Donville Inniss GUILTY as Charged

Millar told the court that in August 2015, she attended a meeting with former chief executive officer (CEO) of ICBL Ingrid Innes and former senior vice-president with responsibility for business development and marketing Alex Tasker.

Following that meeting, she said Innes instructed her to make “an urgent payment” of a referral bonus to Inniss.

She said she was uncomfortable with the request made by Innes as he was “politically exposed” and she enquired if she Innes had cleared such a transaction with the company’s chairman John Wight, to which Innes responded, “It’s fine”.

Barbados Today

723 comments

  • @ Mariposa January 18, 2020 7:08 AM

    You’re absolutely right. Looking at the local slave mentality, I wouldn’t be surprised if Donville is soon appointed ambassador or receives one of those worthless medals. What else should we expect from the DLP?

    @ Prodigal Son January 18, 2020 12:24 AM

    Spare your crocodile tears. I am quite sure that our Most Honourable Prime Minister is laughing up her sleeve and that our Honourable Attorney General has played his part in the success of the conviction. Very good.

    It may be true that many male Barbadians have jerked off while watching a service from a certain Barbadian businessman. But I would rather think about the many victims of the DLP dictatorship who had to emigrate or committed suicide between 2008 and 2018. Donville, on the other hand, lived like a privileged rich white man and despised the black masses. He had a comfortable, trouble-free life for ten years. Donville will at least lose his visa for the USA and will no longer be allowed to enter the country.

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  • @ Tron

    Donville Inniss is not a nice person, but his prosecution and conviction in a US court of law raises as many questions as it answers, most important of which is the long-reach of US law.
    First, at the time of writing, of our senior politicians, only Verla de Peiza has made any comment about the conviction. This deafening silence is an insult to the people of Barbados and confirms the lack of moral moorings in our high command.
    Others have been named in the New York court as taking part in this conspiracy, some of them also wanted by the US authorities. Are these people living in Barbados? Will they be arrested and tried, or extradited to the US?
    ICBL is still tracking in Barbados, what has the regulator done about this? Has anyone involved in this crime be banned from being directors or senior executive of any company in Barbados, listed or limited liability?
    If the police delayed taking any action during the Inniss trial, in order not to pervert that trial, are they now going to take action? Has an inquiry been launched?
    The luke warm words by the Motley government’s attorney general that had Inniss been tried in Barbados he would have been acquitted in light of the absence of any integrity legislation is poppycock. There are already laws in place to deal with the abuse of public office; fraud; malfeasance in office; and money laundering.
    Finally, a major local story, the conviction of a recent senior government minister, and the disgraceful CBC TV news carried a slot of a few seconds. Further, the once highly respected Advocate carries more nonsense about China than it did on Inniss’ conviction. A few paragraphs on the front page. Our journalism is a disgrace. Only the Nation made any attempt to report the case as it should have been, and its offerings were poor.
    Let me end by saying that on the evening of the New York court result, our president was in St Lucy taking part in some silly discussion about ideas. Not a word was said about the idea of getting honest people in politics.
    Maybe this is world class, punching above our weight.

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  • @ Tron January 18, 2020 7:26 AM
    “Spare your crocodile tears. I am quite sure that our Most Honourable Prime Minister is laughing up her sleeve and that our Honourable Attorney General has played his part in the success of the conviction. Very good.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

    Tron, clearly you are not au fait with the incestuous goings-on between the identical twins of Bajan politics.

    The only difference between them is the colour of the livery they wear on the racing day of the grand Treasury Stakes called the General Elections.

    You are clearly a spectator on the periphery and not in tune with what takes place in the sanctum sanctorum of the identical bedrock supporting the political kith and social kin in Barbados.

    Why do you think the leper fella is still free as a cuckoo bird and Malmoney still driving his duty-free luxury vehicle?

    Do you really feel if that money was paid locally in Mickey mouse dollars in a tranches under the M/L threshold that the Don would not be president of the DLP today with a big blue and yellow ‘gatherin’ and looking to replace MAM in the next big race to win control of the people’s ‘free’ money?

    You ought to thank the Bermuda Head Office and the US authorities for their no nonsense treatment of this greedy uppity son of a fisherman who got too big for his intellectual boots. Clearly not as smart as his mouth is loose!

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  • Hal u expecting too much from this turd world country
    Having a court system which would hold up one man to ridicule for stealing a salt bread
    While on the other hand letting Charles Herbert go free while a black accomplice languish in jail

    As for the long arm of the USA dont forget that govts have signed away much of their power to international bodies dicated by USA policies hence a resistence to rattle the cage most likely signed with a vow of silence

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  • (Quote):
    The luke warm words by the Motley government’s attorney general that had Inniss been tried in Barbados he would have been acquitted in light of the absence of any integrity legislation is poppycock. There are already laws in place to deal with the abuse of public office; fraud; malfeasance in office; and money laundering. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Now this is the kind of Hal Austin we admire!

    Refreshed and full of steam to roll the wicket for the BU fast bowlers.

    Imagine alleged white collar criminals known to the public are walking around free as wild doves and with all the evidence in the public domain not even a ‘pretend’ investigation by the local law enforcement authorities.

    Now you can see why your boy Leroy is deemed Mr. Untouchable.

    Barbados is indeed fast becoming a fully-fledged “failed state”.

    Welcome back, fellow Saint Giles boy! With this contribution O.J. Morris would have been ‘most’ proud of his scion from the ‘Ivy’ family tree of academia.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Prodigal welcome back a bit surprise that you have sympathy for Mr Inniss who in my view was an arrogant indivisual and deserved his fate.As for Mr Lucas why should some people not rub it in if it was Ms Mottley some here would be shouting from the roof top go figure.Then there is the cut and paste artist from Canada who wanted to shift the discusion to the bribers and since the guilty verdict is asking why the US persecuted Mr Inniss for $36,000 US dollars?This guy cannot be serious, Mr Inniss commited a crime and was caught and punished nothing to understand about that.As for Mariposa are you sure you want a tell all book which could implicate several of the ex miniters as well as some of the Bees as well. However to be clear whoever is found guilty should be charged whether b or d.

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  • Hi Hal,
    I do not know if you explained your absence elsewhere. I know that you do not have to.
    But it gives a great deal of pressure in seeing you here.
    a———————–****——————-a

    For some reason this Donville Inniss story does not “fire’ me up in anyway.
    The only thing that caught my attention was the petty sum involved.
    For some of you already on the island, the ‘price to play’ may be lower than what we think.

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  • Let’s see what the all talk no action brigade does as the world watches..let’s hear the next excuse about why they can do nothing about corruption coming from Dale whistleblower.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/01/18/scandal-a-stain-on-barbados/?fbclid=IwAR3v8HXqXjtWc6konGId-laX3oh3ZNrqj3A0yWrLfXCTzP1s8z_UZQnRAOY

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  • @ Theo

    Many thanks. I was trying to punch above my weight and become world class. Seriously, just trying to get the technology replaced.

