the systems of passports are colonial in design, the US, UK etc who contributed to their OWN DESIGNS can do as they like, it’s all THEIR DESIGNS, their systems, yall are yet to design anything for yourselves, ya too busy pimping and gossiping like Robert..to create anything for yourselves..

    .again…ya live in SOMEONE ELSE’S SYSTEM, just like your ancestors did post-Africa…and ya STILL don’t have a system of your own…

    ..ah told yall old brainwashed negros to sit ya asses down, ya may learn something just by reading and comprehending.


  58. @SilversleevesAugust 7, 2020 7:29 PM

    Senator Commings is not the brightest. She is a typical child of Barbadian insular education where mediocrity reigns.

    Our leader Mia Mottley should fire her.


  59. Pimping and gossiping, nuh?

    Wuh, WARU, you is the BIGGEST PIMP and GOSSIP on BU. Yuh know that in every village they does got a malicious woman that like spreading news? If BU was a village, YOU would be the malicious woman. And yuh know malicious people does tell lies? And you ADMIT on BU that you does TELL LIES.

    You is the one that always all over social media PIMPING for news and spreading gossip, lies and conspiracy theories on BU. As long as you go on social media and read something that maligning somebody character, you does run to BU with it. You don’t care if it true or not, once it sound juicy, you gine spread it.

    Yuh remember when yuh come here gossiping bout how Caswell Franklyn got OFFSHORE BANK ACCOUNTS and he CORRUPT?

    I tell you already that I compiling all yuh lies and gine post them on yuh friend the nails woman facebook page to expose yuh. I sorry that Naked Departure done, because I find out what name yuh uses to use on that site and I would of post yuh lies there too.


  60. @ Greene

    (I did not mention anything about loyalty or disloyalty. I talked about conflicts of interests. There is a difference.


  61. Lisa apologized because in hindsight she felt she should have not show up to work.

    I waiting to see when Franklin going to apologize for his new highlight grabbing temper tantrum and walking off the job.

    With a negative test (and even without ) all that was needed was for all to be masked up and “fisical” distancing


  62. “I tell you already that I compiling all yuh lies and gine post them on yuh friend the nails woman facebook page to expose yuh.”

    wuh that is the job i created for gossipy little bitch boys on BU…lol..ya only doing what i want you to do and ya putting what your “nails woman” said on the right page, she will deal with you….pure entertainment for me..

    Caswell is nowhere near as dumb as you…


  63. No he is not…because he knows what i post…and what i dont….he knows who my targets are and why.

    only a dummy like you will claim i said anything derogatory about Caswell, when that mess started you were not around so you have no clue what happened earlier…Bushman was still around then….so there you go being an abject failure AGAIN…


  64. @Hal Austin August 8, 2020 4:12 AM “I was always confused as to how a Brit of Guyanese heritage could become prime minister of Barbados, simply on the basis of his grandfather being a panboiler at Buckley.

    Except he did NOT become Prime Minister on the basis of his grandfather being a pan boiler at Bulkley. To say so is a BIG, FAT LIE.

    Did not his mother’s family live in Barbados for hundreds of years?

    Do mother’s count for anything? Or is it that you believe that only sperm counts?

    Don’t mother’s grandmothers socialise and MOST Bajan children?

    Isn’t it mothers who teach chiidren how to become Bajan?

    Was he not raised in Barbados?

    Don’t people become acculturated by living within a culture from childhood?

    How can a piece of paper/birth certificate issued to the parents of a newborn carry more weight than a lifetime of socialization in a culture?

    I wonder if Hal is not suffering from the English Condition?

    The British Condition is that neurological disorder which causes people to falsely believe that a piece of paper carries more weight than a lifetime of lived experience.


  65. YOU are a LIAR. Early this year YOU POST A CHART from the nails woman facebook page showing Caswell as a director of a construction company and said he got offshore accounts and involved in corrupt crap.

    YOU is the body that got short memory.


  66. People want to give so much weight to patriarchy.

    Mothers are mothers in fact. Therefore defining oneself and defining others by who their mothers are is more logical, more sensible, more biologically accurate. My mother, the midwife and my eldest adult sister were present at my birth. There were no witnesses at my conception

    Fathers are fathers because they believe so.


  67. @ Cuhdear Bajan

    Rhianna’s father is a Bajan and her mother Guyanese. She ain’t of Guyanese heritage? People like the same Hal Austin won’t recognize that fact because she famous.


  68. @David August 8, 2020 7:53 AM “Simple Simon. Hope you are not suggesting that a rookie Minister made the decision all by her lonesome to request a medical certificate from the Acting Chief Medical Officer?”

    Lolll!!! David, I bin ‘roun’ town long.

