The Ancestral Call for Return: Start here. End (t)here

Submitted by Tara Inniss, Department of History and Philosophy, The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus

Some of us in Barbados and the Diaspora saw some posts and short videos on social media this past weekend showing a ceremony taking place in Ghana of Barbadian officials burying the “remains” of an “unknown” enslaved African burial/space from Barbados to Africa. Those present described it as a very emotional experience. I have no doubt that it was. Confronting the theft of our culture and the erasure of lives lived during enslavement in Barbados is an extremely visceral experience that would touch any one of us if we had the opportunities to do so.

When we take our students to the spaces that exist here in Barbados, it is also an emotional experience. If I were to describe it, I would say the emotion is more of revelation and connection than it is of reflection and communion. It is a revelation simply because they did not know that these spaces existed. There are no signposts. There are no pathways or guided markers. If there is a sign upon arrival, it is likely a plaque describing something that was – not is. They are forced to reflect on the fact that these spaces are not a valued part of their heritage. They never even learned about them in school. In fact, they never really learned their own history. We reflect on that. Together.

There must be many places on this island that hold the remains of our enslaved ancestors. Unfortunately, we are only aware of three that have been documented archaeologically – all of which faced threats to their protection and at least one, which was completely destroyed. These are the burial spaces at Newton Slave Burial Ground which is now the property of the Barbados Museum and Historical Society (BMHS); Fontabelle Slave and Free Coloured Burial Ground which was destroyed by Government to make way for the Barbados Investment and Development Corporation (BIDC) Small Business Development Building; and at least one burial that was excavated during development at the Pier Head likely in the vicinity of the Royal African Company’s Barracoons where newly arrived African captives were landed before being sold off to enslavers in Barbados and the rest of the Caribbean. The area is better known today as the Barbados Tourism and Investment (BTI) Inc. car park in Bridgetown.

The Barbadian landscape — past and present — is such that we have little documentation on the burials of hundreds of thousands of Africans and their enslaved descendants after living, working and dying here. We know they exist, but we do not know where they are. Plantation records, if they exist and accessible, had been silent and certainly the changing nature of sugar production, estate ownership and residential patterns of a landless emancipation in this island have rendered people’s memories of these spaces either fragile or absent. The majority of enslaved Africans in Barbados were not allowed to be buried in the well-known parish cemeteries on this island as they were not ‘Christian’ and there was complete denial of their religion and spirituality. But they had to bury their dead somewhere – and the places that were selected for them to confer their own rites for their departed were often on the most marginal land of the plantation – usually not suitable for sugar or other agricultural production.

In the case of the burial space at Fontabelle, this was land that was given for this expressed purpose by Joseph Rachell (1716-66) who was widely regarded as the first free black businessman in Barbados.1 He recognised that the slave and free coloured communities of Bridgetown did not have anywhere to bury their dead so he gave them land to do so. Unfortunately, these spaces have been largely lost to time. Having little access to the somewhat permanent materials that we traditionally associate with grave sites, such as tombstones or other memorials, all that may remain is some of the plantings of tress and shrubs that we know helped the enslaved and free find their dead.


1 The irony here, of course, is that there is no memorial to Joseph Rachell, an early example of an enterprising black Barbadian, whose own grave was moved in street communities of Bridgetown did not have anywhere to bury their dead so he gave them land to do so. Unfortunately, these spaces have been largely lost to time. Having little access to the somewhat permanent materials that we traditionally associate with grave sites, such as tombstones or other memorials, all that may remain is some of the plantings of tress and shrubs that we know helped the enslaved and free find their dead.

That is why when we have found them here or in other parts of the Caribbean or the rest of the Americas they are quite special on a number of levels. Although an estimated 12.5 million enslaved Africans came to the Americas, there are only a handful of burial spaces that have been located – largely by accident – during archaeological surveys prior to modern construction. Among these are the African Burial Ground National Monument in New York City, USA and Valongo Wharf Arcaheological, a UNESCO World Heritage Property in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. There have been other excavations in the region including the house-yard slave burials at Seville Estate in Jamaica as well as others in the French-speaking Caribbean. It is important to note that controversies have existed over the movement of ancestral remains of enslaved peoples as well as other artifacts within and outside of state borders for a number of reasons.

Newton Slave Burial Ground is special because it is the only extant communal slave burial ground that has been found in the region, quite possibly in the Americas. That means that we know that the burials at Newton were those of persons enslaved at Newton. When Jerome Handler uncovered the location of the burials at Newton in the 1970s, it spurred an entire new field of archaeological and historical investigation into the cultural and biological history of Africans in the Americas. It is still used today as a benchmark field study for archaeologists and historians globally. And, unlike the rest of the island’s plantation history, Newton Plantation is one of the best-documented estates in the island. That means that we know a lot about the slave community at Newton – stories of maronnage, landmark court cases for freedom; gender dynamics; resistance; even names and family groups for certain time periods. The enslaved community at Newton is not anonymous.

But are these burial spaces quite special to us as a country? That is a categorical No. I know about them because I learned about them while doing history and archaeology at The UWI, Cave Hill. My knowledge of them largely derives from the work we did with Dr. Karl Watson as undergraduate and postgraduate students. In fact, I was there with him and other students when we tried to do rescue archaeology of only a handful of what was hundreds, maybe thousands of burials at Fontabelle in the early 2000s under severe pressure from the contractor with heavy equipment that had destroyed most of the site and with it one of the largest known slave and free coloured urban burial grounds in the Caribbean. Approximately 1000 burials were destroyed! That was an emotional, visceral experience too as we bulldozed a sacred space belonging to our ancestors as a consequence of “development”.

Most people today are not aware of burials at Newton, Fontabelle or Pier Head. Most people do not even know where the Newton Slave Burial Ground is; and if you went you would have to drive up to the back of an industrial park, walk a short hike through a cart road in a cane ground and stare at a rolling field which is usually overgrown so you cannot see the burial mounds. You will be greeted by a molded over Barbados Slave Route sign which is part of a now defunct Ministry of Tourism project. At Fontabelle, all there is to mark what was is a small plaque at the entrance of the BIDC complex. And at Pier Head — well we all park our cars there to go on to do our shopping in town and rarely contemplate the suffering and bewilderment of arrival that took place under our feet.

These are places of return too! These are sites of memory for the slave trade and slavery right here in Barbados! Look what we have done with them. Nothing. Destroyed them. Neglect them. They are not places of revelation or connection and certainly not places for reflection or communion. Most of us will never be able to visit a symbolic burial of ancestral “remains” in Ghana, or any other place on the West African coast although many of us may wish to. Why have we not done our work in Barbados to confront our own African past and to understand the identities that evolved because Africans were here? We have not done our work spiritually or otherwise to even ready ourselves for return. And it is my greatest regret as a daughter of the Diaspora that we have no place here in Barbados to honour our ancestors, even though they exist!

I say this in the light of what other communities in Barbados have done to reflect and commune with their own past and the value they have placed on sharing it with others. The recent redevelopment of the Nidhe Israel Synagogue and its environs demonstrates an enduring commitment by the Jewish community to not only honor their presence here but also to share in that recognition with others, including memorializing the historic location of Codd’s House where our emancipation was read aloud for the first time on our soil (also destroyed by Government in the 1980s). I also look to a small group of dedicated persons who cleared and restored a Quaker Burial Ground – there is not even a Quaker presence on the island having been driven out by persecution in the 17th century! But this space was regarded as having significance and is maintained as such. We can say that since Independence, a majority African-descended Government of Barbados has invested little in the spaces that symbolize the survival and sacrifice of our African ancestors – in fact, we can say that there has been a legacy of neglect and destruction to remove our this past from our landscape.

I am calling on our Government to recognize these failings in our past decision-making of erasure and neglect and with a fervent plea: do not relegate our own heritage to the dust-pile of history. Please respect, protect and value our own archaeological and historical past. Please see archaeology as a friend, not foe to our country’s development and knowledge about ourselves. Please invest in our archives and repositories of memory. Please make this history known in our schools and museums. These are spaces for peace-building and community. These are places that can instill the pride we all feel slipping away.

If 2020 is the year of return for Barbadians, please let it to be spaces like Newton Slave Burial Ground that show the value we place on this history with sensitive interpretation where we can do more than reveal and connect but also to reflect and commune.

We do not have these spaces.

We cannot go on these emotional journeys.

We cannot truly free our ancestral call for return without them.

Start here. End (t)here

118 comments

  • What a scathing indictment of the decision makers past and present and 98% literacy, methinks that we are a country that only pays lip service to our history, the term “no nation” is apt.

    “We Gathering”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Tara:

    Very informative. Thank you.

    Please note that in several construction contracts, there is a provision for work stoppage if items of archaeological interest are discovered. However, not all of them have this provision. I will certainly try to ensure that they are included in all of ours from now on.

    Solutions Barbados did not have a policy on such burial grounds, but one is certainly needed. Including it as a mandatory provision in the construction contract, and the consultants’ contracts (in the event that the discoveries are made during the geotechnical investigations), is likely to be an effective solution.

    Like

  • grenville
    i think that such contracts should be put in the basic training course for leaders ———-wuh you think?

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  • Is this article a veiled criticism of the trip to Ghana?
    Just asking

    Liked by 1 person

  • Good conteibution. Another 9-day wagon for the bandwagonists on BU. Look out fuh the multi-mout twist mouts. 🤣🤣🤣

    Liked by 1 person

  • Let me make it abundantly clear that I wrote a letter to the Editor of the Advocate News about forty years ago calling for African Studies to be introduced into all schools. Since then I was interviewed on a program on CBC and I called for the removal of the queen as head of state shortly after. I marched with the my progressive brothers and sisters with the South African Liberation movement to free Nelson Mandela and publicly backed it up with a comment in the Advocate news.
    Against that background , I find no fault with the current trip to Africa.
    Just a word to the cool aid drinkers.