    Liked by 1 person

  • If you have been follow8ng the story you might appreciate ICBL reported the matter as they are obligated under money laundering obligations. What has unfolded should be taken in context. This is not about the amount or about Innis, or Barbados as s9me suggest, the transaction was prosecutor an obvious reason.

    >

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  • It gives me a great deal of pleasure in seeing you here,

    I was given a mouse with three buttons and a wheel. Possibly the worst invention ever…

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  • We interpret stories in our own way. The bit that catches my attention my be irrelevant to others, and what catches their may be uninteresting to me.

    I have no intention of appealing to them or following them

    I just comment on what catches my attention,, It’s not a B thing or a D thing, just me.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David,

    that begs the question- why did ICBL not hand over the same package it compiled for the US authorities to the FIU in Bim or the Fraud Squad or whatever it is called in Bim?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @greene

    From your comments on BU on this matter your question is taken as a rhetorical one.

    Liked by 1 person

  • i suppose it can be seen that way lol but seriously that package could have been a basis for a complaint, what say you?

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  • Lorenzo u sound very nervous
    Why not a tell all
    Being a fall guy come with its consequences

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  • @Greene

    The blogmaster’s read is that the amounts would have been reported in the local jurisdiction perhaps post revelation. More importantly the cooperation of local authorities would have been coopted. The FBI does not enter a jurisdiction without clearance.

    >

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  • The annual costs of international corruption amount to a staggering $3.6 trillion in the form of bribes and stolen money, United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres said on International Anti-Corruption Day, December 9, 2018.
    Corruption can take many forms: bribery, embezzlement, money laundering, tax evasion and cronyism, to name a few.
    Fighting corruption is a global concer and evidence shows that it hurts poor people disproportionately.

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  • i got the impression the cooperation between the US Authorities and ICBL ownership was done in the US even though the documents were held in Bim but almost everything is portable these days.

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  • @greene

    We can all agree the AG is under pressure or should be to pursue he matter locally.

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  • @ David

    i am on record as saying that there is nothing stopping the AG from directing a senior civil servant or a senior person at BIDC to compile the info and hand it over to the police along with a statement of complaint. it baffles me why he has not so done

    to say that he directed the police to investigate is a cop out, so to speak

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  • @ Hal Austin January 18, 2020 7:58 AM

    US law enforcement authorities have selected Inniss because he is a resident of a US state (Tampa, Florida), has a residence permit and apparently also has a bank account there. So they even had to charge him under the law. They had no discretion. – As for the seriousness of our government: Who testified in US court that Inniss committed a crime under local law? Right, a LOCAL lawyer. He could have said otherwise. But he didn’t.

    I know a lot of other members of the blue elite with residence permit in the USA or bank account in the USA. They all have to fear imprisonment when they travel to the USA or to states with extradition agreements.

    @ Miller January 18, 2020 8:12 AM

    I’m just playing the ignorant court jester. If you operate in the Bermuda Triangle of power, you know very well how your xxxxx despise the puppets and servants as impoverished savages. I see things so much from the inside that I can look out Donville’s ass through the front of his mouth. A little cynicism and fake naivety can’t hurt in this state opera.

    @ Lorenzo January 18, 2020 9:02 AM

    Thanks for your support. We must resist any attempt to show compassion here or to distract attention with completely unfounded accusations against Mia Mottley and Dale Marshall.

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  • Early on when they were newly elected, people were saying that they tried to put stumbling blocks in the FBIs way, but we saw them get in anyway. Don’t see any fuss being made, Interpol is also always there..

    As long as they do not feel invincible and untouchable anymore with their arrogant, ignorant selves, let them get some sleepless nights for a few years to come..

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  • Some folks are opining that if Donville had opted for reimbursement in local l’argent this case wouldn’t have seen the light of day. However Donville, ever mindful of the optics of seeing a rival politician waving around a copy of a cheque at Election time at which time he was hopeful of being the leader of a competing political party opted for the offshore route never cognizant of the fact that he was leaping from the frying pan into the fire.

    Let this be a lesson to all the politicians and wannabe politicians “there is no place like home”.

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  • Tron,

    it is always important to be v accurate where the law is concerned. no one and i mean no one could testify that Inniss committed a crime under Bim’s laws. where a person committed a crime is left to the court and more accurately the jury to decide

    what may have happened is that the lawyer as an expert witness testified that the circumstances as outlined by the US authorities may have been a crime under the Prevention of Corruption Act as the predicate offence or bribery under comparable US law as a basis for the M/L in the US.

    you generally post crap for laffs or whatever but for the importance of accuracy as i see it, it is good to correct the record

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  • Greene,

    If I follow your logic, 300 years of slavery, abduction, human trafficking, murder, forced labour and rape were not a crime in Barbados either.

    I seriously ask myself why your comrade Robert Morriss played the race card before the last election and demanded an apology from the white minority. Your party always refers to the black masses. At the cost of 95% of the black population, your party wants to live like the white masters of Barbados. Somehow that seems contradictory to me.

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  • Most black politicians are house negroes who continue to serve the interest of massa (the white man)…

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  • @ Miller
    Corruption is rampant. Donville has no one to blame but himself. That being said can you imagine any politician anywhere else in the world stating on the floor of parliament, the senate , Congress or anywhere else saying that they owe taxes and hope to get around to paying them sometime?
    That’s where we are as a country. It’s obvious that Donville was going to be protected by the Duopoly on the frivolous excuse that we do not have any law to deal with his dishonesty.
    Yet , in the same country , we can arrest ordinary citizens for money laundering. Pray tell under what law are they hauled before the courts that somehow is absent in Donville’s case.
    Am I therefore left to conclude that we can do away with the fraud squad in our police department?

    The Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 2 people

  • @ Hal
    The reason that they are reluctant to speak is because Donville is one of the tribe. Obviously the instructions from on high to CBC was to go easy on Donville. This is how the Duopoly works. Donville has very close friends in the current parliament and they know how to operate. Don’t forget before his current predicament , he was a “rising star “ in the Duopoly.

    The Duopoly Rules

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  • “that begs the question- why did ICBL not hand over the same package it compiled for the US authorities to the FIU in Bim or the Fraud Squad or whatever it is called in Bim?”

    Greene

    Your contributions to topics such as this are always informative and enlightening.

    I asked the following question in a previous contribution: January 15, 2020 9:30 PM

    “On whose authority would the police investigate this matter? Would they do so on their own volition or would ICBL officials have to make a formal complaint, provide them with the necessary information and ask them to proceed with investigations?”