    Long, long, long, long before anybody in the current House, except for my dear sweet George Payne, but i knew him from the time he was in short pants. I know what his knees look like when they are not dressed in a fine suit, lol! I bin around befor most of the people in the Senate except maybe for Cappy and Johnny.

    Certainly some of my children are older than the Senator, better educated too, and “yes” we do have “dinner-table” conversations. Well maybe not “dinner table” but working in de groun’ conversations. Same t’ing.


  69. Where do these ignoramuses come from, they can’t even go on certain other platforms, first they would have to pass a mental acuity test and many will fail..or struggle significantly

    ……….i RE-POSTED something from someone else’s page which more than likely included other things…which has nothing to do with anything……that is completely different to me POSTING something i typed or created about Caswell…ah told ya that ya are dumb………christ…the education system in Barbados needs to be UPGRADED…

    that is why people like me create work for gossipy, idle little boys on BU…


  70. @Hal,

    i thought it would be better to tackle your query from a ‘loyalty / disloyalty’ stance because the question of conflict of interest is only a theoretical one and i dont see where a practical instance of that would arise as a matter of concern


  71. Her father’s family has lived in Barbados for hundreds of years, one of her elderly great aunts died at 81 two or three weeks ago. She was born in Barbados, but more importantly she was socialized in Barbados so that makes her Bajan.

    I wonder if Hal thinks that because Jesus was born in a stable that makes his an ass?


  72. Yes, you REPOSTED the CHART, and it is YOU that WRITE the COMMENT that Caswell should EXPLAIN bout the offshore account and being corrupt.


  73. So what…i asked Caswell a question…did he answer and did you see me pursue it, ya need real work…asking him to explain is not accusing him of anything, asking is requesting an explanation because of what someone else. and him not replying told me a couple things……there is a difference, what the hell have they been teaching yall at BCC…that ya can’t seem to decipher reality..


  74. If all you have to do is dig around in old posts all day, it says more about you than about me, because am sure i posted thousands of comments that are way more important and gives more insight into ending slave society racist apartheid corruption, human rights violations in Barbados…why don’t you go investigate who held up Caswell at gunpoint, who set it up and paid for it.., if ya looking for real work..


  75. Idiot, why would anybody have to go through old post when they could simply remember what you said. And the fact that I ain’t repost none of your old posts say a lot.

    You post nuff charts on BU with people names them SAYING IT IS PROOF that they GOT offshore bank accounts and they corrupt. You then post a chart with Caswell as a director of a construction company, talk all type of shyte bout the man and ask him to explain his offshore account and being corrupt.

    Now you want to tell we that there is a difference?

    And, look, I say when I was at BCC. That don’t mean I went school there. I cun be uh employee?

    BUT, WAIT, I THOUGHT YOU SAY YOU DON’T READ MY POST?


  76. The way ya carrying on, i won’t be a bit surprised if you have no advanced education…i was being sarcastic when i asked if that is the level of intellect BCC is producing now, so you may have worked at BCC and watching the young adults so closely… when you see i changed the subject, like on the other blog, means am bored with you, since you don’t seem to have a significant other, go play with yaself, try not to molest someone’s minor child..


  77. @Cuhdear Bajan
    Certainly some of my children are older than the Senator, better educated too, and “yes” we do have “dinner-table” conversations.
    +++++++++++++++
    Must you drag your high achieving children and family into every conversation? Who cares if they are better educated? The Senator made a mistake and apologized and she should be commended for it because apologies from MP’’s and/or Ministers are virtually non- existent in Barbados.


  78. The thing is that you real easy to manipulate and that is reason why you does change subjects. Cause you feel if you get in the last word, you win the argument. Yuh can’t help responding every time I post something because you is a weak, delusional woman wid a very fragile ego. That is one of the reasons why you does tell nuff lies and misrepresent what people say to prove just to yuh self right.

    Uh gine mek yuh fret yuh self.


