Notes From a Native Son: For Whom the Bell Tolls, If Not for Thee?

Introduction:

Hal Austin

Hal Austin

The natives are getting restless as the dark clouds descend, it is as if there is  an expectation of bad news. While ministers and their advisers, clearly out of their policy-making depths, struggle with a patchwork of policies initiatives, mainly around the exhausted tourism sector, the rest of government and the private sector is in lock down. People are talking as in a Tower of Babel, but the noise is not making any sense, often lacking in coherence and simple logic, while in the meantime nothing is happening. Even so, what passes for policy is usually a further waste of taxpayers’ money: Four Seasons, Almond Village, Sandals, Transport Board, Gems, the chaos at the central bank – we all know the score. Absent from this roll call are any new and persuasive ideas from parliamentarians, technocrats or policy advisers. It is as if there are no answers to the nation’s problems, that the millions we have spend on education since 1966 has all been in vain, that together as a people we cannot put country before party or ego and come up with viable solutions to our problems.

Entrepreneurial State:
Recently I received a review copy of a book, The Entrepreneurial State, by Mariana Mazzucato, professor of economics at the University of Sussex, and it is a wonderful read. If I though it would have been appreciated, I would send a copy to every member of parliament – government and opposition – so that they can get new ideas on the pioneering role of government in economic development. Prof Mazzucato gives a long list of the new technologies and sectors, from the internet to Apple, Google, pharmaceuticals, and numerous others developments that would not have seen the light of day had not for early State support and intervention. It was State funding – government, military, health service, universities – that funded the early stages of most of these developments before they were transferred to the private sector.
It is a development that we have seen with the global banking crisis and the subsequent sovereign debt meltdown: a crisis that started with Bill Clinton’s removal of the Glass/Steagall barrier, which led eventually to banks over-dosing on cheap credit and, inevitably, the collapse of Lehman Brothers. Then the language of big business changed, from calls for minimum government to one of systemically important banks which had to be bailed out by taxpayers, removing huge unprecedented debt from the balance sheets of private banks to that of the State, ordinary taxpayers. Then calls for a solution, led by academics with access to policy-making, with one set calling for austerity, while the others lined up behind the so-called Australian School, calling for lighter government. But, as Prof Mazzucato has shown, there is room for State intervention, provided it is sensible and prudent and the outcomes are measured and productive.

The real problem, as Professor Dani Rodrik of Princeton, in an excellent paper (When Ideas Trump Interests: Preferences, World Views, and Policy Innovations), has shown in a rather interesting observation: “Ideas are strangely absent from modern models of political economy. In most prevailing theories of policy choice, the dominant role is played by ‘vested interests’ – elites, lobbies, and rent-seeking groups which get their way at the expense of the general public.” Prof Rodrik makes the point that trade restrictions such as import tariffs and quotas redistribute incomes to the politically well-connected and powerful lobbies. He goes on to ask: “Why do political elites not favour growth-promoting policies and institutions? Because growth-suppressing policies, such as weak property rights, excessive regulation, or over-valued currencies provide them with access to rents that would disappear otherwise”.

There are also other answers: the political elite, often talentless, prefer centralising controls since it gives them a greater chance of having their hands on the levers of power, feeding their tendency to corrupt. They also dislike new ideas unless they are the architects since it suggests they add no value for their well-paid positions. Take, for example, a simple idea such as a balance-sheet local bank, a no-brainer for any policy-maker interested in funding small and medium enterprises and households. The need for such a bank in Barbados – be it a Post Office bank or a credit union bank, or both – is so obvious that one is left feeling the reason the government has not introduced such an institution or amended legislation to allow the credit unions to do so must be political. It certainly cannot be financial or economic. Yet stubbornly, even when it is clear the Trinidadian and Canadian-owned banks have no real interest in funding small Barbadian businesses, our policy-makers and regulators continue to dream that something, anything, will happen to change the situation. They are crippled by their own inaction. Their lack of dynamism is such that they sit back and allow these foreign banks to operate like Japanese Yakuza, encouraging households to incur huge amounts of debt which will take them a working life to repay since in the main it is rolling debt. When borrowers are about to payoff one loan, these cretins who run our banks and retail outlets offer them further loans to bind them in to even more debt; it is an addiction fed by, to my mind, organised gangs  masquerading as legitimate bankers and business people. Where are the regulators, where are the politicians, where are the investigative journalists to expose these awful wrongs?

There is something evil and wicked about encouraging people to dig themselves in deeper debt when they do not have enough savings to pay their bills and fund their lifestyles for even a month if they were to lose their jobs. This is financial madness. It is the same with the government and public bodies. Recent public debate around the disposal of the Trinidad-owned Almond Resorts to Jamaican-owned Sandals is a case in point. There is no good financial or business reason why the state should have intervened to obtain the Almond Village property only to lease it direct to Sandals, without even testing the market to see if there was any other bidder interested in the property. There has been no explanation as to the business reason why the government should have paid Bds$6m for the Almond brand, then to discard it when Sandals moved in with its globally recognised name. Why, in these hard times, did the Barbados government wasted $6m to buy an intangible that it had no real reason to buy?

