COVID 19 UPDATES

The following comment inspired the blogmaster to expand the focus on data collection and discussion about the COVID 19 pandemic. Thanks to @Lyall@Amit

Blogmaster


David; re. your 4:41 am post;

You are correct but I have indeed considered that cohort of the population.

The reason that the US experts are beating the drum for testing, testing and more testing is to get a handle on what proportion of the general public has been compromised by the virus in any way and has left its signatures in body fluids including blood in the population. The virus is shed from the infected body as the disease is brought under control. When it is controlled it has been found that it takes around 7 days for all particles to be shed from the body. Infected persons are released back into the community when they test negative twice over a period of 2 days.

Barbados, like all of our island neighbours, did or does not have access to large numbers of tests and had to use what we had very sparingly. Thus, the only measure that we had for gauging the incidence of the virus in the population (and a very imperfect one, at that) might be by comparing the evidence of infection levels hinted at by a comparison of the graphs of the progress of the various Covid-19 outbreaks in our Islands.

Most of the world was in the same position as the Caribbean and used the data obtained by the minimal testing of infected people and their contacts and their contacts to produce the graphs we see on such sites as WHO and Worldometer etc. All these graphs give an imperfect picture and significant underestimation of infection levels in the county or country in which the tests are carried out, but, since they are carried out in the same way in each country they might provide some rationale for guesstimating the comparative levels of the infection in various groups of countries.

The data shows that, starting out at essentially the same levels, there was some divergence in relation to the rate of infection and therefore progress of the various outbreaks in various countries. The graphs for Barbados showed low and declining levels of infection from the beginning, peaking at the level of 13 positive cases per day and thereafter showing a slowly declining trend. The individuals who would have contributed to the declining trend would have been primarily from the contact testing but should also have included other individuals referred by Health professionals or who presented themselves to Government institutions because of concern that their symptoms might point to untimely death due to the dread Covid-19.

Amit, in an earlier post on this blog, reported on his initiative of graphing Covid-19 incidence over weekly periods throughout the epidemic, in several Caribbean Islands. If David thinks it is appropriate and Amit agrees I can post a subset of graphs clipped from his data for 6 Caribbean territories which I think could illustrate some of what I have presented above.


Covid 19

There was 1 more positive case announced today as well as 1 death. A slight uptick of the daily cases line is indicated in the graph by the blue line. The total cumulative number of positive cases from the tests carried out yesterday is 76 – Llyall Small

COVID 19

Attached is the updated C-19 graph for 2020-04-23. There were no additional positive cases from yesterday’s tests and therefore cumulative positive cases remain at 76 – Lyall Small

covid10

covid12

Two new positive cases were identified from yesterday’s tests. There are now 5 cases of contacts with a previously identified individual. The 5 cases are workers from a Government Institution. Tests are ongoing today (25 April 2020)Lyall Small

Covid11

Updated graph for 26 April 2020. No new +ve cases were found. Cumulative count is still 79 – Lyall Small

covid13

There was one additional +ve case identified today (27 April 2020) from the last tranche of NAB workers moving the cumulative total cases to 80. The graph is still essentially trending downwards – Lyallsmall

Covid-Cumulative 1

Graphing Covid-19 incidence in several Caribbean Islands – Source data: caribbeansignal.com

164 comments

  • David;

    Coexisting with the virus is not necessarily Barbados’ strategy. Taken to extremes, it is the Brazilian, early UK and current Swedish strategy, which does not seek to shield disadvantaged groups such as the Old and vulnerable persons with underlying health problems.

    The Barbados Government’s strategy has been and will probably remain as one where the vulnerable are shielded from exposure to the virus while herd immunity is built up in the rest (the majority) of the population. The maintenance of the curfew and the continuance of other mitigating strategies suggest that the Government here will continue the strategy that has proven effective so far.

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  • @Lyall

    You misunderstood the blogmaster. Coexisting using the generic meaning. The virus is not going anywhere, life goes on.

    >

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  • David;

    I did’nt misunderstand. I was just seeking to explain that the Barbados strategy, as I understand it, was coexistence in a way that protects vulnerable groups to the extent possible.

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  • @Lyall

    To expand, until there is a treatment we have to reopen and find a way to survive until.

