Phartford Files: St. George By-Election: Acid Test or Tonic Water?

Submitted by Ironside

There is going to be a by-election in St. George North and some parties have already announced their candidates. I will not waste time speculating about the reasons – real or imagined- why the sitting MP Glyne Clarke has resigned from parliament and is taking up a diplomatic post in Canada. That is for the gossip posse.

What is important is that this by-election has come at a time when the country is at the lowest ever in its economic performance and arguably at its lowest moral ebb. Politically, the country is experiencing a rise in de facto totalitarianism, a trend being reflected around the world and led by the CCP (Chinese Communist Party).  

Coming just over two years after the main election in 2018, the electioneering engines should not require too much of a warm up, especially in this weather! The core question is: will it be an acid test for the government or merely some quinine for covid-19?

I will leave the bulk of the statistical political punditry to the other bloggers who may more be skilled at the enterprise of analyzing historical voting patterns and the like.  Interested readers can now make use of the site Caribbean Elections Website to fuel their punditry and speculations.

What I want to do, as succinctly as possible, is to state a few imperatives/hypotheses about the by-election.

THE RULING PARTY CANNOT AFFORD TO LOSE THIS BY-ELECTION.  If it does it will confirm how we “feel”, namely, that the populace is no longer enamoured with the BLP and its leader what with the serial malfeasances it has committed over the last two years. If it wins, the pundits will put it down to hard core support in the constituency.

Your guess is as good as mine, though, as to whether the BLP is committing political suicide by running BWU union boss, Toni Moore.  I know the BU historians will tell us about the union leaders who have run for political office over the years so I am looking forward to that rehash and the punditry that will follow.  My rough estimate is that about 70% – 75% of Nationnews Facebook comments cast Ms. Moore’s selection negatively. One commentator bluntly hoped she would lose.  But I concede that that is a small and perhaps irrelevant sample.  

THE PDP CANNOT AFFORD NOT TO FIELD A CANDIDATE IN THIS BY-ELECTION.  I have been following their Facebook communications and all other things considered, they have been doing a fairly decent job of dissecting the issues even for a small, neophyte opposition. So, not to field a candidate in the by-election would send a message that they are still not quite ready.

THE DLP CAN BE EXPECTED TO FIELD A CANDIDATE. After all, it has been predicting by-elections in two constituencies (Indar Weir’s and Trevor Prescod’s) for more than a year!  Let’s see what they come up with! Again I leave my fellow bloggers to speculate…if they have time!

THE UPP MUST SHOW THAT IT HAS NOT LOST HOPE. It has fielded a candidate and we shall see how that plays out.  All things considered, it gave a fairly good account of itself in 2018 election. What I “worry” about is their pedestrian and non-charismatic leadership.

GRENVILLE PHILLIPS [A.K.A SOLUTIONS BARBADOS] HAS ENTERED THE FRAY.  Best of luck and more power to the Treasury!

Moving on smartly! What about issues to be raised in this by-election?

There are many hot, topical issues to inspire debate and conspire about: Covid-19, union betrayal, same sex unions, homosexual marriages, tourism, crime, BEST, neglect of the constituency, the push for republic status for Barbados and the “Thrown” Speech in general. The more enlightened and skilful party (parties) will throw in the Chinese influence in Barbados and the Caribbean.  Just remember I did say “enlightened”!

All in all, I am looking forward to political theatre at its BEST!

274 comments

  • eNUFF

    Now i understand why VD did/said the right thing about the selection process.

    Liked by 1 person

  • DavidSeptember 25, 2020 8:55 AM @Crusoe Who will implement or consider your suggestion?
    +++++++

    If you refer to those with interest in maintaining the status quo, you are being pragmatic. However, I would hope that those who are in a position to do so, think of the long term potential, rather than their short term interests.

    A constitution and related governance must be structured to benefit the country and people as a whole and restrict abuse of the power to govern.

    Those in power today, may (or not) be wholly of good intent. That may not be so for future such persons.

    That is why changes need to be implemented with holistic consideration and the intended outcomes and why my suggestion should be, at the least, considered.

    Like

  • DLP members getting busy
    It appears that the thrill of keenly contested internal elections was just the impetus needed to get members and supporters of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) fired up.
    So says outgoing general secretary of the party, Guyson Mayers, who reported that while membership has been steadily growing in the two years following its 30-0 defeat at the polls in 2018, the last few weeks leading up to the DLP annual conference, at which a new executive will be elected, have seen an influx of persons rushing to ensure that their membership is paid up, while applications for new members have also risen.
    “The election has generated lots of interest and in the last week a lot of people who were loyal members, but sleeping, have awakened. A number of people have come in to pay up to make sure that they are in a position to cast their votes over this weekend . . . . We had had to reprint membership forms; we have completely run out of those forms,” said Mayers, who was speaking at a press conference at the DLP’s George Street headquarters yesterday to outline plans for the conference on Sunday. However, when asked about actual statistics to show just how much the membership had grown, the DLP general secretary revealed that those numbers were still being tabulated. He noted that the increased interest in the party was especially noticed in the last year.
    Significant uptick
    “This is not just in the run-up to the annual conference because for the last year we have been noticing a significant uptick in the applications for new membership. We have also seen persons who have not been around the party for a long time. One gentleman told me he left since the days of Richie Haynes and he has again brought himself to George Street,” he added.
    Perhaps the most intriguing contest is at the top of the ticket, with current president Verla De Peiza facing a challenge from former general secretary George Pilgrim.
    Many pundits have billed that matchup as the old guard versus the new.
    It was revealed on Thursday that 15 persons would be vying for the four vice-presidential positions.
    It was also disclosed that first vice-president Irene Sandiford Garner would not be contesting the post, as she made it clear she wanted to make way for fresh blood. Four people are seeking to replace Mayers as general secretary, as he also indicated he would not be running again.
    Three people are vying for assistant general secretary, while four are contesting the post of treasurer and 29 persons seeking General Council positions.
    When asked his thoughts on why individuals were expressing such keen interest this time around, Mayers said Barbadians were beginning to feel buyer’s remorse and saw the DLP as the only alternative to the current Government.
    “The feedback coming through is that people believe that Barbadians are having buyers’ remorse. A lot of persons are trying to make sure that this party is ready to face any challenge.”
    (CLM)