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  • The Free Negro community and the Free Mulatto community arose because Quakers were freeing their slaves from the 1650’s.

    They did not free then willy nilly.

    My feeling is they freed those who could read and who chose to accept Christ.

    Principle drove the freeing of the slaves but in the case of Mulatto slaves, there was an added motivation, blood.

    If you notice, the Free Negroes referred to in the link to Joseph Rachell were baptized in 1701.

    Baptism was not a part of Quaker beliefs.

    So why were they baptized in the Anglican Church if they were freed by a Quaker owner who was almost definitely involved in their teaching?

    It isn’t generally recognized that Christopher Codrington who gave his plantations to the SPG c.1710 was a Quaker, as was his father and possibly his grandfather.

    “His two plantations in Barbados, now known as the Society and the College, together with part of the island of Barbuda, he left “to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts for the foundation of a college in Barbadoes,”[4] in which his “desire is to have the plantations continued Intire and three hundred negroes at least Kept thereon, and a convenient number of professors and scholars were to be maintained, all of them to be under the vowes of poverty, chastity, and obedience,” and “obliged to study and practice physick and chirurgery, as well as divinity, that by the apparent usefulness of the former to all mankind they may both endear themselves to the people, and have the better opportunity of doing good to men’s souls, while they are taking care of their bodies.” The monastic intention of the testator has been lost sight of, but Codrington College, built 1714-42, still flourishes.[5]”

    The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel was/is an Anglican institution, not a Quaker institution.

    When the Quaker connection is grasped the locations of the numerous burying grounds around Barbados can be deduced.

    Joseph Rachell’s provision is similar to other provisions of burying grounds given by Quakers.

    Liked by 1 person

  • De ole man going ask the writer of this piece not to BREK confused with Piece the Legend, to comment on, IF SHE CAN, THE REINTERMENT RITES FOR SLAVES

    SO THAT SHE CAN DO SO PROPERLY HERE ARE SOME POINTERS

    De ole man will continue to expand on this matter of Falsification of Antiquities and the Bones of the Black Belly Sheep.

    De ole man will use text copied from a credible Museum which deals in Historical bodies and their Reinterment

    Here are their considerations INTERSPERSED WITH DE OLE MAN’S QUERIES AS AN EXPERT ON DESE TINGS heheheheh

    Are there human remains in your organisation’s custody, in store, or elsewhere, that you don’t know anything about?

    DID YOU COLLECT ALL DE DUPPY? WHICH IN THIS CASE IS A BLACK BELLY SHEEP

    Is there documentation about these remains? Has it been published?

    WERE THERE WITNESSES TO THE DESECRATION OF THE GRAVE SITE? OR DID THE BLACK BELLY SHHEP PUT UP MUCH OF A STRUGGLE?

    Were they excavated before good records became standard practice?

    WHO ELSE KNOWS ABOUT THIS ROBBERY AND MASQUERADE? HAVE THEY BEEN SWORN TO SECRECY? ARE THEY NOW AN UNWILLING OCCUPANT OF THE DESECRATED GRAVE?

    Is there any record of the remains being used within your organisation or elsewhere, e.g. for scientific research, publication, display, education, community events or other purposes?

    REFER TO THE QUERY ABOVE ABOUT THE UNWILLING OCCUPANT(S)

    If so, when were they last used? If not, does this indicate they could be candidates for disposal? What are the reasons for justifying the retention of the remains?

    WHY DID WUNNA DIG UP DE DUPPIES AND RISK IT BRINGING FURTHER CALAMITY PUN BARBADOS? IS NOT THE SCOURGE OF THE IMF ENOUGH?

    Is there any funding in place for the remains to be studied or used, or any funding anticipated in the future, or plans seek further funding?

    HOW MUCH MONEY WUNNA FEEL GHANA GOING TRANSFER TO BARBADOS AFTER WUNNA MANUFACTURE THESE SHEEP BONES?

    If the remains have little or no contextual documentation, is it still reasonable to assert a use for them?

    WUNNA IS NOT FRIGHTENED DAT DE GHANAIANS EXAMINE THE DNA OF DE BLACK BELLY SHEEP BONES?

    Where there is no scientific, display, educational (etc.) use, are you aware of the value placed on the remains? What do you feel is the value of the remains?

    REFER TO QUESTION 6 AND DE OLE MAN COMMENTS

    Do the public/relevant institutions know about the human remains collection in your care?

    HOW DE RH WAS WUNNA ABLE TO DIG UP PURPORTED SLAVES, DETERMINE DAT DEM WAS FROM GHANA AND NOBODY, INCLUDING NATIONAL HISTORIANS IN BARBADOS KNO BOUT DIS FALSIFICATION?

    Have you made this collection accessible to a wide range of audiences, e.g. through an online collections database?

    DO NOT WORRY BOT DIS LAST QUERY.

    DE OLE MAN AND ME GRANSON GINE HELP WUNNA PUBLICIZE DIS TO A WIDE AUDIENCE SOON ENOUGH!

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  • For over 50 years you have had two wicked colonial minded governments who care nothing about the African Slave trade, nothing about murdered and brutalized Africans slaves, their own ancestors, cared nothing about teaching 3 generations of African descendants anything about their true history…they NEVER WANTED TO IDENTIFY AS AFRICAN DESCENDED…and they made sure to corrupt the minds of the populi to the point that MOST DO NOT EVEN KNOW THEY ARE AFRICAN DESCENDED.

    All they have ever cared about is kowtowing to and enabling the filthy descendants of indentured servants to rob African descendants on the island,

    keeping racism, apartheid and modern day slavery alive and well against the majority population who were descended from victims of the slave trade,

    while they all steal everything from the said majority population and keep a slave society intact, just for that purpose….

    Then ya have all manner of FAKE HISTORIANS…pretending to be in charge of the island’s history, who should not be allowed anywhere near the grave sites of African slaves,

    they lie and make up stories,

    rewrite reality and truth WITH SHITE..and still pretend they are slave masters…adding insult to injury.

    Now they are hot and sweaty running around pretending to care about African burial grounds and African bones when they are violating human rights of the LIVING descendants of African slaves still…when the first opportunity any of them get they will either remove all Slave bones or build their racist hotels right on top of them..

    Ask all these colonial negros aka fake leaders, all black,, where are the reflective pools or giant tributes showcasing RESPECT to enslaved Africans AND THEIR LIVING DESCENDANTS…

    the useless DLP pretenders built shite at the Garrison in tribute to satan,

    they gave away the people’s money to minority thieves by the billions to collect their bribes,

    they continue to build racist hotels…..both governments

    but where are the VISUAL TRIBUTES to enslaved Africans..

    All of this MUST BE KEPT IN THE LIGHT…to expose all these FRAUDS…pretending to be leaders, pretending to be experts of this and that..pretending to be historians…

    Enuff fowl might be above to tell us whose bones got flown out to Ghana without DNA testing…to identify the remains..

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  • This is a brilliant call for historical recognition and it rightly points out we should look closer at home. The only person doing major work on this subject is Elombe Mottley, who has spent a lifetime trying to recapture some of our cultural past.
    The trip to Ghana by the president adds nothing to this, it is pure PR. Slaves arriving in Barbados came from the entire West African area which should be recognised, even if the march begins with a single step.
    But there are more recent examples historical neglect. I recently raised the issue of the long association of Bayland with various merchant navies, and was attacked by one blogger; I have on numerous occasions said that Herbert House should be a reminder of the Barbadians who have left the country for North America and Europe, but instead it is a cricket museum.
    What we need s a cultural policy, not a manufactured one such as Crop Over, but a recognition of our cultural past, especially in a fast-changing world in which all cultures are now American..
    How about recognising the Barbadian presence in other Caribbean and neighbouring territories and in Europe and North America, not only Panama, but Bermuda, the Bahamas, St Lucia, Antigua, St Kitts, Brooklyn, Reading and in particular Guyana?
    There is a lot of work to do to re-connect young Barbadians to their cultural past. By the way, look what we have done to Seawell Plantation, a site of important archaeological interest. Quite often we even get rid of the old names, just look at some of our schools.

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  • @ Ms Tara Inniss,

    De ole man commends you for this piece again.

    Note is made of the fact that there is no title ascribed to you but your affiliation with Cave Hill’s History Department is stated.

    And I will beg you to indulge me with a few questions.

    You said and I quote

    “…And, unlike the rest of the island’s plantation history, Newton Plantation is one of the best-documented estates in the island.

    That means that we know a lot about the slave community at Newton – stories of maronnage, landmark court cases for freedom; gender dynamics; resistance; even names and family groups for certain time periods.

    The enslaved community at Newton is not anonymous…”

    1.Why, in light of this information would it transpire that Dr. Karl Watson or any other historian, was not consulted on this grave desecration?

    2.”The Nidḥe Israel Synagogue (Hebrew: בית הכנסת נדחי ישראל‎ Bet Knesset Nide Yisrael, lit. Synagogue of the Scattered of Israel) is the only synagogue in Bridgetown, Barbados. It is one of the oldest synagogues in the Western hemisphere and a Barbados National Trust property”

    3.Given the respect accorded the graves of the Jews, who number less than 2,000 people in Barbados that the respect accorded the bones of a purported slave (which might well be the bones of a black belly sheep) do you feel that this act by Mugabe Mottley does any credit to us black people

    Let me put this desecration in context for you to respond Miss Inniss.

    4.Do you think that Paul Altman a Jewish businessman WOULD HAVE SAT QUIETLY WHILE MIA AMOR MOTTLEY DUG UP THE REMAINS OF A 1654 RESIDENT OF HIS ANCESTORS GRAVES?

