Do not Entertain it

Grenville Phillips

Contracts tend to consist of three main components: labour, materials, and profit. The prices of materials are expected to increase significantly because of the conflict in Ukraine. Those with fixed contracts, with a significant materials component, may have to choose between: (i) finishing the contract and going bankrupt, (ii) renegotiating the contract, or (iii) terminating the contract.

A construction contract normally has a significant materials component – most of the materials tend to become the built product. If the increased cost of materials is the same as the Contractor’s profit, then the Contractor may break even. If it exceeds the profit, the Contractor may make a loss. If the Contractor has multiple projects, then the losses may accumulate, leading to bankruptcy.

BUY MATERIALS NOW.

A Developer (eg home owner) who has a building contract with a Contractor, needs to discuss the foreseen price increases with their bank and contractor immediately. The risk of increased costs may be avoided if all the building’s materials are purchased now – before their prices increase.

A fair and low-risk method of purchasing all the materials now, is for the Developers to request their bankers to release all the funds for materials as banker’s checks, written directly to the material suppliers.

START NEGOTIATING.

If the Developers’ banks are uncooperative, then the Contractors should negotiate a 6-month loan or overdraft facility with their bank, for the sole use of purchasing the building materials.

If the Developers’ and Contractors’ banks are uncooperative, then both Developer and Contractor should attempt to negotiate the purchase of the materials, with delayed (perhaps 3-month) payment terms. This would require the Contractor to take the profit component of the contract on the final payment from the Developer, and to work without delay.

NEW CONTRACTS.

Where contracts have not yet been signed, then an advanced payment may be negotiated to purchase all the materials at the start of the contact. This money may be paid directly to the material suppliers, to secure the materials for the Developer’s project, and reduce the risk of them being used on other projects the Contractor may be working on.

It should be noted that existing contracts may be amended, once the amendment is agreed by both parties. The aims of the contract should be the timely completion of the building, at the contract price. Given the likely price-increase risks, which were not anticipated before the war, both sides should be willing to negotiate any amendments to the contract that would facilitate achieving those aims in the current environment.

IRRELEVANT ADVICE.

This advice is especially relevant to projects that are funded by the Government. If material costs increase, then taxes will likely be raised to pay for the increases. However, this increase is only relevant to projects that were procured through competitive tendering.

For no-bid contracts given to political supporters, Barbadian residents have already overpaid many times over on the materials – therefore, no increases of those contracts should be entertained.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer. He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

95 comments

  • No bid contracts and the inflated costs to tax payers and the foreign exchange account
    Rent paid by central government and SOE’s to private sector land lords

    Two key areas where tremendous savings could be made, and no one mentions them in any discussion of the budget

    Like

  • Procurement and issuing contracts by the government/public sector is the legitimate channel how tax dollars can be seamlessly channeled to ‘supporters’. This is the tactic used by politicians here there are everywhere.

    Like

  • When Government continues to pay between 60 and 100 million dollars a year in rent, no matter the administration in power, there has to be a quid pro quo hidden in there somewhere as well

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Another sane voice…glad to see you BAFBFP.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David
    “Procurement and issuing contracts by the government/public sector is the legitimate channel how tax dollars can be seamlessly channeled to ‘supporters’. This is the tactic used by politicians here there are everywhere.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Not quite EVERYWHERE.
    There are a few countries where such blatant thievery is NOT entertained, and particularly where citizens DO NOT throw their hands up and say “nothing to see here….’ ..as your comment seems to strongly suggest….

    Like

  • Hi Baffy
    nice to see ya

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Bush Tea

    Which countries? List them so that we can model processes and best practices.

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE Which countries? List them so that we can model processes and best practices.
    CAN A LEOPARD CHANGE HIS SPOTS?
    CAN WE REMEMBER EDUTECH?
    NICE TO SEE YOU BAFFY, OLE BOY

    Like

  • March 16, 2022 8:08 AM

    @Bush Tea

    Which countries? List them so that we can model processes and best practices.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Singapore is up there.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corruption_in_Singapore#:~:text=Corruption%20in%20Singapore%20is%20generally,the%20public%20and%20private%20sectors.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Weren’t we for ever trying to ape Singapore?

    Guess we failed abysmally!!

    Actions speak louder than words.

