Sound of Silence

Mia Mottley_Steve Blackett

Freundel Stuart was the prime minister of Barbados in the period 2010 to 2018 after assuming the caretaker role from David Thompson who became sick on the job soon after the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) was voted to office in 2008. The legacy of Stuart’s stewardship is still being written although some pundits at this early stage are happy to label it worse than the Sandiford administration. The tactic engineered by the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) – the other member of the duopoly – has enjoyed success with branding of the Glorious Years as The Lost Decade.

The failure of a third party movement to gain traction in Barbados means the health of our democracy is nexus to well managed DLP and BLP political parties. A strident dissenting voice is a feature of the Westminster system we try to model – the lacuna created by the recent general election and ensuing legal challenge regarding how the Senate is constituted is a case in point. A good argument can therefore be made that the business of political parties is the public’s business although classified private entities. In fact the unwillingness of quality citizens to offer themselves to join political parties who aspire to selflessly serve the public is at the heart of the type of governments we are saddled.

Some of us who comment on political matters are not surprised at the dysfunctional state of the DLP. It was not difficult to forecast. Barbadians except for the rabidly partisan are turned off by the quality of politics and governments we have been getting since the Tom Adams era which ended in the mid 80s. The blogmaster opines both DLP and BLP political parties have been rotated to govern the country based on the level of voter apathy and lack of credible alternatives and little to do with substance. The unprecedented 30-0 victories at the polls by the BLP in 2018 and 2022 should give Barbadians reason to pause. The BLP despite making several mistakes in a brief tenure of just over three years the political opposition was unable to gain the public’s trust.   The quality of our system of government whether we like it or not is tied to the quality of individuals attracted to serve in political parties. There is that symbiotic relationship only a fool would deny.

Today makes 32 days since the last general election and except for a public position in response to a contentious offer from Prime Minister Mottley to participate in a discussion about accepting two Senate seats, the DLP has been silent and irrelevant in the public space. Sensible observers appreciate it will take the DLP time to assess, reorganize and mobilize BUT there is a reality to be considered by the DLP and onlookers. The silence coming out of George Street is consistent with the ‘glorious years’ of the Stuart administration and the longer it persists, the more difficult it will be for that party to be perceived as a credible alternative. The blogmaster is aware the DLP has skin in the game based on the matter that is before the court brought by AG Brathwaite – who we know is acting de facto for the DLP. Some of us are not so stupid to believe otherwise.

This is a cry for a different type of citizen with a passion and body of work for serving the public to join the two main political parties. An organization assumes the character of its members. If we want our governments to change how business is done, it must begin with the quality of personnel attracted to political parties. Today it is the DLP in crisis, it is not inconceivable the BLP may find itself in a similar position when Mia Mottley demits office whether for a forced or unforced reason. If that happens all of us will be adversely impacted.

The type of government we get starts with YOU!

366 comments

  • @John
    I’ve read of the Breadfruit being brought to feed the population but the slaves would not eat it
    +++++++++++++
    When I was in Antigua two young ladies told me that Antiguans didn’t eat breadfruit because they considered it slave food, maybe that explains my dislike for it.

    Why is it so popular in Barbados?

    Like

  • @ Sargeant

    I’m not fond of breadfruit either.

    But, although it may be “popular in Barbados,” the breadfruit is much more popular in St. Vincent & the Grenadines.

    There is an annual ‘Breadfruit Festival’ in SVG, which is usually held during August, with ‘Breadfruit Day’ on August 1st.
    Vincentians boast of having several different varieties of it and they usually prefer it roasted.

    I think their national dish is fried jack fish and roasted breadfruit. They even make a beverage from breadfruit.

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  • Four days later and the judge sits in silence on a ruling on the Constitutional make up.of the Senate

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    There is a dish eaten in Barbados on Saturday’s that is known to be slave food. What is the point?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Are you understanding the going on in the judicial review being heard? Do you understand the judge is deliberating on preliminary matters presented.