    Source: Nation

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  • PdP’s Walrond on the ground
    David Walrond is a strong believer in participatory politics and wants to ensure people are properly represented.
    On Thursday, addressing the media in Salters, he made his official debut as one of the hopefuls for the St George North seat under People’s Party for Democracy and Development (PdP). He stressed that while he had not yet been chosen by his party to run for the seat, he wanted Barbados to know who he was and what he stood for.
    “I am an approachable person which is not normal in politics except around election time. You see politicians then and not again until five years later and that is not proper representation. There is a lot of disillusionment in politics. Too many conclude politics is dirty and they have no interest in it but not having an interest in politics is like not having an interest in life because politicians make lifechanging decisions,” he said.
    Walrond said he did not have anything bad to say about Gline Clarke, who has held the seat for 26 years. However, he said it was time for a fresh guard.
    “My thing is, his representation was good in comparison to what? He was never challenged and if there is no challenge, there is nothing to compare his tenure to. I would not put him down, he did a good enough job but I believe we need to move things to the next level,” he said.
    Walrond said if chosen to run, then his opponents Senator Toni Moore, who is the candidate for the Barbados Labour Party and Solutions Barbados leader Grenville Phillips II would have a fight on their hands. Concerning Moore, he questioned whether she would truly be able to walk the tightrope between labour leader and politics.
    ‘A tightrope’
    “It will always be a tightrope. The people have to make a decision if they want someone who will always be able to represent them in labour or who will have to pull party lines. A political party may make a decision which could disadvantage labour, so she may find herself in a bad situation,” he said.
    As for Solutions Barbados, Walrond said he ran unsuccessfully under that banner in 2018 in St James North and, while he enjoyed his time there, he had moved on.
    “I enjoyed those three months with Solutions running for St James North and I appreciate that opportunity. I met some wonderful people but there were some issues that created a movement away by some of us. Now, a lot of the strong candidates Solutions had have gone to the PdP which has progressive plans for this country.
    “We are not a fly-by-night party. We have a mix of young and mature people with progressive ideas . . . and I am confident if given the chance we can do better than the more established parties,” he said.
    Regarding the recent Throne Speech, Walrond
    said he preferred to withhold comment until he canvassed the people.
    “We are a caring party with a lot of strong Christian beliefs but we don’t ever want to create a war between church and state. No matter how strong you feel about something, you must not disrespect anyone,” he said.
    He outlined some of the burning issues in St George North, such as the need for bus shelters at The Glebe and St Helen’s; repairs in Locust Hall; drainage issues in Market Hill; land ownership; youth unemployment and managing crime levels.
    (CA)

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  • VOTING HICCUPS 

    Elections for DLP leadership off to rocky start

    By Colville Mounsey The highly anticipated elections for the leadership of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) got off to a rocky start yesterday, as what was supposed to be a two-hour process starting at 3 p.m. was delayed for more than an hour due to technical malfunctions and insufficient ballots.

    From as early as 2 p.m., people started gathering at the DLP’s George Street headquarters and an hour later close to 200 people were waiting to vote for the party’s leadership, only to be told the printers were not working and therefore the voters’ list could not be printed.

    Voting got under way at 4:20 p.m. but was again halted at 5:30 p.m. because of a ballot shortage, which delayed further voting by an hour.

    Some members expressed their frustration, saying they had left work early in order to vote.

    ‘Not good’ “They need to do something better than this. This is not a good look for the party. We need to be better organised than this. You can’t have people taking time off from work to come and meet these kinds of issues,” said one woman, who did not want to be identified.

    Despite the hiccups, the two candidates at the top of the ticket, incumbent president Verla De Peiza and former general secretary George Pilgrim, said they were buoyed by the substantial turnout.

    De Peiza said that she was “quietly confident” that the result would go in her favour, contending that her record spoke for itself.

    “The thing about elections is that we get all of the fervour, but I am satisfied that my record over the last two years is going to put me in good stead. My record speaks to internal reforms and how we faced the public and conducted ourselves for the last two years even though we did not have the resources in terms of persons in Parliament. We got down to work, we did not lick our wounds for too long,” she said, while alsopointing to infrastructural upgrades to headquarters in the last year as among her accomplishments.

    “I am absolutely happy with the numbers that have turned out on the first day. For the last year especially, we were seeing an increase in membership applications. That is thanks to our membership drive, and that has paid off. We also noticed that members have started to be active again this year, coming back out to events and participating vibrantly once more . . . . I think that because we have so little yet are doing so much there has been an appreciation of that, and I do believe that this would carry us over,” De Peiza added.

    She also said that should she retain the reins of power, there would be no time for a honeymoon period as the St George North by-elections must be the first order of business.

    Pilgrim, too, said he was confident, as he believed that the large turnout was the result of his mobilisation efforts.

    “The vote is never finished until the final vote is counted and all that matters on election day is the vote. I have done a lot of mobilising and I see

    a lot of people here who have come out to support me. However, at the end of this period it is going to be one Democratic Labour Party, and I have already indicated that I want the former presidents to have a seat at the table of the council,” he said.

    Pilgrim also took the opportunity to defend his absence from the party in the last two years, following the DLP’s crushing 30-0 defeat at the hands of the Barbados Labour Party.

    “This is a narrative from the opponents. Participation in a political party is not restricted to only being visible. We have evolved over the last three or four years and we saw in the last election the power of social media. So a party has to accept that participation is not defined by a physical presence. I never resigned my remit to the party,” he said.

    Incumbent president of the Democratic Labour Party, Verla De Peiza, chatting with challenger, former general secretary George

    Pilgrim, yesterday at the party’s George Street headquarters on Day 1 of the two-day voting process. (Picture by Sandy Pitt.)

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  • @David et al,

    The excuse that prior union leaders have engaged in elective politics is not a satisfactory one and indeed, that too was a conflict of interest and incestuous.

    Like it or lump it, that is the truth.

    Someone mentioned overseas unions doing the same thing. For sure, the old US Teamsters Union, was hand in glove with the mafia and politics too.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jimmy_Hoffa

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  • Why would planning for an operation to involve 200 voters go so wrong for the DLP?

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  • @David, to you question, ” as early as 2 p.m., people started gathering at the DLP’s George Street headquarters and an hour later close to 200 people were waiting to vote for the party’s leadership, only to be told the printers were not working and therefore the voters’ list could not be printed.

