Where Education Ends Good Sense Should Begin

Submitted by Paula Sealy

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

What mental health services will be provided after you have allowed Lower 6 (ages 16-17) CAPE 2022 students to be placed under severe anguish, unfathomable physical distress and untold mental strain?

In one country, secondary school students have spent approximately seven weeks at school for face-to-face instruction in preparation for their CAPE Unit 1 exams scheduled for next month. 

For those who do not know, Unit 2 of CAPE is completed in Upper 6 (17-18) as CAPE consists of two units over two years with two separate syllabuses and two separate exams. CSEC is a 2-year course of study which starts in 4th Form (14-15) and sees exams in 5th Form (15-16), by comparison. Unit 2 students had the benefit of last year’s experience when their Unit 1 exams began in June. That year’s experience still pushed many of their peers to venture off to technical and vocational studies, community college, UWI or the world of work instead of completing Unit 2.

Across the region, today, CAPE and CSEC candidates are in need of more time in order to complete the syllabus and ‘digest’ the material. I am disappointed but I am not surprised that good sense hasn’t prevailed. The Beckles stewardship model and the Wesleyan leadership style used by CXC do not endorse good sense.

Mses. Williams of Jamaica, McConney of Barbados, Gadsby-Dolly of Trinidad and Tobago, and Manickchand of Guyana, your countries are the major sources of candidates for CXC exams. Ladies, as Ministers of Education you need to challenge COHSOD to address the concerns of the students and teachers of the Caribbean where CXC is concerned with dutiful assiduity. If that fails, it is time enough to step out of your insular comfort zones and represent the children by all necessary and sufficient means.

Each one of the children matters and each one is not deaf or blind. Where education ends good sense should begin, not CXC exams.

May God help the Caribbean and its children. 

134 comments

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “HOWEVER JACKASSES WANT TO STICK WITH THE NORM BECAUSE OF A FEAR OF CHANGE BUT CONTENT WITH THE PAST AND MEDIOCRITY.”

    again for the SLOW learners, the ones who attended the slave master schools, in the back, doubt they heard let alone understand that…

    Like

  • @ DPD
    We are constantly failing to realise that such changes of name is to remove symbols that are essentially destructive to our psyche. Furthermore these changes are in the interest of future generations and not those of us, who are deeply seated in nostalgia.
    Every time a progressive suggestion is made, the defenders of the status quo, come out blazing against the effort. That’s why removing certain symbols must be changed and or pulled down.
    That is the issue .

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William….we can only hope that SINKS IN…

    i remember there was a statue of Jefferson sitting outside the museum of natural history uptown…..it was taken down last year….in the public’s INTEREST…psychological damage swings both ways…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    and here you have it, Oregon, one of the most racist states in US….don’t even recognize Black Afrikans as people STILL…but the public interest SUPERSEDES ALL OF THAT…

    “A statue of Thomas Jefferson outside a high school named for him in North Portland, Oregon was toppled Sunday after a night of protests, reports CBS Portland, Oregon affiliate KOIN-TV.”

    Like

  • @ DPD
    We are constantly failing to realise that such changes of name is to remove symbols that are essentially destructive to our psyche. Furthermore these changes are in the interest of future generations and not those of us, who are deeply seated in nostalgia.
    Every time a progressive suggestion is made, the defenders of the status quo, come out blazing against the effort. That’s why removing certain symbols must be changed and or pulled down.
    That is the issue .

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    NAILED IT.

    SAME SHIT AS THE 11 PLUS PART OF THE COLONISATION THAT ENGLAND ABOLISHED IN THEIR OWN WHITE COUNTRY 50 PLUS YEARS AGO.

    HOWEVER BLACK FOOLS STILL WANT TO KEEP TO LIVE IN THEIR OWN MENTAL SLAVERY.

    WHERE THERE IS NO VISION AND CRITICAL THINKING IDIOTS PERISH.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Skinner, let be clear that I am absolutely not attempting to maintain any status quo nor am I dismissing any progressive ideas. I simply suggested that in these TWO cases (or three) the names do not conjure grave feelings of angst.

    Let’s me also be clear that re-naming of schools cannot be considered as new progressive thought in a nation that has renamed so many of our schools in honour of outstanding local educators.