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  • David;
    Here’s an interesting report on Covid’s strength from Italy.
    https://a.msn.com/r/2/BB14QB6l?m=en-us&referrerID=InAppShare

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  • @Lyall

    Encouraging news if one leans on the side of being overly optimistic.

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  • Here’s a new article on effectiveness of face masks, social distancing and eye protection on reducing risk of covid-19 infection.
    https://www.livescience.com/face-masks-eye-protection-covid-19-prevention.html?utm_source=notification

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  • Here are the 2 graphs for the week ending 5th June. In relation to active cases 4 of the 6 selected Caribbean countries are now trending to zero cases. The other 2, Jamaica and Guyana have a greater number of cases but are themselves rapidly trending downwards – Lyall Small

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  • So far so good.

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  • @Lyall

    Do we need to give it about two weeks to have a sense if rate of infections is changed from June 1?

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  • David

    Just saw your post.

    Yes!!! New infections could show at about 1 week. All the data released by GIS suggests that the viral load here was very low for sometime now. Any change should quickly become apparent.

    The really good news was that all the stranded nationals who came in last week from England tested negative. It was obviously expected to be so, given that they were tested before they were allowed back in. Let’s hope that they all test negative again in two weeks time.

    If people all do their part and treat the virus seriously by scrupulously following the protocols re. masking up, social distancing, etc. and the Covid 19 team maintains its vigilance and continues its good work re. testing and contact tracing, we should be OK.

    Were there any update reports about Ambassador Thomson’s Covid status?

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  • @Lyall

    From all reports Liz is still in quarantine.

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  • ” The Best-dos Santos Public Health Laboratory has now surpassed the 6 000 mark, recording 6 005 tests as of yesterday, according to the Ministry of Health and Wellness.”

    92 people have been diagnosed, 81 people have recovered and seven succumbed to the virus. (BGIS)

    Barbados population is about 287,000. Two percent of the population has been tested.

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  • David;

    I saw Rachel Maddow’s show on MSNBC last night. It was somewhat frightening. She showed status graphs of the progress of the Covid-19 epidemic and hospital bed availability in several US states. It appears that 21 or so states are showing new significant spikes of the disease possibly associated with too early reopening and euphoric reactions by groups who generally ignored social distancing, use of masks, etc. as they reopened.

    I also saw PM Mia Mottley’s presentation on CBC that, inter alia, imposed reduction of the curfew to weekend nights; relaxed several mitigating actions for social distancing, eg, numbers of commuters on buses; numbers at parties; and essentially opened up Barbados to a slightly changed set of pre-covid behaviours. I did not hear of any opening up of the country to commercial Air travel or how well we are stocked with PPE’s; especially high quality masks for the general population; Beds; etc.,

    The current state of the knowledge about the likely global spread of the Pandemic suggests that it might continue without significant diminution into next year and perhaps beyond. It does not appear that a vaccine or medicine will be available this year.

    Are we ready for this reopening phase?

    Do we have enough stocks of high quality PPE’s that could assist in protecting members of the general public from contracting or passing on the virus?
    Do we have enough data to conclude that our temperatures and current low viral loads would be adequate protection for us over the next several months?
    Is there any scenario which makes opening to pre-covid type tourism less dangerous than it appears at present?
    Do we have enough hospital beds in case the virus attacks us with a higher rate of spread than we experienced over the last 3 months?

    Barbados has done an excellent job of combatting the first phase of Covid-19’s attack on us. Are we well prepared for a continued onslaught from overseas, especially from the US where the control has been very spotty?

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  • @Lyall

    Good comment!

    Do we know our COVID throughput capacity i.e. ventilators, beds, etc?

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  • @Lyallsmall

    Glad you have raised these issues. I had the same concerns, but did not want to appear too negative. I also wonder about the rationale of a weekday relaxing of the lockdown, and impose a curfew at weekends – Friday night to early Monday morning. Is there a greater risk at the weekend?
    What is the r-rate? I also wonder about the ban on the David Denny march on Saturday. We are told it was for a CoVid social distancing reason. Now, a few days later, permission is granted for a march from Kensington Oval to Independent Square. All that has changed is the destination. The risk remains the same. Or is it?
    Are we to assume the government has information about the contagion that it did not have last week? Or, it seems more likely, we did not want to offend the Yanks, or the Yanks intervened and got the march called off?
    There are other issues to be discussed also: the job creation proposals (having two years ago sacked a number of people); all businesses are eligible to open, but not really; the micro-managing inviting people to email her office if there were not sure of the new policy. When is the CoVid economic council going to report?
    I compliment her for keeping her speech so short. I hope she is well.