    Voting got under way at 4:20 p.m. but was again halted at 5:30 p.m. because of a ballot shortage, which delayed further voting by an hour.”
    +++++

    So, these jokers waited until the day of the election to print the voters list and prepare the ballot papers?

    Even in a cricket club that would be abysmal. If that is their planning process, then no wonder they were so disastrous running the country.

    Could not run a snocone cart comes to mind.

    GRENVILLE! GET YOUR ACT TOGETHER. THERE IS NO OFFICIAL OPPOSITION!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Crusoe

    Hoffa was not a member of the Senate or the House of Representatives. He was a trade union leader in lock step with gangsters. He came from the same background.

    Like

  • Hal AustinSeptember 26, 2020 6:14 AM

    True, but a politician could not get anything done without the cooperation of the Teamsters, correct?

    Liked by 1 person

  • A gangster is as effective as the moral weakness of the politician. A few years ago the Bird family in Antigua were in all kinds of problems; at about the same time I arrived in Barbados on a flight with a friend.
    We went through immigration together, and made our way to collect our luggage before going through customs. To my surprise, a well known minister (this was the Sandiford government) walked through customs, up to my friend, collected his luggage and walked out.
    I knew this was the Barbados way, but what surprised me was that the Bird allegations were being reported all over the world at the time. The customs officer did not say a word.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “unlike you, i dont hide behind the unbiased shtick when clearly all you do is criticise, in some vague attempt to appear neutral, any comment positive about the DLP or that is negative about the BLP.”

    @ Greene

    I’m curious.

    Perhaps you may want to give an example where in any of my contributions I “criticised any comment positive about the DLP or that is negative about the BLP?”

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  • Oh lordie, now MAM sabotaged DEM printer

    Liked by 1 person

  • Now I know Barbadians LOVE a ‘piece of paper’. First we have Mr Mayer’s telling us they ran out of membership forms and had to print more, then the voting fiasco due seemingly to ‘printers (paper?)’.
    You mean they do not have a single young person who could put the membership and voting ‘online’.
    The membership seems to slumber like their former leader.

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  • the DLP again??? when it rains it pours. they cant seem to get out of their own way.

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  • @NO
    You mean they do not have a single young person who could put the membership and voting ‘online’.
    ++++++++++++
    What? You crazy? You just want the loser to mount a campaign about sabotage and claim that they “wuz robbed”.The running out of ballots could be viewed as good or bad; good in the sense that more people turned up than expected and bad like going to a funeral and finding out that there are no more programs.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David re “Why would planning for an operation to involve 200 voters go so wrong for the DLP?”

    You are being funny, right! The DLP is in the ‘twilight zone’ of ineffectiveness thus Murphy’s Law applies … one desperately hopes they get out of this funk. It really has plagued them for too long.

    @Northern, I agree with your “The membership seems to slumber like their former leader.” … but I wondered about the “You mean they do not have a single young person who could put the membership and voting ‘online’.”

    I presume they desire a private membership vote so a robust secure log-in system with facility to designate each vote de-linked (IP and all) from the member voting would be needed. Quite doable of course but just as surely the contractor would seek a quite decent fee. Is the DLP willing to expend that type of expenditure for such a small vote project!

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Is the DLP willing to expend that type of expenditure for such a small vote project.”

    Once the spend has been made, the system can be used repeatedly.
    —x—

    This reminds of the campaign where one party demonstrated superior use of the new media. More than young blood is needed; more than voters is needed. The party needs to bring itself to 2020; it needs members with new and different expertise and to listen to them;

    Running a 200x campaign in 2020 will only earn second place.

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  • Who is in charge
    Where there is no vision the people peril
    And so it was yesterday
    I gone

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  • Crusoe,

    Your suggestions for reform are indeed worthy of consideration.

    But why, pray tell, do you insist on trying to inflict an idiot like Grenville Phillips on us? The man is a Trump supporter, a feeble minded monarchist and likely theocratic and autocratic.

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  • mARIPOSA just gave the DEMs a downgrade? whaloss

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  • John2
    A deserving one also
    What de 🐕

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  • DonnaSeptember 26, 2020 11:04 AM Oh dear. Thank you, quite to the point re GP.

    The thing is, he has come forward and is an agitator. We need someone to shake the tree.

    Theo,

    You asked about the number 30 or 40 members. I thought of that in writing. Currently there are 30, some think that is already enough.

    But consider a group of nationally elected members. More will mean that a wide group of talents can be accumulated. Independents will have a chance at election. That means that there will be independent voices in Parliament.

    Supposing we say that costs of each MP, salary, operating costs, food and so on will be $180k annually, even if not in the Cabinet. Ten more will be $1.8Million.

    Is that too much for more controls and more talent where it is sorely needed? I do not think so. It will mean that a government may have the majority of 24 to 15 say, of which 10 of the 15 are main opposition, the other five smaller party or independents. More voices. Will there be more action? I cannot say that. But we should structure things with a positive mindset, not a negative one. But pragmatism is necessary, I do agree.

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  • Mariposa
    Why did George Pilgrim not fixed the windows on the Auditorium when the DLP was in office and he was the General Secretary? That was a bad site and it was used to show how far the party had fallen. If you are supporting him as leader then I will be reading your anti -government comments for a very long time. I must say I liked your tenacity on this site but supporting George Pilgrim is a waste of time.

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  • Beam me up Scotty

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  • Crusoe

    Donald Trump was an agitator. America needed somebody to shake the tree.

    GP MUST NOT BE GIVEN AN OPENING.

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  • Verla should sit the next election out. Let George, Ronald and company tek the blows next election. 🤣🤣

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  • Enuff why? In my view for all her shite talk about Ms Moore selection gives them an advantage although they have yet to name a candidate and telling Ms Mottley to stay out of george street business when she is always in the Bees business, shows her politically immaturity and hence she should run and hopefully take her blows.

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  • Despite losing by close to 2 000 votes 12 years ago, Colin Spencer says he has officially thrown his hat in the ring to be the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) candidate in the by-election in the St George North constituency due later this year.

    In an interview with the Sunday Sun yesterday, Spencer said that he had already written to the DLP executive seeking the nomination to take on Barbados Labour Party (BLP) candidate Senator Toni Moore, who was named last week after Gline Clarke stepped down as the Parliamentary representative.