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  • @ Artax,

    the complaint does not have to come from ICBL it could come from the Gov as in a senior civil servant or a senior executive at BIDC the SOE concerned. we have a misunderstanding of what the police can do under these circumstances. how would the police know what went on if someone does tell them?

    the police just cant ruck up at ICBL doors and ask for documents. what documents? who will speak to the documents? and most importantly why would ICBL speak to them? would the police have a search warrant or a production order? and if they dont have a complaint and a complainant what would form the basis for a a search warrant or a production order?

    the police can make inquiries at BIDC but are they obliged to speak to the police without a directive from the Board? and a search warrant or a production order does not guarantee cooperation in terms of some one telling the police what actually happened, which is what is necessary at the initial stages.

    that is why it is necessary for either ICBL or BIDC to make a complaint to police with an explanatory statement and documents and further cooperation

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  • The great sympathy of many Barbadian lawyers, civil servants and politicians for Donville Inniss and his crimes and business activities in adult entertainment has, in my opinion, two reasons:

    First, Barbados is a developing country. We cannot expect the native population to make the mental and moral leap from caveman to civilisation within a few decades. It is therefore perfectly normal that serious crimes have no consequences. Just ask the tourists after the fourth glass of rum what they really think about the natives.

    Secondly, it is the mentality of the plantation. Here only the white owner and the white slave driver is the bad guy, but not the inmates. Between the inmates there is an excessive solidarity, even if they rob each other, rape each other or otherwise become criminals. It is very revelaing to speak of “brother” in the context of Donville Inniss. That also explains why the civil servants are so lazy. They actually think that with their laziness they are harming virtual white colonial masters.

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  • Prosecutors detail how Inniss abused his position

    Prosecutors Sylvia Shweder and David Gopstein this morning convinced a 12-member jury that Donville Inniss had accepted two bribes from the Insurance Corporation of Barbados Limited (ICBL) and that he had conspired to commit money laundering.

    Their submissions led to Inniss being convicted of two counts of money laundering and conspiracy to commit money laundering in the Eastern District Federal Court in New York.

    Gopstein, who led off the closing arguments, told the jury during his hour-long presentation that Inniss had “abused his power” as Minister of Industry, International Business, Commerce and Small Business Development, by taking bribes and laundering them through his friend Roger Clarke’s dental company in the US, Crystal Dental Lab.

    He maintained that the evidence presented by the prosecution including documents, witness testimonies, emails and text messages, was “overwhelming evidence of Inniss’ guilt”.

    Gopstein told the jurors that the prosecution had proved beyond a reasonable doubt that the former minister was guilty of the charges.

    He explained that not much of the evidence which had been presented was in dispute.

    “It can’t be disputed that ICBL sent $36 000 to Crystal Dental Lab for consultation services which were never provided. It can’t be disputed that the money was for Inniss and it cannot be disputed that ICBL sent the money to secure Government contracts.

    “That alone should be enough evidence,” Gopstein insisted.

    However, he further pointed to the figure of $16 536.73 that was sent to Inniss in 2015, saying it was exactly five per cent of ICBL’s contract covering the Barbados Investment and Development Corporation (BIDC) that year.

    “You don’t randomly end up at the number $16 536.73,” he told the jury.

    Gopstein noted that when discussions by the BIDC board of management commenced regarding the issuing of insurance contracts, it was recommended that similar to 2014, ICBL should receive 50 per cent of the contract, Consumer Guarantee Insurance (CGI) 30 per cent and Trident Insurance 20 per cent.

    He said on June 11, 2015, that recommendation was made again by the BIDC board.

    But on June 22, 2015, a decision was made to award ICBL 70 per cent of the contract and CGI 30 per cent.

    Gopstein said this was made after several text messages and emails between Inniss and ICBL’s former senior vice-president Alex Tasker via their personal emails.

    He made note of a subsequent email from Tasker where he enquired about the percentage of ICBL’s contract. Gopstein said this was done to calculate the amount which Inniss would be paid.

    The prosecutor said Inniss then sent an email detailing Crystal Dental Lab’s banking details. He said this was despite the fact that the company had been dissolved since 2004.

    He said two days after the money was sent to the dental company it was deposited onto Inniss’ account.

    “He would have sent the money to his account, but he didn’t do that. He sent it to his friend’s business account,” Gopstein said, noting that Inniss had several bank accounts in the US.

    He argued that the $20 000 payment made in 2016, was not an exact five per cent, but had simply “been rounded off” to escape suspicion.

    Gopstein said Inniss’ plan “fell apart” after ICBL’s former chairman John Wight became aware of the transactions and began to investigate.

    In his closing arguments, Ricco said the US had not proved beyond a reasonable doubt that Inniss had accepted a bribe.

    He admitted that while there was evidence of money being sent to Inniss, it had not been proved the money was because of bribes.

    He argued that the flurry of emails between Inniss and the BIDC’s board had shown that there had been a vetting of insurance companies before ICBL was eventually awarded the contract.

    Ricco said Inniss had not interfered with that vetting process.

    He pointed to the testimony of former ICBL deputy chief executive officer Goulburn Alleyne, who spoke of the rigorous checks which were made.

    “The BIDC board decided on the 70/30 split after they expressed concerns about the conditions of the other insurance companies which were not transparent and their ability to handle the portfolio,” Ricco said.

    He said ICBL was the only ‘A’ listed insurance company which had the capacity to insure 100 per cent of the BIDC’s properties valued at over $100 million and were rightfully chosen.

    “What did Inniss ask the board to do or not to do? It went through the vetting process and they followed procedure. ICBL ended up with the better share as they should have,” Ricco said.

    He also maintained that the emails exchanged between Inniss and Tasker had nothing to do with accepting bribes.

    But in her rebuttal, lead attorney Shweder pointed to the fact that Ricco had not touched on the subject of Crystal Dental Lab, the $16 536.73 or Roger Clarke.

    She said this was because “he had no explanation”.

    Shweder told the jurors Inniss had operated in secrecy because he did not want to be caught.

    “It has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt that he took bribes. He did it in secret because it is illegal. The testimonies and the bank records show it and he hid the payments because he knew it was wrong,” she contended.

    “If this money was a political contribution it would have been sent to his bank account in Barbados, not to the US.”

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/01/17/prosecutors-detail-how-inniss-abused-his-position/

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  • Greene

    Thank you.

    You have explained “in a nut shell” what I have been “trying to say,” only I was not being specific.

    There is a big difference between this situation and loitering or stop and searches.

    It also brings me back to Miller’s question relative to Crime Stoppers.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Greene, you write and have argued your case here with the dexterity of a trained legal practioner so continue to expand on the following please.

    You stated: “the police can make inquiries at BIDC but are they obliged to speak to the police without a directive from the Board? and a search warrant or a production order does not guarantee cooperation in terms of some one telling the police what actually happened, which is what is necessary at the initial stages.”

    1…* but are they obliged to speak to the police without a directive from the Board?*

    Are you saying that under local law, if the police have valid suspicion of a crime and made an investigatory visit to ICBL that they could simply be stonewalled because the Board did not give approval to talk to them in furtherance of their probable cause information even with a valid search warrant in hand?

    2…that is why it is necessary for either ICBL or BIDC to make a complaint to police with an explanatory statement and documents and further cooperation

    Am I too understand from this interesting piece of legal finessing that police authorities only step forward on company fraud, insider trading, bribery and so on BASED on internal complaints with explanatory notes ?