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  • The simple logic in imposing a curfew on the weekend is to reduce the risk of spread because it is the time there is more socializing.

    Again Denny was not banned. You don’t with a dishonest assertion. He applied to protest with 10 people outside the embassy and was unable to comply with the permit.

    His second and different application would have been approved at the same time the curfew and certain protocols were being relaxed.

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  • Per100,000 population, the following places have had the highest number of COVID19 deaths:

    San Marino, 124.32 deaths 100.000 population
    Belgium, 84.45
    Andorra, 66.23
    United Kingdom, 62.52
    Spain, 58.08
    Italy, 56.63
    Sweden, 47.67
    France, 43.85
    Netherlands, 35.24
    Ireland, 35.13

    Barbados, 2.44

    Let us strive not to raise the number of deaths.

    Source: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/mortality

    Liked by 1 person

  • This data is the percentage of people who died as a percentage of the people who testsed positive for COVID19:

    Yemen, 22%
    Belgium, 16.1%
    France, 15.2%
    Italy, 14.5%
    United Kingdom, 14.1%
    Hungary, 13.7%
    Netherlands, 12.5%
    Mexico, 11.8%
    Antigua, 11.5%
    Bahamas, 10.7%

    Barbados, 7.3%

    Let us strive not to raise the number of deaths.

    Source: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/mortality

    Liked by 2 people

  • These 33 countries with a combined population of 269 million, 497 thousand, 964 people have had a total of 174 COVID19 deaths. Each country has recorded 10 or fewer deaths:

    Iceland
    Jamaica
    Mauritius
    Jordan
    Malta
    Montenegro
    Maldives
    Trinidad and Tobago
    Angola
    Barbados
    Cabo Verde
    Syria
    Taiwan
    Burma
    Malawi
    Suriname
    Eswatini
    Monaco
    West Bank
    Belize
    Rwanda
    Botswana
    Burundi
    Liechtenstein
    Western Sahara

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  • Per100,000 population, the following places have had the highest number of COVID19 deaths:

    San Marino, 124.32 deaths 100.000 population
    Belgium, 84.70 [in the past 5 days this number has risen]
    Andorra, 67.53 [this number has risen]
    United Kingdom, 63.53 [this number has risen]
    Spain, 58.08
    Italy, 57.00 [this number has risen]
    Sweden, 49.50 [this number has risen]
    France, 44.15 [this number has risen]
    United States, 35.98 [the United States was not previously in the top 10]
    Netherlands, 35.98 [this number has risen]

    Ireland, 35.13 is no longer in the top ten

    Barbados, 2.44

    Let us strive not to raise the number of deaths.

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  • Updated graphs for the week ending 19th June. The reported incidence of Covid 19 is essentially unchanged from last week. So far so good!

    Source:Lyall Small

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  • These places have had very few Covid19 cases ZERO deaths, and all the sick have recovered:
    Papau New Guinea, 8 cases
    Seychelles, 12
    Holy See, 12
    St. Kitts/Nevis, 15
    Fiji, 18
    Dominica, 18
    Laos, 19
    Grenada, 23
    Timor-Leste, 24

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  • South Korea was held up as the model country for fighting the caronavirus. Now it is reported the country is fighting a second wave of the outbreak. A reminder to the world looking on what is possible.

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  • Who is noticing the Caribbean is being bundled with Latin America when describing the number of covid 19 infections?

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  • I am glad that the PM delivered great news to Bajans today.

    Those of you living in Barbados should continue to be really careful.

    Barbados appears to have managed the Covid-19 crisis better than most.

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  • @Hants

    You wouldn’t have believed Barbados got to this good COVID place after reading comments in this forum three months ago.

    So far so good.

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  • BBcovid25062020carcovid25062020

    No active cases of Covid-19 in Barbados. Caribbean region remains at low virus loads generally. Guyana is only country of the six being tracked where there has been a consistent small uptick in active cases for over 2 weeks. The PM has announced a new C-19 phase to start on 1st July – Source: Lyall Small

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  • As reported in Barbados Today, a number of very important announcements were made at the PM’s last Friday’s press conference.

