Integrity in Public Life Bill Fails to Pass

Since the 1970s both Barbados Labour Party (BLP) and Democratic Labour Party (DLP) have  been promising Barbadians that integrity legislation. Fifty years later Barbadians fully appreciate the adage a promise is comfort for a fool.

Can the BU intelligentsia explain to this blogmaster why the Integrity in Public Life Bill 2020 failed to pass the Upper House today?

#askingforafriend

239 comments

  • Why yu ask? HIV-like prejudice and stigmatization and irrelevant concerns used to mask true agendas. Stay rh tuned to these buggers!

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  • It is very clear why: the influence of the Don from New York reaches all the way to the Senate. How much did the senators receive for their nays, abstentions, etc.?

    It’s time to bring the dissenting senators to justice. We need a popular uprising against the dissenters among the senators! The military and police should storm the Senate when the traitors return and arrest them!

    Our leader, Mia Mottley, should finally have the Senate dissolved and the so-called senators who chose to promote corruption today should be brought to justice.

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  • I read that Senators walked out but the news report didn’t provide the number and two senators abstained? WTF? Lastly the Gov’t must have expected a close vote that’s why there was so much effort in getting Senator Cummins to attend.

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  • I told you long ago that the Senate is totally superfluous and undemocratic. I especially warned against Madam Taitt, who comes from an established family of arrogant blue barons. Everyone laughed at me, as usual. Now we have the trouble.

    A rogue minority of senators have come to protect the Don and keep Barbados totally backward.They are enemies of the people.

    To the US ambassador in Barbados personally: block their overseas accounts, revoke their visas for the USA and freeze their millions of dollars in the USA. Deport all their relatives back to Barbados.

    We need US sanctions against the Senate of Barbados! It worked in Guyana, it will also work here.

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  • @Tron
    There were nine Senators that didn’t vote and you are saving your ire for a single one? How about the others that abstained?

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  • All 9 are traitors to the people. That’s for clarification. COVID19? All excuses.

    It’s abundantly clear why the nine are doing this: they want Barbados to remain a corrupt hellhole and protect the Don in New York.

    It is time for all upright citizens to stand up against the blue and green opposition that wants to destroy Barbados. They talk about white racism, but hate blacks even more because they want to keep Barbados on the level of a banana republic. Anyone who now needs proof that our opposition cannot govern has it now. They confirm all the prejudices that are cultivated in the North against the Third World.

    I pray that our leader Mia Mottley and Lord Dale will find a way to circumvent the crooked Senate which is obviously a stronghold of corruption, backwardness and mental slavery.

    We need U.S. sanctions on the nine senators immediately. Now!

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  • Senate walkout
    OPPOSITION SENATOR CASWELL FRANKLYN stormed out of the Senate yesterday followed by three other members over the entrance of Senator Lisa Cummins, who went into self-isolation on Saturday after she was part of a welcome party for 95 Ghanaian nurses.
    Nine nurses tested positive for the coronavirus, prompting authorities to order Cummins, the new Minister of Tourism and International Transport, Minister of Health Jeffrey Bostic, senior public servants and members of the media to quarantine and be tested.
    Cummins’ appearance, during debate on the Integrity In Public Life Bill, 2020, surprised some senators, particularly Franklyn and Independent Senator Monique Taitt who questioned her presence.
    President of the Senate Sir Richard Cheltenham, however, read a signed letter from Acting Chief Medical Officer Dr Kenneth George, declaring Cummins to be not infectious.
    “Dear Mr Eastmond [Clerk of Parliament Pedro Eastmond], please be informed that Senator Lisa Cummins is cleared to enter Parliament to attend the convening of Senate 2020/8/5. Senator Cummins has satisfied the health requirements of the Ministry of Health and Wellness and she is COVID negative and therefore not infectious. Your cooperation in this matter is appreciated.”
    But Franklyn and Taitt objected.
    “Sir, on a point of privilege, that is a point of corruption. From the inception, they told us that COVID has a sevento 14-day incubation period. This is not 14 days yet, so this doctor needs to retire or resign from the public service. He is influenced and if she comes, I’m gone. That is why you should not have so many acting posts in the public service because if he was a genuinely independent person, he would have said‘no’, 14 days,” contended Franklyn.
    Taitt said she was concerned there were high risk people in the Chamber.
    “We are in an environment where there are no windows. I am not certain that this is a good thing. Based on what we have been advised as to what is to happen when persons have been exposed to COVID, I believe that Senator Cummins coming in here is premature,” she said.
    Taitt referred to an event earlier in the day – a press conference involving Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley – where Bostic, who also tested negative for COVID-19, participated virtually via Zoom.
    ‘Dangerous’
    “What is Senator Cummins doing coming here? I wish to be part of the vote with Integrity In Public Life Billbut I do not want to know how Harrison Point [isolation facility in St Lucy] is. I think it is dangerous. I think it is selfish and I think that Senator Cummins ought not to be here, simply because we do not know. Every time we talk about quarantine we are hearing 14 days and now we are hearing five and seven for them. But Mr Bostic is still at home.
    “Mr President, I am asking you to exercise your power and to politely refuse to allow Senator Cummins to come into a closed environment . . . because for Senator Franklyn to leave, it means that’s one less vote for the Opposition.
    That is not fair,” said Taitt.