    3.Not trying to get into apparent cross talk but simply want to get you to clarify the above which though legally reasoned are also absolutely TOO nuanced.

    It’s like the mind bending remarks from our AG about Inniss not being liable under some aspect of our local ML law but omitting to add that he would just as easily be indictable under our bribery or fraud statutes.

    As the US prosecutor suggested: the plan “fell apart” after the chairman Wight became aware of the transactions and began to investigate

    In sum, it only NEEDS ONE person to unwind this string of corruption in Bim… like those old chicken/pig feed bags… one proper tug of the right end of the complex and seeminlg securely tied bags would render it open in a flash…. tug the wrong way and you are in knots for hours!

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  • @ William,

    Who audited ICBL’s books in 2015/16? Will the auditors be ask to account for their 2015/6 work by their professional body? Back to your duopoly? Are we now to assume that the Barbados authorities will now seize Donville’s property empire as proceeds from crime? Was he the only minister, or are we waiting for confessions?

    @Tron

    You are falling for the excuse used by the US to intervene in a Barbados matter. Fundamentally, our officials are incompetent. It appears as if the US was aware of the alleged offence while Donville was a minister. If so, bilateral arrangements between the US and Barbados should have meant the US informing the Barbados authorities, since the offence took place in the Barbados jurisdiction.
    They did not because they have no confidence in the Barbados authorities. In any case, the evidence given in the New York court is now in the public domain, there is no need for local authorities to wait for a formal complaint. Any of the authorities can approach ICBL or any of the individuals and ask about the evidence given in the US court. Will Donville be formally charged in Barbados? Will ICBL be fined by the regulator? Will any of the individuals involved, including Donville, be banned from holding office in any Barbados company?
    Where is Freundel? Where is the micro-managing president who is always ready with the fictional mantra of punching above our weight and being world class?
    Meanwhile, we gathering’ to eat fried chicken and wuk up.

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  • @ Artax January 18, 2020 1:07 PM

    You can expect the legally-trained Detective Inspector DI “Green(e)” to avoid that question like the plague or to even touch it like a lawyer infected with TB with a barge pole.

    On what basis, Constitutional or otherwise, does the main law enforcement agency act on the receipt of tips about criminal via the Crime Stoppers hotline?

    Who are these “complainants” or observers of criminal acts prepared to provide written evidence or give testimony in a duly convened court of law?

    Watch out for the ad hominem response from Chief Inspector Green(e) trained at the DLP college of subterfuge and deflection to avoid the naked truth.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Life ..stranger than fiction at times?… how exercises you do regularly can one day be fatally dangerous to your health!

    Those who forget their history are often liable to repeat it…soooo let’s reacquanit ourselves with the outstanding Antiguan John William Ashe.

    Diplomat and politician who was President of the United Nations General Assembly at its 68th session, from September 2013 to September 2014 among other high roles. He was born in St. John’s, Antigua with some Bajan maternal roots and was first in his family to attend university and excelled all the way to a PhD in Bioengineering.

    “…On 6 October 2015, Ashe was arrested and charged,[12] along with five others, in a criminal complaint filed by federal prosecutors in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, reflecting an expansion of a probe into the dealings of Macau real estate developer Ng Lap Seng. The complaint accused Ashe of using “his official position to obtain for Ng potentially lucrative investments in Antigua” as part of an alleged broader scheme to funnel more than $1 million in bribes from Chinese sources to facilitate business dealings, particularly in real estate. He died while awaiting trial.

    Ashe was found dead at his home in Dobbs Ferry, New York on June 22, 2016. The Westchester County, New York medical examiner’s office reported that Ashe died of injuries… (specifically, traumatic asphyxia, and laryngeal fractures) suffered when a barbell he was lifting from a bench dropped on his neck.

    Anyhow, this is Bdos we don’t do that type of shizz…And Inniss already spill the beans anyhow. So he safe.

    But for what it’s worth I am sure his wife and children bore the brunt of his fall from grace too after such an OUTSTANDING climb from that hard work to those hallowed posts!

    I gone.

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  • @Miller & Greene

    Local Board members operating under the Company Act have a fiduciary responsibility to respond/behave in the best interest of the company. You may extrapolate as you deem fit given the matter at hand.

    Also we have some here conflating matters. Although the bribe originated in Barbados the indictment in the US was about money laundering that occurred through a bank in the US.

    Liked by 2 people

  • dpD

    a search warrant only gives police the right to search and seize documents subject to seizure named in the warrant or any other illegal items they encounter. it doesnt compel compliance from anyone. in fact the search is conducted by the police.

    a production order compels a person or company to produce certain documents based on affidavits from the police- in that way it is like a warrant except where the police conduct the search in a warrant the company produces the documents in a production order

    no one from BIDC which is a SOE ran by a board or the like has to speak to the police or explain any documents. they may but dont have to and police cant make them. the Board or whoever governs BIDC could so direct. the same goes for ICBL.

    the police can have all the documents in the world but how can they get it into evidence without some provenance as to its authenticity and someone to explain the document and in some cases its context and contents. i know of no police who could do that for evidentiary purpose.

    in a court case the police can only say how they collected the documents and what the documents literally say. they cannot speak to its context.

    police approach prosecutors with what they think are smoking guns in the form of documents only to be deflated when they are told to get someone to explain the context, if the contents are readily explainable or they cant get them into evidence without someone to authenticate them. of course sometimes the documents are indeed smoking guns especially emails

    in this matter didnt someone from ICBL speak to being pressured by innes to send payment etc. without this how strong would have the case presentation before the jury?

    and check out the summation. the defence explained away the emails and this was not rebutted by the prosecutor. this is because no one spoke to the context of those emails.

    the AG is absolutely correct. the Bim laws re M/L at the time of this matter did not capture what Innis did, notwithstanding offences under the Prevention of Corruption Act 1929 wrt what Inniss did.

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  • Miller,

    most tips from crime stoppers is info or intelligence which the police develop and action to get evidence.

    where it is direct evidence police may try to get statements from the tipster and or some other persons. police operate on statements. withoit them how would they present files to the prosecutor.

    tips from crime stoppers dont take away from nothing i have said earlier.

    David,

    the interests of the company dont always mean working with police or legal authorities unless it is detrimental to the company and its shareholders. sometimes company take internal action

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  • If ICBL concealed their relatively small payments to Donville Inniss as “consulting fees,” it is highly unlikely that any blame can be placed on the company’s auditors.

    The payments were probably below the materiality threshold the auditors used for their work, and who knows if management deflected or responded inappropriately to any audit inquiries.

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  • @greene

    This is true but the blogmaster is yet to be convinced that the interest is not present.

    Like

  • “But on June 22, 2015, a decision was made to award ICBL 70 per cent of the contract and CGI 30 per cent.”

    well…it will definitely be interesting to watch, especially the part where the AG gets a request to hand over Tasker and Innes….let’s see them say no.