  79. FIRST FOR CJ
    Post of head of Supreme Court to be advertised
    By Maria Bradshaw mariabradshaw@nationnews.com
    For the first time in Barbados’ legal history the post of Chief Justice will be advertised.
    Attorney General Dale Marshall told the Sunday Sun that while the Prime Minister would still have the final say on the person selected to head the Supreme Court of Barbados, the Judicial Selection Committee will play a significant role in the process.
    “The Prime Minister is about to write to the Judicial Selection Committee to ask them to start the process,” Marshall stated in relation to the advertisement for the position.
    Chief Justice Sir Marston Gibson vacates the bench in three weeks after informing the Governor General back in June that he was going on preretirement leave from August 31.
    Previously, the Chief Justice was chosen on the recommendation of the Prime Minister, after consultation with the Leader of the Opposition.
    Marshall explained that Government amended the Supreme Court of Judicature Act last year to allow the post of judges to be advertised and the selection to be made by the Judicial Selection Committee.
    “So, that is why last year, it had never been done before in Barbados. We amended the Supreme Court of Judicature Act to bring a more transparent process with the appointment of judges. The old system, there were never any advertisements. A person was just appointed to be judge, so persons did not feel they had a fair shake and equally there was no known methods of determining suitability. So we changed our laws so as to allow for the implementation of something that the Commonwealth adopted called the Latimer House Principles.”
    The Latimer House Guidelines states that judicial vacancies should be advertised and recommendations for appointment should come from a Judicial
    Services Commission.
    Marshall indicated that process which was used for selecting eight High Court judges earlier this year would also be used for the selection of a new Chief Justice.
    “We are adopting the same process. Advertisements are going to go out shortly,” he said.
    However, he noted: “At the end of the day, the Prime Minister still has the final say. What this system does, it allows for a wider cross section of people to be considered and therefore will allow for a better and more transparent making decision process.”
    The Judicial Committee is appointed by the Prime Minister.
    Retired Chief Justice Sir David Simmons is chairman of that committee. The Chief Justice sits as an ex officio member. Other members include Sir Dennis Byron, former President of the Caribbean Court of Justice; retired Justice of Appeal, Christopher Blackman; Barry Gale QC representing the Barbados Bar Association and retired banker Patricia Brunton, representing civil society.

    Source: Nation


    • Political lip service to anti-corruption laws
      A severe though not unfriendly critic of our institutions said that “the cure for admiring the House of Lords was to go and look at it” – to look at it not on a great party field-day, or at a time of parade, but in the ordinary transaction of business. – Walter Bagehot, The English Constitution (1873). If one were to substitute the unelected “Senate of Barbados” in the quote above, the prescription of the respected British constitutional theorist’s “not unfriendly critic”, then the cure would perhaps be equally as severe.
      Those who witnessed some or all of the proceedings of the Senate on August 6 when it considered the Integrity in Public Life Bill are in a better position now to appreciate why there is so little admiration for what is also called the Upper House.
      A brief recap: With a clear understanding that the bill under consideration would require a two-thirds majority of senators (14 of the 21-member body) for passage, the Government, with only ten votes certain, given a controversial walkout by four others, nevertheless inexplicably proceeded to the vote, resulting in its fall.
      It was the clearest example of a script for the cure of any admiration for the Senate whether one had seen it at work on “a great party fieldday or at a time of parade”.
      As a journalist who spent a significant portion of my career covering Parliament, I have seen the Senate up close on its “good” days and unfortunately on some of its worst.
      What transpired during the sitting on August 6 approached comedic performance art and helped to fortify my view, expressed previously in this space, that the Senate should be abolished in favour of a unicameral assembly.
      To my knowledge, the Government, which had made anti-corruption legislation one of the central planks of its 2018 election campaign, has not yet offered the public an explanation for why it pushed this bill to its certain death in the Senate – the melodrama surrounding genuine COVID-19 concerns notwithstanding, By my reckoning, it marked the second time that similar legislation has been passed by the House of Assembly but was stymied by the Senate.
      Other anti-corruption legislation made it past both Houses of Parliament but died – without explanation from the then Government either – in that unfathomable abyss between passage, assent and proclamation.
      The history of at least these three pieces of legislation gives rise to the unfortunate and regrettable conclusion that none of the Governments formed by the two major political parties has been serious about enacting strong, comprehensive anti-corruption laws.
      Yes, we have gone through what in each case has turned out to be the theatre of wide consultation and solicitation of submissions from stakeholders, including critical bodies such as the Bar Association, but then nearing or at the final hurdle, things simply fell apart.
      The question is, why?
      Why does the political class continue to pay lip service to the notion of integrity in public life while at each turn of the election cycle, the rooting out of corruption becomes the broad brush with which to paint opponents and the instant order of the day?
      My view is that despite the approximate five-year cyclical charades, the political class – and that includes the elected, nominated and the professional advisers, the influential and well entrenched “army of occupation” along with corporate donors – simply does not have the stomach for the awful-tasting “cure” of modern, all-encompassing anti-corruption laws.
      Remember that the existing legislation was passed in 1929 when Barbados was still, essentially, a backward British colonial outpost.
      Ten years ago, the cynic in me suggested that the
      political class in Barbados was even more cynical than some journalists and that modern anti-corruption legislation would not reach the statute books in our lifetimes.
      Not much has changed in between that time, but the cynicism remains and is perhaps growing even stronger.
      An upgrade to our anticorruption laws would have to breach the stonewalls of what Errol Barrow called the “enlightened self-interest” of those who believe that provisions requiring people in public life, including MPs, senators, their children under 18, to declare their assets would deter outstanding civic-minded people from offering their talents to public service.
      History records that some of the same concerns expressed by the political class in 1981 about key provisions of the bill were repeated with equal stridency in 2012, and essentially from the same quarters.
      The fact that some members of the then ruling Barbados Labour Party (BLP) were opposed to the proposed legislation in 1981 contributed in no small measure to the demise of the bill, which was stymied in the Senate through a combination of internal opposition, Independent senators, senior civil servants and influential members of statutory boards.
      A key member of that BLP Cabinet later explained to me that one reason the party has not been enamoured of the legislation was that some MPs did not think their spouses, who were not paid from the public purse, should have to declare their earnings and assets, especially when in this small society such information could be used by rabblerousers at political meetings to cause embarrassment.
      In 2012, the then ruling Democratic Labour Party (DLP) also faced internal dissent, with one MP, Minister of Health Donville Inniss, publicly declaring that he did not feel elected members of Parliament should “declare our assets to the world”.
      The increasingly amorphous political class still believes it is okay to support the general purpose of anti-corruption legislation but dissent from the majority on certain provisions, secure in the knowledge that it will probably never reach the stages of assent and proclamation to become the law of the land.
      Albert Brandford is an independent political correspondent. Email: AlbertBrandford@nationnews. com