    “I have submitted a letter indicating my interest in the candidacy and I am confident that if I am chosen, I will be a big horse in this by-election. I have never left St George North even though I live in Jackson, I will always be a St George North person. I am the vice-president of the Sheffield cricket club at Lower Estate and I was a member of that club since I was 16 years old. So, I have a kinship with the people of St George North,” said Spencer.

    Best chance

    Spencer, a fixture in the local calypso arena, contended that with Clarke out of the picture, the DLP now had its best chance of capturing the seat in 26 years.

    He believes that out of the names he had heard that have come forward, he stood the best chance to bring the seat home. He argued that St George North was not the type of constituency where one could inherit votes, but rather each person had to stand on their own merit.

    “The seat is now fair game. St George North is not like a St Thomas or a St Joseph, where persons can inherit votes. In St George North that does not happen. In addition, the Barbados Labour Party candidate is coming with some baggage, given her current commitment to the workers of this country to serve them as the leader of the Barbados Workers’ Union. So it is not going to be too difficult to attack her credibility; you cannot repackage damaged goods,” Spencer said.

    In 2008, Spencer mustered just over 30 per cent of the St George North votes. Following that defeat, he was absent from elective politics for more than a decade. When asked why he was coming back now, Spencer explained that at the time he did not have the financial backing that would have afforded him the type of campaign to win the election.

    “The financial backing simply was not there, so I opted out. I believe that I have a very good chance of getting the nod this time around. Of the people whom I have heard that have submitted letters seeking the nomination, based on my track record and my personality, I would be the best candidate without a shadow of a doubt,” he said.

    “I am a St George person and the name Spencer is part of St George’s history. I came through the church choir, in which six of my mother’s seven children sang. My name has been attached with many organisations within that constituency. I am always in St George since the Parish Independence Committee was formed.

    “A year does not pass by that they don’t ask

    me to do something for them. So I see myself as someone who has the love and respect of the people of St George North,” he added.

    The Sunday Sun has also been reliably informed that Kemar Stuart, who ran against Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley in the 2018 elections on the Solutions Barbados ticket at the time, has also submitted his name to be the person to carry the DLP banner in St George North.

    Colin Spencer is throwing his hat in the ring to be a Democratic Labour Party candidate in the upcoming by-election in the St George North


    constituency. (Picture by Reco Moore.)

    Spencer throws hat in the ring 

    By Colville Mounsey

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  • Why is this by-election more necessary than a general election.

    As things are going, Mugabe only has to send Moore to the GG to be sworn in, take a fresh guard and forget the tedium. Or should we say pomp and pageantry.

    If a manifesto can be largely abandoned less than two years after an election and it is deemed needless to go back to the polls for 30 people sitting in Parliament based on a broken social contract, then why would this government need to bother itself with a by-election to have a Moore replace another.

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  • Official: Largest turnout in decades

    By Colville Mounsey

    Close to 1 000 votes were cast over the last two days as members of the Democratic Labour Party continued the second day of elections for the party’s leadership posts for the next year at its party headquarters at George Street, St Michael.
    According to returning officer Ricardo Harrison, the turnout was the largest he has seen in the three decades he has been involved in the party’s internal political processes.
    It was revealed that the voter turnout was so large that consideration was given to the idea of extending voting to today. Instead, the decision was taken to extend the 5 p.m. cut-off time to ensure that all members could exercise their right.
    Harrison said 347 votes were cast on Friday while, as of 4:30 p.m. yesterday, 537 votes were cast with people still in the lines waiting.
    He said that while the competition at the top of the ticket between incumbent president Verla De Peiza and former general secretary George Pilgrim was fierce, there was also a battle lower down the card. He argued that this was an indicator that the party was re-energised and ready to move forward.
    “I would say at this moment we are heading to recording over 1 000 votes and, in living memory, this is one of the best turnouts I have witnessed for a DLP election.
    Highly competitive
    “Last year paled in comparison to this year, when you look at the level of competition not only for the level of president, but all the positions have been highly competitive. What I like is the fact there are very young candidates in the exercise this year. ”
    Harrison said that unlike Friday, when there were several stoppages due to machine glitches, yesterday’s voting process went smoothly.
    “We had a fantastic day yesterday even though we had a few glitches and that could be expected when you start to do anything, but these were quickly ironed out and then we had a very smooth process.
    We finished [Friday] night at around 7:30 p.m. and [Saturday] morning we started promptly at 9 a.m. and we went rather smoothly.
    “Obviously, when you are dealing with man-made equipment it is prone to failure.”
    Yesterday saw a strong showing of members of the Freundel Stuart Cabinet who were ousted in the 2018 General Elections.
    Former Member of Parliament for St Philip North, Michael Lashley, told the Sunday Sun he was happy to see the high turnout, noting that he was almost turned away because he arrived five minutes before the cut-off period. “I got here about five minutes before the deadline and I was told that I could not vote. That matter was, however, resolved amicably and the decision was taken that you can’t disenfranchise persons already in the line,” he said.
    Former Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite and former Minister of Education Ronald Jones also expressed excitement about the party’s prospects, given the enthusiasm generated at this year’s annual conference.