    Cummins defended her presence, saying there was no anxiety over the last four months from her colleagues when she dealt with COVID-19 situations as chairman of the Bridgetown Port.
    She wondered how victims of COVID-19 would fare given the treatment she was receiving from colleagues since “today it prompted a walkout with a COVID-19 test”.
    “I don’t have the time for all the political antics, I don’t have the time for independent politicking,” she said, adding she wanted to be present for a bill she worked hard on.
    She was supported by Government Senator Dr Crystal Haynes who said there was a difference between incubation period and window period.
    Leader of Government Business Senator Jerome Walcott backed Haynes’ explanation on the testing protocol.
    “We are allowing people who are coming from overseas certain freedoms, but now I’m here for political reasons we want to deny it. We sat here and now what it is all about,” he said.
    The bill was defeated when Government could not get the required two-thirds majority 14 votes. The tally was 10 in favour, with two abstentions – Senators Toni Moore and Rev. John Rogers. Opposition Senator Crystal Drakes and Independent Senator Christopher Maynard also walked out. ( JS)
    Source: Nation Newspaper

    Liked by 1 person

  • The judges are the catalyst to drive the corruption and disenfranchisement against the people with their wicked decisions or refusal to hand down any decisions at all, they have been doing it for decades, that’s the reason they were completely left out of the integrity in public life bill…this government believes it will still get away with corruption in this era where everyone is watching them because they cannot be trusted….if the judges are not included in the bill, the criminal syndicate survives……with integrity, anti-corruption and transparency legislations, the criminal organizations on the island will die.

    glad the senators showed some integrity among themselves, showed the people that it’s possible but not if the government structure is totally corrupt, not if judges are allowed to continue to disrupt the society and disrespect judicial proceedings..

    Mia was warned the same month that she was ELECTED BY THE PEOPLE…and not criminal minorities…..that it will not be business as usual…she was warned.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sargeant

    There is a time for serious debate. Moore and Rodgers and a couple others have concerns with judges being excluded from the Bill and there was talk about whistleblowers not protected. Some people are thinking this is a direct attempt to sabotage the Bill by the framers knowing it would fail. This is ridiculous.

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  • Things that may you go hmm.

    Sir Richard retiring from Upper House

    PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE, Sir Richard “Johnny” Cheltenham, last night announced he was retiring.
    The prominent Queen’s Counsel made the announcement just before the sitting ended.
    “This is the last session of the Senate before the prorogation [of Parliament) and I consider it as the appropriate time to indicate that effective 30th August, I shall be retiring from the Senate. It has been a great privilege and an immense honour to sit as your President.”
    Sir Richard added there was an array of rich and diverse talent in the Senate and he would continue to follow the senators with great interest.
    He thanked the Clerk of Parliament and all the support staff, who he said had been immensely helpful.
    Calling the announcement a surprise, Senator Jerome Walcott, Leader of Public Business, thanked Sir Richard for his time served and added: “We will miss your guidance, years of experience and knowledge ….” (MB)

    Source: Nation newspaper

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  • This Bill is so important to improving governance in the country – the government, opposition and independents should have committed to work out all the issues before voting to arrive at a consensus. This is ridiculous. Jerome Walcott as leader of business must take most of the blame. The blogmaster refuses to believe the fiasco could not have been avoided.

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  • It is very clear that the other senators who voted to pass the bill have no integrity period and are only there to be elevated at any cost and at the expense of their people, now we know who the corrupt senators are and they should be avoided at all cost.