    Liked by 1 person

  • &2U2 Bushy

    Like

  • (Quote):
    Procurement and issuing contracts by the government/public sector is the legitimate channel how tax dollars can be seamlessly channeled to ‘supporters’. This is the tactic used by politicians here there are everywhere.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    It’s simply called corruption and nepotism.

    It might be acceptable to many in Barbados but clearly this practice is neither “legitimate” nor legal in your “Christian’ society in which Marcus Mal(m)oney is the Chief Rabbi.

    How else would the razzmatazz elections in Barbados be financed and certain ministers get filthy rich while holding office with the probability of ending up in prison uniform in some American penal system?

    Why then make such a fuss over the ‘arranged’ failure of the political class in implementing the new anti-corruption and FOI laws?

    Why would corrupt politicians- like those involved in the recent Vaccine-gate scandal- construct a legal gallows to potentially hang their own kind?

    Like

  • Singapore is up there.
    ~~~~~~
    Thank you John. David is well aware…
    There are others too, where graft has been controlled to an extent, and where there is a semblance of justice.
    But EVEN IF THIS WAS NOT SO… this would be no excuse for our complacency and lack of OUTRAGE.

    @ Miller
    …any reason why you are avoiding mention of ‘the lack of AUDIT of client fees held by lawyers’ in your otherwise accurate and wide assessment above…?
    ..asking for a mutual friend.
    LOL

    Like

  • A Businessman willing to pay for play is not corruption, A politician willing to “listen” to said businessman is not corruption and a Civil Servant(s) failing (either deliberately or through incompetence) to do their job is not corruption. But put the three together and we have synergy.
    Replace the civil servants with robots or hold them accountable. The COVID vaccine scam is a perfect example. Is that PS still employed?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Bush Tea,

    No need for AUDIT of client fees held by lawyers’

    Fees put to good use. lol

    ” said he did not launder the money, adding he helped “a lot of people who were in need”.

    Like

  • That’s a lie hanging fruit. Can be solved in no time.

    Surprised no administration will pick the fruit.

    Like

  • Singapore apparently pays its politicians exceptionally well. So it is still an expensive exercise

    Like

  • @ Baffy
    How is it an ‘expensive exercise’ to pay exceptionally well for exceptional service to the people?
    That is called ‘paying money for value’.
    Besides you should research the consequences of bribery and incompetence that goes with the salary.
    Have you any idea what private companies pay their executives for their loyalty and commitment to the business?

    Like

  • Man Bush the guys in Singapore are paid BIG time. Private sector people on the other hand, are expected to be a part of the earning process. It is said that a good CEO costs the company nothing since he brings in more than he costs.

    In any event, Ministers (Cabinet) are the equivalent of DIRECTORS (board). They operate at the level of policy/direction. The last time I checked, Directors are paid STIPENDS.

    Like

  • Bushie can see where you are coming from. However you may be allowing what we refer to as ‘ministers’ bout here, to contaminate the REAL meaning and value of a Minister of State, in a real-real country… where POLICY direction and VISION are understood and valued.
    Trust Bushie on this…Baffy,
    Where there is VISION, the people flourish…
    The role of Leadership, vision and coherent policy-making cannot be overvalued… in the success of a country (or organization)

    Like

  • @Bush Tea

    Leadership of anything entity/people is priceless. That goes without saying.

    Like

  • I have a vision. you have a vision. People have visions. But PMs have visions too, and if your vision does not mesh with the PMs vision, you should decide to leave and set up else where… or yah goose cook’

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  • Rihanna had a vision too. She speaks of it quite a lot. In Barbados her vision would not be worth the pillow that she slept on. Bynoe has had a vision for over twenty years. He invested in quite a bit of equipment in an effort to realize that vision. This is PM number four since he started, and still there is no common ground. But his white competitor’s vision is being entertained.

    Like

  • @Baffy

    It is unconscionable what successive black governments have done to Bynoe. In fact unforgivable.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Successive governments have not listened to BAPE.

