The Jeff Cumberbatch Column – A Barbadian Miscellany II

Last Monday’s delivery of the so-called “mini-Budget” by the Honourable Prime Minister and Minister of Finance & Economic Affairs has served to shift, ever so subtly, the national discourse from the analysis and interpretation of constitutional provision to that of the optimal recourse out of the economic morass in which we have found ourselves.

Now relegated to the pages of our constitutional history are issues, some left unanswered, such as whether the Prime Minister solely possesses the constitutional authority to choose the date for a general election even if Parliament has been dissolved by the effluxion of time rather than on his or her advice; whether the Constitution contemplates a prolonged parliamentary interregnum between dissolution and the general election wherein the Cabinet is responsible to no other entity; who is empowered to nominate the two opposition senators should one party win all the seats in the Lower House; whether a single member of parliament claiming not to support the government may be validly appointed leader of the Opposition; and whether an incomplete house of Parliament may legitimately pass legislation of any kind. I have written on all of these in the past weeks.

In their stead now arise matters such as the fiscal prudence of imposing additional financial obligations on the tourist trade in a destination already rated as one of the more expensive globally; the genuineness of collective bargaining by the public sector workers’ organizations that initially proposed surreal 15 and 23 per centum wage hikes to their employer and then settled ultimately for 5 per cent only from the same employer, though comprising different personalities; the fiscal responsibility of a blanket removal of all tuition fees for Barbadian students at UWI without regard to their individual abilities to cope; and the combined effect of the removal of the national social responsibility levy [NSRL] with the varied slew of taxes freshly imposed.

Of course, any public disenchantment with these matters will be suffused by the patent popularity of the new administration during its current honeymoon period. In addition, this new administration, heirs to a degree of political capital that contrasts starkly with the low level of civic trust enjoyed by the one outgone in its latter days, has astutely availed itself of this goodwill to depict the new fiscal initiatives as an opportunity for patriotic Barbadians unselfishly to wrap themselves in the flag and proudly to perceive themselves as being fully participatory in any recovery that might inure. A veritable political masterstroke.

Hence, rather than the populace categorizing these initiatives as bothersome and trying, the Barbados Labour Party and its supporters, who appear now to control the tenor of public discourse, have succeeded in portraying them rather as merely trifling inconveniences in a creative recovery programme necessitated by the allegedly dubious infelicities of the previous Democratic Labour Party administration.

To such an extent that a press conference called by three former Cabinet Ministers and a Senator in the DLP government seems to have been greeted not with any acclaim but, rather, with popular dismay at the effrontery of the members of an administration recently rejected (to a candidate), and principally so on the basis of perceived financial mismanagement, publicly criticizing negatively an attempt by a “nationally embraced” administration to “put things right economically”. To judge from popular reaction in some quarters, this partisan analysis on their part appears to have fallen flat in a polity seemingly still resentful of their party’s mode of governance.

Of course, it is not that simple, however. The DLP, whether as a collective body, a group, or as individuals, are as entitled as any other person or persons to comment critically on matters of official economic policy. To seek to deny them this right or to impose prior restraints thereupon would scarcely comport with our accepted traditions of democracy.

I recall that immediately after the similarly categorical defeat of the party by the BLP in 2003, the then leader, the late Mr. David Thompson (as he then was), convened a group of individuals to analyze the main reasons for such a devastating rejection. It is clear that the party must eventually adopt a similar course on this occasion, even though these may be early days yet. Given the degree of electoral rejection, some inconvenient truths will no doubt have to be told. It seems to me that there must be an acceptance that the disaffection felt for the government of the day pervaded the entire party and hence caused even promising talented newcomers to suffer defeat as a result.

From the ashes of this debacle, the DLP must seek, as does the fabled phoenix, to rise again so as to be a politically relevant force in our nation. Our democracy demands no less.

A common entrance?
On an entirely different topic, I queried of some colleagues recently why the publication results of the annual Common Entrance becomes a national spectacle with Ministry officials solemnly announcing a list of the top ten performers in a test for eleven year olds in basic English, Composition and Mathematics. I mean, we recently awarded a number of first class degrees in law, a discipline aspired to by some of the younger star pupils and there was no equal publicity. It does seems somewhat incongruous for there to be such a charivari surrounding the common entrance results, where the acclaimed top ten performers are earmarked for two or three schools only, and then gravely to iterate the myth, “We need to cultivate in the minds of the people that there are no top schools or bottom schools, but that all schools are equal…” Yeah, right!