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  • Meanwhile elsewhere at the other ranch…

    Bill on high-level corruption
    GOVERNMENT is moving to deal with corruption in high places.
    On Tuesday, Attorney General Dale Marshall introduced the Remediation Agreement (Deferred Prosecutions) Bill, 2020, to the House of Assembly, which seeks to deal with commercial entities and individuals who are found to have engaged in corrupt practices.
    The bill allows for such commercial entities and individuals who are guilty of corruption to enter into a remediation agreement with prosecutors, where they would agree to disclose all of the information and deals of the corrupt act; subject themselves to a financial penalty and possible compensation to the victims and in terms of the company, disgorge all of the benefits received.
    Marshall said once this was agreed upon by all parties the entity involved would be allowed to continue its business operations.
    “In this way we eliminate a costly and unpredictable outcome of a trial, we eliminate delays and we provide opportunities for the alleged offender to make good on what he has done wrong,” Marshall reported, pointing out that Barbados would be the first country in the region to implement such legislation.
    He said both England and Canada had similar legislation in place but Government had decided to model the Canadians.
    Not unknown concept
    “This is not an unknown concept in law. It gives the prosecution an additional method in dealing with a difficult situation, he said.”
    He also made it known that the financial penalty could be substantial and that the agreement must be approved by the court.
    Noting that not a lot of entities have directors willing to take a reputational hit, he said, the agreement

    must also be approved by the High Court, pointing out that factors such as the nature and gravity of the act and impact on victim and the degree of involvement of senior officers would be taken into account as well as the punishment imposed by the corporation on persons involved such as dismissal.
    However, he noted that once an agreement was entered into and approved by the court there could be no prosecution. But he stated that if there were any breaches such as failure to pay the fine that would render the agreement null and void.
    In addition he said the entity involved would also have to undertake not to carry out such acts in the future.
    The Attorney General, however, noted that the remediation agreement would not be made public.
    He said the legislation was conceptualised after a specialist team of investigators came into Barbados last year to examine the workings of a number of statutory corporations and “to give us a preliminary indication of which areas were the best cases to deal with areas of corruption.” (MB)
    Source: Nation

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  • An anti-corrupt bill guaranteed to KEEP CORRUPTION ALIVE and the corrupt unaccountable for their evil actions, free to revise and revamp corrupt practices….you have a joke government who continue to insult the intelligence of the Black population who elected them and pay them a monthly salary, acknowledge it and deal with them accordingly…none of what they are doing is acceptable and should be REJECTED by the people and those who are not corrupt and easily bought.

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  • Just bear in mind that Black people go to prison in Barbados for stealing a salt bread, for stealing a nail clip, FOR MARIJUANA so fcuk ya remediation bill you dirty corrupt nig*ers.

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  • A remediation bill to allow minority thieves the freedom to continue stealing BILLIONS from the treasury and pension fund…so that corrupt government ministers and lawyers can get their BRIBES in exchange….eager to .allow minority thieves to pretend that they are rehabilitated AFTER they helped both governments steal billions of dollars from the people and the island for the last 40 years, they all created the ongoing POVERTY and brought the island to its knees….only their briber business friends can now become rehabilitated and Black people can’t, you demons…..

    watch what will happen next.

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  • We would be very surprise if the propose legislation has any teeth.

    That it is not just another toothless tiger. Full of loopholes, large enough to drive a political gangster through.

    If there is one thing this system is expert at it is the passing a forest of laws easily circumvented by the rassoul crooks in powah.

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  • David
    I said yday we waan go heaven but…..Listen to Lisa Cummins’ presentation and listen to opposition and independent senators. Imagine senators asking to be exempted and trades union leaders asking for senior public servants, their union members, to also be exempted. We are all talk when the shoe is on the other foot. Btw did the GG send a letter to a body of Parliament advising on this bill?

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  • @enuff

    We are in 2020, many countries have operationalized integrity legislation. What makes Barbados a unique situation?

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  • There is no integrity in public life!!!

    Why would this outcome surprise anybody?

    Looks like Johnny Cheltenham gone long.

    Nation opines he is slated to become CJ at 78, way beyond the age limit for judges in the constitution.

    Current CJ it is alleged is resigning in disgrace.

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  • 30 0’s is still zero!!

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  • A good contribution.

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  • Right…well that thing above is being serenaded on FB as the negro lawyer who robbed two elderly Black females of their 200 plantation Deeds and oil field and what they did not tief for themselves the bar association cabal, they are accusedly gave away the rest to tiefing, corrupt minorities, the direct descendants of the SLAVE PATROL who terrorized, hunted down and murdered the ancestors of the majority Black population….he should be proud of himself….why not take a bow….sell out..