    5.do you see why de ole man calls bajans Sheeple and People?

    For Altman and Haloute and all the rest THEY HAVE A VALUE ASCRIBED TO THEIR DEAD!

    We black people DO NOT HAVE ANY SUCH VALUE and our RH Prime Minister has shown us the RH value she has for us by this action.

    What do you think? (Ignore my RHs those are acronyms for Right Honorable)

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ the Honourable Blogmaster your assistance please with an item here for Mr Hal Austin thank you

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  • I am afraid that the die was casted under the premiership of Errol Barrow. He spent his time in office blocking the advancement of his own people. He was fervently against the development of black nationalism and was determined that it would not flourish under his watch.

    There are some here who said he left a great legacy. Tara Inniss excellent post refutes this. What is the saying – if you start wrong; it is going to end wrong.

    We salute you Mr Barrow. Bravo!

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  • @Sargeant

    Is it also a scathing indictment of our people?

    It is good that although politically motivated something positive has yielded from the ceremonial return of the remains of slave remains.

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  • Does anyone have any PROOF that what Mia packaged and spirited away in SECRET to Africa are indeed slave bones…show me the proof, she said NOTHING to the majority population who paid fror the trip, she held no ceremony in her haste to deceive…

    Better still…how do any of these Black ministers/politicians…reconcile and EXPLAIN AWAY…their over 50 YEARS OF MULTIPLE CRIMES against the descendants of African Slaves,

    the collusion,

    the thefts,

    the violation of human rights all in a bid to please minoritity criminals and thieves and enrich them and said criminal ministers AT THE EXPENSE OF THE AFRICAN DESCENDED POPULATION..

    yall need to stop allowing these wicked leaders to get away with these crimes, stop trying to sugar coat their evil actions AND DECADES OF CRIMES against the descendants of slaves and memories of their ancestors…because:

    it was DELIBERATE

    it was MALICIOUS

    it was METHODICAL

    it was MEANT TO DESTROY AFRICAN DESCENDANTS mentally and economically ..and it has

    IT STILL CONTINUES….that is why it will stay in the light for the whole damn world to see..

    so run Mia run…

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  • What makes Dr. Inniss’ contribution refreshing is that it is not steeped in political BS. It addresses the failure of how we have been educating our people, we are numb to the matter under discussion.

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  • Barrow was just another colonial brainwashed and miseducated FRAUD..

    his HATRED for black nationalism and all things African …WAS CLEAR…..and CONTINUED UNCHECKED under each and every useless negro who crawled into that parliament in the last 5 decades NONE OF WHOM EVER WANTED to be identified with anything African…….TO THIS DAY…

    those two political parties marinated in BLACK SELF HATRED…must be PERMANENTLY DISBANDED..by the PEOPLE…and should only be discussed in books about HOW NOT TO BE A HOUSE NEGRO..

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  • We should not lose focus of the opportunities from the reciprocal arrangement between Barbados and Ghana.

    Liked by 1 person

  • No one is losing sight, but we must NEVER lose sight of the CRIMINAL track records of both governments…none of it is any good, especially not to the memories of enslaved Africans and PARTICULARLY not to the lives of LIVING DESCENDANTS OF AFRICA…who are still the VICTIMS OF BOTH TOXIC, DESTRUCTIVE GOVERNMENTS…

    besides…I WILL REPEAT..no one in the CARIBBEAN needs these colonial minded fraud governments to go to Africa and access their birthright….just buy your ticket, make the trip, do your networking and BEGIN…JUST LIKE WHAT AFRICAN AMERICANS DID..they needed no permission, no interference from any government, they just did it.

    watch and see who this FRAUD…will push forward to do business in Africa,

    watch and see who will benefit,

    watch and see it will be no one who looks like her…that is the intent..it is a pattern from wicked black governments..

    Black Caribbean people, Black Bajans, need not include corrupt governments in their plans to return to Africa or to do any business there…do not depend on them for any return, YOU DO NOT NEED THEM….they will continue to SELL YOU…

    whatever scheme they are concocting is their own, the people need not get involved.

    stop looking at useless, toxic leaders who have no original ideas and have to use taxpayer’s money by the millions to hire halfassed consultants to tell them what to do, why would you put you and your children’s futures in those useless hands.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Have yall not lost enough billions of dollars THROUGH THE SAME LAWYERS, GOVERNMENT MINISTERS AND MINORITY THIEVES…throught the decades, ya mean yall want to LOSE MORE…the perpetual victim continously treated and mistreated as SLAVES.

    the futures of your descendants HAVE ALREADY BEEN STOLEN….your children and grandchildren ALREADY VICTIMIZED..

    what and HOW MUCH more do you want…TO LOSE..

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  • Water just returned for some but now there is NO electricity…can anyone say..THAT THE ISLAND IS IN SERIOUS TROUBLE….they will now need to hire more consultants at taxpayer’s exense to tell them what to do, never mind these parasites in parliament were hired BY THE PEOPLE and collect a salary every month and swore post election that they knew what to do.

    and yall will blindly TRUST THESE CLOWNS with your futures or anything to do with Africa or even anything to do with the island…. well go right ahead…yall will get exactly what YA DESERVE.

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  • The truth is that no self respecting Black nationalist would oppose closer ties with Africa. The problem here is that like it or not, this trip was not properly presented to the populace and it gives the impression that it was secretly planned or at least there just was not enough information about the delegation etc. Some people are claiming that they only Knew who were going when they saw the pictures released on facebook.
    With an enlightened approach, to such a historic occasion , the opposition should have at least been offered to send one representative . We just have not reached that level of maturity. Hence as some have understandably suggested or concluded, it looks like political PR.
    The article clearly condemns the Duopoly for destroying or allowing to be destroyed important sites related to our African history and archaeology.
    @ TLSN
    Your critique of Barrow cannot be disputed. All you have to do is check the notorious Public Order Act, that was precisely designed to handicap and wipe out the progressive black nationalist movement.
    BTW we used to bring nurses from Namibia to be trained here. Now we have no nurses and are turning to Africa. In many ways , we are going backwards.
    Everything around here is now based on hocus pocus economics and IMF abracadabra.
    The Duopoly Rules

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  • David
    How you expect pigs to purr? Like I said, another 9-day wagon for the resident bandwagonists who for the most part don’t know what they are talking about or just plain wicked.

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  • @David

    Is it also a scathing indictment of our people?
    ++++++++++++
    In a word “Yes!”, that is what the 98% literacy is supposed to convey, we all need to take a look in the mirror.

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  • Wicked is….. rushing off to Ghana in secret with bones ya don’t know to whom they belong…

    Wicked is….saying NOTHING TO THE PEOPLE…who pay your salary and WHO PAID FOR THE TRIP..

    Wicked is…not even having the RESPECT or DECENCY to hold a ceremony to unearth and remove the bones..

    Wicked is….NOT EVEN TESTING THE BONES BEFORE RUNNING OFF TO GHANA WITH THEM…

    that is the true definition of wicked…

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  • nextparty246
    November 18, 2019 10:13 PM

    Tara:
    Very informative. Thank you.
    Please note that in several construction contracts, there is a provision for work stoppage if items of archaeological interest are discovered. However, not all of them have this provision. I will certainly try to ensure that they are included in all of ours from now on.
    Solutions Barbados did not have a policy on such burial grounds, but one is certainly needed. Including it as a mandatory provision in the construction contract, and the consultants’ contracts (in the event that the discoveries are made during the geotechnical investigations), is likely to be an effective solution.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Grenville

    All you have to do to find some is to go to the Public Library and ask for the 1910 Report on Historic Sites in Barbados worthy of Preservation.

    There is a starting list of burials in it.

    It took me a while to understand why the burials were where they were but I pretty sure I got it now and have moved on to deducing the locations of multiple others.

    They are all over Barbados and in all parishes.

    The logic is beautiful.

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  • If you need help figuring it out, call me.

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  • Is the information a sector, are you looking for payment?

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  • Can bankrupt Barbados really afford to spend more of its limited resources on the fetishization of its dead and the suffering of the past?

    The veneration and consecration of burial sites and other “sites of memory” can become prohibitively expensive for a tiny Third World country, particularly if any and every construction project can be slowed or interrupted by archeological finds.

    To all those (like William Skinner) ranting about the neglect of our past, I would say to you that I was required to spend hundreds of hours studying West Indian history in high school. Surely, you were also required to study the subject and could have used it as a foundation for your own research into the tragic lives of our ancestors.

    Personally, I believe I would have been better off as an individual if my teachers had devoted more time to what I consider “useful subjects” (viz., the natural sciences and the business disciplines), and less time to historical navel-gazing. But I recognize there are many people who think differently.

    Regarding what Hal refers to as the imperative of reconnecting with our “African culture”, I have to ask what exactly is there of particular value to be found in the Motherland, which never developed any moral awareness of the evils of slavery and has rarely apologized for it.

    It is not an accident that Africa today is a place of extreme backwardness, corruption and greed. The vast majority of the literally thousands of Africans I have dealt with over my lifetime seem to have great difficulty treating anyone outside their own family and tribe with decency and integrity. Pity the leaders of Ghana or any other African state: How can you maintain social trust in a nation saturated with tribal resentment?

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  • “It is not an accident that Africa today is a place of extreme backwardness, corruption and greed.”

    And that is by design, the UK and Europe were well aware this would happen, were well aware that their colonial negros would implode after 70 years, take note that the very same can be said about the black Caribbean leaders aka colonial house negros…they have driven the islands into corruption, backwardness and greed…and Barbados the former clearing house for slaves is in the lead……it is not a coincidence…

    i have seen this for years…

    what screwed up the plans of UK is they got exposed with Windrush, or they would have happily returned with their master plans of evil against the descendants of slaves…..

    problem for the Caribbean, they have no good, intelligent leaders who are not colonial rats, to make the requisite changes and free the people from that bondage…same is happening in Africa..