    Like

  • QC says only quorum needed
    The Senate can be constituted by an indefinite number of senators once that number is made up of the constitutionally mandated quorum.
    So said Government’s attorney, Queen’s Counsel Alrick Scott, who also argued that the provisions of the Constitution should be broadly, and not narrowly, interpreted.
    “The purpose of Section 50 (2) (of the Constitution) is to enable either the House of Assembly or the Senate to convene and lawfully conduct its business notwithstanding there is a vacancy,” he said.
    “Its purpose is that the legislative business of the country should not come to a halt because there is a vacancy, however caused. The purpose can be realised at any time. No provision in the Constitution restricts the operation of Section 50 (2) to a period only after the commencement of the first session of Parliament as contended for by the applicant (Adriel Brathwaite),” the attorney argued.
    Scott was responding to Queen’s Counsel Garth Patterson’s submissions when the constitutional motion challenging the validity of Parliament continued before Justice Cicely Chase via Zoom yesterday.
    The motion, brought by former Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite, is alleging that the Senate, with only 18 senators, was not properly constituted and, therefore by extension, neither was Parliament.
    Judicial review
    The application for judicial review claims that any business conducted by Parliament on or after February 4 this year, “including any law purportedly enacted by it, is invalid, null and void”.
    Brathwaite, through his attorneys Patterson, Michelle Russell and Rico Yearwood, is submitting that a failure by President The Most Honourable Dame Sandra Mason to appoint two opposition senators amounts “to the wrongful abdication of her constitutional duty to proceed under Section 36 of the Constitution to the appointment of all the senators as soon as may be practicable after every General Election”.
    Queen’s Counsel Leslie Haynes is leading Government’s team of ten lawyers, which includes Scott and Roger Forde QC, as well as Gregory Nicholls, representatives from the Solicitor General’s Chambers and attorneys from the legal firm Carrington and Sealy.
    Narrow interpretation
    Scott argued that the contention that Section 50 (2) of the Constitution should be narrowly interpreted was inconsistent with the general principle that constitutions were to be given a “broad, generous and purposive interpretation”. He added it required “legal gymnastics” to exclude Section 39 (1) (a) from the meaning of the words ‘any vacancy’ in Section 50 (2). “The plain meaning of Section 50 Subsection 2 is that the Senate is properly constituted and can exercise its powers and perform its duties, notwithstanding that there are fewer than 21 members appointed to the Senate,” Scott said.
    “We further submit that by Section 50 Subsection 2, the Senate can be properly constituted by an indefinite number of persons, be it 18, 19 or 20. The maximum number being the mandatory maximum of 21 set by Section 36 (1) and the minimum set by the quorum provision of the Constitution, namely 18 presiding persons,” he submitted.
    The senior lawyer said the court must consider the purpose of Section 50 (2) and should avoid giving Section 36 (1) a meaning that “would lead to an absurd result”.
    “And the result that the applicant contends for can lead to an absurd result,” Scott said.
    He argued that the proper meaning of the phrase ‘shall consist of’ was to provide a “mandatory, maximum number to the appointment upon which the President cannot exceed.
    “Its effect is to limit the number of senators that the President is empowered to appoint. If the President appoints 22 senators, she would be acting outside of the Constitution.”
    Turning to the constitutional amendment claim, Scott argued the word “members” in Section 49 (2) should be given its ordinary meaning – that of a person who belongs to a particular group.
    “In this sense, John Rogers, Kevin Boyce and the other 16 appointed senators are members of the Senate. The words ‘all the members of the Senate’, therefore, refer to all the persons who belong to the Senate, that is the presently appointed senators.”