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  • Nation opines he is slated to become CJ at 78, way beyond the age limit for judges in the constitution. {Quote}

    Yes, John, that is true. But yuh know the same constitution makes provision for acting judicial appointments beyond retirement age?

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  • the Remediation Agreement (Deferred Prosecutions) Bill, 2020 will be a good Act. Kudos Dale. but to exempt Judges but include PSs in the primary ITAL Act without a plausible explanation is pure BS and it should have been defeated in the House too

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  • @Greene

    Have you listened to the reasons given in the debate for exempting judges from the Bill?

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  • The colonial slaves in Barbados’ parliament have no shame and no self worth…..UK can have them.

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  • @David
    yours@3.55am
    If the two members Moore and Rogers have concerns about the Bill why abstain? They should have voted against it and not take the coward’s way out.

    There are 21 Senators and my count is 12 stayed on to vote and 4 walked out which makes 16, where were the other 5?

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    Found it interesting that conceptualizers would look at statutory corps in forming DPA legislation.
    As we learned in Canada, it can be just another political weapon. In our case to protect large political donors, under the shadow of “jobs”.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David,

    no i have not. but i read a previous print one liner from Dale that did not really explain so i am willing to amend my statement if the exemption is a reasonable one.

    please summarise if you are so willing

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  • @Sargeant

    You assume there is always 100% at every sitting? This is when a Whip borrowed from the US system could have been useful.

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  • @Greene

    If you listen to Cummins contribution she explained the consideration. Apparently it is being challenged in Trinidad_ the point of contention appointment of judges is protected under the Constitution. The prevailing thought on the government side is that this group should be treated differently for this reason.

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  • @David,

    the Whip is used in British jurisdictions. mostly in the house. the senate can only delay

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David,

    on the face of it doesnt sound like a good enough reason. i would have to understand more of what the clash is. we are talking about integrity here. Certainly the Constitution and Integrity should not be in opposition.

    in any case with the numbers MAMA MIA have in the house, the offending bit of the Constitution can be amended. or is it now sacrosanct because we are dealing with judges?

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  • @David

    Given the importance of this Bill there should have been a more concerted effort to attend, illness is the only excuse acceptable any other absence is a gross dereliction of duty.

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  • After the failed act it is clear that Barbados remains a banana republic where opposition members abuse their privileges to commit crimes against the innocent people and their government.

    It is time for the businessmen to stand up and to rebel against the opposition!

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  • NorthernObserver

    Is the waiver provided to judges retroactive? Does it extend to matters before they were appointed?

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  • @ Greene

    Isn’t this so-called integrity legislation all optics? As you know, there is no integrity legislation as such in England and Wales, but there are numerous offences for which public officials can be prosecuted. There is also the Unexplained Wealth Orders; the Disclosure of Tax Avoidance Schemes; the Criminal Finances Act, etc. What about a register of interests?
    We need simple legislation: if a person has a lifestyle that appears beyond his/her declared income, then s/he should be asked to explain by the tax authorities. Simple.
    It is not an Act that is important, it is the spirit of the Act. People of integrity do not need a law to keep them in the straight and narrow. In Barbados we will pass a law, but it will remain dormant.

    Liked by 2 people

  • @Sargeant

    Hence the reference to Whip – in a generic sense- to predict how the vote will go and work harder for a consensus.

    @Greene

    Judges are protected under the Constitution to protect their independence.

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  • @Hal,

    as i understand it, this Act is to take care of all this. there is also misconduct in public office amongst the ones you mentioned.

    i have no problem with this Act. i think there is a reporting corpus to complement the Act

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  • David
    Ask the independent and opposition senators why. We really need to stop scapegoating judges.

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  • @David,

    protected yes but in what regard. i would have to look into that to understand fully what the protection means?

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  • @Greene

    You should if you want to constructively critique the Bill.

    @enuff

    What are you saying? You have a problem with senators and trade unionists on the other side asking to be excluded as well?

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  • The so-called Senate is a racist relict of the white colonial past. The so-called senators lack ANY democratic legitimation. All the people of Barbados wanted a progressive red government, not a so-called Senate to block integrity legislation.

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  • So the bajan white criminal syndicate with their black slaves and the lebanese syrian cartels are being EXPOSED OFFICIALLY…..wuhloss…..Piece stop hiding…

    “Every government in an independent Barbados, including the two-year-old Mottley administration, has failed Black-owned business, said the head of a UWI thinktank who has pleaded with the two-year-old regime to break the cycle.