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  • Just bear in mind that Black people have been studied among other things for centuries…and they are still unaware, maybe they should start studying those who continue to study them and who studied their ancestors for centuries becoming well acquainted with their behaviors, practices etc and are more in tune with their minds and brains than even they are……..that is the only way BLACK PEOPLE may finally become EDUCATED…and more SELF AWARE…

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  • @ Ewart Archer
    I guess you have taken the liberty to redefine what is ranting. I assure you that your point of view is the more popular one and I guess that makes you calm and reasoned.
    I am and shall remain a Black nationalist. We maintain ties with England that enslaved us and still call a white English woman our queen and head of state.Apparently most people are okay with that. Not me!
    Some believe that Africa is some backward place and they are welcome to their view. It’s not a crime to be uninformed.
    Therefore I will continue to “rant” and you can continue to be calm and well reasoned on this issue.

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  • @ Ewart

    Regarding what Hal refers to as the imperative of reconnecting with our “African culture”, I have to ask what exactly is there of particular value to be found in the Motherland, which never developed any moral awareness of the evils of slavery and has rarely apologized for it.(Quote)

    How about recognising the Barbadian presence in other Caribbean and neighbouring territories and in Europe and North America, not only Panama, but Bermuda, the Bahamas, St Lucia, Antigua, St Kitts, Brooklyn, Reading and in particular Guyana?
    There is a lot of work to do to re-connect young Barbadians to their cultural past.(Quote)

    @Ewaer

    I have a surprise for you, I was once young too. If you are going to quote or paraphrase someone, always make sure you get it right. I learned that as nine-year-old at St Giles.
    Plse remind me where I said it was “imperative that we reconnect with our African culture” and any mention in the time I have been on BU that I have referred to Africa, or Barbados or the UK, or US as the Motherland?
    I have sad to you before plse use this time to LEARN and stop with your juvenile nonsense.

    @William

    Plse ignore this young man’s ignorance. Teach him some of what you know.

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  • It is nonsense to pretend that Africa is not an extremely backward continent.

    It has failed to develop the technologies essential for addressing its most basic needs: freedom from disease and early death, immiserating physical environments, malnutrition and undernutrition, etc. And of course, it is light years away from the ability to provide itself with the glittering consumer goods its ruling oligarchies constantly salivate over. Without the constant interventions of the West, the poor bastards would be helpless.

    In the Belgian Congo, and more recently in Zimbabwe and South Africa, we have seen textbook examples of the descent into Darkness and Decay when “African values” replace the Enlightenment values of the colonial states established by Europeans.

    I thank my lucky stars for having been born before the advent of political independence in the Caribbean. I am reasonably sure I got a better education (and had the benefit of better programming on local radio stations) than the kids today

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  • @ Hal
    All I need say is that it is not a crime to be uninformed. @ Ewart Archer therefore cannot be imprisoned. Sometimes it is best to simply accept that the massive European brainwashing was and still is still in full force.
    Not everybody has taken time to read : How Europe Underdeveloped Africa by Dr. Walter Rodney nearly fifty years ago.

    Like

  • @ William

    Still have my copy; I reviewed it when it was first published in the magazine Race Today. It was published by the late Jessica Huntley, a Guyanese of Bajan heritage.

    Like

  • “when “African values” replace the Enlightenment values of the colonial states established by Europeans.”

    you mean when europe STOLE WHAT NEVER BELONGED TO THEM…europe was in even WORSE BACKWARDNESS and darkness, poverty, desperation etc until they were EDUCATED to what Africa contains and SAW IN AFRICA just how backward they themselves were….,…they thought they had stolen all, during their 400 year savagery and brutality against Africans but were wrong…and are now desperately trying for colonization 2.0

    problem is they are now shit outta luck…..no one likes them, no one trusts them, they are still as pathological and savage now as they were in the 14th century and are about to sink right back into 14th century poverty…….but in these times, everyone is on to them…it is harder to tief from Africa…..

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  • The half truths and misconceptions in the dependency theory literature only impress the feeble minded.

    Despite the current popularity of anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist ideas in the Western academy, no first-rate economics department in North America would put Walter Rodney on its reading list.

    Of course, there are many political scientists, sociologists, human geographers, etc. who find Rodney compelling. But for the most part, these are arm-waving dilettantes — not people capable of rigorous and meticulous scholarship.

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  • Rigorous and meticulous scholarship in economics????? Walter was a historian, not an economist. The trouble with economics is that there are too many mathematicians, psychologists, politicians, journalists and others messing around in a discipline they do not understand.

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  • Hal Austin

    Let me break it down for you.

    Economics includes the study of economic history, economic growth and economic development.

    Economists have to explain why some countries are much wealthier than other countries, and for how long this has been true.

    I thought they would have picked up this kind of general knowledge working for that British rag. Did you spend all your time at the copying machine?

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  • you would have …

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  • MR ARCHER SIR

    WIST THOU NOT YET THAT THOU ART IN THE MIDST OF A BUNCH OF SEMI-ILLITERATES AND BRIMBLERS WHO USUALLY SPEAK OF THINGS ABOUT WHICH THEY KNOW VERY LITTLE

    WHEN YOU COME HERE THEREFORE YOU WILL FIND THAT YOU WILL USUALLY FIND YOURSELF KICKING AGAINST THE PRICKS

    GOOD LUCK

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  • GP

    I hear you. Thanks.

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  • “Economists have to explain why some countries are much wealthier than other countries, and for how long this has been true.”

    it is not rocket science…the 1% CRIMINALS steal everything from the 99% BRAINWASHED AND UNAWARE…..the shit outta luck for the 1% is that everyone is now on to those THIEVES.

    UK and Europe does not have Africa’s wealth….AND NEVER WILL..

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  • @ Ewart

    You got me in one. I am so silly. I always thought economic history was a different sub-discipline in economics; by the way, so are economic thought, economic philosophy, and the sociology of economics. Plse explain the rigorous and meticulous scholarship and give some examples. I am waiting.
    In the meantime, tell me why is heterodox economics not taught as a normal part of academic economics in the US or UK? Tell me why a decade after the financial crisis, even given institutional lag, why the same old, same old economics are being taught? Tell me why economists at Cave Hill still say the same things they old lecturers learned and taught in the 1960s and 70s and 80s and why they are taken so seriously by the media?
    We call this intellectual colonisation and, through that, the colonisation of popular understanding. Listen to the bogus nonsense about foreign reserves.
    A recent survey of UK parliamentarians found that 85 per cent of the 650 members had no idea where money came from. And these are the people passing laws for the 5th largest economy in the world.
    Here is what one academic said about heterodox economics: “…heterodox economists continue to be treated as just a step or two away from crackpots, despite the fact that they often have a much better record of predicting real-world economic events.” I can go on, but you get the drift.
    Economics is not mathematics or physics or chemistry; it is not a science; it is a body of arguments between theoretical perspectives, but what do I know, having worked for a British rag. I should have been a Yank.
    You better send me a copy of your economics curriculum. You studied economics in the US, right? But you are not too old to learn.
    By the way, I am watching the US tearing themselves apart with the impeachment hearing, so do not disturb.

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  • @ Hal
    @ Ewart Archer
    @ GP
    @ WURA

    Nigeria’s GDP will expand by 2.3 percent in 2019, which is below the rate of population growth, as the government struggles to reduce the nation’s oil dependence and attract foreign investment. South Africa’s expansion will be even slower, at 1.7 percent, as the continent’s most-industrialized economy battles to recover from last year’s recession. Both countries are in the AfDB’s list of 10 slowest-growing economies.

    Surging Ahead
    Economic growth in East Africa will continue outpace the rest of the continent

    Source: African Development Bank

    Note: Data for 2018 and 2019 are estimates

    While the powerhouses in western and southern Africa struggle to gain meaningful momentum, the continent’s economic growth will once again be driven by East Africa, which will be the fastest-expanding region for the fifth straight year. Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania all feature on the AfDB’s list of 10 fastest-growing economies for 2019. Egypt, the biggest economy after Nigeria and South Africa, will also help drive growth. Output in the Arab world’s most-populous country will rise around 5.5 percent this year as the government’s structural reforms attract more investment.

    Subdued growth in southern Africa is due to South Africa’s weak output, which affects neighboring countries, the AfDB said. While West Africa’s prospects are more upbeat, they may be clouded by risks including uncertainty in global commodity prices and security concerns in some countries, the lender said.

    Ref: Bloomberg April 3rd 2019.

    Africa is the world’s fastest growing economy outside of Asia. An investment strategy in Africa can benefit Barbados. Note that despite the slow growth of its two most vibrant economies , Nigeria and South Africa, as a whole the African Continent is experiencing seven straight years of growth. We spend so much time on Brexit and Trump , that we don’t ever look at Africa or even the Caribbean in any detai.l(My Comment)

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  • “While the powerhouses in western and southern Africa struggle to gain meaningful momentum, the continent’s economic growth will once again be driven by East Africa, which will be the fastest-expanding region for the fifth straight year. Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Tanzania all feature on the AfDB’s list of 10 fastest-growing economies for 2019. Egypt, the biggest economy after Nigeria and South Africa, will also help drive growth.”

    Me thinks they are FORGETTING THAT AFRICA IS A CONTINENT…a goddamn CONTINENT with REAL WEALTH…that Africans do not have to STEAL..it is OUR BIRTHRIGHT…

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  • @ William

    Africa has a major problem, and that is the 54 nation-states. If Africa were to unite it would be one of the two or three most powerful nations/economic regions in the world. And with a population the size of China’s, more natural resources and a younger population, the second half of the 21st century could be Africa’s.