    Like

  • @ Greene

    Ignore the money laundering allegation. Donville committed the offence, if the evidence is accurate, of fraud, malfeasance in public office, abuse of public office. Any of these will be more powerful charges than money laundering, which, as I understand it, came out of RICO legislation. The substantive offence was committed in Barbados..

    Like

  • Miller,

    most tips from crime stoppers is info or intelligence which the police develop and action to get evidence.

    where it is direct evidence police may try to get statements from the tipster and or some other persons. police operate on statements. without them how would they present files to the prosecutor.

    tips from crime stoppers dont take away from nothing i have said earlier.

    David,

    the interests of the company dont always mean working with police or legal authorities unless it is detrimental to the company and its shareholders. sometimes company take internal action,

    correct the ML took place in the US but the criminal conduct or predicate offence took place in Bim. that is why the lawyer from Bim was called to give evidence to say that Inniss’s action re the reason for the payment in the US could have constituted corruption under the BIM Prevention of Corruption Act 1929, which is comparable to bribery in the US, for the ML in the US to succeed. and that is why Innes and Tasker have been indicted in the US on conspiracy to ML and not corruption or the US bribery

    Like

  • US authorities made an example of Donville Inniss but turn a blind eye to other corruption US officials who have committed worse crime.

    Like

  • @Greene

    Any decent company especially an ICBL that is Best A rated will protect its reputation without compromise. One suspects ICBL and its parent would have this written into governance policy. Of course any director of the board would be duty bound if questioned by the police to present concerns to the Board and at minimum issue a formal position to a police request.

    Like

  • @ David

    which again begs the question- why didnt ICBL turn over the package they presented to the US authorities to the Bim FIU if they didnt want to turn it over to the police?

    Like

  • @Greene

    The blogmaster is yet to be convinced they did not.

    Like

  • @Hal

    given the archaic nature of Bim’s laws i would be surprised if there are such animals as malfeasance in public office or abuse of public office in Bim. the Prevention of Corruption Act 1929 is the closest you will get as far as i can gather

    Like

  • @ Greene

    But we are world class, we punch above our weight.

    Like

  • Mariposa you got to be joking .Why would i be nervous? I am not related to any of them b or d therefore i am fine with any outcome unlike you who are sad because of Mr Inniss conviction.As for Skinner on what basis was Mr Inniss a rising star probably in your head certainly not on performance in my view maybe in talk.

    Like

  • @ David,

    that is a v interesting comment. uuumm

    Like

  • @ Hal Austin January 18, 2020 1:34 PM

    Dear Hal,

    My answer is not quite politically correct, but it gets to the point. Always remember that Barbados is still a big plantation!

    “They did not because they have no confidence in the Barbados authorities.” The Americans know full well that the blue partisans have settled like parasites in the Barbadian judicial system, who in case of doubt do everything to prevent prosecution.

    “Will Donville be formally charged in Barbados?” Of course not. Remember that in Barbados the black masses are oppressed and controlled by criminal law. Criminal law is not for the white elite and their black domestic servants.It is quite possible that they will soon make him a senator and that he will be highly honoured. At the latest the next DLP government will completely rehabilitate Inniss. Please remember that many men in Barbados admire Inniss for certain websites and jerk off with them every day.

    “Will any of the individuals involved, including Donville, be banned from holding office in any Barbados company?” Same answer.

    “Where is Freundel?” My guess is that Freundel is kissing the ass of his white masters in Canada. As you know, many local politicians admire whites for their lifestyle and want to be like them. There’s even a name for it, named after cookies … 😉

    Like

  • @Prodigal Son January 18, 2020 12:24 AM “Donville was the brightest of dem and ended up in trouble.

    A Silly Response: If Donville was the brightest of dem, then I real, real sorry for us, because them less bright ones are still around, still interested in seekig political office so that they can rule over us and perchance pick our pockets. Your words scare me, truly they do.

    @Prodigal Son January 18, 2020 12:24 AM “I do feel sorry for him as his sister is a close friend of one of my relatives and she is a good lady.”

    Nobody on this blog nor elsewhere has accused Donville’s sister of anything. Take note that there are hundreds of men at Dodds [and at prisons in every single contry of the world] whose sisters [and mothers, wives and daughters] are decent women. We are not responsible for the sins of our brothers, sons, or husbands; although idiotic Ewart thinks that we are responsible for the prostate cancers of our menfolk.

    But we will not take responsible for male cancers either…every man gotta man-up and manage his own doggie and his own balls.

    Like

  • What is the threshold in Barbados that would deem it compulsory for either a corrupt businessman or a politician to face a jail sentence?

    And please tell me what is the threshold for Bajans that would motivate them to agitate for a change in our political system?

    I am unaware of our great leader passing comment on Inniss’ conviction. However, I saw a video clip of her making a rambling speech which contained a large number of muslims.

    Yes, Barbados really is a failed state.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Greene
    The 1929 Prevention of Corruption Act provides for prison sentences of not less than three years nor more than seven years for Donville as well as for the two local ICBL executives.

    Note that the Act makes prison mandatory in cases of corruption involving government contracts.

    Like

  • @Tron January 18, 2020 4:30 PM. “Please remember that many men in Barbados admire Inniss for certain websites and jerk off with them every day.”

    Can’t be much of a man if you can’t find a woman to have VOLUNTARY sex with you.

    Just sayin’

    Like

  • @ Greene January 18, 2020 2:47 PM
    “most tips from crime stoppers is info or intelligence which the police develop and action to get evidence.
    where it is direct evidence police may try to get statements from the tipster and or some other persons. police operate on statements. withoit them how would they present files to the prosecutor.
    tips from crime stoppers dont take away from nothing i have said earlier.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Yes it does!

    For it goes contrary to your earlier stated support of the police legal capacity to “develop and action to get evidence” only when there is a’ known’ complainant except when an act of law breaking is observed by members of the Force like smoking marijuana in public?

    How would the police “develop and action to get evidence” if there is no known complainant?

    Who will be ‘willing’ to provide evidence either orally or in a signed statement or appear in a court of law?

    The perpetrator of the same reported/suspected crime?

    The tipsters using Crimestoppers are anonymous grassers who are assigned a number which they can possibly use to collect the grassing money.

    How then can the police get statements from them if they cannot get in contact with the tipsters who have exploited the Crimestoppers hotline?

    What about the videos or statements made on social media sites? Who are the complainants in these cases? The public?

    Isn’t BU the ultimate source of tips for Crime stopping and proactive policing?

    BTW, how do you know that the ICBL HQ management did not give the local police an ‘evidentiary’ package equivalent to what the FBI received but it was put away in file 13 like a very very politically hot potato?

    Ms Millar should have used the Crimestoppers hotline in the Bajan scenario. And see how far she would have gotten.

    Don’t you think Adonijah wrote his song “Two Barbadoes” because of only the way the small fellas on the block are treated for ‘handling’ dope but not when they are involved in white-collar organized crime?