    Source: Nation

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  • BWU’s political shift from Dems to Bees
    By Peter Wickham
    The announcement of Senator Toni Moore as the Barbados Labour Party candidate for the St George North by-election is a significant political shift and prompts several questions, with the easiest being the likely outcome.
    The political statistics are compelling with St George North being the BLP’s fifth strongest seat where the party holds 81 per cent. This would mean that for an alternative party to succeed there, a swing against the BLP of 31 per cent is needed. Admittedly, there is precedent as the highest recorded swing against an incumbent party/ candidate was 36 per cent (St John in 2018) so in theory this is possible but unlikely.
    Best-case scenario Then there is the matter of opposition parties and here, the best-case scenario would be a single united opposition force, but already there are three contenders who will compete for the minuscule anti-BLP vote and in so doing enhance the BLP’s performance.
    The implications of this likely outcome are stacked in favour of the BLP. If the oppositions present this as a referendum on the Government’s performance mid-term, the outcome would be a resounding endorsement of the Mottley administration.
    The most plausible opposition strategy, therefore, would be to campaign in the hope of a low turnout by BLP supporters and thereafter argue that the swing against the BLP was enough to reflect a lack of confidence. Such a proposition is, of course, all relative since the matter of a demonstrative negative swing is subjective and would be the subject of much disagreement.
    The COVID-19 environment is also a factor here, especially as the most recent elections reflected a reduced turnout and enhanced support for the incumbent. My research on this issue of voter participation has suggested that voters are less likely to turnout where their motivation is compromised by several factors.
    The question here, therefore, would be whether the low likelihood of victory or the comfort of success would be the greater de-motivator for party supporters (on either side). Sadly, the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) and other opposition parties have already demonstrated a poor record of managing expectations since they have all declared imminent victory which plays directly into the BLP’s referendum on performance strategy.
    It is for these reasons that I originally suggested that the DLP might want to consider not contesting the election since they have much to lose and little possibility of success. The situation is different for the other smaller parties since they lack legitimacy in the minds of voters; however, the DLP is currently not in a good place and the last thing it needs is to have to explain an electoral performance that is as dismal as Jepter Ince’s was in 2018.
    Performance considerations aside, the other interesting proposition for the BLP is the fact that this would be the first time since Sir Frank Walcott parted company with the BLP in 1956 that a general secretary of the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU) has been associated with the BLP as an MP. The fact that Sir Frank and then Sir Roy Trotman have preferred the company of the DLP implied that the DLP was the more viable and progressive as a political vehicle. Now that Moore has taken comfort in the BLP, it speaks volumes about the major shift that has taken place and the extent to which she and the BWU see the BLP as progressive and viable.
    Tradition
    In this regard, there should be little objection to Moore’s serving as a trade unionist and MP since this has been a long-established tradition as reflected in the politics of Sir Frank, Sir Roy, Robert Morris, Evelyn Greaves, O’Brien Trotman and David Bowen.
    There is also a similarly rich tradition in the
    Senate where senators such as Sir Frank, Sir Roy, Derek Alleyne, and Caswell Franklyn (to name a few) have served in independent and/or political roles at different times. To suggest, therefore, that Moore was crossing any sacred lines would be either disingenuous or hypocritical which are both traits that are sadly well-known to our contemporary political discourse.
    At the personal level, Moore is also in a good place on account of this move Downstairs. She has already made history by being the first woman to lead our leading trade union and as she seeks to build her legacy the BLP association will be an asset.
    Like Sir Roy, she can fully exploit the corridors of power within which she now walks to gain the best advantages for workers, although her challenges are far greater. Both Sir Frank and Sir Roy were considerably more powerful than she was in terms of numbers and key divisions. They could (and did) shut down the country as needed, while the reality of today’s configuration is that no union is any longer this powerful.
    Contemporary trends in labour relations are such that the finer traditions of banging on tables and calling out workers on strike, will have had little effect before COVID-19 and even less now. As such, a well-placed negotiator is perhaps more useful to workers, than a petulant child that is more anxious to score political points by walking out of the Senate.

    Peter W. Wickham is a political consultant and a director of Caribbean Development Research Services (CADRES).

    Like

  • Historical ties of party and
    union

    By Ezra Alleyne

    Once again, skimpy or no actual or virtual knowledge of our constitutional politics and of our recent history has fertilised wayward discussion on headline political news.
    The disclosure that Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU) general secretary Senator Toni Moore is to be the ruling Barbados Labour Party’s (BLP) candidate for the by-election in St George North was a catalyst for the usual coterie of instant coffee experts to grind into powdered action a brand of criticism which is no doubt well meant but grossly misinformed.
    Now, that is my view. You are entitled to disagree. There is nothing wrong, and indeed there is everything right, about any workers’ union leader seeking or accepting a seat in the legislature of the country in which he or she represents workers.
    Put bluntly, workers’ rights in Barbados have been won only through concerted action of dedicated unionists working hand in glove with politicians seized with the power to eradicate from the landscape the anti-worker shackles which formerly recognised the worker as almost the property and possession of the employer.
    Keen readers would recall the centurion who, speaking to Jesus, remarked on his own power. Hear him: “I say to a man, go; and he goeth and to another, come and he cometh.” It was . . . what it was.
    In fact, keen students of the history of industrial relations would recall that when even progressive lawyers started to write books on legal relations between employers and employees, the leading texts were called The Law of Master and Servant . . . a clear reflection of their power relations then.
    That was the status of workers then, supported and reinforced by a legal common law system which made it illegal for workers to combine together for improved conditions of work. These Combination Acts, as they were called, stifled the growth of unions and led to prosecution and criminalisation of union leaders.
    That was the British experience which filtered and flowed down to these parts which were subjected to an even more draconian and now outlawed experience of slavery.
    It was worker agitation, including the 1937 riots, which ultimately led to the passing of legislation that has unshackled workers from the hands, over time, of unscrupulous employers. The Moyne Commission recognised the importance of the force of law in ameliorating the conditions under which workers suffered as recently as 1938.
    Recommendations
    It recommended that… “as regards trade unionism, the enactment where they are not already in force, of laws to protect the unions from actions for damages consequent on strikes, the legislation of peaceful picketing ….”.
    Visionary unionists like Sir Hugh Springer, the first general secretary of the Barbados Workers’ Union, understood the key importance of alignment of his union with the legislative apparatus of the state. But, so too did Sir Frank Walcott, the (second) former general secretary of the Barbados Workers’ Union.
    It was their hard work that eventually led to adult suffrage and to an Independence Constitution with what is now a constitutional right of association, as, for example, in trade unions and any groups enshrined in our Constitution.
    I am pellucidly clear about the twin power and capacity of the union and a political party, (interested in workers), to push the cause of workers and I applaud Moore’s decision to offer herself in the cause of the workers.
    A curious side wind has now developed with some saying that she is an Independent Senator. First of all, senators are not chosen for political independence. Governor General nominees are chosen to represent interests which the Governor General thinks should be represented in the Senate.
    There are, for example, some Governor General’s nominees in the current Senate who may appear on the face of it to be Democratic Labour Party-leaning. Nothing wrong with that, whatsoever.
    Given the 30-0 election result, I applaud those choices by Her Excellency as examples of her fine judgment on the public affairs of this country.
    I can only guess that Moore was chosen so that the interests of the workers in these perilous economic times could be represented in the Senate. It is a role she can continue to exercise as the elected member for St George North.