    I have no issue with that honorific model but I do have a problem with ‘wokism’ simply for its sake.

    Coupled with that I also have a problem with the absurd concept that HC or QC by their nature are somehow to blame for elitism or classissm in Bim. This is suggested loudly by many and given the psyche of life all across the world it makes absolutely no practical sense to me.

    There will and must always be centers (supposedly) of excellence … and absolutely we strive to improve the standards of all schools so that our product is equally good… HOWEVER how or why does that take away from the places where supposedly high achievers match wits… or why must it.

    @Blogger Baje, you say that you are a former educator in this system and I will presume that you were also a consumer of our educational product yet you try to debase the system with these continuous riffs where you present some amazing non sequiturs and rather confusing (il) logical to set up your positions!

    The fact that our island was controlled by “OTHERS MAKING DECISIONS ABROAD WHO NEVER ATTENDED HC, QC, LODGE, ETC” or that “THE MAJOR COMPANIES ARE OWNED BY FOREIGNERS WHO NEVER ATTENDED HC, QC, LODGE, ETC” is irrelevant and fallacious.

    No one DISPUTES that our system of education needs to change and be adapted to be ‘fit for purpose’ … that is FREAKING as obvious as the nose on our faces or the fact that EV cars are taking over from gas turbines for good reasons BUT yet EV car issues have to be addressed!!!

    Life is about needed change and adaptation.

    That you consider our ed system so ridiculous is itself ridiculous considering what it has produced… even as it has failed many! Yes more nimble modifications were needed but no one can suggest that much change was introduced across our educational landscape for years … unfortunately sometimes in fits and starts like the Elma Parris model.

    Those who want to focus on the 11+ transfer process as a seminal failure are free to do so … I do not share the view that it’s some abject failure. Clearly an equally effective alternative could NOT be introduced (for whatever reasons) and that does NOT mean anyone is sticking to an old failed system: alternatives MUST be made to work otherwise more FAILURE is assured.

    Anyhow carry on smartly.

    I goneee.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Blogger Baje, you say that you are a former educator in this system and I will presume that you were also a consumer of our educational product yet you try to debase the system with these continuous riffs where you present some amazing non sequiturs and rather confusing (il) logical to set up your positions!
    Xxxxxxxxxxx

    YOU OBVIOUSLY CHOOSE TO PICK PARTS OF MY COMMENTS THAT SUITS YOU.

    THE FACT THAT I HAVE BEEN EXPOSED ALSO IN ENGLAND AND THE UNITED STATES BOTH PROFESSIONALLY AND ACADEMICALLY MEANS THAT I CAN COMPARE APPLES WITH ORANGES.

    NOT INTERESTED IN DEBATING NARROW MINDED INDIVIDUALS.

    EACH DAY IN MY 2 CURRENT BUSINESSES ONE IN THE CARIBBEAN AND THE OTHER USA I EMPLOY AND INTERACT WITH DIFFERENT NATIONALITIES IN PERSON OR IN CYBERSPACE.

    I AM NOT INTERESTED IN BEING CHAINED BY MENTAL SLAVERY.

    ALSO NOT INTERESTED IN THE CRAB IN THE BARREL MENTALITY EITHER WHICH IS WHY I MAY HAVE BEEN A PART OF BUT BROKE AWAY BY FREEING MY MIND WHILST BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL FOUNDATION WHILST NOT BEING A PART OF ANYONE’S CROWD.

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  • William Skinner

    @ WURA
    If we cannot bring ourselves yo rename Harrisons or Queens, what real changes can we expect to engineer.
    Here is a country that gave its highest National Award to the poster child of slavery.
    We can rename every school in Barbados but we dare not touch the golden two.
    We the so called baby boomers are an aberration. We have lost almost three generations because of our Eurocentric thinking.
    It is going to take two generations to undo the damage, we have inflicted on our children and grandchildren
    Right now people just laughing at we. They came on this blog and joined Mottley cussing the life out of Chris Sinckler.
    And within five short years the same Mottley has him on his way to Washington to live high off the hog.
    And I if these clowns can’t see through the trickery and deception, as you correctly suggested, it’s best to leave them to boil in their own fat.
    They are shameless partisans, drinking the cool aid from George’ and Roebuck Streets. May their bellies bust!!!
    Enjoy your weekend. Keep up the good work.
    Respect due .