Given that the tourism authorities have been allocated a Bds$14m marketing budget, and the obvious attraction of Sandals (it appears as if Sandals has not spent any money on acquiring Almond Village, even though it is reputed to have bought, or is in the processes of buying, Casuarina on the South Coast), the only legitimate business case for doing a deal with Sandals could be one of marketing. Therefore, what was the BTA’s marketing strategy prior to the Sandals deal, and what empirical and demographic data was this marketing plan based on? How do the Sandals proposals differ from that of the BTA’s?

In financial services and accounting theory the Almond brand is what is described as a market-related intangible asset (see: Manual of Accounting – New UK GAAP), which should have been measured at fair value at the acquisition date. And one of the first questions a financial analyst (or any financial journalist worth his/her salt) would be: what was the fair value of the Almond Resort intangible asset at the time of sale? My suggestion is that the market value was nil. Almond Resort was not a going concern at the time of acquisition, therefore all government was buying was a seaside property and it should haven been valued as such.
This single event, to my mind, gives an indication in to the quality of government legal and financial advice, or how it is interpreted by political and civil service decision-makers.

Nationhood and Development:
The real problem goes beyond the failure of a single opportunity to negotiate in the nation’s favour. In wider terms, constitutional independence has not made any real impact on the way most Barbadians perceive the State. First, despite claims to Errol Barrow being the Father of the nation, this sentimental and largely political interpretation of post-war statehood independence has nothing to do with the facts on the ground. In 1937, Barbados, like most of the other British colonies in the Caribbean reacted to the economic hardships of the 1930s by rebelling, but the battle against Hitler intervened and concentrated minds. The post-war Moyne Report, to a large extent, was historical in its scope and by the late 1940s Britain was in serious economic trouble, even offering to give Jamaica, Trinidad and Guyana to the Americans for a loan. Britain was broke. The US turned them down, but demanded in return for the Marshall Plan that Britain granted independence to its colonies. This briefly was the beginning of the discussions which started with the granting of internal self-government and led eventually to the Marlborough House negotiations and independence.

One major post-independence failure is the lack of transparency in public sector governance and the apparent inability of decision-makers to use government procurement as a vehicle for the redistribution of wealth. Major contracts seem to go to the same narrow circle of business people, in particular construction, road-building and supplies. In a political culture made up mainly of lawyer/politicians we cannot seem to break that death grip. This can in many ways be explained through the prism of collective failure, of both Left and Right, people who have taken a different journey to arrive in the same political cul-de-sac. Where is the radical, angry even, army of young people who came up under the late Leroy Harewood? Those who congregated around the People’s Progressive Movement and its Black Star Bookshop, an organisation terrorised by Prime Minister Errol Barrow?

In its own way, the indigenous business class has also failed, the old Roebuck Street boys, those who worked as book-keepers on the plantations for absentee landlords, eventually sold out to the Trinidadians, an act that also symbolised failure. In the main they are the very people marginalised by the Trinidadians who leveraged their insurance companies to establish banks, buy property and other retail businesses.

In place of what should be a post-independence dynamic leadership and professional group has emerged a technocratic class comfortable with its public sector jobs, huge mortgages and SUVs on credit – and a lawyer class quite prepared to risk stealing from their clients to maintain a lifestyle their earnings cannot support. So, in place of being the architects of post-independence nation-building, they find themselves reduced to alcohol, promiscuity and personal abuse of anyone who tries to critique society and their wasted lifestyles. One reason that we have failed to devise a roadmap to the future is that we have ignored our history.

Some time ago I suggested that the university, the National Cultural Foundation and CBC should work together to collect an oral history of Barbados, going through the villages and talking to all those old people so anxious to tell us stories from their youths. But, like most things which cannot be interpreted in a party political way, it was largely ignored.

A few weeks ago, listening to some of the wonderful stories told by some old men sitting by a well, the thought came rushing back to me. It is not too late. We can stretch this urgent need for State intervention across a number of disciplines, but it will all fall on deaf ears.

Analysis and Conclusion:
In the final analysis, our failure is not to do with ability, but with self-hate, a people prepared to tolerate any form of leadership as long as it is not indigenous. I remember on one occasion some time ago when Ms Farnum was chief immigration officer seeing a private health care facility advertising for a specialist nurse; knowing someone who had recently retired from working at a similar job in the UK, still strong and healthy, I encouraged her to apply for the position, which she did. She wrote out her application and I drove it down the Wharf and handed it in myself; to this day she has not even got an acknowledgement of her letter, far less an interview by the immigration authorities. To my mind that was not just administrative incompetence, but contempt. We need to see State intervention in a positive way. There is nothing wrong with state activism, per se. What is wrong and inexcusable is lack of vision, misuse of office, ignorance. And it is this poisonous view that has dominated what passes as national discussions. Because someone wants a different future for his or her country that does not make them disloyal or an enemy. What it means is that all sides should sit down and have a grown-up discussion, a desperate search for common ground.