    Ezra Alleyne is an attorney and a former Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly.

    Source: Nation

    Liked by 1 person

  • Nonsense from both. The only thing that the traditional linkage of the union leaders such as Sir Frank and Sir Leroy, shows, is the incestuous nature if Bajan politics.

    Just because it was done before does not make it morally right.

    Like

  • @Crusoe

    We have these political talking heads who see every opportunity to “íntectualize’ matters.

    Like

  • Crusoe

    who are we to decide if it is morally right or not? i for one dont not see anything wrong with it if it had happened before or if this is the first time.
    The ones who will decide are the ones who this will effect, the people in SGN and the members of BWU – some will be for some will be against but the majority wins.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John2

    Some of us are not concerned with the transaction. How do we affect the change to improve our governance. In recent years we have been caught out doing the same things all the time. How do you anticipate it will affect outcomes?

    Like

  • in this case all we can do is talk. only the two mentioned groups can effect change (that is if they want change)

    Like

  • History shows and is today #blm the tipping point will come.

    Like

  • There is enough “history” in the BWU that the membership can look back on to see how worked for them in the past and help them decide which road their want to take in the future.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The labour movement is different. It is declining especially with the shift from field to knowledge workers. Two compare with a bygone era is myopic and simplistic.

    Like

  • Then so shall it be. it is still the membership that will have to final say on which direction they go.

    unless you are a member of the union you can talk till the cows come home.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Your perspective is why some of us feel compelled to rail again what is the current state of play.

    #timesooncome

    Like

  • if/ when you succeed let me know

    #notinourlifetime

    Liked by 1 person

  • Life is a journey with successes and disappointments to manage along the way. It is not transactional. There is joy that comes from trying to do the right thing based on noble ideals and not to be confined to machaelvilian behaviour.

    Like

  • As i said before – all we can do is talk. the final decision lies in the ballots of the two groups.

    Toni Moore is not the only person capable of leading BWU and i am sure she would live with any decision they make.

    BWU is not the only union in the bim – i am sure “independent” Caswell will welcome them with open arms..

    you can go picket BWU HQ. that may be more effective than keyboarding

    you may have the last word.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Now I understand why things are what they are. David BU prefers to verbalize issues rather than “intellectualize ” them. Lord have mercy !! He is in good company with Hal Austin.
    Good column by Ezra Alleyne ,as usual. We need to be more rigorous in our arguments,starting with collecting the facts.

    Like

  • I see verla won. she think SGN is there for DLP since moore was chosen – she should lead from front ad go up against moore

    Like

  • So a whole set of people see nothing wrong with what is a clear conflict if interest.

    No wonder things are such a mess. Ezra A. is unsurprising, see that he is a hardcore party man, as much so as it gets. Peter W. et al should know better.

    As for comnents above, no EA does not present any facts that support a union person being a party insider simultaenously. The most he can come up with is that Frank Walcott and Trotman did it.

    Not comforting, unfortunately.

    But, when in Rome I guess…so when is the head of the Chamber of Commerce going to get a lil pick?

    Next bye-election?

    Or do different rules apply to him?

    Like

  • @Crusoe

    What is there not to understand? Ms Moore is an independent member of the Senate, presumably the voice of trade unionism. She is now also the candidate for the BLP in the forthcoming by-election.
    Is it me, or people who cannot see the conflict of interest have a deeper understanding of ethics than I could ever do. She has a moral obligation to resign as a senator immediately. In fact, the moment she was selected for St George North she should have resigned.
    What we all now know is that she is no longer ‘independent’. All the talk about trade unionist who were MPs is smoke and mirrors.

    Like

  • @Hal. 10.25am

    Agree 100%.

    Like

  • Crusoe

    Same rules apply for the head of CoC.

    If he is selected to run for MP and he continue in his position it up to the individuals of CoC to vote him out/in if he was selected by the ballot.

    Like

  • As long as Moore does not participate in any more senate there is no conflict of interest. when she should resign is up to her and the GG.

    Liked by 1 person

  • No regard for ethical behaviour. Some of you held up the moral/ethical argument when Stuart overstayed his welcome by extending into the 90 days.

    >

    Like

  • Are we not assuming the Moore has not yet resigned?

    Like

  • The general public must assume in the absence of any communication. Like some have expressed it should have been all done seamlessly.

    Like

  • was she really an “independent” senator if she was also a member of a political party?

    Like

  • what that saying about assuming?

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  • now if there was a senate meeting tomorrow and she take her seat then that is a different story.

    Like

  • What is it about the people’s right to know?

    >

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  • As far as I am concerned Ms. Moore should either fish or cut bait, she can’t continue as an independent member of the Senate and be the declared candidate for the ruling party in a bye election. Her resignation should have been on the GG’s desk the moment that the PM acknowledged that she was the BLP’s candidate.

    It is the moral and ethical thing to do, not that I expect it will happen

    Like

  • @ John 2

    Aren’t independent Senators are chosen by the Governor General? In Ms Moore’s case, isn’t her choice ‘automatic,’ since she represents the trade unions in Parliament?
    Is the ruling political party guaranteed a specific number of Senators?

    How can she remain an independent Senator and represent the BLP’s interest in Parliament at the same time?

    Then, wouldn’t it be obvious Ms Moore has to resign from the Senate?

    Like

  • the people will know i have no doubt about that.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @VC, again I share your concern or ‘amazement’ at the Blogmaster’s post that “We have these political talking heads who see every opportunity to “intellectualize’ matters.” … So I ask you, Senor Blogmaster, what would you prefer ? That we simply toss around BS disinformation related to these issues, produce AI manipulated memes on them or go with violent protests rather than deep-dive with FACTS and intellectual review?

    And @ Crusoe, why exactly are the two opinions “Nonsense”? They both offer SOLID FACTS on Bajan governance and its nexus to the labour movement… how in the Father’s name can we actually dismiss that relationship – incestuous or whatever – when in very simple terms BOTH parties forever noted their links to the mass movement of workers with the word LABOUR in their name. …. If we disagree strongly with the views them refute them with sold rebuttals; calling them nonsense is ‘school boy’ stuff … and has little value in this forum.