    Like

  • And within five short years the same Mottley has him on his way to Washington to live high off the hog.
    And I if these clowns can’t see through the trickery and deception, as you correctly suggested, it’s best to leave them to boil in their own fat.
    They are shameless partisans, drinking the cool aid from George’ and Roebuck Streets. May their bellies bust!!!

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    THEY ARE MORE THAN THAT CRABS IN THE BARREL.

    PROBABLY BENEFACTORS OF THE SAME ONGOING CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES SURRONDING THE 2 MAIN POLITICAL PARTIES WHETHER BLP OR DLP.

    WHO WANTS A NEW PLAYER ON THE BLOCK WHEN ONE KNOWS HOW TO LINE THE POCKETS WITHIN THE EXISTING STRUCTURE OF OVER 50 YEARS.

    Like

  • @BAJE April 22, 2022 12:58 AM ” SOME DON’T KNOW WHAT THE FACTS ARE AS IT RELATES TO THE USA JUST ACCEPTING THE ABOVE BY THEIR ACCREDITED UNIVERSITIES/COLLEGES. ALL STUDENTS WHETHER AMERICAN OR FOREIGN MUST TAKE THE SAT OR ACT WITH MIMIMUM PASSED SCORE BASED ON THE UNIVERSITY/COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE STANDARD BEING APPLIED TO. THIS HAS BEEN THE CASE FOR AT LEAST THE LAST 30 YEARS. FAIL THE SAT OR ACT AND NO MATTER HOW MANY CXC OR CAPE SUBJECTS PASSED WILL REMAIN IN THE 2 x 3 ISLAND OR IN THE REGION.”

    This is a common misunderstanding of international education. And “yes” I am an actual expert in international education.

    Hundreds of thousands of foreign students who enter USA universities every year never take the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) since the biggest of cohort of foreign students entering USA universities are from China, about 200,000 Chinese students are present in the USA at any given time. Typically their English is not yet good enough that having them take the SAT would give an accurate measure of their aptitude for university education. Such students, that is students whose first language is not English take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Alas USA universities are not perfect, and it is not unknown that sometimes a Bajan or other native English Caribbean student is asked to take the TOEFL. However USA admissions officials are not stupid and a letter from a guidance counselor of Ministry official will bring the admissions office to understanding and the student is advised to take the SAT.

    But “yes” typically Bajan and other native English speaking Caribbean students will take the SAT and will do well on it. However the SAT is not the only or even the most important item needed for admission to a USA university. Excellent or very good CXC and/or CAPE grades are also very important. After all CXC and CAPE tests exactly what and how well a student has learned English, Math, Physics, Geography etc. Excellent CXC/CAPE results assures the USA universities that the students have an excellent foundation on which the universities can build a tertiary education. In addition universities look at what else the student brings to the university, leadership qualities? sporting or artistic ability? diversity? etc.

    In addition a student may decide to attend a community college in the USA. The SAT may not be required for these. On successful completion of a 2 year the student can seek admission to the 3rd year of a 4 year university program.

    Canadian UK and other Commonwealth universities only very, very rarely ask for the SAT. These Commonwealth universities are very familiar with the Caribbean educational systems and readily admit students with excellent, very good or good CXC/CAPE grades. Again for some programs universities also look for that something else. An essay perhaps? Or for example a student who wants to study fine art, architecture or design will very likely have to produce a portfolio of drawings in addition the CXC and or CAPE, a dance student may have to produce a video, a music student a recording etc. Before Covid and perhaps reinstated now performing arts students may have to attend an in-person audition.

    In conclusion it is not true to write “FAIL THE SAT OR ACT AND NO MATTER HOW MANY CXC OR CAPE SUBJECTS PASSED WILL REMAIN IN THE 2 x 3 ISLAND OR IN THE REGION.”

    Our children are blessed with various gifts. We should NEVER say or do anything to discourage any of them.