    Like

  • @Tron January 17, 2020 1:30 PM “If they enter Barbados, it will no longer be a case for the civil courts. They must be arrested immediately at the airport at passport control and sentenced to 20 years penal labour for treason.”

    So what is you plan to get 20 years of hard labor out of a couple of elderly ladies?

    If you have discovered the fount of eternal youth, please post the recipe here.

    Like

  • “Ms Millar should have used the Crimestoppers hotline in the Bajan scenario. And see how far she would have gotten.”

    She made the best move..

    Just this week we saw the AG in parliament LIVE claiming people came forward to tell them about corruption, in the same breath he claimed these same people were afraid to talk or give evidence, fear for family’s lives and other fears, yet the same day Donville got convicted, out jumps the same AG telling the same FRIGHTENED PEOPLE to come forward and give evidence of corruption and how they were prepared to talk before ….

    so since Dale Whistleblower can’t seem to keep his story straight, now i am left to wonder if all of that was a very subtle THREAT to these same very frightened people.

    anyhow…all their evil corrupt actions are out there for the world to watch, they cannot now roll it back in ….TOO LATE.

    Like

  • @robert lucas January 17, 2020 1:51 PM “Silly Woman,There is no need to rub salt into Donville’s wounds.”

    Not rubbing salt Robert. I was not the one who VOLUNTARILY applied for a U.S. green card, the U.S. does not just give out green cards you know, you actually have to fill out a ton of paperwork and wait months or years to get one. I did not compel Donville to apply for a green card.. I wonder if his constituents even know that he had a green card? As a Barbados tax payer I certainly did not know. Formally a green card means that the applicant intends to RESIDE PERMANENTLY in the USA, which is all fine and good, but why was Donville still seeking to be elected to Barbados’ parliament when he was planning to live permanently in the USA?

    Or are Bajan taxpayers only good for paying taxes and the salaries and pensions and perks of the political class who by their actions show that they choose NOT to dwell among us.

    Are Bajan taxpayers then only the sore nipples on which the political class sucks and when the milk dries up [we kick their sorry asses out of Parliament] they take off for foreign lands?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Miller January 17, 2020 5:07 PM “Being a permanent resident he ought to declare to the IRS all incomes received in the USA (for sure). Did the Don declare that $36 grand in the tax years they were received into his account?”

    I am sure that the IRS is following this case most carefully. Probably got about 6 officers assigned to it.

    I trust that BRA is also doing the same. I would love to see his Barbados tax returns wouldn’t you?

    Like

  • BRA can’t get Tammi to work properly.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Mariposa January 18, 2020 7:08 AM “However there is always roads which he can travel for redemption of his souls which can shed light on what occurs in the underbelly of politics in barbados by writing a tell all book.”

    All of the political/economic class needs to find Jesus. Perhaps some will find him in prison. You would be amazed at the number of people who claim to have found Jesus while imprisoned. It seems that Jesus has a real-real fondness for bad boys [and bad girls].

    Like

  • @Hal Austin January 18, 2020 7:58 AM “most important of which is the long-reach of US law.”

    I don’t know that the arms of U.S. law enforces are that long.

    The U.S. did not fetch Donville from Barbados. He places himself directly into the sharks mouth by travelling to Florida. As a son of a fisherman, raised in a fishing community he ought to have know better. You frequently talk about learning by rote, did his schooling at HC make him forget what any St. Philip fisherman would understand? Nobody compelled Donville to travel t the USA.

    Nobody compelled him to apply for and accept a USA green card. If he had the green card before being elected, or if he got it afterwards, you know don’t you that green cards can be surrendered at anytime. A friend of mine a laborer surrendered his. Once his closest relative in the USA died he said he had no need to go there and no need of a green card so he turned it in.

    Donville CHOSE to swim with sharks and discovered that he was a sprat. A son of a fisherman should not have been so caught.

    Like

  • ” I wonder if his constituents even know that he had a green card? As a Barbados tax payer I certainly did not know. Formally a green card means that the applicant intends to RESIDE PERMANENTLY in the USA, which is all fine and good, but why was Donville still seeking to be elected to Barbados’ parliament when he was planning to live permanently in the USA?”

    Some years ago on this very blog we asked Donville if he was a dual citizen and he or someone came on BU and said no. He should have checked himself from back then.

    Like

  • When people like myself mention certain things on BU they too love to cuss and carry on, calling me witch and bitch and demon.

    the person who claimed to be Donville said at the time… to move on from that discussion… or words to that effect.

    Blogmaster can confirm from his archives, since it was years ago..

    Like

  • @WURA-WAR-on-U January 18, 2020 7:20 PM ”Some years ago on this very blog we asked Donville if he was a dual citizen and he or someone came on BU and said no. He should have checked himself from back then.”

    It appears that truthfully Donville is not a dual citizen. Holding a green card is not the same as being a citizen. If Donville was a U.S. citizen after serving his sentence, whatever that turns out to be the U.S. would have to keep him permanently, but since he is ONLY a permanent resident, once his sentencing is completed, the U.S. authorities will almost certainly revoke his green card and forbid him from entering the U.S. for a period of at least 10 years. How do I know this. I have a neighbor who is a deportee [nice person believe it or not] who wants to go back but still has several more years of waiting before an application to return can even be submitted. Another acquaintance manslaughtered his wife more than 40 years ago, served his sentence, has not re-offended, but is on parole for life so cannot travel outside of the country of his birth.

    In addition once one has a criminal conviction it is damn hard to migrate to anyplace else, in fact it is hard to travel at all [unless one lies] because most countries are reluctant to grant even tourists visas to criminals.

    Like

  • Miller,

    i thought better of you man. in drug cases the police are the complainant so to speak especially if they saw or suspected drugs use or dealing going on. there is in criminal law phrases called found committing and having reason to suspect (what americans call probable cause) that give police the right to arrest someone in such circumstances

    most if not all drug offences need no civilian complainant to be brought before the court because of this. police develop tips and intelligence by doing surveillance or other actions to form their suspicion before pouncing on the drug suspect.

    and suspicion is formed from facts, information or circumstances if i remember my criminal law correctly.

    in a case involving assault a police can arrest too if he saw the assault but ultimately he would have to rely on the statement of the victim for a successful prosecution. for instance suppose the victim says he wants no police action or does not give a statement. some thing with theft etc.

    this is not the case with corruption/bribery. police may get a tip that a politician is corrupt and got money from x person for doing a favour, whatever. based on that do you think the police can go and arrest the politician or x person? what does the police have to rely on? can the police get a search warrant or a production order just on a tip? most such evidence to do with that sort of crime is secreted away and it is quite difficult for obvious reasons to get the parties involved to give primary first hand information. surveillance hardly work in such instances

    and yes i dont whether ICBL delivered the package to the police but you seem to know, correct?