    Engineers: Plan to realise green vision lacking
    THE Barbados Association of Professional Engineers has given Monday’s Financial Statement And Budgetary Proposals presented by Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley the thumbs up.
    But according to president Trevor Browne, there are concerns regarding how everything will be implemented in the area of green technology.
    “We are particularly impressed by the Government’s focus on pressing forward with the national greening initiative and the clear intent to improve efficiencies and the quality of services to the public, rather than taking a defensive tax and contract approach,” Browne said in a statement to the media.
    The engineer, who is also president of the Barbados Sustainable Energy Cooperation, said the one small disappointment was the lack of an income tax incentive, such as up to $10 000 per year for the next three years for direct investments by Barbadians in the renewable energy sector, where the investments are made through a cooperative entity.
    “We felt that this would go a long way in changing the culture of ordinary Barbadians towards the important matter of investing in our own productive enterprises.
    “Having said that, however, the Prime Minister presented a compelling case to the country for this reluctance on the part of ordinary Bajans to invest to change urgently,” added Browne.
    He noted that planning, problem-solving and the implementation of national policies were still a humbug to development in the green sector.
    “We have been extremely concerned at the lack of a comprehensive, detailed national plan which details our path to success in this brilliant and innovative policy. The headlong rush to install as many solar panels as possible is actually quite short-sighted in the absence
    of a full understanding of the complex consequences we will face a few years down the road as a result,” the engineer said.
    He believes Government’s policies are in dire need of engineering planning, four years after they were first envisioned.
    “What we would like to see is the same level of high-quality thought, public communication and strategic planning that have been applied to the excellent policies outlined in the budget also reflected in the architecture and engineering of the necessary solutions that arise from the policies,” the president said.
    (BA/PR)

    Like

  • There is an Energy Smart Fund 2, IADB worth around 40 MILLION dollars. You could bet that there are consultants that have doing all manner of studies that have tapped into that fund. But where are the tangible results..? It has been quite a few years now. With 40 million dollars one would think that Barbados would be well on its way to being “green”

    White people laffin’ at we

    Like

  • The blogmaster was privy to a conversation with the late Leron Gibbs etal and the discussion turned to the piece of equipment Bynoe has sitting up there unable to use because of government’s ineptness. And we talk about going green and nurturing black business. The late Sinckler MoF had it within his authority to waive duties on the equipment and clear a path for it to operate.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Bush Tea March 16, 2022 11:41 AM
    (Quote):
    @ Miller
    …any reason why you are avoiding mention of ‘the lack of AUDIT of client fees held by lawyers’ in your otherwise accurate and wide assessment above…?
    ..asking for a mutual friend.
    LOL
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Because the (majority) of lawyers in the brass-bowl land are certified crooks who tend to believe that they can operate ‘above’ the Law.

    Which other “profession” would you find so many ‘educated con-artists who have perfected the art of combining two of the biggest sins of lying and stealing to make the lives of honest ordinary citizens pure misery?

    Why do you think that there are so many to be found making up the political class in the same nepotistic Parliament competing under the twin-coloured umbrella which our William Skinner aptly describes as the ‘Duopoly’ of tricksters and scammers.

    Why do you think our man BAFBFP (Baffy aka Anti-America for the radio call-in show) despises that profession with the same fervency as the son of your ‘own’ BBE?

    Like

  • Sinkler is diseased?

    Like

  • @ Miller and Bush Tea

    ” Minister of Housing, Lands and Maintenance, Dwight Sutherland has given property owners notice that Government is exploring its options about what can legally be done to “unlock” the majority of the
    35 000 unoccupied properties and vacant lots across the country.”

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/03/17/vacant-houses-and-idle-lots-could-be-put-to-use-as-part-of-govts-housing-plan/

    Like

  • @ BAFBFP

    I think he meant former MoF Sinckler

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ BAFBFP,

    Good to see you on BU again.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ha ha ha .. It has been close to a decade. Man so good to see the old names still around. Apparently GP has moved on

    Like

  • The Barbados Association of Professional Engineers (BAPE) has mostly welcomed the measures announced in Monday’s Budget but expressed concern that a comprehensive plan for achieving 100 per cent reliance on renewable energy is missing.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/03/17/where-is-plan-for-renewable-energy/

    Like

  • BT
    ARE YOU SAYING THAT SINCKLER WS GUILTY OF THIS DIVINE EDICT
    Proverbs 3:27
    “Withhold not good from them to whom it is due, when it is in the power of thine hand to do it.”