    Like

  • And actually a student can take the SAT at anytime, although uni’s prefer that the test result is no more than 2 years old. Just for practice and for fun my little susie took it at 15. Scored in the 95th percentile, in the language section that is in the top 5% of the up to 3 million or students who take the test each year . Went into a career in which language is very, very important. Susie attended public Bajan schools all the way, Then public regional and foreign universities. I am a big believer in public education. A little girl who was raised in my gap scored a combined 1490 out of a possible 1500.

    I beg wunna please do not ever give up on ANY of our young people.

    Because if we do, the rest of the world is waiting to snatch them up.

    Like

  • @David April 22, 2022 1:21 AM “The blogmaster is obviously mistaken that an international student must submit a transcript with application to the college.”

    It is actually an application package.

    For example:
    Completed application form
    Transcript(s)
    Certified copies of certificates, CXC, CAPE etc.
    If entering a post-graduate program, then transcript and copy of undergraduate degree
    Standardized test results, that is SAT, ACT, GRE, GMAT
    Perhaps the results of one or more SAT subject tests
    Perhaps an essay
    At the post graduate level very likely up to 3 references, two of which must be from academics
    MONEY. Evidence of how the student/parents/government is going to pay for the tuition and other costs.
    And before actual admission evidence that the student has been immunized against the formerly common and dangerous “childhood” diseases measles, mumps, diptheria, polio etc.

    But all of this varies by jurisdiction. And Commonwealth universities even the very best ones are not likely to require “American” standardized test results.

    It is a big world. Room enough for everybody.

    I think.

    Like

  • @William Skinner April 22, 2022 1:25 AM “we never hear of these highly adorned students after the hoopla is over.”

    Because we don’t hear, that doesn’t mean that they are not there doing excellent work. Off the top of my head I can think of 3 now, all physicians doing heroic work in the current pandemic. Working long hours for a government salary. Work that has saved lives. Sometimes our brightest and our best are also NOT attention seekers. They work hard and work well without drawing attention to themselves. These 3 have had both local/regional and foreign education, but have CHOSEN to remain in Barbados to serve their own people. I am sure that there are dozens or hundreds more. For example who do you think keeps our water safe? Who ensures that it meets or exceeds the WHO standard for safe water.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “We can rename every school in Barbados but we dare not touch the golden two.”

    aspiring to keep the slave master’s stench alive while bartering for reparations….while whitewashing the same slavery crimes for the prostituting tourism sector……dangerous hypocrites…

    “We have lost almost three generations because of our Eurocentric thinking.
    It is going to take two generations to undo the damage, we have inflicted on our children and grandchildren”

    i put it at 3 generations because of the degree of damage, but hope you are right.

    “They are shameless partisans, drinking the cool aid from George’ and Roebuck Streets. May their bellies bust!!!”

    no one pays attention to political pimps and clowns on here anymore, most just pass over their comments without pausing, it’s a sickness with them and might be contagious, we have moved on to much better….big things are happening, and they are still stuck with Alice in Wonderland, but it looks good on them, they have been wearing it since i came on the blog……..regressive, bad omen, bad Karma…..

    Like

  • Was reading where school children felt they were being discriminated against because of wearing dreadlocks.

    Sometimes, I read a story and I wonder if it is about a place in the USA. But I know that there are many schools in the USA where wearing dreadlocks would not be an issue and that many schools are becoming more accepting of the ‘black experience’. Why is it that we (Bajans) seem to have a negative attitude about some of our brothers? We seem unable to release these prejudiced ideas once they have taken root.

    Warning: Not a fan of dreadlocks and would advise my son against wearing them. But that is where I stop.

    Like

  • ” SOME DON’T KNOW WHAT THE FACTS ARE AS IT RELATES TO THE USA”

    I would hAve ended right there.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Sometimes, I read a story and I wonder if it is about a place in the USA. ”

    who just legislated against hair discrimination in the ENTIRETY….no exceptions…

    but Barbados is working overtime to keep up the ANTI-BLACK AFRIKAN charade, within their usual slave status designation….and still pretend to be Afrikan, Well, we know why, there is no choice but to, if they had a choice, they would not choose the embrace Afrika route……

    ……something is very wrong psychologically….

    I worked in the corporate world in NYC for a long time and never had any problem with my dreadlocks, which were never covered. It was seen as REAL HAIR……..but step into Barbados and the slaves are all ready to attack…negative indoctrination..breeds discrimination……….