It is clear to any fair-minded person that the state has a right to intervene in the development of the nation, to direct resources where they are most needed, since by definition the State is the guardian of the big picture. Where this is sometimes betrayed is when government – the execution arm of the State – uses office not in the interest of the entire nation, but as a form of continuing campaigning, as an arm of a political party. We must also pay closer attention to the failure of the business class, another aspect of our collective failure.

It is generally badly-managed, dominated by family-owned small hotels, most of whom seem unable to identify their core customers, not through the rough and ready, but often misleading, measure of demographics, but through lifestyles and personalities – drill down the data. What is more, government, regulators and retailers close their eyes to mountainous household debt as if it did not matter.

There is a mistaken belief that if individuals were to use their credit cards and bank and credit union loans to buy cheap consumer durables that somehow the economy will take off and that personal debt of over 100 per cent of workers’ annual salaries are not just tolerable, but should be encouraged. Barbados should be an exciting and thriving island-state, with beautiful architecture, creative and innovative enterprises, a successful night time economy, great opportunities for its young and relaxing third-age activities for its elderly. We should, in a real way, be the model for small states, rather than living in a fantasy world.

Instead, the course they are embarking on, pumping more taxpayers’ money in to a dying tourism sector, is like a drowning man grasping at straws. It is the course of least resistance, one that is full of uncertainty and downside risks. They do not fully understand what is happening to the local economy, far less the global one.

How are we going to explain our failure to future generations? Blame it on party politics? Our geographical size? Our collective obstinacy? We must wait for the appropriate time for a detailed story about our failed political leadership to be told; it will be one of devious, mistrustful, sardonic, coldblooded, flawed men and women. A self-appointed professional and political elite that is filled with self-hate, who cannot stand new ideas, and who dislike anyone who shakes them from their mental laziness.

But a government that has lost its nerve to innovate, that has substituted intrigue and betrayal and cunning for principle and vision, is not fit to govern. History will tell that story. Until then, government will continue to depend on burnt out academics, who, apart from failing to keep up with their disciplines, are in the main in the midst of serious cognitive decline.
These are men (they are mainly men) who now dine out on their PhDs and professorships, but have little of real intellectual value to offer their former disciplines – and it shows and the nation is the poorer for it.

70 comments

  • There is something evil and wicked about encouraging people to dig themselves in deeper debt when they do not have enough savings to pay their bills and fund their lifestyles for even a month if they were to lose their jobs. This is financial madness.

    This seems to be much the same issue confronting the UK as seen in the video below in which10 year old Holly explains to high power banking executive “Mr. Teddy” the drawbacks of a debt based monetary system in an environment when many are already overloaded with debt..

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  • Thanks for sharing the blog related to Novato home loan rates. Its really awesome!!

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  • HAL-you are assuming that our parliamentarians are up to the task . for my own enlightenment, what is meant by Glass/Steagall barrier?

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  • @ Balance

    It is the US legislation introduced in the 1930s which separated investment/merchant banks from ordinary retail banks. Bill Clinton removed the separation and look what has happened since.

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  • HAL -this topic is very interesting will NUPW cut loose mr “cutloose the middleclass”for his latest cell phone bill of $18000.this month –and this is not the first time it has happen –he went to CHINA which was paid for by the host country and the General Sectretary still gave him allowances from the NUPW –he went to Geneva which was paid for by the Government yet Denis gave him allowances from nupw .has he repaid the funds from the credit card uses for his personal business-has he repaid the $6000 cell phone bill from 2010–yet he can be saying cut loose the middle class after he and Denis Clarke refuse to bargain for increases for the same middleclass–for whom the bell tolls

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  • I find the NUPW rather interesting. What ever happened to the Bds$6m loan they got from the government?
    More important, why is the government subsidising a trade union?

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  • ‘It is the US legislation introduced in the 1930s which separated investment/merchant banks from ordinary retail banks. Bill Clinton removed the separation and look what has happened since.”
    Am I to understand that as a result mortgages became accessible through investment banks and competition fuelled the lowering of loan requirement eligibility and standards which opened a virtual floodgate where any and everybody could qualify for a loan without having to provide stringent evidence of ability to repay and hence the fallout. Correct me if my analysis is wrong.