    Like

  • LOTS OF WORK FOR LAWYERS

    ” Government is exploring its options about what can legally be done to “unlock” the majority of the
    35 000 unoccupied properties and vacant lots across the country “

    Liked by 1 person

  • Critical Analyzer

    The unoccupied properties and vacant lots problems will go away quickly if the title ownership validation and transfer sale process is cleaned up to where a lawyer is not needed for properties valued under a certain value and the whole title transfer process can be completed within a month. Transferring a title deed should be as simple as transferring vehicle ownership.

    I personally know of three vacant lots in limbo in my family. None of us are interested in pursuing because the outstanding taxes are too high, process too onerous and time consuming to risk trying to take ownership unless one of us decides to squat.

    Like

  • What is a vacant lot?
    If the taxes are paid up,, but the land is unused for a number o.f years or the plot is not built on, is it considered a vacant lot?

    It would be interesting to find out who are the owners of these vacant lots
    and where they are located. Are they on the island or in the Diaspora?

    Like

  • What is this ‘piece of equipment’?

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  • Leading from the front ?

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  • Critical Analyzer

    The electric car thing is good on a very small scale but is a big joke when you do the numbers unless they develop capacitor technology that can store all the solar captured during the day to charge cars when we come work at night and plug in our cars.

    Electric vehicles take power to charge and we are all starting to charge at that 5-7pm time when most people get home from work and that will require more diesel generators to provide reliable power to charge electric cars unless we have found a way to harness solar power in the dark or keep the wind constantly blowing at 30mph everyday to power a wind farm.

    We have not even started to talk about the environmentally hazardous metals in the batteries themselves. Short story, electric cars are not ready for prime-time.

    Like

  • C/A is correct. Many many vacant lots are vacant because the lawyers are holding up the legal processes to give title.

    Got those in my family too!

    Like

  • And many vacant lots belong to owners who pay no attention to keeping them clean.

    Like

  • I have one of each case next door. Both family members. I reported the lots to the authorities.

    Like

  • TheO,

    Both, I would suspect.

    Like

  • @TheOGazerts March 17, 2022 10:08 PM “What is a vacant lot?”

    My response: a lot that is not being uses for agriculture, housing, recreation, business or any other socially/economically productive purpose.

    @TheOGazerts March 17, 2022 10:08 PM “If the taxes are paid up, but the land is unused for a number o.f years or the plot is not built on, is it considered a vacant lot?”

    My response: In our family’s case the taxes are paid up

    @TheOGazerts March 17, 2022 10:08 PM “It would be interesting to find out who are the owners of these vacant lots. and where they are located. Are they on the island or in the Diaspora?”

    My response: owned jointly by at home and overseas Bajans. We have clear title. The lawyer was actually very good, reasonable and quick

    Like

  • @Critical Analyzer March 17, 2022 8:16 PM “…the outstanding taxes are too high…”

    Why did the family permit taxes to mount?

    Like

  • @David March 19, 2022 2:10 PM “And many vacant lots belong to owners who pay no attention to keeping them clean.”

    What is clean David?

    If my vacant lot has grasses, bushes, and trees on it. In other words all living green things, how is green dirty?

    After all I am not the one to discard plastic, old appliances and dead dogs on my own property.

    So ease up on the property owners, ok.

    My property is green, not dirty. grasses, bushes and trees are NOT dirty.

    Like

  • Will the vacant lots become a version of eminent domain where land is grabbed for the “best interest of the nation”

    Will the victims be recipient of J-Bonds?

    Will this be a next transfer of wealth from a few unfortunates to select beneficiaries?

    Will Mr MM be chosen as a builder on the land taken from Mr hand-to-mouth

    Bajans are asked to speak out now. I don’t want to see letters to BU from another Mr “black man”

    Like

  • Overgrown lots in residential areas pose problems for residents. It’s not only garbage and dead animals thrown by others that pose problems.

    The problems should be obvious and so I will not even list them

    Like

  • HantsMarch 17, 2022 7:13 PM

    LOTS OF WORK FOR LAWYERS

    ” Government is exploring its options about what can legally be done to “unlock” the majority of the
    35 000 unoccupied properties and vacant lots across the country “

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    35,000 lots at perhaps 1/4 acre a lot is about 9,000 acres.

    A plantation might be 200 acres or so which means that 35,000 acres is about 45 plantations.

    Efficient use of these lands in agriculture pre during and post WWII was what provided the employment and source of funds to pull Barbados out of its misery.

    These 35,000 lots are the result of having no agricultural policy and deliberately permitting connected elites to get permissions for change of use from agriculture to residential and make a killing.