    Source: Nation

    Liked by 1 person

  • JUDGE TO DECIDE
    By Heather-Lynn Evanson heatherlynevanson @nationnews.com
    Justice Cicely Chase has reserved her decision on the preliminary matters in the constitutional motion challenging the validity of Parliament.
    She has also indicated her decision will include a ruling on whether Attorney General Dale Marshall will be subjected to cross-examination on his affidavits.
    She called the volume of submissions and case law “a mammoth task, if nothing else”.
    “I can tell you that the issues, in my opinion, they are not straightforward issues. They are complex. It’s a complex legal matter. To those who say it is easy, that’s a matter for them,” the judge said yesterday.
    Motion
    The motion, brought by former Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite, is alleging that the Senate, with only 18 senators, was not properly constituted and, therefore by extension, neither was Parliament.
    The application for judicial review claims that any business conducted by Parliament on or after February 4 this year, “including any law purportedly enacted by it, is invalid, null and void”.
    Brathwaite, through his attorneys Queen’s Counsel Garth Patterson, Michelle Russell and Rico Yearwood, is submitting that a failure by President The Most Honourable Dame Sandra Mason to appoint two opposition senators amounts “to the wrongful abdication of her constitutional duty to proceed under Section 36 of the Constitution to the appointment of all the senators as soon as may be practicable after every General Election”.
    Queen’s Counsel Leslie Haynes is leading Government’s team of ten lawyers, which includes fellow Queen’s Counsel Roger Forde and Alrick Scott, as well as Gregory Nicholls, representatives
    from the Solicitor General’s Chambers and attorneys from the legal firm Carrington and Sealy.
    Yesterday, to a virtual audience that numbered almost 200, Scott and Nicholls responded to the submissions of Patterson, who then responded on the law.
    Justice Chase then adjourned the matter pending her decision on the preliminary issues.
    “Consequent upon that decision, we will then go back to the other issues to be dealt with in the matter that have not been ventilated in this court,” she said.
    “I want to thank everyone for comprehensive submissions, both in writing and orally. They are going to be very useful.
    “I will consider all that is put before and I will provide you with my decision on the preliminary issues, and of course I need to rule on the oral application to have the respondent crossexamined on his affidavit,” the judge said.
    Patterson had made an oral application for Marshall, as representative of the President in the matter, to be subjected to cross-examination based on his affidavits.
    However, Haynes objected, saying the issues of law did not require a need for crossexamination.

    Source; Nation

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  • The judge in my opinion is playing cat and mouse at every turn
    Keep reserving matters
    She might be in the wrong place at a time when barbadians are seeking quick resolution to this matter
    As for the govt attorney Scott of the make up of Parliament
    He is confusing apples with oranges
    Can’t wait to see this mockery head to the CCJ and watch the embarrassing actions and actors of the highly paid govt lawyers played out
    The embarrassment needs to be culled sooner rather than later

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  • Some non-legal but practical advice to the judge.

    Skip the beginning and the middle. Start at the end. Figure out what is a fair and the best outcome for Barbados and try to work backwards. Decision first and then a strong legal argument to support it.

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  • The judge has a single task, to arrive at a decision based on precedent and best practices for interpreting the law

    Liked by 2 people

  • Hard to imagine a lawyer QC confusing the Constitution tenets and intentions of having a fully constituted Parliament
    Not understanding that when that process is complete a minister having met with unforseen circumstances if having to be absent would not affect govt continuance in Parliament
    That area being dealt with by the Framers that with an understanding that unforseen circumstances occurring after Pariliament is fully constituted would not render Parliament helpless from performing its duty
    In other words the process of having a fully Constituted Parliament must be met and fulfilled also as a record that a Democractic govt is fully in placed first and foremost
    If so done a minister because of unforseen circumstances needing to be absent would be given as to no cause for concern or asking of question dealing with govt makeup since the proper process had occurred imitially noting that there is a fully constituted Parliament and the Minister rights for absence can be activated
    What govt is doing is trying to do is use a smoke and mirror obstruction to make a wrong right
    The judge in my opinion needs to go back to law school and study Constituonal law in its fullest

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  • What is harder to read your support for Michael CARRINGTON keeping his job of the august lower court with your support.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I like how some will act like a contortionist, do back flips, twists and pirouettes and end up exactly where you expect them to land.

    Some love the theatrics and I guess the dance is a part of the act.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Yes @David that is her ‘single task’. Of course the exact and very same one of every judicial decision.