    Director of the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES) Dr Don Marshall

    Dr Marshall contends that Barbadian black business startups are often crushed under the weight of centuries-old White and later, Syrian-owned, wealth that was supported and maintained by colonialism. On the other hand, he argued that Black entrepreneurs, whose wealth dates back no more than three generations are often more risk-averse because they are in peril of depleting their entire family inheritances.

    He said: “Most of the Syrian and Lebanese came here with their wealth, but when you deal with the African-derived populations, we were victims of terrorism, banditry, denial of black humanity and these are the origins.

    “So you cannot have a state emerging out of that colonial and slavery experience that simply allows the market to exist with the private sector being the main engine of growth.

    “At some point, the state must intervene to do more than just correct a historical wrong. The only way to shake up the dominance of a conservative enterprise culture is to create an enabling environment for industrial deepening, new inventions and value-added approaches to business.”

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin at 9 : 00 AM

    Past experience indicated that there is no guaranty that this bit of legislation would be enforced.What took place in the Senate was purely theatre. All the events prior to the tabling of the bill were calculated to frustrate the process. All participants wittingly or unwittingly played their roles on cue.

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  • @David

    In any event a Whip could only be used for Gov’t members as the Opposition couldn’t be “whipped” to defeat the Gov’t. From my count 5 Senators left the chamber not 4 and the Gov’t which has 12 senators could only muster 10 votes so 2 Gov’t Senators were absent and it would have been dependent on Independent and/or Opposition members for passage of the Bill.

    In a sense the makeup of the Senate is a check to balance the Gov’t overwhelming majority in the House as it has to depend on other Senators to amend the Constitution and certain important votes. I have to amend my numbers as it appears that 4 Senators didn’t bother to show up.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin

    I omitted to state I concur with your position on this.

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  • Yuh fuhget the President.

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  • Well….apart from the brouhaha with the judges and the new bill to save minority criminals from justice and jail time for their crimes AGAINST BLACK PEOPLE, if Mia thinks she is shoving Cheltenham into any chief justice position who still has a huge mountain of CASES still lingering in the Supreme Court as well as Haynes who has an even LARGER MOUNTAIN and REFUSES to adhere to any instructions from the judges and absolutely refuses to complete any personal injury cases, disenfranchising and discriminating against injured people, leaving them to suffer for years when the cases are simple and can easily be settled and completed…without hearing something from their Black victims, she gotta be goddamn mad….and need psychiatric help….

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  • @ Vincent

    You are right. But these optics are hypnotising. Ordinary people think they are impressive when in fact they are just theatre, as you say. I am sure you have noticed on BU the narrative usually goes down a side track away from the substance. Nonsense about judicial independence as if that has anything to do with integrity.
    I still cannot understand why you need legislation to tell people they must behave with integrity. Implicit in that is that if there is no legislation then I cannot behave as I like since it is within the law. What jungle do we live in.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Nathan Jolly Green

    When you lay down with dogs you get up with fleas. Ralph Gonsalves has fought tooth and nail to stop the same legislation in SVG. Introduced years ago as a bill by the NDP opposition, Gonsalves has ensured it never got throught the house. He said if it was passed no one would want a public job. In the meantime he has got stinking rich of parliamentry pay, or thats all we know of?

    Keep him out of your politics he is venum.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin at 9 :39 AM
    Yes. I have noticed the attempts to shift focus. BU is impoverished by it.

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  • “On the other hand, he argued that Black entrepreneurs, whose wealth dates back no more than three generations are often more risk-averse because they are in peril of depleting their entire family inheritances.”

    what Marshall meant to say is the Black entrepreneurs in Barbados ARE NOT allowed to steal their own tax dollars and pension money by the BILLIONS OF DOLLARS…like the minority criminal cartels are..hence the reason for a remediation bill so these fraudulent crooks can escape justice…

    if Black people were allowed access to their OWN money and not BARRED by the colonial parliamentary slaves every time, they would then have no fear or risk of “depleting entire family inheritances”

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  • Vincent
    The electorate called for IL?

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  • @Vincent

    You are saying our own Senator Caswell was a willing participant in the charade? We think not!

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  • @VC
    I am mostly surprised at your cynicism, we clamour for laws and then we opine that they are not going to be enforced anyway, don’t you believe at some point Gov’t or someone will step up and do the right thing? I am amused that the English correspondence will state that there are multiple laws in Blighty dealing with official corruption and then state that he doesn’t see why there is a need for laws to tell people “they must behave with integrity”. Is he only saying that to Bajans and did he ever direct an op-ed to the Brits about his thoughts? He must be living in an alternative paradise, laws in respect of integrity have been around for thousands of years the one which we mostly subscribe to is the one that Moses brought down from the Mount but Hammurabi and others before him had their say.

