African Liberation Education (3)

Submitted by Ras Jahaziel

In this post-emancipation era, the world has become split into two different economic realities: Slavery-Wealth and Slavery Poverty…. otherwise known as First world and Third world…. otherwise known as

The Developed World

and The UNDER-Developed World…

otherwise known to the wise as The Shameful and Unjust Results of The Great Robbery.Look at this picture below: It can be called “Inequality as a result of The Great Robbery,”

…and you can be sure It is a strategy of White Supremacy.

One US dollar equals 134 Jamaican dollars.
Any place in the world where you look, you will find the same economic disparity when comparing any predominantly white country with any predominantly Black country.That is why there is always an exodus from the countries that were invaded and robbed to the countries that benefited from invading and robbing other countries. The survival instinct is always the prime motivator of Black and Brown migration.

Read full text @ Ras Jahaziel Website

13 comments

  • MAN THERE WAS A TIME WHEN THE JAMAICAN DOLLAR WAS WORTH MORE THAN A US DOLLAR.

    WHAT CHANGED TO CAUSE THE CURRENT DISPARITY WAS ALL THE FAULT OF THE MANLEY GOVERNMENT IN THE MID 70’S

    NOW WE READING A LOAD OF BULL SHITE

    Liked by 2 people

  • Israel, Saudi Arabia, Gulf States, Singapore, China, etc. – By Comparison, What makes them what they are if it’s not by either having good fortune of sitting on oil and an ability to use it for the benefit of their populace or by their ability and acumen to produce high value products the world wants?
    Then again, I’ve never seen an African leader who looked as though he needed a good meal himself or for a well armed and clothed force.

    Like

  • Some un-educated BLACK POPULACE needs to STOP THIS RACIAL RETORIC and start looking inward for their BLAME PATH.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Black leaders are notoriously weak and corrupt and only show strength when robbing, selling out or disenfranchising their own people…Barbados and other Caribbean countries are prime examples…right alongside their useless African counterparts.

    And that is outside the robbery games the former slave owning countries play..

    Like

  • Ras

    The IMF is colonialism in its modern context … Or what some called neo-colonialism today …

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    You are a liar … the Jamaican dollar started its declined in the 1980s/90s and this may have had a little to do with the Manley governmental economic policies… However, the Jamaican dollar valued a few cents more than the US dollar for about a year or two…

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Lexicon at 7:19 AM

    It may be more correct to say that the decline in the value of the Jamaican currency mirrored the decline in the value of its main exports – sugar and bauxite.

    Like

  • WHEREAS THERE WAS A decline in the value of its main exports – sugar and bauxite AND ALSO BANANAS, IN THE 70’S DURING THE MANLEY REGIME WITH HIS DALLIANCES WITH CUBA THERE WAS MASSIVE FLIGHT OF CAPITAL FROM JAMAICA, ALONG WITH MYRIADS OF THE BUSYNESS FOLK.

    Liked by 1 person

  • We could add gypsum and aluminum to the mix.

    Like

  • Sorry david no aluminium out of jamaica they had no smelters however jamaica did gypsum but barbados gyptmore

    Liked by 1 person

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Vincent Codrington February 26, 2019 9:52 AM
    “It may be more correct to say that the decline in the value of the Jamaican currency mirrored the decline in the value of its main exports – sugar and bauxite.”

    It also “more correct” to argue that since Barbados is about 30 years behind Jamaica as far as the Western model in the ‘economic-development’ race is concerned are you implying that a similar fate faces the Bajan dollar given that the sugar industry in Bim is dead and its tourism industry (which will never outshine that of Jamaica’s) is not generating the levels of forex needed to stave off the dreaded devaluation of the Bajan Mickey dollar?

    BERT will soon tell Bajans like it is and that their currency is not even worth the tripe of paper it is printed on.

    Middle-class Bajans (and their materialistic aspirants) are going through the same death pangs that their Jamaican counterparts in the Red Hills communities experienced in the 1980’s.

    Like

  • Champagne tastes on mauby pockets. Living in a fool’s paradise. We Bajans could do a lot more for ourselves if we addressed some of our psychological problems. We could be happy living as our true selves instead of trying to be mini-Americans.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Miller

    Barbados never trailed Jamaica in anything of virtue. Is there any good reason why we should follow it now?

    @ Donna

    The champagne that is being imported is not being drunk by the average Barbadian. The tourists,expats and wannabes are drinking it. Most of them bring the foreign exchange to pay for it.

    Like

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