    That she labelled it as: “I can tell you that the issues, in my opinion, they are not straightforward issues. They are complex. It’s a complex legal matter. To those who say it is easy, that’s a matter for them,” was annoyingly amusing! 😎😊

    I believe most people actually do see it (as they do ALL matters of this type) as VERY straightforward. It is the lawyers who tease words to mean -‘this’_ when it means ‘that’ who make these affairs COMPLEX!

    In a broader context, it’s very straightforward that unprovoked (you were not attacked) you bomb my city and kill innocent citizens with or without a thermobaric vacuum bomb that you ARE committing war crimes … lawyers are teasing us with lots of words to make what’s straightforward complex .

    Here it’s even more simply straightforward: Does the Senate need to be constituted with 21 senators to be actively in session. Yes or No. Cite the reasons and precedents for same and be done with it.

    And then now this procedural teasing: Can the AG be deposed to defend the legal arguments prepared for the govt (and the President) or is that lawyer-client privileges or even simpler is that barred by the President’s immunity. Yes or No. Cite the reasons and precedents for same and be done with it.

    So respectfully to Justice Chase but she SHOULD simply use her knowledge and legal research skills to explain the straightforward issues before us and worry NOT about how both sides are teasing words to create complexity…. that is and will always be the definition of a great jurist: making contrived legal complexities as straightforward as they actually are!

    I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dee Word

    A decision in law does not mean it is right or wrong, it means based on the rules of interpretation the best decision is taken. It explains why at the highest court there can be dissenting decisions. So far the blogmaster likes retired judge Chris Blackman’s perspective, interpret the law to avoid absurdity.

    Liked by 2 people

  • To be absurd…
    If she took 12 months to give a decision, some of you would be here talking shit and supportive.

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  • Now you dare to be hypothetical. Always moving the goal posts to squeeze through narrow positions.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Last/last
    Father in heaven
    Give me the strength not to ‘kick against the pricks’ 😃

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    We are 100% in agreement Mr Blogmaster… so as Justice Blackman alluded to in his essay a few weeks ago and what I summarized above as : Adjudicate Yes or No. Cite the reasons and precedents for same and be done with it.!!

    To your point unspoken her decision will be challenged to the CCJ REGARDLESS of what she decides so please let her do her judge thing and let’s get on with it!

    Of course take time to do it thoroughly but also do hasten that time along!

    Oh, let’s also be clear that a FINAL appellate decision does mean RIGHT or WRONG regardless of dissents… Just saying for clarity’s sake!

    It’s alright to have an abortion now in US (within certain parameters) and just now if others get their way a different Supreme Court adjudication could make that ‘right’ very WRONG!

    Lata.

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  • I love this… Silly

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  • My game was so thrown off that I forgot to say

    Have a great day Barbados.
    It’s the weekend, try and enjoy it.

    For me to get some pudding and souse or turnovers, I would have to get in my car and go into Brooklyn. Not going. Can only sit here and envy you.
    One of those 2×3 things that I miss and long for.

    So enjoy the day… I’m envious.
    (Did you see how I did that. I’m over here now)

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  • Jesus, I have a headache …
    Think the old brain went from zero to sixty too quickly.
    Feeling more stressed out than if I was in Ukraine.

    Will make myself a breakfast and take a 3 hour break (minimum) and get the brain up to speed.

    After the sneak attack at Pearl Harbor and a battle in the Pacific a US general was heard to say “I’ll be back”.

    Don’t pat yourselves on the back too quickly.

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  • @Dee Word

    They consideration for Justice Chase is that not judge likes to have a decision overturned. It is a matter of professional pride, so to your point she should do it thoroughly to withstand the harsh peer review that will come given the nature of the matter.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    I have often said there is nothing wrong with our systems . It is the post holders that are reluctant to operate them. Responsibilities never go away however much we procrastinate, The decision will be bad or good regardless.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    If public servants fail to act honorable you are saying we are doomed? There is no recourse?

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU
    I am simply saying that we are not ready. We want the glamour of high posts but we do not want the responsibilities attached to these positions. People make the systems work. Unfortunately this miasma has spread to the persons at lower levels that they are supposed to supervise. Are we doomed? Only if we like it so.