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  • And this is why BLACK PEOPLE WHO ARE AWAKE…will not allow UK and Europe to RAPE Africa and the DESCENDANTS OF AFRICAN SLAVES ANYMORE…

    .not even their CORRUPT, ignorant, backward, colonial house negros can help them with that anymore…

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  • Some here will appreciate if we discuss the best way to stoke an awareness in our people as it applies to the sacred burial grounds of our ancestors.

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  • Don’t know if Blogmaster can get the video to show, it is very important that people see it, it is on facebook. the evil neocolonialism system that comes out of the warped, twisted and corrupt UK system is being EXPOSED… for the toxic, racist demonic nasty, wicked miseducation system that it is…..

    yall thought we are joking but it is no joke….and the the dirty likes of ugly Boris, greasy Rees- Moggs aka RassMuggs and coke head Gove got it in their heads that they can use these crimes against the black descendants of African slaves to rape Africa…AGAIN…while telling themselves that no one knows what they are doing…

    shit outta luck i say, shit outta luck…

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  • Your leaders are RESPONSIBLE for African burial grounds…it is not rocket science…those bones now lying in slave burial grounds ARE THEIR ANCESTORS TOO…although the negros with titles for some reason do not beleive they are black or even African…but it is THEIR RESPONSIBILITY TO MAKE SURE THE AFRICAN BURIAL SITES ARE HIGHLIGHTED FOR THE WORLD TO SEE AND REMEMBER…through REFLECTING POOLS and other means…

    no one has to tell them how to do it or spoonfeed these riffraffs to the fact that that the bones buried there also belong to TO THEIR MURDERED, BRUTALIZED AND HORRIBLY ENSLAVED ANCESTORS..AND IT’S THEIR DUTY…to SHOW RESPECT..

    .or if they STILL don’t think it’s important…the people will JUST HAVE TO KICK THEIR UPPITY, consultant ADVISED asses to the CURB..

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  • Hal

    Try to keep up with the economics profession. I am guessing your (unattributed) quote referencing an “academic” is taken from a recent book review.

    Or perhaps you have actually read parts of Robert Skideksky’s Money and Government: A Challenge to Mainstream Economics. That book came out last year, and is one of nearly 100 recent books or book-length publications criticizing the type of neoclassical economics taught at many universities.

    You are late to the party. There are now at least three recently published undergraduate textbooks that address the point you have raised about economics being contested ground among warring conceptual frameworks. These textbooks incorporate some of the lessons of the Great Recession of 2007 into intermediate macroeconomics. Other more advanced materials for graduate students have been published in a series of volumes edited by Olivier Blanchard and Latry Summers.

    Of course, Skidelsky himself is a Keynesian scholar and he has overstated the deficiencies of the standard neoclassical models.

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  • Larry

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  • @ Ewart

    Yes, that is Skidelsky’s Money and Government; by the way, Skidelsky is an economic historian. You fail to realise that neoclassical economics lost its way decades ago to monetarism, which collapsed with the global financial crisis.
    Books are published all the time, most of them just a waste of trees; as for textbooks, they simply explain and are written for undergraduates and as an income stream for dons.
    The more serious books, those used by postgraduates and independent thinkers, are the better reads of the discipline. But the most cutting edge ideas are found in periodicals and think-tanks and seminars and debates and conferences. Economics is a dynamic discipline.
    As to university curricula, long after the crisis universities were still teaching the same old nonsense in the UK; it was only when students at the London School of Economics and the University of Manchester revolted that faculty responded. The US and France are no different.
    However, I am still waiting for references to the rigorous and meticulous scholarship in economics; tell me where these works can be found. I am keen.
    As to Olivier Blanchard, he performed a mea culpa on the IMF’s insistence on the Washington Consensus (the policy version of monetarism), which by the way is still operable in Barbados. Tell me where this exceptional scholarship in economics is found: at Chicago, Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, Oxford, Cambridge? Where?

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  • Hal

    You are talking rubbish as usual. Neoclassical economics has not “lost its way”. It is a vast and distinguished body of rigorous scholarship.

    When it failed to provide convincing explanations of, or solutions for, the Great Depression of the 1930s, it was temporarily displaced as the pre-eminent theoretical framework in economics by the General Theory of Lord Keynes.

    But Keynesian economics stumbled in the 1970s when it could not generate effective policies for combating stagflation, and an updated version of the neoclassical tradition returned to favour. Since the Great Recession of 2007, Keynesian approaches are again in vogue, but how long that will last is a big question.

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  • @ Ewart

    Why am I not surprised that you preach nonsense about neoclassical economics, the theory that dominated the 1960s and 70s and are still taught at Cave Hill? Just listen to the background noise about foreign reserves, it is almost Biblical.
    You have missed decades of economic dynamism. Have you heard of Reagan and Thatcher? Of Milton Friedman and the Chile experiment? Of the economic battle between the mid-west universities in the US (Chicago mainly) and the East Coast (Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Columbia)? Monetarism ruled until it was exposed by the Global crisis when it was rescued by neo-Keynesianism in the form of quantitative easing, not the same as Keynesianism.
    By the way, where is the rigorous and meticulous scholarship of neoclassical economics? Name names and reference the publications; explain their theories in idiot terms so I can understand; explain the science of economics, and how conjectures and refutations would be applied, how would Kuhn’s revolution fit in?

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  • Please take this exchange from this particular point. Both of you made your points, post on the topic or.

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  • The revolution against ideas. You cannot make it up. Who says BU is a forum for ideas? Stick to the topic, or else.

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  • AGAIN..

    “@ William

    Africa has a major problem, and that is the 54 nation-states. If Africa were to unite it would be one of the two or three most powerful nations/economic regions in the world. And with a population the size of China’s, more natural resources and a younger population, the second half of the 21st century could be Africa’s.”

    that is why they are REMOVING ALL THE BORDERS…that the TIEFING UK/EUROPEANS put there…it’s the ONLY WAY FORWARD for AFRICA and her DESCENDANTS…..

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  • Why do many Barbadians dislike debating ideas? It must be political, or party political, oar just personal abuse. Is that the result of learning by rote, or just the people attracted to BU?

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  • BU is always creating impediments to economic development.

    It vigorously made the case for “environmental impact analyses” that were intended to delay pending hotel projects until BU’s friends could seize power and take credit for said projects.

    Now we are searching for burial grounds to consecrate. What a giant rabbit hole. Creating a whole new category of problems for economic planners.

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  • Quite frankly, I would properly maintain the few sites we have and not kill the living for the sake of the dead. That does not mean that we cannot explore and document the sites that we find along the way as well as marking them with a monument or a plaque.

    We should teach our children about their African roots, warts and all. It is not about romanticized perfection. It is about anchorage. Europeans were a mess and it seems they will be again. But the Europeans will rise again. They know who they are. But we black people in the Caribbean have no identity. So we will be a permanent mess. We must acknowledge and embrace our flawed identities and reflect on how we came to be who we are. Then we can determine who we want to be. Then we can move forward. Unfortunately humans usually progress at snail’s pace several steps behind technology.

    PS. The African nations were artificially designed by the Europeans to keep the tribes working against each other to the benefit of the Europeans. It was not an organic process allowed to develop with the consent of the tribes. And so they do not trust each other.

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  • @ Hal
    Just imagine: We can get on this blog and beat Brexit and Trump to death. But try a real discourse to debunk the nonsense they want to talk about Africa and we are threatened with a shut down. This blog allowed all kinds of comments about a year ago. Nobody was disciplined and everybody cussed and did as they liked. I say no more. High wind know where old house live.

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  • @William

    Don’t be an idiot. The blogmaster asked the two to take the exchange about economics offline for the expressed purpose of allowing the blog to focus on the issue raised by Dr. Inniss.

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  • While you might not have understood what was being said some were watching with keen eyes the dialogue between Mr Hal Austin and Ewart Archer.

    Indeed, while the blog was on the topic of Burial Grounds note is made of something that you said that identified you today.

    You said and I quote.

    “…We should not lose focus of the opportunities from the reciprocal arrangement between Barbados and Ghana…”

    The issue here Honourable Blogmaster that you are failing to comprehend OR PURPOSELY IGNORING is the basis of good faith between the partners.

    I know that you DO NOT LIKE MY MEMES BECAUSE OF WHAT THEY DO BUT BEAR WITH ME MOMENTARILY AS I POST THIS ITEM.

    What is the purpose of this post David?

    What are the optics here?

    What is being prostituted Honourable Blogmaster?

    Do you not think that de ole man could not have creating a spring board of authenticity for Ghana or Nigeria or and African country to bridge the fact that we are “sons of slaves AND THEY, WHILE NOT SONS OF SLAVES, ARE INHERITORS OF HATE AND MISTRUST OF NEXT DOOR TRIBES?

    Ewart Archer is correct when he speaks of the defining tribal hatred that divides us.

    But look at this item for a little while and tell me what you see

    And I will return to explain it

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  • So de ole man will explain the Stoopid Cartoon for your benefit

    1.what does the Stoopid Cartoon title do?

    Piece’s Response. It Brings focus you say yes, but it does more than that. It ask a question which speaks to the central issue about Falsification of the claim?

    So Ms Inniss’ article speaks of authentic records WHICH ARE AVAILABLE PUBLICLY!

    So the question arises WHY THIS SECRECY!

    Why would a black Prime Minister 18 months inter her term, with a government of 30 to 0 seats HIDE AND DIG UP A SLAVE!

    You feeling me?

    2.Now look at the Question posed as the header.