    Pick a plantation that has been “sold out” in lots and what you will find is that it has many “bottoms” that do not lend themselves to housing or areas that are sitting on caves.

    The developers have made long made their killing on the lots they have been able to develop and sell already but having made the profit they want more and more.

    they picked a plum from a tree and in so doing they cut it down.

    The construction sector of our economy is based on the inefficient and unintelligent use of land and produces a demand for water which the country cannot supply.

    Unless the GOB plans on bringing back the lots into productive agriculture which is well nigh impossible, it has to be satisfied with watching the vacant unused lots grow bush and their decisions transform our country from the Garden it once was to a dump.

    There are two articles on Barbados appearing in the National Geographic in the 1940’s and 50’s describing the utilisation of land for agriculture which is worth reading.

    I got them somewhere so I can give a date and those interested can take a look at what Barbados used to look like.

    Like

  • January 1941 and March 1952.

    If you can, check these back issues of Nat Geo.

    Like

  • Here is what the area around the Crane looked like in 1951.

    … and here is what it looks like on Google Earth today!!

    Your mission, should you decide to accept it , is to identify the unused lots in this area and decide on what should be done with them!!

    Like

  • Here is another 1952 aerial view of Barbados from Nat Geo.

    … and here is what it looks like now.

    Anyone can figure out where this is??

    Hint: Check ABC Highway!!

    Like

  • You mean nobody don’t know where this is?

    So how you going to locate the 35,000 vacant lots?

    Like

  • @John

    Why keep us in suspense? Why don’t you tell us the location?

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  • It gotta be one of, or a few of the Deane lands. The Kingsland affair.

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  • Nope!!!

    Nothing to do with my family.

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  • Strait from Nat Geo 70 years ago.

    My family owned Husbands Plantation in those days and Adams Castle!!

    One is in St, James and the other is far away in Bajan terms.

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  • …straight … for Grasshopper!!

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  • So, of what use is the land in the area?

    Once it is concretized, it is of little use.

    How many people live in all these houses?

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  • Just came back here and saw your many posts. Great posts.

    Your picture indicating the change in land use over time is surprising..

    I am struggling to recall who own Husband’s plantation. I seem to recall that Friendly Hall and Broomfield was owned by the Wards.

    The Wards ran the color spectrum as one of them still had the slave master mentality when it came to his female workers.

    Like

  • @John
    If I get your cryptic one word answer, the image presented is part of Balls Plantation, I was going to guess Wotton (Kingsland)

    Like

  • @ John March 23, 2022 10:45 PM
    (Quote):
    Strait from Nat Geo 70 years ago.
    My family owned Husbands Plantation in those days and Adams Castle!!
    One is in St, James and the other is far away in Bajan terms.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Your extracts from the Nat. Geo are enlightening and confirms the then editor(s) assessment of rural Barbados as being reminiscent of the English countryside transported to the tropics.

    Little England was clearly ‘made’ in the image of Somerset.

    What you Sir John ought to tell us if your family who owned plantations also benefited from the large payout the British government made to the same plantation owners as ‘compensation’ for the loss of their black chattels and cattle called slaves.

    And if they did benefit, then you and your current family can expect a claim from those entitled to receive back-pay overdue to their ancestors.

    Like

  • MillerMarch 24, 2022 9:45 AM

    @ John March 23, 2022 10:45 PM
    (Quote):
    Strait from Nat Geo 70 years ago.
    My family owned Husbands Plantation in those days and Adams Castle!!
    One is in St, James and the other is far away in Bajan terms.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Your extracts from the Nat. Geo are enlightening and confirms the then editor(s) assessment of rural Barbados as being reminiscent of the English countryside transported to the tropics.

    Little England was clearly ‘made’ in the image of Somerset.

    What you Sir John ought to tell us if your family who owned plantations also benefited from the large payout the British government made to the same plantation owners as ‘compensation’ for the loss of their black chattels and cattle called slaves.

    And if they did benefit, then you and your current family can expect a claim from those entitled to receive back-pay overdue to their ancestors.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I’ve told you this a zillion times already, you must be suffering from dementia!!

    I have two ancestors on my mother’s side who received compensation from the England.

    One was a former female slave and the other her former owner who manumitted her and her first child and then together had 9 more children.