    I have to agree with the sentiment “we all want to go to heaven but no one wants to die’ there are no perfect laws, there are potential holes in every bit of legislation but we soldier on, however you and others can continue to support the status quo.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sargeant

    This is an interesting opinion worthy of further comment. The blogmaster sides with the view an abstention should be recorded as NO. Why should they be allowed to sit on a fence?

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  • @ Hal Austin August 6, 2020 9:00 AM

    My proposals are NOT fasict. I simply suggest what our government should do to DEFEND democracy.

    The problem is the Senate, the Senate alone. It is a racist relict of the colonial past. Today the opposition abuses the Senate without ANY democratic legitimation. THAT is a fascist move.

    Did anybody vote for the outspoken, troublesome so-called “senator” and others? I do not know a single person in Barbados.

    Therefore I repeat my suggestion for US sanctions against said so-called “senators” opposing the bill. The measures shall include deportation of their relatives from the US back to Barbados or elsewhere, blocking any visa permit to the US, VISA, Mastercard and AE credit cards, international bank transactions and using the USD as currency.

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  • @ Tron

    Fascist policies to protect democracy? Which world do you live in? Plse explain the role of the second chamber in our bicameral parliament?
    Sometimes I think what you say is funny; other times I think you make Fascist proposal under the guise of humour. Cut out the cheap laughs, we have enough unintentional idiots on BU who think a laugh is all life is about.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal Austin August 6, 2020 11:12 AM

    My proposal is no joke. Surely Lord Dale and his knights are considering the same now.

    We need to abolish the Senate. It is an expensive, outdated institution with ZERO democratic legitimation. Its sole purpose was to secure the power of the plantation class. – Of course, the Senate has not to be included in its abolishment, since all senators are highly biased here for obvious reasons. The Prime Minister and the lower chamber alone have the democratic right to abolish the Senate.

    I fear, if the Senate goes on like this, we will soon face riots.

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  • @Tron

    What is the role of the second chamber in a bicameral political system? I am not talking specifically about Barbados, but in any liberal democratic system.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sargeant

    Heard a caller to the radio this afternoon saying former minister and Senator Lucille MOE was absent from the chamber yesterday. Another thing to make you go hmmm.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    For 90 % of my interventions every word carries weight. Please refer to the part where I said “wittingly”
    and “unwittingly”. If one studies most people for long enough one knows what action to take for the person to behave in a certain way.70 % of the time. It was a gamble and the expected response took place. The intended result was achieved.

    @ Sergeant
    I love surprising you.
    I do not clamour for laws, that I know from experience, will be full of loop holes and that no one seriously plan to enforce. Like Hal ,I happen to know that there is enough legislation on our books that would be a deterrent to the corrupt acts that we whine about on this blog. But they were not enforced. Over and above that, a democratic society based on the Brittish Legal system rely on the honour system. In that system one depends on the spirit of the law not on what is on the law books. I think we are borrowing and mixing our system with that of the litigious culture of the American System. If there is no specific law on the books , it is legal.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU
    Abstention from a vote means for most people: “I do not have enough information to take a position on this matter before us. Let those people with all the relevant information vote.” It is neither a ” no” nor an “yes”. It is a democratic right to abstain. You are indeed a fascist.

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  • This is not the case with Moore and Rodgers Vincent from their contributions.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WURA,

    The first problem is the declaration of the assets. To whom are they declared?

    Start wrong. End wrong.

    And further, a toothless tiger cannot bite and the remediation aspect declaws him.

    Bare mock sport in de parliament!

    Liked by 1 person

  • there will an integrity commission or body that will be set up to hold, deal with the declaration of assets and investigate any anomalies or untoward declarations.

    as i understand it some assets have already been declared but are being keep unopened in a safe in parliament for when the Commission comes into being.

    this is a good ACT except for the exclusion of Judges. wholeheartedly i back this ACT and the set up of the Commission.

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  • @Greene

    Have a read of this link. Our space is not dissimilar to Trinidad and Tobago.

    https://www.guardian.co.tt/news/judges-escape-integrity-net-6.2.333184.a14ca43235

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  • i have read it David. it is short on the legal reasoning for the exclusion and on the face of it seems to be relying on a 2004 assurance from the AG Jeremie in parliament that Judges and Magistrates are exempt from the ACT.

    i am not sure whether the AG is so stating from a legal standpoint or as a matter of policy?