    Like

  • @ Greene January 18, 2020 8:33 PM
    “this is not the case with corruption/bribery. police may get a tip that a politician is corrupt and got money from x person for doing a favour, whatever. based on that do you think the police can go and arrest the politician or x person? what does the police have to rely on?”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    How about an arrest warrant or extradition order for Ms Millar? Or don’t you consider her to be a ‘reliable’ witness to the unlawful act covered under Cap.29?

    You shall soon see if your ‘legal’ argument can hold water in your sieve of tautological gymnastics when the other parties to the M/L act are forced to explain themselves.

    Your learned friend, G. Mayers.

    Like

  • Does America recognize dual citizenship?
    Just asking.

    Like

  • @Greene January 18, 2020 8:33 PM “what does the police have to rely on?”

    Some people, not me of course say Baygon and a plastic bag.

    Some people not me say that the Americans think that waterboarding might work.

    But maybe those things only work on people without access to hot shot lawyers?

    Like

  • @William Skinner January 18, 2020 9:20 PM “Does America recognize dual citizenship?”

    It depends on what you mean by recognise.

    If my spouse and I are dual American/Bajan citizens and a child is born to us in Barbados, the fact is that the child is a dual citizen whether America “recognises” it or not. it is just a fact.

    Like

  • Does America recognize dual citizenship?
    Just asking.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    YES, JUST CAN’T BECOME US PRESIDENT IF BORN OUTSIDE USA.

    Like

  • If my spouse and I are dual American/Bajan citizens and a child is born to us in Barbados, the fact is that the child is a dual citizen whether America “recognises” it or not. it is just a fact.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    THIS IS NOT CORRECT.

    THE CHILD ONLY BECOMES A US CITIZEN ONCE THE PARENT(S) FILES PAPERWORK WITH THE US EMBASSY UNDER CHILD BORN ABROAD TO A US CITIZEN.

    IF THE PARENT(S) DO NOT FILE FOR THAT CHILD BEFORE THE CHILD BECOMES 18.

    THE 18 YEAR OLD OR ABOVE MUST FILE ON THEIR OWN WITH DNA RESULTS OF BOTH CHILD AND PARENT(S) BEING US CITIZEN(S) ALONG WITH OTHER PAPERWORK THROUGH US EMBASSY.

    THEY CAN BE REFUSED.

    Like

  • @ Baje January 18, 2020 10:24 PM

    It seems you are rather well versed in the immigration laws of the USA.
    Do you know as much about the tax laws?

    If you do, could you do BU a favour and tell us if a person holding permanent resident status like the Don should have been declaring to the IRS his or her income(s) earned in Barbados including the US$ 36 grand obtained while moonlighting as a minister of the Crown.

    Like

  • f you do, could you do BU a favour and tell us if a person holding permanent resident status like the Don should have been declaring to the IRS his or her income(s) earned in Barbados including the US$ 36 grand obtained while moonlighting as a minister of the Crown.
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    ALL ADULT RESIDENTS WHETHER US CITIZEN OR NOT ARE LEGALLY REQUIRED TO FILE ANNUALLY WITH IRS EVEN IF $O EARNED,

    THEY DONT NEED TO HAVE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER(SSN) HOWEVER WOULD NEED A Taxpayer Identification Numbers (TIN).

    YES DONVILLE INNISS WOULD HAVE BEEN REQUIRED TO FILE IN 2015/2016 SINCE FLORIDA RESIDENCY WITH THE IRS AMOUNTS EARNED ESPECIALLY SINCE THE 2 AMOUNTS WERE TRANSFERRED TO HIS US BANK ACCOUNT SO BANKING PAPER TRAIL.

    IF DIDNT FILE WITH IRS WOULD BE SEEN AS TAX EVASION ESPECIALLY NOW HE HAS BEEN CONVICTED AND PUBLIC RECORD.

    Like

  • @ Baje January 18, 2020 10:24 PM “THEY CAN BE REFUSED.”

    Under what conditions would a refusal take place?

    Like

  • This is what dumbass, corrupt ministers/politicians/lawyers cause, senor loco now thinks it’s unfair that US cannot benefit from paying bribes to corrupt officials in corrupt countries overseas and according to Bloomberg wants to change that law that prevents it……..another problem has been created…hope they are not salivating because guess who will be going to prison still anyway if senor loco succeeds, he only thinks he is missing out on something…steupppss..

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-01-17/white-house-considers-changes-to-law-banning-overseas-bribes?fbclid=IwAR2WUwOAG5lIUmgc2x7P-oxWhmTI-72LWvpBUCQjjslW_E9i8CEKUUEO-cU

    “President Donald Trump’s administration is weighing whether to seek changes to a 1977 law that makes it illegal for U.S. companies to bribe foreign officials.

    “We are looking at it,” White House Economic Adviser Larry Kudlow said at the White House on Friday, in response to a reporter’s question about the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

    “I would just say: We are aware of it, we are looking at it, and we’ve heard complaints from some of our companies,” Kudlow said. “I don’t want to say anything definitive policy-wise, but we are looking at it.”

    Like

  • Miller

    Greene, in his general contributions to this issue and responses to you, is correct.

    Like

  • @ Artax January 19, 2020 8:01 AM

    How can it be “correct” when it has not been tested in a local court of law or at the CCJ?

    It is his perspective not a ruling (precedent) to which he can allude.

    As Hal Austin ‘wisely’ pointed out there are other pieces of legislation other than the M/L loopholes which can provide the law enforcement agencies with sufficient grounds to institute investigations rather than waiting on ‘specific’ complainant.

    This matter is of major public concern and has serious ramifications for the integrity and reputation of the State which the enforcement of its laws is vital for its ‘democratic’ existence.

    What do you think should be done at this stage to bring local justice to bear on this embarrassingly shameful scandal and ‘blackened’ stain on the reputation of a country who likes to boast about it being a ‘educated’ nation of laws and its high international ratings on the corruption index?

    A commission of Inquiry like the Duffus or St. Joseph Hospital or even the Alexandra School?

    As in the case of the ‘Crimestoppers’ situation, the law enforcement agencies have received all the “TIPS” they need to initiate a serious investigation.

    A precedent has been set in the USA now get on with the job of Justice in Bim.

    The refusal to act on these perceived breaches of the Laws of Barbados would only add fuel to the fire of derision about Barbados being a “Failed State” and a fully-fledged banana republic.

    Like

  • Miller,

    you are a hard headed fellow.

    of course the police can go to ICBL and ask questions. of course they can go to BIDC and ask questions.