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  • Thanks for the clarification Vincent.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    @ Sargeant.
    There is no such thing called slave food. Please note that the breadfruit has a texture and taste similar to the Irish/ English potato. Please note also that the composition of the populations of Barbados, St. Vincent and Grenada have a common population component. Bread fruit is food. The Bajan soup ( a stew) is very Irish in origin..

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  • @Vincent

    We do not disagree that breadfruit is good, the ‘argument’ is about how perceptions effect taste and decisions taken.

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  • At times it would appear as if we have sharp divisions, but in reality we want the same thing but are divided on the way to get there.

    Some have faith in the judicial system but to others the system has already proven itself to be a faulty vehicle. We will not pretend that some parts are virginal and other parts belong to a whore.

    Talk about games, it is those who pretend that some parts of our justice system are blind that play games. Thank God, that evey now and then, they admit it doesn’t work.

    I suspect that I already know the outcome to this charade. After much pontification and deliberation, we get to a position that favors the government. End the games.

    We do not need to get this decision in 2023, let’s get it today, then deal with the uproar and move on.

    🐇/: Let the games to play on forever
    some: Let’s play this one game
    Me: cut it out; give me the outcome and let’s get back to business

    Sorry, but I don’t find the charade entertaining or intellectually stimulating.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu
    I think starvation is a greater motivator of what we consume.The breadfruit was introduced into the Caribbean to feed the hungry population. After emancipation the previous indentured servants were unwillingly sent to the Islands listed or existed on lots below the Cliff where breadfruit trees were prolific.
    So they left Ireland with its scarcity of food to settle in Barbados with a similar scarcity.

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  • Vincent has a precision that is refreshing but sometimes his cut is much too clean.

    I suspect everyone knows what is meant by ‘slave food’.

    But on Vincent’s point, it always amuses me when I see the sign ‘Hispanic Food’ in my grocery. That does not stop me from purchasing and eating and it does not make me Hispanic…. so in my world ‘there’s no such thing as Hispanic food, but I know what is meant.

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  • @David
    There is a dish eaten in Barbados on Saturday’s that is known to be slave food. What is the point?
    ++++
    My point is that the attitude in Antigua goes back to a time when the “highly productive food” (see wiki below) was brought to the Caribbean as a food source for Slaves who in many cases refused to eat it . It has no relation to how you feel about it or what the mindset is in other places. BTW I have never heard the food Bajans consume on Saturday called “Slave food” I’ve heard that Slaves converted what was considered inedible and “throwaway” parts of pigs for their own use as is done in many cultures for different types of food. I believe there is a difference in what one chooses to eat as opposed to not having a choice of what to eat.

    Here is an excerpt from wiki
    Sir Joseph Banks and others saw the value of breadfruit as a highly productive food in 1769, when stationed in Tahiti as part of the Endeavour expedition commanded by Captain James Cook.[7][11] The late-18th-century quest for cheap, high-energy food sources for slaves in British colonies prompted colonial administrators and plantation owners to call for the plant to be brought to the Caribbean.

    Here is an article from Nat G

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/culture/article/breadfruit-and-the-bounty-that-brought-it-across-the-ocean?loggedin=true

    Liked by 2 people

  • Have some sympathy for Justice Chase! Imagine being plucked from conveyancing, power of attorneys, wills, and the odd criminal case to ruling on Constitutional matters. Imagine ten Gov’t lawyers on one side and three lawyers on the other side arguing arcane points of law and the nation’s eyes and ears on you is enough to make a person say “Thanks for nothing Mia”

    There is a legal scholar who used to pen articles on BU who would have ruled on this a while ago

    Can I have an Amen?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    Amen !