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  • I keep telling people that integrity can’t be legislated, that one can only punish crimes after the fact, and that there are already plenty of laws which CAN punish thieving, but we have long CHOSEN NOT TO APPLY those laws to the political/economic class and other assorted big shots. So we feel like we need another law, and another law and another law.

    Now see why I tell wunna? We can’t even manage to to pass the other law that we feel that we need.

    So Integrity in Public Life has still not been legislated.

    But wunna think that I is a simpleton.

    I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Greene,

    I only read of the safe-keeping aspect. How long has the idea of unfettered assess by the Integrity Commission been in the bill?

    Liked by 1 person

  • By the way, the governor of Ohio will be in isolation for 14 days after testing positive for the corona virus. Where did we get this five day standard?

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  • Donna

    Cummins did not test positive. So what is de relevance of DeWine?

    Like

  • @Greene

    From listening to some of the debate there is a concern about the need to ring fence judges given their roles are enshrined in the Constitution.

    Like

  • @David

    I was wondering whether Ms. Moe was one of the absentees, perhaps I misread that situation and it may be a case of wounded pride.
    To abstain is to cop out, Ms. Moore is a Union chief one would have thought that this matter was of importance to the workers as for the Rev. would he be on the side of the money changers?

    Like

  • Donna,

    i dont know what you mean by this “How long has the idea of unfettered assess by the Integrity Commission been in the bill?” but i hope this helps

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/07/30/senator-integrity-commission-could-be-toothless-tiger/

    here is a draft in its earliest iteration. it hasnt changed much form the present bill

    https://www.blp.org.bb/draft-integrity-commission-bill/

    this is the make up of the commission from the above draft bill

    INTEGRITY COMMISSION

    Establishment of Integrity Commission
    (1) There is hereby established an Integrity Commission for Barbados.
    The Commission shall consist of—
    a chartered or certified accountant of at least ten years standing appointed by the Governor General after consultation with any body which in his opinion represents chartered or certified accountants in Barbados;
    a person who has held or [holds] the office of Judge in a Court of Record or Supreme Court in any part of the Commonwealth appointed by the Governor General, after consultation with the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition.
    a person who has been admitted as an attorney under the Legal Profession Act and whose name has been entered on the Roll of Attorneys with at least ten years standing, appointed by the Governor General, after consultation with the Council of the Barbados Bar Association;
    a member of the clergy, appointed by the Governor General after consultation with the Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition;
    a person appointed by the Governor General on the advice of the Prime Minister;
    a person appointed by the Governor General on the advice of the Leader of the Opposition.

    the bill further speaks to the issue of investigators etc who are going to do the actually work of the commission.

    i think this is a necessary step in our development. i support the ACT. and i was very disappointed that the DLP did not pass this ACT when it promised to do so. it still vexes me.

    contrary to popular belief all our laws that deal with public corruption are archaic and do not adequately cover public corruption as we know it now

    Like

  • The question stands, after three years of the Bill being in committee why would it have failed to garner support before parliament was prorogued. What are we doing? A government senator just confirmed 10 government Senators votes yes, the president cannot vote and two independents abstained.

    Like

  • This is a dark day in the work of parliament. For once the Bill got through to the Upper Chamber and opposition and independents had the opportunity to make it happen. The Bill will never satisfy everyone.

    Like

  • the issue of the Judges and the inclusion of civil servants seem to be the more vexing matter. save for an understanding over the role of Judges and how the construction impacts that wrt integrity legislation i would include all of them

    Like

  • Why would the government include them if it was a court matter in a jurisdiction next door that mirrors ours?

    Like

  • @Donna
    The quarantine period seems to fluctuate, we don’t know what we don’t know the standard social distancing was established at six feet since then tests have shown that it should be more than six feet, the standard isolation period was said to be 14 days but Prince Charles was out of isolation in 7 days.

    Seems like Caswell decided to err on the side of caution but he had a good point when he said Bostic said he was cleared but opted to stay away from the Press Conf. while Cummins came to the chamber with a letter of excuse.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Tron August 6, 2020 11:18 AM

    You’re comparing apples and oranges. The United States Senators are elected by the people. The so-called “senator” Caswell F. and the other dishonourable gentlemen were appointed by the opposition which aims to destroy the whole society.

    It would not surprise me, after this tragic day, if the opposition put up money launderers, drug dealers or even their own senators as candidates for the next elections.

    Therefore, I stick to my proposal that the US must impose drastic sanctions on the opposing senators.