    He left more or less everything (including two plantations one of them over 300 acres) to her and her children … some to another woman of colour and her child.

    Whatever compensation she received from her ownership of slaves would have gone to her children.

    …. and so it was with many other Barbadian families.

    If you do the research you will find that out of a total population of 800K slaves emancipated by Great Britain, about 80K were Bajans, that’s about 10%.

    Of the 20 million GBP paid out, Barbadian slave owners would have received 2 million GBP.

    Even if the 2 million GBPs had been split among the 80K slaves, each one would have received less than 20 GBP’s, peanuts.

    Instead, each slave received an education, training and grounding in the Christian faith, worth multiple times more than any cash you might imagine should have come to them.

    My father’s family is from Venezuela so his side would have received nothing from England and his ancestors were also slaves.

    “Enslaved Africans were transported to Venezuela mostly in the eighteenth century to work on the numerous cocoa plantations. Despite proposals by Simón Bolívar, ‘The Liberator’, slavery was not abolished upon independence in 1811, but rather some forty years later with the Law of Abolition of Slavery of 1854.”

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  • My Grandfather, who hailed from Negroman John Cuffley in 1721 bought Adams Castle in 1939 using a mortgage on a salary of $80.00 per month.

    He was either very lucky, very smart or blessed because WWII elevated the price of sugar by multiple times allowing him to pay off his mortgage quickly and buy Husbands and Oxnards (about 400 acres) in 1948.

    With the continued high price of sugar through the 1950’s and into the 1960’s, his family, wife, 5 sons and 2 daughters bought Hanson Plantation in 1954, Wotton Plantation in 1961 and Bannatyne Plantation in 1965.

    Like

  • Here’s what was going on with sugar at the time and why sugar prices soared.

    Like

  • @ John March 24, 2022 10:30 AM
    (Quote):
    Even if the 2 million GBPs had been split among the 80K slaves, each one would have received less than 20 GBP’s, peanuts.
    Instead, each slave received an education, training and grounding in the Christian faith, worth multiple times more than any cash you might imagine should have come to them.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Agree with you there, Dearest John!

    What else do black Bajans want other than their ‘inherited’ sweet white Jesus!

    No wonder there so full of diabetes!

    And what did the slave owners do with their compensation packages?
    Build hotels and brothels?

    All this talk of reparations is rather uppity of the descendants of those slaves.

    After all, that “20 GBP’s “ of the 1840’s is still equivalent to 20 pounds sterling bus fare in 2022.

    As for suffering from “dementia”, have you forgotten that general elections took place in May 2018 and January 2022?

    Or are you planning to be around in 2027 to vote for your MIA LOTO?

    Like

  • Ok Sarge, here is another one!!

    !951 vs the present.

    Find the vacant lots today!!

    Here is 1951.

    Here is the present from Google Earth!!

    The land is actually useless.

    Tell us where it is!!

    Like

  • Where are the vacant lots?

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  • You all real slow!!!

    Like

  • TheOGazertsMarch 24, 2022 6:00 AM

    The Wards ran the color spectrum as one of them still had the slave master mentality when it came to his female workers.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    … or was it the village ram?

    Like

  • Grasshopper

    You are confusing Husbands St. Lucy with Husbands in St. James.

    Husbands, St. Lucy
    1635 Ligon map – Macock
    1642 1/140 William Foster of St. Lucy carpenter, sells to Lt. Thomas Maycock of St. Lucy, 24 ac, St. Lucy. This 24 ac being part of 40 ac bought by Foster from Roger Blondell whose pltn was 200 ac
    Bounders: W & NE) The Cliff and the sea
    1645 1/650 Matthew Key sells 20 ac, St. Lucy to Lt. Thomas Maycock
    Bounders: Lt. Thomas Maycock
    1668 6/232 Margaret Hush, widow of St. Lucy, sells to Thomas Maycock, Snr, and Capt. Thomas Maycock, jnr, 31 ac, St. Lucy, 26 slaves
    Bounders: Richard Skidbury, William Jordan, Thomas Clutterbuck, Robert Stroud, Roger Gregory, John Kendall, Thomas Jackson

    1668 6/577 Matthew Hardaker sells to Thomas Maycock snr, and Thomas Maycock jnr, 20 ac, St. Lucy
    Bounders: (E) Tohmas Maycock, snr, (S) Robert Downman (Harrisons), (N) Richard Ross, (W) The sea