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  • If the judge follows the process that starts with a beginning she would be released of her jammed mentality
    The lawyers for govt are deliberately introducing a reckless game of bait and switch

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  • If the judge follows the process that starts with a beginning she would be released of her jammed mentality
    The lawyers for govt are deliberately introducing a reckless game of bait and switch

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  • slave food
    we love to efflux a lot of FOOLISHNESS on BU

    SO CALLE SLAVE FOOD IN MOST ISLANDS IS ACTUALLY NOW THE NATIONAL DISH OR A POPULAR DISH ON THOSE ISLANDS AND/OR EVEN LOVED BY SOME TOURISTS AT SOME RESTAURANTS AND GUEST HOUSES , UH LIE

    NO I AM NOT–THIS IS SOUND DOCTRINE THAT CAN NOT BE REFUTED

    Liked by 1 person

  • @GP
    I think you illustrated the point that some folks talk of slave food.

    “SO CALLE SLAVE FOOD IN MOST ISLANDS IS ACTUALLY NOW THE NATIONAL DISH OR A POPULAR DISH ON THOSE ISLANDS AND/OR EVEN LOVED BY SOME TOURISTS AT SOME RESTAURANTS AND GUEST HOUSES , UH LIE”

    Not uh lie, but folks rightfully or wrongfully invent all kind of named for things.

    Good to see you out and about.

    Liked by 1 person

  • -next topic-
    I wonder if the positions that we take are a reflection of our personal experience in Bajan society …

    The hardliners (Aware): Harsh, extremely critical and giving no quarter. The system did not work for them and they expect it to continue to work for a select few.

    Cheering section (conveniently unaware): They speak of systems and processes as if they were in the garden of Eden. Their easy and well rewarded lives makes them unaware of what others are experiencing. To hear anything other than ‘life is beautiful’ is to hear treason.

    Survivalists: Aware but will adopt the position that benefits them. They are like lizards who blend in to suit the landscape. I remember when the pie was being shared (2018) and it was slow in coming to one guy,his song started to change. Pie came ..

    Trying to figure out why we sing different times.

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  • THANKS THEO
    QUESTION FOR ANY OR ALL
    HAVE ANY OF YOU EVER HAD ANY PROFESSIONAL DEALINGS WITH JUSTICE CHASE?

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  • RE There is a legal scholar who used to pen articles on BU who would have ruled on this a while ago
    THIS LEGAL SCHOLAR WAS TEACHING……..AND THUS LIKELY TO BE ON TOP OF ALL THE VARIOUS ASPECTS OF THE LAW
    I KNOW THIS HOW?
    I WOULD ASK THIS
    WHY WOULD I APPLY FOR, OR TAKE ON A POSITION THAT I KNOW I AM NOT PREPARED FOR, OR DONT HAVE THE ABILITY TO DO, ETC ETC

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  • Haven’t had any professional or otherwise dealings with Justice Chase
    However her last ruling where the disenfranchisement of voters were at high risk left a bad taste signaling her rulings can be hoisted on govt preferences when necessary
    Imagine a justice of the high Court dismissing an important case having to do with voters right under the banner ” Her court is not an election court”
    First and foremost she does not have ownership to any court and she has sworn to respect and fulfill the duties bind in principle on the Constitution
    Barbados justice system is in a bad state when a judge can openly dismiss a Constitutional tenet on a sloppy ruling

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  • @Sargeant March 5, 2022 12:04 AM “Why is it [breadfruit] so popular in Barbados?

    Those of us who love it love it because we love it. We love the taste, the texture, the versatility, the price, the nutrition. It is a love thing.

    On Thursday, Friday and today I had some wonderful St. Joseph breadfruit, with carrots, spinach and oven roasted pork chops. Delicious.

    Tomorrow I’ll cook a lovely big pot of soup. I’ve got some cooked slices of breadfruit in the fridge, and 5 minutes before the soup is done, I’ll add some breadfruit slices to it.

    Breadfruit is an excellent carbohydrate. Right now I have on hand, whole wheat flour, white flour, whole wheat bread, several kinds of pasta, brown rice, white rice, cornmeal, cassava flour, frozen cassava, fresh and frozen sweet potato, yam, white potatoes also called English or Irish potatoes, but none of these carbohydrates can hold a candle to breadfruit.

    Breadfruit is the best. Breadfruit is the king of carbohydrates.

    And “no” I am not fat.