    I also remain further confused that we continue to palaver as if the relationship between unions and a political party is not deep and pervasive everywhere in the world… the tone of these BU argumentations is purely political pageantry!

    Question for you @Hal Austin… you stated that :“She has a moral obligation to resign as a senator immediately. […] What we all now know is that she is no longer ‘independent’.” The columnist Alleyne made the point that ‘Independent’ Senators are chosen by the GG (NOT the PM) … and further suggested that it seems that such choices have been made to give a voice for workers …. It’s also clear that the ‘independence’ did not ever mean that the senator did not have a strong party preference.

    All that said to ask whether your assertions are are definitive a moral question of conflict of interest as you so purposely note… by the ‘letter of the law’ so to speak, your assertion can be argued quite differently. We are making Ms Moore into something she really is NOT.. and all too often perception can become reality.

    So let the ‘intellectualizing’ continue apace and get rid of the dangerous BS argumentation, please!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Artax.

    I any of my submisssions did i indicate and thing differen from what you are asking?

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    Are you so trapped in a linear box that you are unable to apply context? Carry on.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    And to note… if it’s necessary … obviously she CANNOT continue as an independent senator if she becomes a BLP representative. Whether she resigns now or after she wins/loses is ‘political’ calculus.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Has Miss Moore sought to or represented the workers as an independent senator since she has been selected to run?

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David, EVERYTHING in life MUST be viewed in context. I am definitely applying it to this Moore scenario. You should consider that you and others steeped in the local scene daily are much more ‘blinkered’ than I am and that your context may not be as comprehensive as mine is!😎😊

    Liked by 1 person

  • Moore is an educated woman. i am sure the she is wall aware that she cannot continue in her position as an independent senator after being selected to run for the BLP.

    i am sure she will do what is right according to her timetable and not according to caswell or any BU commentors timetable.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dee Word

    There is a correct way to do things which is respectful of the people. When Moore was offered as the BLP candidate all conventions should have been acknowledged. This is important given Moore’s type of selection.

    Like

  • @DpD
    Quite often I find myself disagreeing with statements of the blogmaster, but his “We have these political talking heads who see every opportunity to “intellectualize’ matters.” came as a shock to me and sent me into the conspiracy theory world of there being three or four blogmasters. This one has a perfect understanding of our talking heads.

    Your “deep-dive” had me rolling with laughter. If they knew what they were diving into, they would cover their noses and hide their faces and miss the target.

    I must compliment Crusoe and his rather short and accurate summary. Sometimes we long to prolong the debate to such an extent that we ignore the immediate and the obvious. Here are three more comments that were more polite than Crusoe’s. You will notice that there are not as voluminous as those that you like (but simple and sweet)

    @Hal
    “Is it me, or people who cannot see the conflict of interest have a deeper understanding of ethics than I could ever do. She has a moral obligation to resign as a senator immediately. In fact, the moment she was selected for St George North she should have resigned.
    What we all now know is that she is no longer ‘independent’. All the talk about trade unionist who were MPs is smoke and mirrors.”

    @Sargeant
    “As far as I am concerned Ms. Moore should either fish or cut bait, she can’t continue as an independent member of the Senate and be the declared candidate for the ruling party in a bye election. Her resignation should have been on the GG’s desk the moment that the PM acknowledged that she was the BLP’s candidate.”

    @Artax (an answer given as a question)
    “How can she remain an independent Senator and represent the BLP’s interest in Parliament at the same time? Then, wouldn’t it be obvious Ms Moore has to resign from the Senate?”

    Like

  • The people of St.George are voting for Mia Mottley not Toni Moore.

    The BLP will win the by election.

    Like

  • Reading the comments on the DLP live stream is funny. Partisans exist in an alternative universe. Dee Word the blogmaster is aware how the wind blows your side.

    Like

  • @ David
    “ . Partisans exist in an alternative universe.“
    So true !

    Like

  • Agree Verla did well in her specifying, let us see if she is able to make the crossover to general public with the same verve. The by election will be a good test.

    Like

  • @ William

    Blackie, and his older brother Oliver, were two of the brightest boys to be educated at St Giles of their generation. They are good examples of how poverty in the old days limited ambitions.
    Today they will both be lawyers. He had a successful career as a surveyor/builder. Oliver went on to be an outstanding fitter at the Central Foundry.
    In the 1950s St Giles had a Speech Day at which a play was performed by the older boys. I remember one year Oliver played the lead, the following year, the same play, Grenville played the lead. Both performances were absolutely outstanding.
    After school Grenville became a sort of people’s advocate, the person people in the Ivy and Howells X Road will go to to fill in forms, write letters, etc.
    For a time some people thought we were brothers. It was a joke of mine that I could not tell what my father got up to, but I have been, and remain, close to the Barrow/Braithwaite family.
    Sometimes I think they too thought I was a blood relative; at least they treated me as such, in particular the late Leroy, one of the outstanding black chefs in the UK, who often invited me to his home to share meals with his family.
    I will miss Blackie, and I know Trevor Prescod and others from the district have already expressed their condolences. May his soul rest in peace.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Overly optimistic Verla depezia making her presence known
    Clearly she was upbeat and well pleased with the followers response to the election
    Hope she can revitalise and build on that positive energy carrying it forward for a win in all upcoming elections
    She said she was prepared for the fight

    Like

  • David

    Monitor GIS and you will find out about the conventions were followed or not..

    The public did not select Moore

    Like

  • VD selection is another rejection of the old guards. At first i support her selection but after two years………..if she is the best DEM have …….then DLP got a long road to travel.

    Like

  • e pedantic DribblerSeptember 27, 2020 11:16 AM @
    And @ Crusoe, why exactly are the two opinions “Nonsense”? They both offer SOLID FACTS on Bajan governance and its nexus to the labour movement… how in the Father’s name can we actually dismiss that relationship – incestuous or whatever – when in very simple terms BOTH parties forever noted their links to the mass movement of workers with the word LABOUR in their name.

    ++++

    For them to regurgitate history is nothing more than words. So what if there was a historical relationship. Are we stuck in a ”forever paradigm”, with no change allowed?

    The fact that I can offer is that no man can serve two masters, let alone three, simultaneously. The letter of the law may be unbroken, but does that tell the whole story?

    Sure, you can be the head of a union and the chair of a cricket club. Totally unrelated activities.