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  • @ Balance

    It was worse than that. As you know from the news in the UK, to get any professional group more incompetent and dishonest than a banker would be a miracle.
    Basically, mortgage lenders start ed packing their loan books and selling them on to other investment banks who then formed offshore companies called Special Purpose Vehicles SPVs to park them in. They then paid the rating agencies to rate these mystery companies in order to get other banks to invest in them.
    It was easy money and lenders started offering people money on their credit cards, store cards, mortgages, loans to travel to far away places like Barbados, loans to buy properties in the Caribbean and Southern Europe and so on.
    But, since the new investors did not know who the other investors were, and most important who the counterparties were, it was a big gamble. All they had top go on were the ratings (which were paid for).
    But one of the big counterparty risk takers was Lehman Bros, along with AIG, which at the time was the biggest insurance company in the world.
    So, in 2007/8, when the music stopped, Lehman Bros was caught with its trousers down, the banks stopped lending to each other, thus the global crisis.
    Then the central banks in the developed countries moved in with rescue plans: in Ireland, after the awful lending policies of the banks; in Europe, after European banks over-invested in these SPVs, in the UK and obviously in the US.
    Until Bill Clinton, the Glass/Steagall, named after the two Senators who pushed through the legislation, kept the two sides of banking apart. Now they are tied at the navel.
    However not a single one of the 400 odd local banks in Germany had to be bailed out or ran in to trouble.
    That is the model we should be following. There are now 21 applications with the regulators for local banks in the UK.
    Hope that helps.

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  • Hal you are doing well –now CTUSAB is about to ask government to pay its rental fees -when this same organisation uses the government subvention to pay wages and salaries ,rent ,allowances to officers and travelling fnrepresent workers or political paryies ?d see who they or officers –little or no training for the workers is done -but we need to look at the o

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  • HAL–from above –it should have -and travelling to officers- little but we need to look and see who they represents workers or political parties

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  • @erice

    It is the corruption of the public space, best illustrated with the nonsense of the corporatist so-called Social Partnership, in which the private sector only makes demands on government, but never makes any real contributions, apart from ‘jobs’.
    Look at its contribution to the nation’s economic problems.
    We need tougher laws to control union bullying – calling out workers because of sick building syndrome, what next? Barbadian trade unions do not talk, they strike.
    And the man who to my mind typifies Godfather of trade unionism is Roy Trotman. The once great and proud BWU must put him out to grass.

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  • @Hal

    In your submission, why did you deliver the job application to the Immigration Department?

    To your other point about how investment bankers were ALLOWED to operate, who do you blame the bankers or the REGULATORS and a greedy PUBLIC.

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  • @erice

    Wasn’t the political party party born out of the trade union movement? There must be an affinity which will influeuce policy.

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  • @ David

    That was the reply address given.

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  • Usually the Immigration will publish a notice to alert the public the company wants to advertise for an expat and locals may write to Immigration if there is objection. The job app needed to go to the agency/company advertising the job.

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  • The reply address given was the Immigration Dept, The Wharf and there was a deadline.

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  • Beautifully written, essentially accurate and definitely timely…..
    …but Hal, you said all that (and so eloquently) to say that Bajans are a bunch of brass bowls….!?
    ….and if you truly understand the nature of a brazen bowl, you may understand the self-hate, the willingness to allow outsiders to throw any &$@e into it, and the lack of any creativity beyond the occasional polish job……

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  • Any fool can kick down a barn, but it takes a carpenter to put it together.

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  • A strong trade – union is the essence of a strong democratic government. And anyone who decries the efforts of Trade – Unionism is obviously untellered in the public affairs department.

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  • @Mark Fenty

    Is the narrative about trade unionism in general or about being effective in a changed environment from when it was born?

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  • @Mark Fenty
    No I disagree with you entirely and agree with Hal.You will get agreement from the man whom Tony Blair said had not one chip but two big chips on his shoulder…one John Prescott former Deputy Prime Minister of Great Britian and a bloody sod and disaster who had to be put out to pasture.
    What makes a great democracy is a free unfettered press and a Public Information Act…the right to know.Give us the latter two and we are on our way.Ask the Nation newspaper why they lost 2 or 3 printing presses in ’72’73 and at whose hands.Trade Union?Between them and this insipid government passing a lot of anti employer legislation and the un-informed Physical Deficit Senator calling attention to it in a left hand complimentary manner,you will see what damage the trade union of the 21st century is doing to Barbados.Blow your trumpet for productivity.That’s what we need to get us outof this morass.

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  • The following saying comes to mind about Roy Trotman —

    Shoot – Shovel – and Shutup

    Trade Unions in Barbados should be outlawed if the country wants to start to get out of it’s financial difficulties, next comes the POLITICIANS.

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  • Is Barbados faced with a problem of

    THE RISE OF WOMEN IN BARBADOS AND THE REGRESSION OF THE SOCIETY.

    Is there a correlation between the rise of women in Barbadian Society and the decline of Barbadian Society ?

    I want clients to deal; with this question

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  • @ David

    I blame a gullible public for taking up those cheap loans, g eedy bankers and incompetent and unknowing regulators.