    1668 7/116 Thomas Maycock, Snr, gives to Thomas Maycock, jnr, both of St. Lucy ½ of pltn of 360 ac, St. Lucy, on the occasion of the marriage of Thomas Maycock jnr, to Mary Berringer. The gift being for the purpose of the support of Thomas Maycock, jnr and his wife. Thomas Maycock jnr, to receive the other ½ at his father’s death. Included in the gift are ½ the Christian servants and ½ the Negro slaves
    Bounders: (Windward) Maj. Samuel Tidcombe (Bromefield), (Leeward) Robert Downman, (Harrisons) “From Crab Hill to the Sea”

    1674 Maycock (Capt. Thomas Maycock age 57 in 1659)
    1680 Thomas Maycock, 399 ac, St. Lucy
    1691 27/? Thomas Maycock executor of will of Thomas Maycock snr, brings Chancery Court suit seeking levy on land held by Samuel Lambert and his wife, Mary Lambert who was formerly Mary Maycock, née Berringer, the wife of Thomas Maycock, dec’d and mother of the plaintiff who is executor of his grandfather’s estates. The plaintiff seeks to recover £5000. The plaintiff is granted 135 ac, St. Lucy formerly the property of the plaintiff’s grandfather. Land appraised @ £16 per ac
    Bounders: Samuel Tidcombe (Bromefield), Lt. Col. Robert Harrison (Harrisons), others

    1721 Maycock (Thomas Maycock)
    1738 89/131 Surveyor’s platt of whole or part of Husbands pltn, St. Lucy
    1739 90/49 Common Pleas Levy on 78 ac of the pltn of Hon. Thomas Maycock, dec’d to satisfy debt to Hon. John Colleton of St. John. Purchaser William Gulstone. Well preserved surveyor’s platt accompanies deed.
    Appraisal of Thomas Maycock’s pltn, 378 ac, St. Lucy:
    Dwelling house £250
    Curing house £150
    Stables £25
    Boiling House £200
    Still £70
    Overseer’s House £50
    2 stone windmills £100
    Corn house £25
    Rocky land £5 per ac
    Cane land £17 per ac
    90/49–56 – Several levies on Husbands amounting to nearly 200 ac
    1756 117/94 Thomas Maycock died 1730 heavily in debt. Now his son, John Maycock, sells to Samuel Husbands:
    1) Pltn of 393 ac, St. Lucy. Husbands gives mortgage for whole purchase price
    Bounders: Henry Thornhill (Harrisons), Clarke Edwards, Amor Whytfood, Friendship, John Whitney, John Carmody, John Holmes, Simon French, Dorothy Holmes, William Moore, Thomas French, Samuel Brome (Bromefield)
    2) Mount Brevitor pltn
    1780 Chancery Court papers, B’dos Archives. Maycock v Husbands
    Impossible to read due to decay
    1825 John P. Griffith
    1842 John P. Griffith dec’d (lease to John Briggs) 256
    1846–98 John P. Poyer (’59 dec’d) (’54–’79 Rented by W.M. Howard) 256
    1859 Absentee
    1901–07 W.P.B. Shepherd 256
    1901 Steam
    1912–14 Shepherd & Poyer [1918 W.I. Com. Circ 6/3/19 sold for £15,000, but see 1924 258

    1921 Springhall Ltd 258
    1929 — Walcott 258
    1934–37 Est.of C.L. Walcott dec’d 258
    1951 S.A. Walcott
    1957/8 W.L. Armstrong
    1970 G.W. Edghill 194

    Like

  • Ok Sarge

    I realise you struggling.

    I’ll give you two clues.

    North is up and Warrens is in the picture!!

    Like

  • @John March 23 at 6: AM “satisfied with watching the vacant unused lots grow bush”

    It is not bush.

    The land has been restored to natural woodland. The land has been re-forested.

    Like

  • 20 British pounds in 1834 is worth $7,307 BDS today, and since the debt was never paid, then interest is due on the 20 pounds for the 188 years since 1834 to the present.

    Like

  • @ John March 24, 2022 10:38 AM
    (Quote):
    My Grandfather, who hailed from Negroman John Cuffley in 1721 bought Adams Castle in 1939 using a mortgage on a salary of $80.00 per month.
    (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Sir John, we are so glad to see that you have accepted the fact that you are indeed ‘BLACK’ and can never go back.