    Like

  • @David

    unless the court decision or matter is one that would impact the laws of Bim but from what i have read i am not sure of that. i still dont understand how the constitutional role of a judge impacts integrity legislation as described in this bill. i have not read the constitution wrt judges

    i would have included them and amend the law later when the matter is settled

    Like

  • @ David August 6, 2020 1:47 PM

    It is now obvious that Barbadians cannot govern themselves even more 50 years after independence. All the talk about emancipation and about local education cannot hide the fact that Barbados has fallen into decline, not only economically but also morally. Yes, Barbados is now a failed state, since corruption is de facto legalised – all thanks to the opposition.

    In future, the outspoken so-called “senator” should keep his big mouth SHUT instead of talking about integrity. The man is a first-rate hypocrite. The people now know that he is fully committed to Donville’s cause.

    Offside: I would like to record here for our leader Mia Mottley, Lord Dale and Enuff, that I have cautioned for years against the Senate and its destructive senators, especially the outspoken so-called “senator”.

    Like

  • @Enuff August 6, 2020 6:48 AM “I said yday we waan go heaven but…”

    We don’t want to die.

    Who wants to die?

    Stupssseee!!!

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Greene
    I agree.
    Canada learnt several years ago in a public enquiry into Corruption, that judges, lawyers, elected officials, senior public service employees, contractors, design professionals, and the underworld were ALL involved. To exclude anyone is to exclude them all. It takes but one bad apple…..

    Like

  • @Northern Observer

    From following the discussion judges will get their own legislation. Meaning they will not be left out. It becomes a timing issue.

    Like

  • @Robert August 6, 2020 7:46 AM “Yes, John, that is true. But yuh know the same constitution makes provision for acting judicial appointments beyond retirement age?”

    The Constitution can say whatever it feels like, but we all have to obey the rules of nature.

    The rules of nature says that the life expectancy of a Bajan male is still 77.162 years.

    Mr. Cheltenham is 78?

    Like

  • @Sargeant August 6, 2020 8:32 AM “There are 21 Senators and my count is 12 stayed on to vote and 4 walked out which makes 16, where were the other 5?”

    According to a government senator on today’s Brass Tacks some of the others were “sick” The way I look at it if you are not well enough to show up EVERY DAY for a part time job you should not continue to hold the job, and the PAY.

    Like

  • Not some, if there are 12 government Senators and the president is non voting, it means one government senator was absent. The 2 opposition senators walked out, 2 independent senators abstained. You can do the arithmetic.

    Like

  • @Hal Austin August 6, 2020 9:00 AM “We need simple legislation: if a person has a lifestyle that appears beyond his/her declared income, then s/he should be asked to explain by the tax authorities. Simple. It is not an Act that is important, it is the spirit of the Act. People of integrity do not need a law to keep them in the straight and narrow. In Barbados we will pass a law, but it will remain dormant.”

    Agreed 100%

    Apparently there is a 1929 “Prevention of Corruption Act that has NEVER been used.

    If this is true I can only assume that from 1929 to the present all of our high level officials are HEAVEN bound.

    Except Donville. Naughty boy.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “WURA,

    The first problem is the declaration of the assets. To whom are they declared?”

    a whole shitshow to protect the corruption….but no one is buying it….glad Caswell and Co. managed to catspraddle them.

    then they, having no shame, principles, morals ethic nor intelligence, drafted a remediation bill to protect all the thieving minorities who continually robbed the Black population for over 40 years….all in a bid to make sure these criminals never pay for their crimes, for that the black slaves are working overtime drafting these bills of corruption protection..

    all the crooked minorities will have to do is circumvent the remediation bill, redesign all their scams and voila, back in business with the sellouts in parliament getting their bribes again, even a teenager can pull that off

    …if they would put that much effort into diversifying the economy, they may actually find ways to get the country back on its feet….

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Blogmaster
    Are they not ALL paid from the public purse? Then why not encapsulate all. Sounding like a modern update to Animal Farm.

    Like

  • Stupse! Maybe you should try reading.🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • “Apparently there is a 1929 “Prevention of Corruption Act that has NEVER been used.”

    and they never planned to use it on each other ever, but the US knew just how to use the act.

    wuh Donville said in US, he would not have had to worry about that act being used against him for criminal activity in Barbados…apparently he still dont.

    Like

  • @NO

    Just reporting what is in the public domain. One would anticipate the legislation should be massaged to reflect local realities.

    Like

  • @David,

    if that is the case you will get little opposition from me as along as it adheres to all the conditions in the bill that we are talking about.

    it begs the question, why didnt you say so earler?

    Like

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