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  • PLANTATION DEEDS FROM 1926 TO 2013 , MASSIVE FRAUD ,LAND TAX BILLS AND NO DEEDS OF BARBADOS, BLPand DLP=Massive Fruad

    Hal Austin |@ No one can be strong or right on FRAUD,
    All of this will be get BARBADOS NO WHERE .STUDY the land Hal , get to the point of all the MATTERS TO FIX , FOCUS , FOCUS
    TO HELL WITH THE DLP TO HELL WITH THE BLP
    THE LAND WILL AND SHOW ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW , THEN LOOK AT THE YEARS THE RULES CHANGE, look at what OWN and MIA did, Check out MIA land DEEDS ..

    Tell the truth put the blame where it need to be, Expose the crooks, talking with out looking get us no where ,
    This is about BARBADOS AND ITS PEOPLE NOT PARTIES.

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  • Header reads happy 47 anniversary.
    may i say that when we were given independence is when or slave trading and cheep labor and a way to stop African Barbadians from emigrating to England and going on welfare and causing trouble and gangs and violence.
    SINCE THEN IT BEEN ALL DOWN HILL…………..WHY?
    tourism…let us look at the low class of England, canada, and America not to mention Germany and Europe. coming to our shores and lowering the morality and doing and wanting done all kind of filth to them by our man dingoes.lowering the GOD factor and morals of our people.atheist and heathens .come to our island and drown it with sexual depravity.
    there for more herpes and aids for the heathen dogs.
    the lord has its way with dealing with godless scum.
    time will show this.has it not???????????

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  • recently i did some work for a man from canada ,he was a wealthy from
    old money man. he chose to sail round the world.he bought his big sail boat.
    learned how to sail and set on his voyage.he left western canada headed to Hawaii, stopped there,carried on to,new Zealand, Australia,then was heading for Thailand when something on his sail boat some 60 ft long broke and the closest port was Papua New Guinea,
    he reached there and ordered the part or was in the process of fixing the boat.
    he rented a house on a hill.
    he was not at ease there as the natives do not like whites some what.
    one day he went walking to a look out tourist spot.
    a young man came from behind and hit him in the head with a rock.beat him till near death. and stole all he had on him and thinking he was dead went to his rented home and stole everything he owned.
    the man managed to crawl near death with one eye ball hanging out and some one saw him and saved him.
    he had to be air lifted back to Australia and he paid some men after he was some what better to take the sail boat to Australia to be kept there. he paid some one for all this .
    so he is now brain damaged and can hardly walk .he was in hospital for a year in canada.
    moral to this story——————some countries could have tropical paradise tourism but new Guinea does not.they prefer to live as they are used to from generations before.they have their own culture which does not include begging from the tourist or shall we say the white man. barbados is a sell out.
    anything for money,———–the love of which is the root of all evil.
    not so?

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  • @David
    Before I comment on Hal’s contribution, I commend this to BU readers:
    Jamaica’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has issued a warning to people traveling to Trinidad and Tobago in the wake of recent reports of several Jamaicans having been denied entry into that Caribbean Community (CARICOM) country in recent weeks. It seems that 13 people have already been denied entry and have been detained by Trinidadian immigration officers and sent back home for unspecified reasons.

    “The ministry is concerned at this development and continues to interface with the relevant authorities in Trinidad and Tobago on the matter, including in the light of the Shanique Myrie ruling by the Caribbean Court of Justice,” said a release issued by the Ministry. It stated that a few Jamaicans have reported the incidents to the Ministry and as a result the High Commission in Trinidad has been instructed to obtain clarification and information from the authorities in the twin island republic.

    The Ministry has urged Jamaicans who believe their rights under the CSME Regime were breached, to make a report to the nearest Jamaican High Commission or the Ministry. The Foreign Affairs Ministry also reminded Jamaicans that the freedom of movement provision does not give permission to work and persons falling outside of the ten agreed categories will require work permits or exemptions.

    Meanwhile it has been reported that 13 Jamaicans were denied entry into the twin island republic on Tuesday. According to a report in the Jamaica Observer newspaper, Trinidadian immigration officers denied them entry, detained them and sent them back to Jamaica on the first flight on Wednesday morning.

    For full article, see http://www.caribbean360.com/index.php/news/jamaica_news/1085940.html?utm_source=Caribbean360+Newsletters&utm_campaign=358615cf88-Vol_8_Issue_201_News11_21_2013&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_350247989a-358615cf88-39311822#axzz2lLBasKZM

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  • @Hal,
    David is right. The advertisement from the immigration department is directed at those who object to the granting of work permits for jobs being offered to non-nationals. Persons who object are to direct their objections to the Chief Immigration Officer, and the deadline is for those objections. It has nothing to do with the actual job. Applicants who have the necessary qualifications are supposed to forward their applications to the person offering the job. the Immigration Office is not an employment agency. If you advised the young lady to apply to the Immigration department for the job, you advised her wrongly. No wonder the application might be found in File 13.
    @David
    Let’s see if Jamaica takes Trinidad to the CCJ. Neither of them supports the CCJ. I wait with bated breath for the commencement of this case.