    Is Mugabe tricking Ghana? Right above Black Belly Sheep exposed Everything followed by picture of the sheep.

    Two questions so far NEITHER OF WHICH CAN BE ANSWERED because the Barbados Prime Minister hid AND EFFECTED THESE THINGS IN THE DARK!

    So the question becomes WHY?

    3.You starting to understand why this newspaper is called Enquirer?

    That’s a eye hijacker! For viewers

    4.Whose Bones are these? Again the question AND THE SHEEP RESPONDS baaaaaa

    5.then that mockery of a ceremony with the bones she desecrated from their supposed burial place!

    Why did Mugabe hide to smuggle out these bones?

    How can a Stoopid Cartoon elicit such interest BECAUSE HER ACTIONS PERMITTED THIS TO HAPPEN.

    NOT A FELLER COULD HAVE SAID SHY$E ABOUT THE NON EXISTENT RECORDS WHICH NOW WILL HAVE TO BE FABRICATED AND THE WHOLE 9 YARDS OF BACKSTORY and so called DNA EXPERTS to verify the Black Belly sheep’s DNA is a human

    And more importantly A GHANAIAN!

    So you were able to secretly dig up bones, neglected to tell 300,000 people who you talking bout you appreciative dat dem suffering through 26 ministers, ent tell dem shy$e

    But gone to Ghana and tell 28.8 million people.

    And you heah in Barbados talking bout DOAN FOCUS PUN DAT RH LIE?

    YOU SMOKING SACREMENTAL HERB TOO?

    Why is Mugabe Mottley telling a lie about this?

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  • fortyacresandamule

    Until a black nation becomes a member of the nuclear club, we will never be respected. Even North Korea, an economic basket case, can lift its head high among the comity of nations.

    Economics is not a rigorous scientific endeavor, but rather a exercise in PHYSIC ENVY. The discipline has no major economic theory achievement to its name.

    Mia journey to Ghana is just another regional projection stunt. She is vying to be the region natural default leader. The burial ceremony is way over the top for me. Nonetheless, the connection to the motherland is important.

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  • When you keep antiquated SLAVE LAWS on your statute books for CENTURIES…..REENSLAVEMENT is a CAKEWALK….for all negro governments still practicing this evil against their people …hopefully they are the ones reenslaved FIRST…

    https://worldnewsdailyreport.com/mississippi-man-who-was-legally-sold-to-circus-as-a-baby-still-owned-by-company-says-court-judge/?fbclid=IwAR3HHQ4UNqA_yID0Xx2S8K5yAixpRfaa6bQSEID2hAiq9lEkvBjabXQd5AM

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  • @ the Honourable Blogmaster

    De ole man does deal with examination of minute detail THAT MANY PEOPLE HERE CANNOT SEE!

    Here is a your post earlier

    “… David November 19, 2019 5:06 AM

    We should not lose focus of the opportunities from the reciprocal arrangement between Barbados and Ghana….”

    But there is something that the average bajan does not see in that post THAT I WILL EXPOSE FOR ALL READERS!

    Between Barbados and Ghana!!!

    And this nuance is being diluted every RH day and sheeple ARE NOT SEEING IT and youself are part of the Mugabe regime that is pushing it.

    And let me show you how your agenda in being enforced

    Here is the video you went to pains to supply to channel readers to the Mugabe agenda

    “https://youtu.be/zxszAjz796U”

    But behold a mystery Up in the left hand corner INSTEAD OF THE RH EMBLEM OF THE RH GOVERNMENT OF BARBADOS, our Rass**le prime minister has the RH emblem of the fvucking Barbados Labour Party!

    You feeling me? Blogmaster?

    You understand how de ole man is “seeing” the dictatorship genes of this Despot Mugabe?

    The fvucking business of the Government of Barbados IS BEING BRANDED BY MUGABE MOTTLEY as her own!

    And wunna sycophant poochlickers ARE NOT SEEING THIS though I for one know that YOU, HONOURABLE BLOGMASTER are seeing this!

    And this is why I have been begging my fellow myope and apostate Dr. GP to make all his postings links to the google docs amazon servers as opposed to having them hosted here.

    IT IS THE SMALL THINGS THAT BOTHER ME DAVID, A PUSSY HAIR OUT OF ALIGNMENT, which cause de ole man to pause and say “WHY DID SHE DO THAT?”

    So the reason I would pursue this matter as an extrapolation of Dr. Lisa Inniss’ submission here so vigorously IS BECAUSE THERE IS NO VIABLE REASON FOR MUGABE MOTTLEY, WITH THOUSAND OF SLAVE SITES LOCALLY, TO HAVE SUBVERTED A PROCESS OF THIS IMPACT AND IMPORT AND FALSIFY THE IDENTITY OF THIS SLAVE!

    Couple that with this BLP branding of this bilateral agreement AND WHAT DE FVUCK IS YOUR ASSESSMENT?

    WUNNA FEEL BAJANS STOOPID!!!

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  • @ WARU

    THIS LAW being still on the statutes of the state of Mississippi is as much an indictment of the GoUSA as much as it is an indictment of the NCLAA which can be said to have not been as vigilant in effecting its mandate for all these years.

    Let me explain that.

    You, as a single blogger became aware of this item how? By research or by it being sent to you? And you are a single person!

    The USA HAS MANY MANY INSTITUTIONS and other black entities with enough resources to address these matters of laws which are still on the books.

    The thing about this is that, if I was a white man, and the law provided for me to commit acts such as these, while they might seem morally discordant IT IS MY RIGHT, like a Conceal & Carry.

    It is incumbent on the oppressed to look out for their own rights cause they are NOT GOING TO

    By the way, is Jared Arnold liable for ALL HIS MAINTENANCE FOR 21 YEARS or did the judge only assess him as liable for medical expenses after attaining the age of 21?

    Notwithstanding what the circus owners said and what is emblazoned over the newspaper article like the title WHOSE BONES ARE THESE? is on the Stoopid Cartoon

    Having said that

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  • People oppose the government all the time. Did not the newspaper show the faces of those who attended that shameful DLP meeting at the Princess Margaret Secondary School last Sunday? They were obviously not afraid.

    My father opposed Tom Adams and all it cost him was a promotion.

    I do very little to hide my identity here. My son’s teacher who did not know me figured it out. Anything I say here I would say to Mia’s face. I try to be fair and balanced at all times.

    Am I supposed to be afraid??????

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  • Wuhloss..can’t whitesplain this one away.

    Uppity negros in parliament should TAKE NOTE, yall love to swear ya following westminister system while breaking every human rights treaty and every law….well UK is leading now by showing…THAT NO ONE IS ABOVE THE LAW….not even a title holder from the palace.

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  • “THIS LAW being still on the statutes of the state of Mississippi is as much an indictment of the GoUSA as much as it is an indictment of the NCLAA which can be said to have not been as vigilant in effecting its mandate for all these years.”

    Piece…it is ALWAYS BY DESIGN….what we want to know is why did Barbados’ governments and am sure some other Caribbean governments…STILL KEEPING SOME OF THESE DESTRUCTIVE TO BLACK PEOPLE LAWS ON THEIR STATUTE BOOKS.

    some years ago this indian dude got curious checked out some laws and this is what he found..

    “Until February 7, 2013, the state of Mississippi had never submitted the required documentation to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment, meaning it never officially had abolished slavery. The amendment was adopted in December 1865 after the necessary three-fourths of the then 36 states voted in favor of ratification.Feb 19, 2013.”

    So when NCAAP and the general population took it on good faith that these laws were ratified 150 YEARS AGO….and slave laws REMOVED FROM STATUTE…THEY WERE NOT….by design AND DELIBERATE..

    So….again, why would black governments not only keep slave laws but continue fighting hard to maintain a slave society.

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  • Politics is a funny thing. We should all be talking about Mia’s clandestine visit to Ghana, duppy dust and supposed bones from a slave. Yet here we are embroiled in another Bajan controversy. Barbados has become the theatre of the absurd. Sadly real lifes are being affected and there will be no end to people’s misery. It is difficult to say how this will all end. One thing that is certain our nation is broken and it is going to take a hell of an effort to restore the feel good feeling of the country. Dig in for the long haul. And if youth is on your side – take a hike.

    Like

  • It seems like SLAVE SOCIETY BARBADOS…is the last holdout in trying to continue to CRIMINALIZE BLACK PEOPLE, and ENSLAVE RASTA, while violating their human rights….USING THE MARIJUANA PLANT…even the FEDS have LIFTED PROHIBITION.

    “In a surprising turn of events, a key Congressional committee, the House Judiciary Committee, has voted to approve the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019, or H.R. 3884, which would effectively put an end to cannabis prohibition in the United States of America, on a federal level by removing it from the Controlled Substances Act.

    The bill also stipulates the potential expungement of certain federal cannabis convictions—with expenses being covered by a small excise tax imposed on the legal cannabis industry, as well as the creation of a Cannabis Justice Office focused on reinvesting resources into communities most affected by prohibition. Finally, if fully passed, the law would allow the Small Business Administration to issue loans and grants to marijuana-related businesses, and provide a green light for physicians in the Veterans Affairs system to prescribe medical cannabis to patients, as long as they abide by state specific laws.”

    Like

  • Piece…now ya see how STUPID BLACK LEADERS ARE…always allowing themselves to be SHOWN UP…with their ignorance of trying to control, criminalize and destroy their own people.

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule

    On a theory of the mass psychological behavior of a powerless and perpetually disrespected group people.

    Self-hatred in all its ugly form emerges.
    self-hatred leads to self-destructive behaviour.
    Always seeking validation from the dominant group.
    Socially condition to treat the dominant group with a certain level of deference over own people. This is one of the source of white privilege.
    Wallow in self-pity

    6.The stockhome syndrome behaviour is very prevalent among the lucky successful few who live in a bubble.