    Liked by 1 person

  • GP BU RETIRED "RESIDENT" DR

    ACTUALLY BREAD FRUIT IS NOT PARTICULARLY NUTRITIOUS SINCE IT IS PLANT MATERIAL
    CONSEQUENTIALLY THE GLUCOSE THEREIN IS NOT OF MUCH BENEFIT TO CONSUMERS BECAUSE THE GLUCOSE UNITS ARE LINKED IN BETA I- 4 LINKAGES, WHICH WE CANNOT BREAK, SINCE HUMAN AMYLASES CAN ONLY BREAK ALPHA 1-4 BONDS
    BIOCHEMICALLY AND NUTRITIONLY THE POST TO THE EFFECT THAT BREADFRUIT iS the king of carbohydrates.IS ESSENTIALLY CONCENTRATED BULL SHIT
    THIS IS SOUND DOCTRINE THAT CAN NOT BE REFUTED

    I LOVE BREADFRUIT THOUGH

    Liked by 1 person

  • Dear GP

    Kindly rank these carbohydrates. Thanks.

    whole wheat flour, white flour, whole wheat bread, several kinds of pasta, brown rice, white rice, cornmeal, cassava flour, frozen cassava, fresh and frozen sweet potato, yam, white potatoes also called English or Irish potatoes
    Note that I did not serve my breadfruit alone. I added some spinach, carrots and pork. Onions, sweet peppers, tomatoes, and herbs with the pork.

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  • A few years ago I saw a travelogue on Hawaii and there are over 100 varieties of breadfruit there, some people even eat them raw
    Here is an example (not from the travelogue)

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  • The ultimate slave food was non-perishable: salted cod. It would survive the crossing and has become our staple diet.

    Jackfruit belongs to the breadfruit family and has become very popular in the UK. It is being promoted as a wonder food. Last month, for the first time ever, Lidl, ( a popular retailer) was selling tinned breadfruit.

    Here’s the irony. Try ordering Caribbean dishes from our major hotels and restaurants. Cassava, breadfruit and a host of other home grown vegetables are off the menu. You can eat Italian, Thai, Chinese and the rest.

    An Indian family based in the UK has made a killing selling “Slave food”. When are we ever going to learn?

    https://www.grocerytrader.co.uk/News/November_2006/G_wanis.html
    https://www.vice.com/en/article/597ez5/tropical-sun-boycott-caribbean

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  • What are we going to learn that the mindset of people on how to eat and what to eat has changed
    A change in eating habits which consist of less starches and more vegetables
    The vegan menu is on the rise and more favoured

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  • TLSNMarch 6, 2022 6:39 AM

    The ultimate slave food was non-perishable: salted cod. It would survive the crossing and has become our staple diet.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Salted cod came from the fishing grounds of Newfoundland and everyone ate it..

    Just another traded commodity on which Quaker prosperity was built.

    Check this recent PhD thesis and you will get to understand that most trade in which Barbados was involved in early days was between Barbados and the ports on the Eastern seaboard of America.

    https://era.ed.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1842/23560/McGuinness2017.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

    Like

  • MillerMarch 4, 2022 8:18 PM

    Sometimes you take on the poorly played role of the fool.

    Of course the West African monkeys came on the same ships as the black slaves; but not as pets or companions like your Irish dogs or even Welsh black belly sheep or ‘English’ white pussycats.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Monkeys have been arriving in South America from Africa and by extension the Caribbean from the dawn of time.

    Go look at the two Atlantic Gyres and you will realise that depending on where a tree starts its journey across the Atlantic from the coast of Africa it can end up in the Caribbean, Central America or in Brazil.

    Here is an article you may find edifying in New Scientist.

    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2240325-monkeys-made-their-way-from-africa-to-south-america-at-least-twice/

    Sometimes he who laughs last laughs loudest … and longest!!

    I play the fool sometimes but I do it when I know my facts and I want the real fool to step forward and be acknowledged!!

    Take a bow!!

    The fact is that it is doubtful if anyone could with any certainty say when monkeys arrived in Barbados.