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  • @Alvin

    All of us are waiting on the response. Bear in mind we don’t know the reason why T&T immigration acted the way they did.

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  • @David,
    Based on the CCj judgement, aren’ the T& T immigration supposed to make their reasons for the refusal of entry known in writing? We’ll wait and see the level of compliance, and the degree of support the Jamaican government gives in defense of these citizens.

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Alvin Cummins | November 22, 2013 at 7:30 PM |
    “Let’s see if Jamaica takes Trinidad to the CCJ. Neither of them supports the CCJ.”

    What do you mean by that? Both are members of the CCJ in its original jurisdiction and accept that Court as the chief adjudicator under the Treaty of Chaguaramas.

    They are not (yet) members of the CCJ in its Appellate jurisdiction (Appeals Court instead of the Privy Council).

    Do you agree or do you want to engage in a futile argument as in the case of “forcing” Trinidad to accept payment for oil in Barbados dollars?

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  • @Miller,
    I AM NOT GOING YO GET INTO AN ARGUMENT WITH YOU, BECAUSE i SHOULD HAVE CLARIFIED WHAT i MEANT,eSPECIALLY SINCE i AM ALWAYS ASKING FOR CLARIFICATION. i AGREE THAT THEY ARE NOT YET MEMBERS IN THE APPELLATE JURISDICTION. But that is where the Myrie case was argued.
    We are not going to revisit the argument about payment to a country in it’s own coin. I will continue saying that we do not have to pay Trinidad in U.S. dollars. The purchase of Trinidad dollars with Barbadian dollars and submission of same in payment cannot be legally rejected by Trinidad. If I owe money to a U,S entity, I can buy a draft either designate the amount in U.S. dollars, or the equivalent in Canadian dollars. I have done it with things I have ordered from American entities, so I know it can be done. Nuff said.

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  • All of us are waiting on the response. Bear in mind we don’t know the reason why T&T immigration acted the way they did
    **************
    All of us…!!
    You mean all of wunna, ….David.
    Bushie knows the reason why T&T acted the way they did…..
    Because they are NOT brass bowls.

    Only a brass bowl would have an open door policy to his home

    Only a brass bowl would let a set of foreigners dictate who has RIGHTS to walk in and out of his house

    Wunna think Trickidadians foolish? How wunna think they come to own every shiite bout here? …by talking shiite bout CSME?
    …or by leveraging their national assets to their OWN benefits….?

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  • @Bushie

    They own everything because it has a petrobased economy which is generating more excess capital then can be absorbed domestically. Cherry-picking investment opportunity across the region is a no brainer.

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  • By the way…..N&M has the property at Mannings Fontabelle already up FOR SALE…din take long

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  • @ David
    …..it has a petrobased economy….
    **********
    …with all due respect….you know not of what you speak….

    Indeed, possession of natural resources often provides incentive for brass bowls to be even more lax – and to compromise themselves….. ….a la mineral rich Guyana and ‘really blessed’ Jamaica.

    Even when oil was dirt cheap, you think you could go into Trickidad and buy property, businesses etc just so….?
    …skippa, even when you tried to LEAVE the men had a thing called TAX CLEARANCE in yuh tail to make sure that what was theirs stayed with them.

    You see Trickidadians bringing in white people to run their businesses? You see Canadian banks dictating monetary policy? ….or Canadians running T&TEC?
    Look an see who on their boards….
    You think Loverage, Bizzy, COW, and them fellows so could run things in Trickidad like they do in Brassbados?

    It ain’t one shiite to do with oil
    …it is all about BRASS.

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  • Hey looka Bush man

    Is time I start charging you royalties for my word “Brass bowl”‘…man everything is brass burl……LOL …Not even a merger, nor acquisition, but a hostile takeover at dat…. man pay up!

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  • @Bush Tea

    You are seeing red and misreading the view. Because T&T is oil rich it has excess monies to invest outside of a saturated domestic market. This is in response to Trinis buying up everything in Barbados.

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  • @ David
    …OK….Let’s follow your logic….
    Bushie is not a hand-to-mouth fellow….the bushman controls a few green bills…..
    ….so according to your logic, you can expect that Bushie will be buying your front lawn, your children’s bedroom, and acquiring controlling interest in your bank accounts come next week….

    No need to worry when Bushie exercises his options with your favorite daughter….after all “he has more money than you do…”

    SOME THINGS ARE NOT FOR SALE DAVID.
    FULL STOP!!!

    ……well this oden not apply to brass bowls- who will sell their very birth rights… for a meal (pot of soup)

    Like

  • What is your story Onions?
    …are you claiming rights to Bushie’s wares?
    Just to brush up your memory, your association with “brass bowlery” stems from its use in describing you and ac with respect to AX.