    Like

  • And the uppity negros in the Mia government believe they should come down on BLACK PEOPLE EVEN HARDER….anything to institute their slave society scenario.

    “A Good First Step
    Maria McFarland Sánchez-Moreno, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance explained that, with the markup of the MORE Act on Wednesday, the United States of America is “coming one step closer to ending the devastating harms of marijuana prohibition, which have fallen so heavily on Black and Brown people.”

    Like

  • @ Talking Loud Saying Nothing

    You sai and I quote

    “…Politics is a funny thing. We should all be talking about Mia’s clandestine visit to Ghana, duppy dust and supposed bones from a slave. Yet here we are embroiled in another Bajan controversy…”

    The fact is that people in general AND SHEEPLE, IN PARTICULAR, HAVE A SHORT ATTENTION SPAN.

    words, particularly written words, have a major battle with a seemingly educated but severely illiterate set of people

    The first of the Rented Jackasses noted that any topic here on BU, lives for 9 days (though de ole man has campaigned on a few for much longer)

    It really comes down to what you are willing to fight for, IF YOU ARE WILLING TO FIGHT.

    If you attend the town hall meetings you will see Barbados’ changing landscape.

    There ate more voices talking now than before.

    So when you continue by saying “Barbados has become the theatre of the absurd…” the fact is that increasingly people are standing up.

    And yes “Sadly real lifes are being affected and there will be no end to people’s misery…” but it is up to us to continue to agitate for change whenever the opportunity. Presents itself.

    “..It is difficult to say how this will all end…” but of one thing we must be sure IT MUST NOT END IN A MUGABE MOTTLEY DICTATORSHIP!

    I AM AMONGST THOSE WHO ANLSO CONCUR WITH YOU and say “…One thing that is certain our nation is broken and it is going to take a hell of an effort to restore the feel good feeling of the country…”

    We IF WE ARE TRUE CITIZENS, cannot give up IN THE FACE OF DESPOTISM AND DICTATORSHIP!

    Like

  • @Ewart Archer: November 19, 2019 10:30 AM

    +++++++++++++++
    Personally, I believe I would have been better off as an individual if my teachers had devoted more time to what I consider “useful subjects” (viz., the natural sciences and the business disciplines), and less time to historical navel-gazing. But I recognize there are many people who think differently,

    …………..

    It is not an accident that Africa today is a place of extreme backwardness, corruption and greed. The vast majority of the literally thousands of Africans I have dealt with over my lifetime seem to have great difficulty treating anyone outside their own family and tribe with decency and integrity.
    ++++++++++++++++
    Couldn’t agree with you more.

    Met some students from Ghana while studying at a UK university. They believe we in the Caribbean are “bastards”; not “pure African stock”. Very tribalistic set of people. That [atitude] is at the root of our politics.

    Hence the great dialectic:

    “Those who do not learn their history are doomed to repeat it” George Santayana

    vs

    “We learn from history that we learn nothing from history” Georg Hegel

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Ironside

    It is not an accident that Africa today is a place of extreme backwardness, corruption and greed. The vast majority of the literally thousands of Africans I have dealt with over my lifetime seem to have great difficulty treating anyone outside their own family and tribe with decency and integrity.
    ++++++++++++++++
    Couldn’t agree with you more.

    Met some students from Ghana while studying at a UK university. They believe we in the Caribbean are “bastards”; not “pure African stock”. Very tribalistic set of people. That [atitude] is at the root of our politics.(Quote)

    Plse remember our President is recruiting nurses from Africa. Sometime ago I spent a month in hospital where they were nurses, medical staff and ancillaries from around the world. By far the most offensive of the staff were the African nurses: rude obnoxious, uncooperative. I said that on BU.
    One loudmouth came on and said she did not believe me. Funny that. She should speak to any returnee who has worked with West Africans I the UK.
    I am glad in another social context you have had similar experiences. In my bachelor days I went out with a London-born Nigerian-Ghanaian doctor. It was an experience.
    All it calls for is critical thinking; how can a culture of tribalism, where people literally murder each other because they are from the wrong tribe, can create a situation in which they encounter other black people, but from other ethnic and national backgrounds, and they will treat them with courtesy and respect? It is like having a culture of caste-sim and then expected such people to treat others as equals. We always want to learn the hard way.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Ironside November 21, 2019 7:48 AM
    “Met some students from Ghana while studying at a UK university. They believe we in the Caribbean are “bastards”; not “pure African stock”. Very tribalistic set of people. That [atitude] is at the root of our politics.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You were lucky not to have been called “Slave Baby”.

    Both West Africans and black “West Indian” people carry a massive chip of a monkey on their backs loaded with the baggage of slavery on both sides of the Atlantic.

    Until that shame and scandal on both sides of the West African family tree is dealt with by means of genuine attempts to accept the Truth surrounding the trade and by moves towards practical Reconciliation there would be no healing of that gaping and still festering wound of brutal history.

    You should soon see if the culturally-intact nurses expected to be ‘imported’ from Ghana would be given preferential treatment over their local Bajan ‘slave-baby’ counterparts.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Miller

    We are connected to the motherland whether we like it or acknowledge the issues you have expressed. Where will the healing start? Do we adopt the Eurocentric way as the default? It is not like Black people have endeared themselves in the alternative establishment.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Fortyacresandamule,

    The psychological damage runs deep. I agree with everything you said. There is this tendency from many to seek the approval of the dominant race and defer to them. And most whites in Barbados have come to expect it as their privilege.

    There’s a funny little thing I have noticed in Barbados. When caught in never ending traffic where one has no hope of ever exiting from a side road or a drive way without being let out Bajan whites NEVER let me out. But blacks ALWAYS let the white people out.

    Simple things like that reveal a whole lot.

    PS. Apologies to the refreshingly colour blind white Bajan man I met yesterday at the supermarket checkout counter who not only would let you out but would do so without any conscious effort. Obviously I never had the good fortune of meeting him on the road.

    Like

  • Miller,

    The West Africans too have suffered trauma that has not been addressed. There is much to work through but we must start somewhere. It is not going to be pretty but neither is weaning an alcoholic off alcohol.

    The relationship will have warts. We must not expect romanticized perfection. But what we must decide is whether or not it will be worth it in the end.

    I believe it would be.

    A child who is adopted, even by a wonderful family who gives him a good life, still feels a need to know the name of the drug addicted mother who sold him for the next fix. It is about knowing who he is and where he came from. Even if the story is bad, he still wants to know. Without that anchor he does not feel whole and cannot move forward.

    And I am certain that in the drug addicted mother’s lucid moments she still wonders what became of her child.

    This is not so for everyone of course, but I would guess it is so in most cases.

    Like

  • To be honest, lately this name I have been given is feeling a little strange and I am beginning to understand why a person would want to change their name. Before i thought it was an affectation.

    Like

  • Well! Well! Well! The nerve of some “Africans” to believe that they are better than us, looks like we have to rewrite the book where we think we are better than Trinis; Guyanese; Jamaicans and the whole shebang. If singular negative experiences inform you of the attitudes of the people in a Continent of many countries speaking different languages and countless dialects and myriad cultures then we are really lost.

    Liked by 2 people

  • @ the Sage Annunaki

    More and more I “see” that purple emanating from your written communication everen here on Barbados Underground

    It is evident that your Ajna is fully opened and no “frontlet” obstructs your vision!

    You said a d I quote

    “…Until that shame and scandal on both sides of the West African family tree is dealt with by means of genuine attempts to accept the Truth surrounding the trade and by moves towards practical Reconciliation there would be no healing of that gaping and still festering wound of brutal history…”

    Wow, incredible Sage Annunaki incredible.

    Few, IN THIS WORLD, can see, OR MAKE THAT LEAP OF WISDOM to understand the connection to the subtleties of experience that you, Hal, Ewart and Ironside have testified to.

    De ole man considers it THE CRYSTALIZATION OF DIMINISHMENT and it speaks to a strategy of the white man? to cause a hatred from within the blacks who were transported to the colonies AND THOSE THAT REMAINED.

    It is a very effective strategy which REINFORCES THO POINT THAT I AM MAKING ABOUT THE WICKEDNESS OF MUGABE MOTTLEY WITH HER FALSIFICATION OF THE IDENTITY OF THESE BONES!

    As a black woman, she has singlehandedly done more to destroy our collective attempts to eradicate this DIMINISHMENT THAN ALL THE EXTERNAL FORCES THAT HAVE BEEN ASSEMBLED ON THE WORLD STAGE.

    Mugabe Mottley AND THE GOVERNMENT OF GHANA ARE WORSE THAN WAR CRIMINALS!

    Those of us who have lived in the US, and to a lesser degree, Canada the US, easily understand the treatment that black West Indians, SUFFER AT THE HANDS OF OTHER AFRO AMERICAN BLACKS.

    We are perceived as different AND TREATED AS BEING DIFFERENT BY FELLOW BLACKS.

    You dont have to go far to experience that PERPETUATION OF DIFFERENCE AND ENFORCEMENT OF DIMINUTION OF THE FOREIGNER BLACK!

    Look at what we say and do to other “low island” black brothers and sisters!

    I intend to ramp up my campaign against The Desecration of Ancestral Bones not because of a contra Mugabe agenda BUT BECAUSE SHE IS FACILITATING THE SAME DISCORDANT AGENDA OF RACISTS, but she is doing it as a purported black woman.