  80. However, he noted: “At the end of the day, the Prime Minister still has the final say. What this system does, it allows for a wider cross section of people to be considered and therefore will allow for a better and more transparent making decision process.”…(Quote)

    Smoke and mirrors. How can the prime minister have the final say under the so-called Latimer Principles? The prime minister should recuse herself. But, can she? She is obsessed with power and this is too important an appointment to allow someone else to make..


  81. Maybe the issue is who is pulling the strings behind the scenes with politicians who are groomed and sponsored by people with big money to follow their agendas. Likewise there are networks of people in power within Justice, Legal, Banking, Business Financial, Government, Police and all local systems such as brotherhood of masons in western lands who also rife in third world.

    ‘Follow the money’ is a key method in identifying corruption / lack of integrity MO, although people hide their tracks with various tricks and loopholes like in money laundering and tax avoidance such as offshore accounts, payment in lands, money paid as loans that are not paid back etc.

    Any new laws implemented must also be able to be applied retroactively as by the time they are put into force people have invented new workarounds. When Government designs systems they also design back doors and know how to work the system.


  82. Wuhloss…the corrupt claim they are headed to the international court and some are of the opinion that while they say they are taking EU there that others are gearing up to take corrupt ministers to international courts too….lol

    and while all that drama is playing out their slaves are on BU displaying envy and jealousy….and can’t see that manipulating a slave swings both ways…

    we can’t make this up..


  83. Maybe the best way to proceed is to set up a non-political Policing Task force to crack down on breaches in laws regarding integrity etc, with powers to implement new laws and processes through Parliament if needed. There is the issue of one hand reconciling what the other is doing if those in power are the ones checking themselves.

    Laws are just abstract concepts, open to interpretation, easily circumvented and are not brick walls that prevent people doing whatever they want. People break laws and rules all the time and are only careful to do what is right if they are at risk of being caught and punished for doing wrong.


  84. quote]
    However, he noted: “At the end of the day, the Prime Minister still has the final say. What this system does, it allows for a wider cross section of people to be considered and therefore will allow for a better and more transparent making decision process.”
    The Judicial Committee is appointed by the Prime Minister.
    Retired Chief Justice Sir David Simmons is chairman of that committee. The Chief Justice sits as an ex officio member. Other members include Sir Dennis Byron, former President of the Caribbean Court of Justice; retired Justice of Appeal, Christopher Blackman; Barry Gale QC representing the Barbados Bar Association and retired banker Patricia Brunton, representing civil society.
    [quote

    i dont understand this piece at all. if there are rules and a committee set up for the interviews, how does the PM have a final say? i understand that the PM would have appointed the Chair and perhaps other committee members but is the PM consulted by the chair before the person is chosen for approval? can the PM dictate which candidate is acceptable? if so, how does this process make any sense?


  85. He/she is independent but also accountable to her. Even lawmakers cannot be lawbreakers. A feature of making Chief of Justice unaccountable to anyone is he/she could be bribable and above the law himself/herself.


  86. The PM appoints the members of the Judicial Committee that in turn selects the candidates that the PM ultimately approves. What is transparent about that process?


  87. There is an input, verification, authorisation process put in place*
    where PM’s approval signs off Judicial Committee’s work
    this covers the Judicial Committee’s asses for claims of impropriety
    if it all goes tits up then PM is ultimately responsible for the blame

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