    These included:
    * A declaration that Barbados was now Covid-19 free.
    * The current State of Emergency has been extended to August 31st to allow Government to maintain physical distancing and sanitizing requirements.
    * The end of the Curfew from 1st July and a cautious return to relevant pre-covid-19 conditions.
    * The relaxing of the physical distancing requirements from 6 feet to 3 feet.
    * The reopening of all Nurseries by Monday 29th June.
    * The 250 person limit on attendees at outdoor sporting events raised to 500 but the current density requirement for indoor events would be maintained.
    * The time limit on Church services removed.
    * The current restrictions on number of visitors to patients at Hospitals and Nursing homes will remain

    The reopening of commercial flights between Barbados and a number of tourism partner countries / Airlines starting from 12th July.
    The first scheduled flights will be by Air Canada -12th July – twice weekly; by Caribbean Airlines – mid-July; by BA – 18th July – once weekly; by Jet Blue – 25th July from JFK, New York, 4 times weekly; by Virgin Atlantic from August 1st – once weekly.
    The future of Liat and its contribution to the reopening will soon be determined following meetings of its shareholders.

    Several protocols will be implemented to ensure the protection and safety of Airport workers and the Barbadian population from any incursion of Covid-19. Amongst these are:-
    * All visitors entering Barbados must wear face masks and undergo a temperature check.
    * All visitors from outside the Caribbean would have to take a locally approved accredited Covid-19 PCR antigen test 72 hours before their scheduled arrival in Barbados
    * Travellers from within CARICOM will have to take a Covid-19 test one week prior to departure. Failure to do so will result in such visitors having to do the test on arrival here
    * Routine testing will be carried out at a repurposed test facility at the Concorde Experience Museum.
    * Some hotels here have been earmarked as satellite testing and hosting facilities and discussions with their owners have begun. Visitors will have to pay for such services.
    * Over 60,000 Covid-19 tests are currently available and the Authorities here are actively sourcing additional tests.
    * If any visitor fails a Covid-19 test they would be placed in isolation.

    The Government has done an excellent job in its management of the Covid-19 outbreak here with a sensible approach that ensured proactive buy-in by the public of the major initiatives taken. We are now going into a new phase that is no less fraught with danger to our health and economy than the first one. But I think that the planners and frontline workers in all aspects of the Covid-19 battle have successfully done what they set out to do and are eminently capable of continuing to do so.

    But there might be some pitfalls on the way. The managed risk approach that has worked so far must be continued into the future using all the information science technology available to ensure full consideration of the actual and projected progress of the pandemic all over the world so that we can rapidly adjust our strategies and micro strategies to quickly respond to how the pestilence is developing in the countries we have to trade with. The US is a huge country compared to Barbados and the Caribbean and obviously much of what happens there is not of relevance to us. But there are lessons there about the interface between the science and politics and how that interface is of extreme importance in its effect on eventual numbers of infections and deaths that we should seriously take into account. E.g. The rationale for relaxing the mandated physical distancing here from 6 ft to 3 ft does not appear to be clear. I have also not seen anything here discussing the mandatory use of masks after 1st July. What is the protocol on that for the General Public?

    Some scientific justification for our protocols re. these areas and others, might be necessary.

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  • @Lyall

    The work continues in a new normal environment. We cannot afford to let our guard down. Agree with the PM we have to find a way to manage our business because to shut down the country indefinitely is not an option.

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  • David re. your above comment I agree almost totally except that I must split some hairs re. your first sentence.
    The work continues in a new normal environment. . The environment that we all have to operate in from 1st August will be transitionally new, but it will be demonstrably abnormal compared with the pre-Covid way of life in most important aspects of our lifestyles.

    It will take some time for that environment to become a new normal one. Covid-19 changed everything. I think there might eventually be three normals; The pre-Covid-19 normal; the Covid-19 normal; and the post-Covid-19 normal which hopefully will be for an extended time period before another horseman rides again.

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  • @Lyall

    Your observation is noted, all equate to the new normal.

    #newnormal

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Lyall S
    The US is a huge country compared to Barbados and the Caribbean and obviously much of what happens there is not of relevance to us.
    +++++++++++++++++
    I support the reopening of the country but disagree with that statement. The EU is on record of planning to impose a ban on US citizens and US airlines will be among those flying to Barbados.