    THAT does NOT give you any royalty rights….
    Come to think of it ….we can now define a term that IS worse than a brass bowl…..
    …a brass bowl onion…. LOL HA HA Ha Ha ……muh belly!!!,

    Like

  • @Bush Tea

    It is the light of service based economies and the need to support consumption behaviour..

    Like

  • Bush Tea said:
    Wunna think Trickidadians foolish? How wunna think they come to own every shiite bout here? …by talking shiite bout CSME?
    …or by leveraging their national assets to their OWN benefits….?
    ____________________________________

    could not have said it better, you are greeted with great respect at the airport, great courtesy at the hotels, you are allowed 6 months in Trinidad, they know you know that their domestic immigration laws SHOULD be respected and adhered to at all times, hence the reason Trinidad adhers to the CSME treaty……you are allowed to do business in the country, stay as long as you can afford to…….you are NOT however allowed to dictate to Trinidad’s government because of the COLOR of your skin, you are NOT allowed to sell out Trinidadians if you are local politician and expect to live a long and healthy life, you are NOT allowed to practice bobool indefinitely without going to JAIL…..you are NOT allowed to make more money than the average Trinidadian and then turn around and pretend you are higher up, better off and superior to Trinidadians, you are NOT allowed to act like Trinidadians are your slaves, don’t care how many hotels you own…….you do so at your own RISK.

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  • …and they don’t hesitate to stage a coup if the government get them vex. Government do their shiite and Trinis does laugh and mek mock sport…..then BAM a…. coup in their tail, or some body lock up, or in court on charge…..
    Wuh even the little mock riot we had bout here we had to bring a Trini to organize…and when they deport him the whole thing fizz out while we bring in a white man to sort our business out…

    Rating: BB

    Like

  • Trinidad aint like the rest……

    They don’t give without strings attached to Hurricane relief…………Grenada
    They don’t admit everybody in their country………CSME
    They don’t sell anybody oil cheap…….Petro-Caribe
    They don’t want CSME final appellant duris….
    They don’t share flying fish rights……
    They don’t sell off their businesses to outsiders
    They don’t care about others workers
    They just think of ..” all a WE and all fa We”

    Like

  • Home drums beat first Onions….
    …also, home is where CHARITY begins…

    Like

  • I was at a certain hotel in Trinidad back in 2009-2010…..Patrick Manning spoke, oh boy was he high and mighty filled with charisma and bullshit. Very shortly after the elections….i saw Trinidadians stoning the same Patrick Manning………bajans have a lot to learn.

    Like

  • I think that is very commonly forgotten that evidence is subject to interpretation by fallible people, who do not possess all of the facts. Having said that; doesn’t it strike you as odd? That some who calls themselves columnist, have this special tendency for appealing to our irrational fears. In their failing effort to invoke some kind of negative emotional reaction from those of us who are sensible enough understand their motives.

    Like

  • As I understand it there are no barriers to Trinidadians buying property and businesses in Barbados and vice versa.

    That is a completely nonsensical arrangement because Trinidad has massive amounts of cash to invest and Barbados does not.

    Therein lies the inequity that will allow Trinidad to “own” Barbados.

    Meanwhile we continue to fool ourselves that Barbados is a truly independent nation because of an event in “66”.

    Worse yet is that we still rely on Tourism and financial services for (50%?) of our economy.

    We need to rebuild and restructure the Barbados economy in a way that will minimize our dependence on “foreigners and their money”.

    Like

  • As I understand it there are no barriers to Trinidadians buying property and businesses in Barbados and vice versa.

    WRONG ANSWER……my friend…..you need to investigate some more

    Like

  • @Old onion bags,
    investigate what?

    Like

  • Wait Onions…you want to tell Hants ‘how he understands it”?
    …most Bajans understand it so too…
    You don’t know that most of us think that the “free trade” agreement mean open reciprocal trade…?
    LOL
    It REALLY means that the rich countries get to dump their cheap stuff in our laps while putting all kinds of technical and other barriers in the way of our access to their markets….
    The Trickidadians UNDERSTAND that game….
    Our Brass bowls just go to the meetings for the per diems and the shopping….

    But WAIT though Onions…..you going let Bushie get away with
    Bush Tea | November 23, 2013 at 10:32 AM |
    ….. Wuh sort of Cawmere man you is….?

    Like

  • We can use as an example Pine Hill’s battle to break through in the T&T market. Bear in mind Pine Hill is owned by a T&T conglomerate.

    Then there was a similar issue of Pine Hill attracting certain duties which should have been waived if product originates/manufactures in CARICOM.

    Like

  • @ Bushie
    You think I paying Hants any mind?..If he is truly Bajan, he should got some sense….. T &T won’t sell Baje a shoite (landbusiness) …but he want yours..I ent calling no names but I know…..

    Nov.23 10.32….which thread?

    Like

  • Old onion bags wrote “If he (Hants) is truly Bajan,

    That is the single most important “fact” of my existence.

    Born and raised in Barbados (by parents born and raised in Barbados) for the first 20 years of my life.