    But a union representative should act in the interests of the workers and cannot also be a party insider to do that. There is clear conflict.

    Similarly to that of being an independently appointed senator and being a party insider.

    Pardon me for just labelling their opinions nonsense, because as I see it, their facts as such do not support anything, hence my conclusion. That I would have to resort to putting this into written words is astounding.

    But whatever, same old, anything goes I guess.

    Like

  • You can imagine how often she encountered that version of her name as achild.
    Grows up to be a serious politician, but one of the bullies followed her from the schoolyard.

    Like

  • Crusoe

    Do you know the histor of the unions in Barbados/ their birth?

    Cant we be we sometimes instead of following the bigger countries all in the name of “progress”

    Like

  • We all agree that she should resign as a senator and she will if she has not already done so.

    Resign from the union – if she dont want to then its up to the membership to decide not john public.

    I have already that the main goverment workers under BWU is supporting her the same way they supported Trotti

    Like

  • The executive should not be confused with general membership.

    Like

  • John 2, why are we blaming Toni Moore and the BWU for accepting the 5% increase, when everybody knows that it is the NUPW that represents the majority of the public sector employees?

    And a next thing too. The general secretary or union president can’t make no decisions on salaries, strikes, protests or anything, unless they get authorization to do so from the membership.

    Like

  • I seem to remember a former union president trying to establish a buyers club, or some such to help union members cope with the rising cost of living. It never got pass the membership as far as I am aware.
    Perhaps the membership don’t always know what’s best for them?

    Like

  • David

    Executive there and can be removed but the votes of the general membership

    MC

    There going to claim that the leader word carry weight. If she say to refuse then the members will say to refuse or something like that

    Like

  • David

    They tried to remove Akanni who kept him

    They tried to remove two of the teachers unions leader. What happened?

    I

    Like

  • You are aware the general membership is controlled by a few hundred? The same flawed governance arrangement affecting our system of government is mirrored in how the unions are badly managed.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, a smile re “how the wind blows” comment. I myself am not sure how it does blow so I am quite pleased that you do!

    And I completely agree (and your thrust also @Theo) when you say
    “There is a correct way to do things which is respectful of the people.”

    But within that context I respectfully assert that there is or was nothing ‘incorrectly’ done thus far. This has become more about perceived rather than factual mischief.

    1-When Moore was appointed senator it was known that her independence was ‘constrained’ by her political leanings surely.
    2-Then as now her role was to be representative of the workers … thus what is now perceived as CHANGED is that she will under-serve those worker interests when they conflict with her party’s policies…

    That’s a fair perception and thus she will have to resign her senatorial appointment to allay all concerns…

    … but to say that her immediate resignation was required is really to be saying that she cant (and shouldn’t) be trusted to offer any of the reasoned support for which she was previously selected… to me that’s a damning perspective of her (and us) as “decent’ and “honest’ beings.

    Just saying.

    @Crusoe, I am unsure how to I interpret your comments … as @John2 asked you, do u care to accept the history and affiliations of labour and our political development as deeply ALINGED TO PARTIES and more directly to your point how executive Gen Secretaries were also “executives’ in or leading party officials!

    To repeat NO ONE disputes that independent senator and party elected MP cannot coexist… the point of all our diatribes is whether 1)she has done something wrong up to this point and 2) whether anything is truly different to past union-party relationships or frankly NEED to be different.

    No, and No… is my view.

    Trying to delinking union executives from deep political party relationship is THE nonsense… as that makes absolutely no rationale sense and is seen no where in the world under NO form of governance.

    Looka I gone, yah here . This is becoming a circle self-amusing tingy!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The bigger issue here though is this. If we have unions that many are claiming answer to the political powers. We have an opposition that lets economic measures basically go unchallenged. A press that clearly does not question financial reality or refuses to challenge it openly, who then pray tell is there left to clarify and represent the interest of the masses? Who will stand up and challenge measures so as to keep the general population informed on change which is clearly coming?

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    Will the goodly Senator Moore vote YES when the integrity bill is retabled in the second session of parliament?

    Like

  • @ Pedantic

    The idea is not only to be ethical in one’s behaviour, but to be seen to be ethical. But Ms Moore is not the only guilty one. It is incumbent on any ethical person with a 29:1 parliament to proceed with caution, not act like a bull in a China shop.
    Immediately you realise you have an almost 100 per cent parliament, you impose on yourself caution, self-control, internal checks and balances.
    So, instead of bringing on a new and, preferably, young person to be an MP, one deliberately selects someone already in the Senate, a leader of a trade union and a member of the Social Partnership, in other words, someone who can already command a public platform, is an egregious act.
    It reinforces the view that the president is Machiavellian in her behaviour. Barbados deserves better.

    Like

  • at the time of the DLP offer of the $49 mil one time pay out and concessions and the 5% BLP pay increase acceptance the BWU and the NUPW were working together for their workers in the civil and public sector. Both their heads are BLP supporters.

    so it is nonsense to try to separate the two and then to say that such matters are driven by members- utter poppycock. the leaders represent the member and bring back to them any offers made and in most cases whether they should accept or not. leadership counts can sway certain votes and situations

    in any case i was in Bim soon after the 5% was accepted and members were incensed. in fact i was present at an argument between some members and a first or second vice president of the NUPW who tried to defend the decline of the DLP offer by saying union leadership did not view it as a serious offer as it was not formal. he was cussed sink sink sink and had to excuse himself in some haste

    Like

  • And we supposed to take the word of a self confessed DLP operative that happen to be there when a union exec and some union members was cussing out one another?

    Now that is what I call poppycock.

    A next thing too. You know that saying members were incensed don’t mean that ALL the members were incensed? Bring some stats to prove it.

    Like

  • a self confessed DLP operative? well well. can i ask where you got that from? confessed DLP supporter i will accept gladly

    in any case people who masquerade as neutral dont have to provide any proof of anything right?

    Like

  • So, wait, let me ask you something? I notice that when anybody ask you something about what you write, you say that they pretending to be neutral? You better relax yuh.

    It looking as though you like accusing people that don’t jump up on your bandwagon of being pretending to be neutral?

    You know that you didn’t give us no proof that it is the whole union membership that was incensed about what the unions decide either?

    Like

  • Raw bakes

    Was that union a credit union ?

    Like

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