    As far as we know people with the virus can test negative one day and positive the next who is to say that a traveller that tests negative for the virus as per Gov’t regulations won’t be positive during his/her visit? Also, in the US has a head of Govt that disparages testing and some people blindly follow that lead and as we can see the US States that were encouraged by him to reopen early are reaping the “benefits” of those decisions. US residents will not be denied entry to Barbados no matter their State of residence.

    We can reopen but to say what happens in the US is of no consequence to us is burying our heads in the sand.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @LyallS, I also share your sentiments at 9:45 and following posts particularly your remarks on the rationale on the 6′ to 3′ reduction in distancing, yet like Sargeant I also disagree with your “The US is a huge country compared to Barbados and the Caribbean and obviously much of what happens there is not of relevance to us.”

    Apart from what he well stated I suggest that in general we must recognize that the big developed countries are only particularly different from our small nation in the ‘large scale’ scope they can achieve or put another way: we can learn a lot from the nuts and bolts operations of any corporate, parastatal (SOE), or government agency that is directly transferable to our operations…And certainly that very directly relates to cov19!

    Also, re that 6′ and 3’… what is the sense of all this! If everyone is wearing masks then 3′ or 6′ should be irrelevant and crowd sizes too should mean nothing but of course not everyone wears a mask…. so why is the distancing being reduced???

    I can only surmise that this is for legal purposes… that is, the gov’t sets the standards in order to allow businesses to enforce standards and stay ‘within the law’… beyond that, it looks like a ‘pappy-show’ of non-scientific guess work!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sargeant and dpD;

    I did not intend to give the impression that the experiences and data and scientific findings of the US and large countries re. Covid-19 were not relevant to our situation but I evidently did not express that clearly in that 2 of my favourite posters came to the same conclusion.

    The offending paragraph read as follows:- The US is a huge country compared to Barbados and the Caribbean and obviously much of what happens there is not of relevance to us. .. But there are lessons there about the interface between the science and politics and how that interface is of extreme importance in its effect on eventual numbers of infections and deaths that we should seriously take into account. E.g. The rationale for relaxing the mandated physical distancing here from 6 ft to 3 ft does not appear to be clear. I have also not seen anything here discussing the mandatory use of masks after 1st July. What is the protocol on that for the General Public? Some scientific justification for our protocols re. these areas and others, might be necessary.

    There is a lot that is implicit in my post that suggests that lessons from the US and large countries in terms of politics and the translation of scientific data to policy are of extreme importance in its effect on the eventual numbers of infections and deaths and the running of the economy. I was not minded to go into the specifics at that time.

    Like

  • The blogmaster congratulates the government team and whole country for finding a path to where we are now. The journey is not for the swift but …

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  • dpD;

    re. the 3′ and 6′ social distancing protocol. I have not yet seen any scientific work from anywhere that establishes a 3′ distance as safe. Indeed the work I have seen suggests that a higher distance might be more effective in reducing the possibility of viable viral particles travelling from one human to another. Masks may be less efficient in reducing the human to human spread depending on the quality of the mask. But both social distancing and masks, in addition to embargoes on port openings and quarantines, all work on the same principle; reducing the likelihood of spread by eliminating or reducing contact between healthy and infected humans. Covid-19 Risk management is likely to be an Art as well as a Science but I think we are in good hands as we embark on the next phase and new normal especially since not-reopening is not an option.

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  • dpD …… continuing above. Here is a very recent paper by Oxford and MIT Scientists that explore the social distancing question.
    https://www.cebm.net/covid-19/what-is-the-evidence-to-support-the-2-metre-social-distancing-rule-to-reduce-covid-19-transmission/

    It appears that a 3 ft spacing may indeed not be effective but instead may engender false comfort.

    I think Government should take a new look at protocols which incorporate such a reduction.

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  • dpD;
    Just one more thing.

    I think that Government should explore the feasibility and possible effectiveness of conducting a survey by random general population sampling by PCR of the incidence of Covid-19 antibodies, as soon as possible, with follow up surveys every quarter, or biannually, to assess the effect of the opening up of the economy on any changes in inferred viral loads. This could be very costly, but WHO or PAHO or some similar agency might be willing to fund part of the programme as it would provide important information on the dynamics of viral incidence and spread that is currently lacking on a country wide basis.