    Is that truly Bajan enough for you Onions or do I need to add catching flying fish an dolphin ?lol

    Like

  • this has been a very great week on bu
    THERE HAS BEEN NO CCC TALKING THE USUAL SHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

    Like

  • @ Hants

    Relax nah…..Kolij boy….LOL

    Like

  • @Georgie Porgie,

    Every week on BU is great.

    Sometimes you have to be selective in what you read.

    Like

  • Old onions I am very relaxed.

    Went fishing this morning but couldn’t stay long because the wind chill factor is -7c.
    Some may now question my ancestry because most Bajans would not stand at a river in that temperature.lol

    Like

  • LOL @ Hants
    Onions can relate to that kind of fishing too…..he gets his fish off the freezer at Oistins…at about the same -7 degrees… LOL

    Like

  • Yeah Bush Tea I agree wid you on this whole free movement / CSME con that seems to only apply to Barbados. But Bush Tea, de brass bowl term get popularise by you here pon BU but de copywrite belong to Brian ‘Bumba’ Payne.

    Like

  • Thank you for that information Oilman,
    LOL once Onions know that he is not in the runnings… 🙂

    Like

  • @ Hants….dony worry about de cold,…next two to three years a WHOLE SET a bajans going be emigrating an coming up there wid you……

    Mark my words.

    Like

  • Micro Mock Engineer

    “Beautifully written, essentially accurate and definitely timely”

    BT you like you going senile in your ole age yuh….

    Dis caan be de same BT that use to keep bloggers like Dictionary and livinginbarbados in check… nah, dis en Bush Tea… dis is Liptons…

    The concluding analysis refers to an absurd story of submitting a nursing job application to the Immigration Department… LOL… and the lack of response as evidence of “administrative incompetence”, “contempt” and “a people prepared to tolerate any form of leadership as long as it is not indigenous”…… LOL… what?!? I suspect Hal meant to say “as long as it IS indigenous” but it is easy to lose your train of thought in such lengthy monographs.

    The “Entrepreneural State”?!? No thank you… stick to protecting our individual rights and freedoms and providing basic social services… politicians shouldn’t be ‘innovating’ wid our money.

    “Prof Mazzucato gives a long list of the new technologies and sectors, from the internet to Apple, Google, pharmaceuticals, and numerous others developments that would not have seen the light of day had not for early State support and intervention. It was State funding….”

    Hal… have you ever heard of the Broken Window Fallacy…. look it up and then reconsider the Prof’s conclusions.

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  • @ Micro

    I have not heard of the Broken Window Fallacy, but I am familiar with the bogus criminological theory of the broken window….basically that every perceived anti-social act must be criminalised if not it may lead to much more serious things. It is nonsense.

    ……

    Like

  • mme
    you still in de land of the living man?

    Like

  • Micro Mock Engineer

    Still here GP… I pop up from my bunker every now and again to see how you and BT’s end-time predictions are playing out… ☺

    Hal… not broken window theory… that is sociology. Mazzucato is an economist… I was introducing you to the broken window fallacy penned by economist Frederic Bastiat a couple centuries ago, so that you could identify the flaws in Mazzucato’s arguments for yourself… but never mind.

    Like

  • I think the professor got it all wrong – The Internet, Apple, google, Facebook, etc. have never looked to the state for funding or support.
    The Internet was born from the need of scientists to collaborate in large projects at CERN based on the work of the inventor Tim Berners Lee – OK, there was also government funding of DARPA NET headed by Vint Cerf.

    All the others were and still are privately developed and funded.
    Apple — Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne.

    Google — Sergey Brin and Larry Page while they were Ph.D students.

    Facebook – Mark Zuckerberg and some fellow students.

    The birth of those enterprises were due to a few people with an idea that they brought to fruition and expanded through hiring of some of the cleverest brains around.

    The internet has spawned many initiatives and continues to do the same as it allows collaboration between vast numbers of clever individuals who may never have met face to face.

    You have a bright idea, you detail it over the internet and if it looks appealing developers will flock to join in the effort.

    When google was young but worth tens of billions they occupied only a small building in Sunnyvale, California which amazed me.

    What I constantly hear from Barbadians is that if there was the money ideas would follow and be developed into successful businesses, whilst elsewhere on the planet ideas are developed and money is made on what is produced – typical is the Brazilian starting out with $1000 who built a $100m business or the Mexican who with just a PC who collaborated on his pet project with other developers around the world, sold the company for $300m and now has another successful venture going.

    The advantage those companies and guys have is that they posses enquiring minds, are educated to THINK rather than be taught by rote and are able to encourage other similar minded individuals that like their ideas to join them.

    Basically you can’t do anything unless you have some clear idea of what you want to achieve and how to go about it — certainly more important than money in many cases.

    Lately successful ventures are being created by crowd funding via such innovative vehicles as kickstarter.com which raises funds for projects that no venture capitalist would touch.

    Like

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