    You must always ‘remember’ that Jim Crow golden rule: Just ONE daub of the tar brush makes you ‘Colo(u)red’.

    Just to let you know that trying to pass for ‘white’ will not cut it today in Britain, North America or even in South Africa.

    But we can expect you to just carry on with your charade in false apartheid Barbadoes by promoting the worship of the bushfire YHWH instead of the adoration of the celestial RA.

    Like

  • @John
    Instead of asking folks to guess, why don’t you do a “before and after” then we could really see how the landscape has hanged

    Like

  • I’ll give you an easier one, the coast should tell you where it is!!

    I appreciate the fact Bajans are no good at maps and don’t even know their own island.

    1951

    Today

    The land has been restored to natural woodland. The land has been re-forested and in the process, it grew alot of houses!!

    So, where are the vacant lots?!!

    Like

  • Cuhdear BajanMarch 24, 2022 3:32 PM

    20 British pounds in 1834 is worth $7,307 BDS today, and since the debt was never paid, then interest is due on the 20 pounds for the 188 years since 1834 to the present.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    That’s assuming there was somewhere to put down the 20 GBP’s and did not have to be used to house, feed and clothe the freed slaves.

    In other words, if the 20GBP’s were placed in individuals hands in 1834, it would not have survived to grow.

    It was not due them in any case.

    Far better to provide land for people to feed themselves from and training and education to allow them to grow.

    Look at the picture on the coast and you will see just how many Bajans owned and farmed land in 1951.

    What has happened is all this land has been converted into houses which cannot feed or clothe.

    There is no case for reparations.

    Like

  • So where are the 35K vacant lots we are being told about?

    Are they a figment of imagination?

    Why would anyone want to mislead on this matter?

    What are 35K lots with houses worth?

    At $200K per lot and hose that is alot of millions of dollars …. maybe billions!!

    Who wants these lots?

    What are these criminals planning?

    Like

  • What has happened in this last area on the coast is that someone or someones convinced individual landowners to subdivide their agricultural lots and sell them on to others.

    The result is a cash windfall that gets blown in no time at all and two or more families who cannot feed themselves or generate income from their land.

    But, they all have a roof over their heads …. assuming the mortgagee doesn’t foreclose!!

    I wonder who owns all these lots!!!

    Like

  • Perhaps there are 35K lots which are in mortgage default!!

    Like

  • “At $200K per lot and hose that is alot of millions of dollars …. maybe billions!!

    Who wants these lots?

    What are these criminals planning?”

    They said vacant lots, but if a lot is worth more than $28K that is over a billion dollars.

    It is a transfer of wealth; a next rob quick scheme

    Like

  • You are right. I was thinking St Lucy. I forgot where, but there is also a village in Christ Church that has the same name of a village in St. Lucy.

    Like

  • So where is this and how many vacant lots do you see?

    Maybe vacant lots are lots on which no Land Tax has been paid and as far as the Land Tax folks are concerned they are vacant!!

    If you can’t get this one Grasshopper I give up!!

    Like

  • I’m going to zoom in a little closer and see if you can recognize it.

    Like

  • Cave Hill is the village right Grasshopper?

    There is also a plantation in each parish that carries the same name, Hope, in fact two, Content as well.

    Like

  • “1756 117/94 Thomas Maycock died 1730 heavily in debt. Now his son, John Maycock, sells to Samuel Husbands”:

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You see how Husbands Plantation in St. Lucy got its name.

    It wasn’t until 1756.

    Before it was Maycock, which is why Maycock’s Bay is so named.

    The Maycock family (Quakers!!) owned it from 1635 to 1756, more than a century.

    Like

  • I left Barbados years ago. I may not even recognize where I lived.

    Like

  • @ John March 24, 2022 7:02 PM
    (Quote):
    You see how Husbands Plantation in St. Lucy got its name.
    It wasn’t until 1756.
    Before it was Maycock, which is why Maycock’s Bay is so named.
    The Maycock family (Quakers!!) owned it from 1635 to 1756, more than a century.
    (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++

    We are sure that you meant to say:
    ‘Stole it from the indigenous people and immorally (and against all good Christian values) forcibly occupied it from 1635 to 1756, more than a century’.

    Like

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