    Like

  • @23, 2022 8:09 AM “Warning: Not a fan of dreadlocks and would advise my son against wearing them. But that is where I stop.”

    I am surprised at this.

    I like having fun with my hair and I have worn it every which way. And I’ve always received compliments whether it was in a big ‘fro or a small one, cornrows, fake braids, straightened long or short, or dreadlocks. when I rocked my black and silver dreadlocks I got the most compliments, especially from old me like you Theo. Lol!

    There should be no rules about hair except for health and safety requirements. We all bathe. We all wash our hair. We all wear clean clothes. Long hair should be covered to prevent it becoming entangled in playground equipment, this is especially so for little kids. Or for the older children to prevent is getting into to lab equipment, or construction equipment. And it does not matter whether the hair is on the head of a person whose recent ancestors came from the Caribbean, Africa, Asia, Europe, North or South America, Australia/New Zealand, Micronesia or ALL of the above. Long hair is long hair and can pose a hazard. That’s all. No other rules.

    I like cornrows on school girls and boys. Neat. Easy to do. Cheap to do. Won’t get caught in equipment. Can be washed without undoing the style, so saves busy mothers time.

    By recent ancestors I mean the last 5,000 years or so.

    Like

  • And contrary to what BAJE says, many universities in the USA and elsewhere, perhaps most, have different admissions requirements for mature students. That is students who are about 25 or older [the age varies from university to university] At this age the applicant is no longer a giddy teenager [not that all teenager are giddy] but mature students may be using some of their money, may have a job and earning a degree may lead to to a promotion or a higher salary etc., may be more certain what they want out of life etc. One of my children entered university 2 weeks after 18th birthday, another entered at 23. Both completed their degrees on time and with very good grades, and successfully entered the work world.

    Intelligence, hard work and integrity are not taught at university. Intelligence, hard work and integrity. good health in addition to a university degree or 2 or more tends to lead to a life typically described as successful.

    There is a big, big world out there. Room enough for everybody, room for the teachers, accountants, engineers, doctors, artists, builders, policy makers, business people, entrepreneurs.

    Even room for the lawyers.

    And politicians. Lol!

    There is no need for us to put down each other. When I want to be entertained I don’t call an engineer, and when I want my hair done I don’t call a doctor, and if I need a beautiful dress made I don’t call a lawyer, and for my surgery I didn’t go to a prime minister.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Let us celebrate ALL of our wonderful children. Let us honor ALL their gifts.

    On my way to a pharmacist now, and then to a restaurant. Happy to know that graduates of our system can safely dispense my medicine, happy that a Bajan doctor [both probably taught by our friend GP] could correctly diagnose me and recommend treatment, Happy that somebody is cooking my lunch right now, because I don’t feel like cooking today. Happy to have a safe ZR driver too.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Just had a glass of Bajan tap water. Glad that a team of Bajan scientists, graduates of our much maligned system are keeping my water safe. One of these scientists was raised in my gap. Educated in our public primary, secondary and tertiary schools, post-graduate education abroad. You have likely never heard of her, but if you have ever had a glass of water, a salad, a shower or brushed you teeth in Barbados she has served you.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Simple Simon

    What are you saying, that good things do happen in Barbados?

    Like

  • Yup.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Pressure on CXC to push back exams