    Like

  • @ the Honourable Blogmaster your assistance please with an item here for the Sage Annunaki thank you

    Like

  • @ Donna November 21, 2019 9:17 AM
    “A child who is adopted, even by a wonderful family who gives him a good life, still feels a need to know the name of the drug addicted mother who sold him for the next fix. It is about knowing who he is and where he came from. Even if the story is bad, he still wants to know. Without that anchor he does not feel whole and cannot move forward.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    That is why there a first call to do DNA testing to scientifically establish genuine family ties.

    Many black Bajans do not consider themselves as ‘Africans’ and reject any notion of this ancestral or anthropological connection.

    This is first bridge that must be crossed by black Bajans who. Acceptance of their West African genetic origins the same way an alcoholic has to accept that his or her alcoholism before starting the journey to recovery.

    No one is expecting black Bajans to play the proverbial role of the “Prodigal Son”; but flying in the face of science by rejecting DNA testing is not the road to reconciliation.

    They must come to the stark realization that their Adam & Eve origin is nothing but a fable which has long past its “tell-by-date’ as a technique of colonial brainwashing to continue to divide and conquer a simple people.

    Like

  • @ Donna,In case you are going to change your name this may help.lol

    https://buzzghana.com/ghanaian-names/

    Like

  • I had published this earlier but…

    @ the Sage Annunaki

    More and more I “see” that purple emanating from your written communication everen here on Barbados Underground

    It is evident that your Ajna is fully opened and no “frontlet” obstructs your vision!

    You said a d I quote

    “…Until that shame and scandal on both sides of the West African family tree is dealt with by means of genuine attempts to accept the Truth surrounding the trade and by moves towards practical Reconciliation there would be no healing of that gaping and still festering wound of brutal history…”

    Wow, incredible Sage Annunaki incredible.

    Few, IN THIS WORLD, can see, OR MAKE THAT LEAP OF WISDOM to understand the connection to the subtleties of experience that you, Hal, Ewart and Ironside have testified to.

    De ole man considers it THE CRYSTALIZATION OF DIMINISHMENT and it speaks to a strategy of the white man? to cause a hatred from within the blacks who were transported to the colonies AND THOSE THAT REMAINED.

    It is a very effective strategy which REINFORCES THO POINT THAT I AM MAKING ABOUT THE WICKEDNESS OF MUGABE MOTTLEY WITH HER FALSIFICATION OF THE IDENTITY OF THESE BONES!

    As a black woman, she has singlehandedly done more to destroy our collective attempts to eradicate this DIMINISHMENT THAN ALL THE EXTERNAL FORCES THAT HAVE BEEN ASSEMBLED ON THE WORLD STAGE.

    Mugabe Mottley AND THE GOVERNMENT OF GHANA ARE WORSE THAN WAR CRIMINALS!

    Those of us who have lived in the US, and to a lesser degree, Canada the US, easily understand the treatment that black West Indians, SUFFER AT THE HANDS OF OTHER AFRO AMERICAN BLACKS.

    We are perceived as different AND TREATED AS BEING DIFFERENT BY FELLOW BLACKS.

    You dont have to go far to experience that PERPETUATION OF DIFFERENCE AND ENFORCEMENT OF DIMINUTION OF THE FOREIGNER BLACK!

    Look at what we say and do to other “low island” black brothers and sisters!

    I intend to ramp up my campaign against The Desecration of Ancestral Bones not because of a contra Mugabe agenda BUT BECAUSE SHE IS FACILITATING THE SAME DISCORDANT AGENDA OF RACISTS, but she is doing it as a purported black woman.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    @Donna. My sister your observation is on point. I have been to many caribbean Islands and see where black police officers treat the white tourists who break the law with courtesy and politeness, but yet, treat their own who commit the same infraction with contempt and disrespect. And yes you are correct, white people are very conscious of this privilege and the exceptional treatment they come to expect from us.

    Like

  • Thank you, Hants. I am not quite there yet. Gotta do my DNA testing first. I am renovating my house at present and planting some gardens next, food and flower. So much to do with my money but maybe I’ll give it to myself as a birthday present next year. Then i’ll know what name to chose.

    Gotta prepare my son as well, or wait until he is an adult wrapped up in his own life.

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule,

    I myself had to point this out to the police force just last week. The attitude they brought to my son would never have been brought to a white boy. Totally unacceptable.

    But in my rage I missed the opportunity to make them pause and think. They just went on the defensive. But they got my message.

    I am not an inarticulate ghetto mother with no credibility nor do I quake in my boots when it comes to protecting my son. I am not without resources or connections.

    My son has a good reputation wherever he goes. But he will defend himself when he has to. He has that right under the law. These policeman make no distinction between the aggressors and defenders in the way that they deal with young black boys. They ask no questions but respond with unnecessary and ILLEGAL threats against MINORS. Granted the superior handled it better although he never made that necessary call to me but the one on the street was a total thug. My son, who has watched how they handle situations, did not trust them before and trusts them even less now. When asked what he would like done to make it right he asked them to organize training for officers in how to deal with children. He should have said BLACK CHILDREN.

    I see now why it is better for parents to leave work and pick up their children from school and to drive them EVERYWHERE they go. Children who take the bus are assumed to be underprivileged and therefore easy prey.

    It is a shame that this is where we are.

    But I now have more reason to believe that the confessions the police obtain from underprivileged and uneducated young men have not been obtained by outsmarting them during interrogation..

    Like

  • For one to comment sensibly on a topic one must first read then comprehend the topic, assimilate it and then provide an outward expression of that topic.

    In a way the education cycle And it’s useful output is much like eating food, breaking down its elements and getting or providing nourishment to our constituent cells.

    Unfortunately, given that my eating example includes elimination of waste nuff uh we does end up talking real shy$e

    And with these DLP AND BLP politicians their hallmark accomplishment is defined by that Shy$e

    As a few of you may know, de ole man is very serious about this concept of Black Enfranchisement and Edifying our Psyche.

    Let me use the very material of the Ghana side of this fiasco to show how far we are from anything serious

    http://caricomreparations.org/ghana-offers-african-americans-caribbean-people-the-right-of-return-the-right-of-abode-in-2019/

    Take a look at this site that is supposedly central in our regional outreach

    And, because, if de ole man said it, it would be said dat “I ent got nuffin good to say bout we tings”

    Here are the comments of a commentator there at the Caricom site

    “…Mr. Rathael G. Fambro (Ka-Mugisa Nyaagaku)

    I retired from the states to Puerto Rico, in August 2017. I would still like to ultimately permanently, relocate to Africa. I have many friends throughout the continent, and keep up contacts, and my wife and I, along with our two adult sons, have traveled together extensively over the years.

    I have not come across any “specific” instructions/details, on “how” to make abode/return application, to Ghana, or anywhere in Africa.

    I am not one for fanfare, celebration, with no concrete ways to get things accomplished.

    I am interested in investment, and relocation, but I need serious, specific details and outlines about many things.

    Where can I get that? ”

    Here is a serious Diasporean appealing to the CARICOM JERKOFF SPECIALISTS FOR THE SUBSTANCE BY WHICH FITURE ACTIONS ARE TO BE CONSUMATED making the same RH point that de ole man been making.

    Dis is only a RH opportunity for Mugabe Mottley!!!

    He continues with this comment

    “…I’ve been to Ghana, and seen everything I wanted to see as a visitor.

    As someone interested in possibly moving there, and investing there, I’m not interested in feel good celebrations and parties…”

    AND WITH THIS REMARK BY THIS DR., DE OLE MAN REST MY POINT!

    Both Ghana, Barbados and CARICOM SEE THIS INITIATIVE as tours and bus rides.

    Observe that one Year and several months later de RH site remains un updated like No Solutions Barbados website.

    And we let a subject of this nature languish.

    A RH BRIDGE TOO FVCKING FAR!!!

    Like

  • @ Donna

    So here you are in 2019 FINALLY!!!

    You said and I quote

    “…But I now have more reason to believe that the confessions the police obtain from underprivileged and uneducated young men have not been obtained by outsmarting them during interrogation…”

    Welcome to the state of the thousands of NAZZIM BLACKETT’s in Barbados WHO HAVE NO VOICE and who de ole man does try to represent when I heah talking bout de Royal Baygon Police Force!!!

    You are a gentile lady and therefore you ent got to, nor need to, use my jaw breaking adjectives and nouns.

    But we dealing with thugs wid badges and corruption so de ole man cant and wont be nice like you CAUSE DERE ENT NO TIME AND DE NAZZIM BLACKETTS GETTING BEAT AND LOCKED UP DAILY by the rapists like 2143 Detective Kyan Mullin and not a feller saying a pang.

    Like

  • re For one to comment sensibly on a topic one must first read then comprehend the topic, assimilate it and then provide an outward expression of that topic.

    In a way the education cycle And it’s useful output is much like eating food, breaking down its elements and getting or providing nourishment to our constituent cells.

    Unfortunately, given that my eating example includes elimination of waste nuff uh we does end up talking real shy$e

    ================================================================================
    most folk who come here dont really assimilate they go directly to elimination of waste nuff uh we does end up talking real shy$e

    then they get vexed when you call them betzpaenic brimblers and brayers and barkers

    Like

  • Piece The Legend,
    The unfortunate turn of events should serve as a teaching moment for Barbadians. We witnessed a prime minister whose naked ambition got the better of her in Ghana. I was alarmed. I saw an opportunist.

    What lessons can we learn from her trip? However reluctant some of us may be; we have to connect a bridge to Africa. We are a people without an identity. Our youngsters will benefit from this exchange of minds and cultures.

    With Mia exposed as an opportunist we need to look towards community development and empowerment in order to build a wall to protect as from a government that continues to emasculate their own people. By combining our experiences and skills sets we can outperform the services provided by our government and in many cases private enterprises.

    Our ambition should be to form economic, social and political links with communities from the African diaspora and mother Africa. Whilst steering a wide berth from government interference.

    Like

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