    Only a fool would claim different.

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  • This may help you in your quest to discover when monkeys arrived in Barbados.

    https://today.duke.edu/2014/01/southamericanmonkeys

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  • @TLSN March 6, 2022 6:39 AM “The ultimate slave food was non-perishable: salted cod. It would survive the crossing and has become our staple diet.”

    Not anymore. Salted cod, mostly from Canada was widely used in the days before refrigeration. Since the rural electrification programs in the 1960’s Bajans eat a lot of chicken, and a lot of fresh local fish.

    If you want to score a [salt] fishcake nowadays you will need an invite to a “high-class” cocktail party.

    Lolll!!!

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  • @TheOGazerts March 5, 2022 8:47 AM “For me to get some pudding and souse.”

    Maybe one of these days I will post a pudding and souse recipe on Carmeta’s Corner. It is not difficult to make. Basically boiled pork in a cucumber pickle. A cucumber pickle is cucumbers, lime juice, onion, hot pepper, salt, parsley if you like parsley. Pudding is grated sweet potatoes mixed with whatever herbs pleases you and steamed. The thing about pudding and souse is that you can adjust the recipe to get the flavor that YOU like.

    I have a cousin whose family had been in the baking trade for generations, maybe I’ll ask her for a turnover recipe. I am not too keen on turnovers myself so I’ve only made them once or twice.

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  • @TLSN March 6, 2022 6:39 AM “Last month, for the first time ever, Lidl, ( a popular retailer) was selling tinned breadfruit.”

    Tinned breadfruit is an abomination. I tried it once 40 years ago and I have never permitted it to cross my lips again.

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  • @cuhdear
    Funny that you should mention turnovers. This evening, I promised my wife that I would make some.
    Flour
    Baking soda
    Grated Coconut
    Sugar

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  • @John March 6, 2022 6:58 PM “The fact is that it is doubtful if anyone could with any certainty say when monkeys arrived in Barbados.”

    A DNA comparative analysis of West African, South American and Barbados monkeys will do it.

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  • Message to Bajan parents with you g sons growing up in Barbados

    Son, she may be nice, sweet and everything that you desire. As you get older and nostalgia sets in you will dream of Bajan delicacies. You will find that doubles, roti and even paime (similar to our conkies) are not a true substitute.

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  • For cuhdear, Donna and the old men of BU

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  • Cuhdear BajanMarch 6, 2022 8:47 PM

    @John March 6, 2022 6:58 PM “The fact is that it is doubtful if anyone could with any certainty say when monkeys arrived in Barbados.”

    A DNA comparative analysis of West African, South American and Barbados monkeys will do it.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    OK Miller

    You know what to do.

    Go and catch a monkey, hold it down, stick your swab in its mouth and send it to Amcestry.com.

    Then go to West Africa and do the same and then South America.

    There is apparently only one species of monkey in Barbados.

    There are 216 different species of primates in Africa and 111 in Madagascar.

    There are 78 species that have been registered in South America.

    Consult the resident BU monkey expert on which species to test.

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  • The alternative is to accept the fact that no one will know for sure how they cot here or how they came and that it really does not matter.

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  • @ John March 6, 2022 11:28 PM
    (Quote):
    The alternative is to accept the fact that no one will know for sure how they cot here or how they came and that it really does not matter.
    (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Ok Mr. Bajan Johnny Houdini, since you are capable of wriggling your way out of a sealed can of ringworms we will let you off the hook to pupate another day into some form of primate like a bonobo which shares almost 99 % DNA with both African and European homo sapiens like you.

    So let us strike a deal and accept that those Bajan resident green monkeys jumped off the SS Noah’s Ark, like the two “mengeese”, after sailing from South America and Antarctica to pick up two sloths and two emperor penguins to save their sorry asses from inundation.

    We are sure you will receive 100% scientific support from your doctor friend Rev. GP.

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  • Don’t blame me … you just forgot to seal the can!!!!

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  • .. and the bottom had rusted out.

    Next time, do your homework and think.

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  • So, what news from Court?

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