    By Tre Greaves tregreaves@nationnews.com
    As the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) holds firm in its decision to execute May/June examinations from next week, more pressure is being placed on it to push them back.
    The Barbados Union of Teachers (BUT), Caribbean Coalition for Exam Redress, Barbados National Council of Parent-Teacher Associations (BNCPTA) and Minister of Education in Jamaica Fayval Williams have called on the regional body to be flexible and postpone Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) and Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) tests as students were “ill-prepared”.
    According to the Jamaica Information Service, Williams even called for an urgent meeting with the chairwoman of CARICOM’s Council for Human and Social Development (COHSOD), who is Barbados’ Minister of Education Kay McConney.
    The request came after Jamaica’s National Secondary Students’ Council conducted a survey between February 23 and March 8 which revealed that out of the 2 812 students surveyed, 1 754 said they needed additional time to prepare for the exams.
    “We believe our students deserve additional time for their exams and so [we will] present our case to them. Some of the other accommodations they made last year, we’re asking for those as well,” Williams said on Friday during an installation ceremony of the National Youth Advisory Council of Jamaica.
    Efforts to reach McConney yesterday were unsuccessful.
    Parent advocate and spokesperson of the Caribbean Coalition for Exam Redress, Paula-Anne Moore, told the Sunday Sun: “Maybe CXC and COHSOD will now finally pay attention to the concerns publicly expressed by parents, teachers and students since early 2021 regarding 2022 exams, now that Jamaica has come out so forcefully, in a rather unprecedented manner, advocating for a delay to the 2022 CXC exams.”
    Moore, who has been speaking out publicly since the 2020 examination results controversy, said CXC needed to act as the public continued to lose faith in the regional body.
    “There are growing calls to seek alternatives for CXC as the public exam body. Certainly greater numbers of parents are pursuing private options, nationally and regionally, as confidence in CARICOM public secondary school education has been significantly damaged, if not destroyed, based on the treatment of our children since the September 2020 release of CXC’s exam results,” she added.
    BUT president Rudy Lovell said as the regional body stands firm in its decision, they were hoping students did their best.
    “Many of the students who have to sit this year’s exams missed close to two years of face-to-face classes. There was a myriad
    of challenges; this year in addition to last year was extremely difficult for students. Some of them were unable to log in online, some students contracted COVID-19.
    “Nevertheless, the CXC has determined they are not going to postpone the exams so we are hoping that the students will have the wherewithal to cope with whatever comes their way,” Lovell said.
    However, CXC said that concessions were put in place to support students in light of the ongoing pandemic. These included as much as a 50 per cent reduction in some School-Based Assessments (SBA) and the option to defer.
    “The deferral strategy has been extended for use any time prior to the administration of a subject. Candidates will be able to defer to January or June 2023, whenever the subject is administered,” CXC stated.
    General secretary of the BNCPTA Nicole Brathwaite said the deferral option was not satisfactory for many students.
    “What CXC has been saying is there is the option to defer, but not everybody wants to push back their studies for another year. They just want a bit more time to get prepared to do the exam to enter colleges or universities in the time frame they expected.”
    Brathwaite said the additional time will be needed especially for students who have to submit SBAs. She urged CXC to listen to its clients and parents to speak up more.
    “So I think CXC needs to be more flexible under the circumstances. You need to listen to the people who are their clients and make room. Not only to say we are going to stick to our rules hard and fast, but understand that the pandemic has affected these children in so many ways and this pressure to meet these deadlines is not beneficial to their mental health,” she added.
    The May/June CAPE examinations are set from May 2 to June 10 and CSEC’s May 2 to June 3.

    Source: Nation

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  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Pacha..totally appropriate for this thread:

    “We cannot advance or appropriately defend our interests and lives as Afrikan people if we place the fate of our community in the hands of the educational establishment of our oppressors and enemies, and in the hands of those Afrikans educated in them. Afrikan peoples and Afrikan leaders should be the recipients of an Afrikan-centered education. No Afrikan should be granted leadership in the community who has not been certified through education or experience as Afrikan-centered in consciousness, identity and orientation.”
    Amos N. Wilson.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I post these things to BU because i know it’s wasted on most.

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  • Allow me to make a gigantic leap and at the same time tie two items together.
    I wish to put it to you that our conversations on Dodds and Education are both sides of the same coin or two Barbados..

    Dodds – deviants, lost, almost unsalvageable and applying the rules with all the savagery they contain to the unfortunates

    CXC -salvageable, promising future and running to bend/twist the rules for the benefit of the favored few

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    You are right, they are linked, the same archaic criminal colonial laws, and slave codes used for both…

    Like

  • The place formerly called Ryerson University is now Toronto Metropolitan University

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  • Harvard leaders and staff enslaved 79 people, university finds
    The school said it had benefited from slave-generated wealth and practiced racial discrimination

    Harvard University leaders, faculty and staff enslaved more than 70 individuals during the 17th and 18th centuries when slavery was legal in Massachusetts, according to a report chronicling the university’s deep ties to wealth generated from slave labor in the South and Caribbean — and its significant role in the nation’s long history of racial discrimination.
    More here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2022/04/26/harvard-slavery-report/