    PACE and i suspect, the Judges Rules, under which i believe the Bim Police still operate, states that when police are making inquiries into an alleged offence they can speak to any person from whom they think useful info can be obtained or something along those lines. usually before seeking such info, the police have an idea where to go and to whom to talk, because someone has complained to them.

    in the case, they dont have a complainant or a complainant in the conventional sense. but lets assume they take up the AG on his directive to investigate or a crime stopper tip and go to BIDC. suppose they speak to the CEO or general manager and that person doesnt answer any questions or says he would have to get directions from his board and the same goes for BIDC. what is the police to do next?

    you can well say that persons from those two organisations may well talk to police and give up all the info and all the police have to do is approach them. that is possible but highly unlikely. why wait for police to come to them? why not go to the police especially after the matter has been ventilated and after the AG has given his directive publicly.

    to get the ball rolling so to speak the AG could direct the Board of BIDC to complain as i have outlined on numerous occasions or ICBL could do the same on its own accord.

    the question is why has neither been done given the public nature of the matter?

    and this is not a legal question. it is a matter of police procedure- how an investigation is initiated.

    if an employee steals from an institution and it is made public should the police investigate when the institution never complained? if someone steals from BRA and BRA does not report it or complain to the police and it is later made public should the police go to BRA and investigate? isnt that an indication that they dont want the matter investigated? so if neither ICBL nor the BIDC doesnt not complain what does that tell you?

    this is the last post i will make about this. it is exhaustipating (combo of exhausting and constipated) meaning i am too tired to give a shite, trying to explain something so simple

    Like

  • @ Greene

    Laxatives are good.

    Like

  • How are you Hal? faring well, i hope. are you going over for the gathering?

    Like

  • @ Greene

    I am not gatherin, Have you noticed that Gatherin’ is all about picking, wukking up in beautiful Barbados and bringing ideas and investments The president obviously thinks we are stupid.
    Invest in what? Who will manage these investments? The same people who mismanage the NIS? If I need investment advice do you think I will jump on a plane and visit Barbados for that advice?
    In a country depending on tourism and the hospitality industry and the people are so rude; they all try to rip us off. Have you experienced the old trick: pricing in dollars and when you go to pay, they add US dollars. Barbados is not only a failed state, it is the heart of gangster capitalism. Just watch the lawless ZR vans on the streets. Have you noticed the Coastguard guys walking through Broad Street with their side guns?
    Hope you are yours are doing well.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    thanks for asking. yes, me and mine are doing OK. i gather (chuckling) that you are not conned by the GATHERING.

    you must admit nonetheless that on the face of it it seems a good gesture to align overseas bajans who have some spare dosh with investment potentialities in the homeland. and the President as you call her does have a sweet mouth.

    i have already committed to building a retirement house so i cant pull back now. it is all in for me. i am v concerned about the violence tho and the lack of will power to solve.

    the President MAM is v good at waxing eloquently about everything under the sun except crime.

    how would you approach the high murder rate in Bim

    Like

  • @ Greene

    Be careful with your money. A friend of mine just had a local guy in to repair her guttering; when it continued to leak and she called him back, all he said was he wanted some of her English pounds. They are heartless rip-off artists. By the way, I have nothing to invest; I go to the foodbank.

    Like

  • @Greene,

    Burgler bars on windows and doors. Security system. Motion detecting lights at night. @ German Shepards and a pit bull.

    Piece might suggest a piece but not me. Nobody will be able to accuse me of suggesting something that would get you in trouble.lol

    Enjoy your retirement in Barbados. Wish I could do the same but my Canadian pension is not enough to support me in Barbados.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    i am starting a maintenance company to do repairs for my fellow retirees from Blighty. i have a good group of men and i dont do the rip off thing. but some of us could be tightfisted with the pounds but no fear i know how to deal with my own.

    get her to contact me in the future.

    @ Hants

    thanks and done. no burglar bars tho. but 3 bull mastiffs

    Like

  • @Greene

    Barbados is not as bad as the other places if you are able to keep your wits about you.

    Like

  • @ David

    true but something must be done. dont know how your wits can save you from a stray bullet.

    the Govt is v silent on the issue except a few mutterings from Marshall every now and then.

    i cant turn back now so i am hoping we get this matter in hand.

    why it is that crime seems to escalate under the BLP?

    Like

  • @Greene

    A stray bullet can hit you anywhere even in the great US or Canada. Agree something must be done to restore Barbados to the old standard, that said the blogmaster will take living here over the cold ass place you reside. As discussed on the blog many times we are witnessing a dysfunctional social landscape that started many a year ago. The blogmaster suspects what is happening now will become the new norm here and elsewhere.

    Like

  • (Quote):
    in the case, they dont have a complainant or a complainant in the conventional sense. but lets assume they take up the AG on his directive to investigate or a crime stopper tip and go to BIDC. suppose they speak to the CEO or general manager and that person doesnt answer any questions or says he would have to get directions from his board and the same goes for BIDC. what is the police to do next? (Unquote),
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Let them take your hypothetical scenario to a stage of implementation and see what happens.

    Nothing beats a ‘trial’ but a failure (to act).

    Now that the FBI is on the ‘case’ you will soon see if the other alleged collaborators will continue to evade Justice by this obvious case of inertia in the fast becoming dystopian state called “Badbados”.

    Time is certainly longer than twine. And if local Mohammedans (law enforcers) don’t go to the mountain of justice then the mountain will have to send the FBI to instruct them accordingly.
    The Don must not go down alone in this case of one-sided justice.

    Then you guys want to ask why Barbados is blacklisted in certain quarters.

    The same way the country was forced to clean up its act with its offshore financial business dealings so to it will be forced to clean up its act regarding white collar criminals (like the thieving lawyers who have a massively bad reputation not only among the locals but among the Bajan communities overseas).

    “Hard ears wunna wunt hear, hard ears wunna gine feel!”

    Like

  • I am very disappointed with the pittance your minister tried to launder …..it is obvious he wasn’t qualified for the job

    Like

  • Miller

    I won’t go as far as “saying” you are a “hard-headed”, but It’s obviously clear you’re missing the points Greene has been making.

    This doesn’t have anything to do with being “tested in a local court of law or at the CCJ” and I’m at a loss as to why you would make such a comment.

    However, Greene has been painstakingly trying to explain standard police procedures and how the law applies in certain cases. Perhaps you’re allowing emotion to guide you on this matter.

    Like

  • NEVER thought i would see the day when Lawson and I agreed. A pittance! I thought other amounts would have been forthcoming.

    A loose woman my grandmother told me about used to say, “If I’m going to hell at least I’m going in my shoes and stockings!”

    That was in the day when people were mostly barefooted and shoes were a very big deal. She wasn’t selling her soul for a pittance!

    Like

  • @ Greene

    I shall. Good luck with your new maintenance group. When it comes to Barbados, there is an optimism bias, and a pessimism bias. Plse put me down for pessimism.
    By the way, don’t let those reckless, speeding drivers kill you. And remember, Barbadians are the best drivers in the world, especially when they see a car with an H registration..

    Like

  • “I am very disappointed with the pittance your minister tried to launder …..it is obvious he wasn’t qualified for the job.”

    1 + 6 pittances = 7 pittances..

    suppose, just suppose he collected that many x 36,000 US per year between 2015-16 and not from ICBL only..

    who would know the difference, can’t tell now, that is only what he was caught with.

    Like

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