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  • These countries have reduced the number of people infected by COVID19 to zero:

    Barbados,7 deaths
    Brunei, 3 deaths
    Dominica, 0 deaths
    Fiji, 0 deaths
    Grenada, 0 deaths
    Laos (7.06 million population; 19 confirmed cases, 0 deaths)
    Liechtenstein, 1 death
    San Marino, 42 deaths
    St. Kitts/Nevis, 0 deaths
    St. Lucia, 0 deaths
    St. Vincent and the Grenadines, o deaths
    Timor Leste, 0 deaths
    Vatican (825 population; zero deaths)

    Total population 10,528.094, about the size of the U.S. States of Georgia or North Carolina, a bit more than the Canadian province of Quebec, a bigger number than any British city
    Total deaths: 53, of which 42 occurred in San Marino very early in the epidemic

    Liked by 1 person

  • @lyallS
    yours@2.22pm

    And this is how our world ends not with a bang but a whimper of “I can’t breathe” as our lungs give out………

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sargeant; re. your 4:02 pm post;

    Beautiful imagery!
    We don’ need no horses in this one.

    Like

  • David;

    Here’s the best article, by far, on the way forward for Barbados. I suggest you elevate it to a new blog
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/07/01/covid-still-lurks-doctor-warns/

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    Blood is on the News Media, Stupid Doctors and Trump Haters’ hands.

    All the lies told about hydroxychloroquine and studies designed to fail are starting to unravel. The Truth is finally starting to come to light and repeat after me, ‘Trump was right about Hydroxychloroquine’.

    https://www.henryford.com/news/2020/07/hydro-treatment-study

    Like

  • Barbados COVID 19 Free and Open for Business

    Prime Minister Mia Mottley gave the all-clear recently Barbados will be reopening for business on the 25 July 2020 with the proviso public health protocols must be adhered to by individuals and businesses. At the time of the announcement she confirmed to date there have been 96 confirmed cases, 83 total recoveries and seven deaths from Covid-19. Locals woke up

    Like

  • Government has not closed the door on the possible restart of its Vision 2020 We Gatherin’ campaign that would see Barbadians from the diaspora returning to connect with their heritage, according to Project Coordinator for the campaign Selma Green.
    ++++++++++++++++
    I thought that COVID 19 was the death knell for “we gatherin” but looks like someone is still gung ho for partying in the time of COVID.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/07/04/we-gatherin-could-restart/

    Liked by 1 person

  • Here are latest graphs of C-19 progress in Barbados and comparison of Barbados’ active cases and those of 5 Caribbean neighbours. There were no new cases in Barbados. Guyana’s cases were continuing their upward trend – Source: Lyall Small

    Here are latest graphs of C-19 progress in Barbados and comparison of Barbados’ active cases and those of 5 Caribbean neighbours. There were no new cases in Barbados. Guyana’s cases were continuing their upward trend – Source: Lyall Small

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    Another doctor with sense has found another treatment for the COVID19 problem.

    Hopefully our doctors will do something sensible with this information and stop doing nonsense like blindly following the corrupt WHO.

    https://americacanwetalk.org/dr-richard-bartlett-shares-covid-information/

    Like

  • @Critical AnalyzerJuly 8, 2020 8:34 PM “Hopefully our doctors will do something sensible with this information and stop doing nonsense like blindly following the corrupt WHO.”

    Since “doing nonsense like blindly following the corrupt WHO” has worked so well for us why shouldn’t we continue?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Thank you, Cuhdear Bajan!
    We ain’t no stupid Americans!

    Like

  • Critical Analyzer

    This is another interview from the same doctor in my earlier post (July 3, 2020 5:32 PM) on how he treats his COVID patients in a primary care setting. Hopefully, Youtube leaves these two videos up long enough for local medical practitioners to get to watch this one.

    The last site has tons of useful COVID information and video interviews with other doctors on the frontline. Information is knowledge and knowledge is power so get informed people.

    http://covexit.com/an-introduction-to-early-hydroxychloroquine-based-treatments-for-covid-19/

    Like

  • The most substantive take away from last week’s graphs is that the Guyana active cases continue to trend upward, as compared with the other 4 selected countries. The consistency of the uptick over the last several weeks in Guyana might be cause for concern and strengthening of mitigation measures by Guyana and its Caribbean neighbours – Source: Lyall Small

    bbcovid10carcovid10072020

    Like

  • David;
    re. your 10:57 post, Worldometer is reporting that the new cases for the USA yesterday was a record 71,787 cases.

    Like

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