    Like

  • Harvard and the legacy of slavery
    The report is here: https://legacyofslavery.harvard.edu/

    Like

  • Teachers under pressure
    Absenteeism putting strain on system

    RECENT HIGHER LEVELS of absenteeism is putting pressure on some primary school teachers.
    President of the Association of Public Primary School Principals, Ivan Clarke, said that although some teachers may have been absent because of legitimate reasons such as COVID-19 precautions, some schools had been under pressure.
    “We are finding just a little higher number of absenteeism than normal, because when someone is ill they go and get tested to take the precautions.
    “However, there is some pressure because those teachers who do special subjects, have to be pulled from their programmes and they have to fill in. Before you could’ve put the children together but now we can’t. So those are the subjects that suffered in the last term, ” Clarke said.
    Not only were specialist teachers substituting, he said some principals also had to.
    “There were some principals who said the last term they had to take up some of the slack when people were out because the children must be taught and if they’re at the school they must be supervised and taught,” he added.
    He was responding to questions about the start of the Trinity and face-to-face teaching term beginning this week.
    While noting that the consistent rainfall weather the country has been experiencing since Monday could have led to the reduced numbers, Clarke said they would be keeping an eye on the trend.
    Meanwhile president of the Barbados Association of Principals of Public Secondary Schools Stephen Jackman said that he received no complaints at the end of the first day of face-toface instruction.
    Smaller roll
    “Nobody reported concerns some of us might have seen a slightly smaller roll because of the rain but there were no serious concerns,” he said.
    However, he pointed out that the COVID-19 measures were in place and the COVID Monitoring Unit had been working closely with schools.
    “From what I understand the protocols were in place. Some of us had a visit from the COVID Unit to do some measurements but that was not an issue,” Jackman added.
    Last night president of the Barbados Union of Teachers, Rudy Lovell, could not be reached for comment but on Monday said the readiness “will only be ascertained once we are on the compound”.
    He promised to inform once the association had received feedback.
    (TG)

    Source: Nation

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  • LOL
    What a set of jokers…
    Presumably when the shit REALLY hits the fan (as it will soon), we will see CXC actually distribute the exam questions in advance, to be done along with the SBAs, so that the teachers can fully assist the students to ‘succeed’ in their exams.

    It seem that ‘success’ is defined by passing these exams and getting into a university…
    NEVER mind that the brass bowls OUTPUTED from these ‘exams’ and from subsequent ‘university graduates’ are UNABLE to hold their own in ANY form of competition, even for the ownership of our OWN local assets…. far less for international penetration.

    How many CXCs are needed in order to work in a damn hotel ‘bending over’ to make visitors feel like lords and masters for a price? …or working in a Canadian-owned business or bank carrying instructions from Toronto or Ottawa to local staff?
    steupsss…

    The REAL purpose of ‘exams’ are to separate the sheep from the damn goats, so that the REALLY talented among us can be identified and TARGETED to take the place forward in the face of FIERCE international competition.
    CXC (and UWI) have managed to water down the process to the point where the sheep and the goats are now BOTH brass bowls….. and as a result, foreigners have been eating our lunch now for well over a decade….

    Bushie has been saying FOR YEARS now, that the REAL potential LEADERS in this society (those with the balls and character) have been relegated to the ‘blocks’ and the ‘ZR community’ by the stupidity of the idiotic systems that we have in place.

    As things get tighter, the foreigners will start to ration the scraps that they have been leaving us,,,(as EMERA has started to do,) …ONLY THEN will we understand that the point of ‘exams’ is NOT to ensure that any and every jackass can bray….

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    “Bushie has been saying FOR YEARS now, that the REAL potential LEADERS in this society (those with the balls and character) have been relegated to the ‘blocks’ and the ‘ZR community’ by the stupidity of the idiotic systems that we have in place”

    say it louder for SLOW LEARNERS… those with degrees from degree mills sitting at the back.. believing they arrived..

    saw them bigging up a VP, who works under a Managing Director, who works under a Director, who works under a Vice President who works under a President, who works under a CEO who works under a….and so on and so on….so a VP is low down on the food chain…in any corporate setting….but don’t tell that to the GIDDY…

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