A blessed Fathers’ Day to all!

94 comments

  • @Jeff
    Much food for thought and each issue deserves a separate column, Constitional issues under the rug; economic issues on the front burner. The union stance is one of several issues why people become cynical about politics in future the members should query the genuiness of their leadership position when it comes to negotiations. How about the media doing a follow up on where the top students in the eleven plus are in 8 years? 60 years on and we still celebrating a largely discarded British educational practice.

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Do you know what prevented Minister Santia Bradshaw from sharing 11+ results current and past? It is a government about change isn’t it.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    Well Barbados is alive and kicking. The lists of apparent ills will be corrected ,if they need to be, all in good time. This is who we are. Like it, or lump it. We aim for excellence ;not perfection.

    Congratulations to all the entrants to Secondary Schools. Congratulations to the high Flyers . It is you who will assist in keeping Barbados among the Leading Developing Countries. Those who did not score highly in the academic subjects need to strive and remedy this gap in your development . You are all worthy citizens of Barbados. Do not let the school to which you are assigned define you. All current leaders and wannabe leaders did not graduate from the so called “good schools “. Ask them when you see them.

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    As a scholistic relative of mine opined, past academic performance is not an indicator of future successes in life..

    One day those with the 11 plus mentality will come to that realization and fixate instead on what’s more important in preparing these young minds and undeveloped brains for the real challenges in the real world.

    Liked by 2 people

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Jeff, where is the real issue…with the parties or with us, the electorate!

    You noted that “I recall that immediately after the similarly categorical defeat of the party by the BLP in 2003, the then leader […] convened a group of individuals to analyze the main reasons for such a devastating rejection.”

    OK. All reasonable. Yet, 15 short years later the same party was still more heavily embarrased at the polls.

    So what is the take-away? Should we perceive that the exercise in ’03 taught them nothing; or is it that they dismissed the lessons learned; or have the dynamics of the populace changed so much that the psychology was misread?

    If these are our leaders thus presumably some of those same former 11plus and 1st class honours stars and yet can fumble a review and reset so ineptly should we even expect any new phoenix to fly …. or merely expect another horrendous crash and burn a few terms on ? Does this even make sense!

    You are right there is a clear “disaffection felt for the government of the day” …. a disaffection for ‘politics as usual’.

    Our democracy demands vibrant political activity, no doubt…Yet, it is perplexing that the party of the forthright Errol Barrow can be so abjectly rejected twice in the last 20 years and too that of Grantley Adams also suffer harsh rejection but we continue apace with this politics as usual.

    Something is totally wrong with this scenery…

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  • @Dee Word

    Contrary to what some who post on BU pages would have you believe there is no perfect man made system. There is flux that is driven by a constant search for equilibrium?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ David BU at 9:49 AM

    I agree with you . We aim for equilibrium; but we never reach it. What constitutes equilibrium is constantly in flux. We move in a concentric whirl…..like the weave of a cobweb. And that is reality. Long may it be so.

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  • Bernard how does one explain people who underline perspectives with absolutes?

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  • @B Coddrington

    “keeping Barbados among the Leading Developing Countries.”

    HUMMMMM, these are the same past 11+ that have got the country into the SHIT HOLE it’s presently in, what makes you think this batch is going to be any better, maybe WORSE.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Well Well at 9 :10 AM

    Your scholastic relative is so right. It is no indicator of future success in life. It is for a significant number of people an achievement hurdle. After surmounting that hurdle they do not have the desire or energy to tackle new challenges.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    Yes David, I also agree with your “equilibrium search”…

    And in that regard I suspect we perceive that we can only be balanced with a vibrant DLP….but not being an acolyte of the party I query if the group’s decay and rot is so pervasive to render it as a bit player to Bajan politics and room made for another.

    Of course that will be determined by new powerful leaders and not my stupid blog post …

    But I must admit I am truly gobsmacked that ANY DLP former minister in the just dismissed destroying administration can rationally question the new admin at this moment.

    That said I am also waiting with bated breath to see if the turbine at sewerage plant recently cleaned by BLP directive will be returned to operations in a timely manner or simply lay idle because it’s so badly inoperable.

    If it’s returned to operation relatively quickly then the DLP should never, ever manage a govt of this nation again.

    That would be perfect equilibrium! Errol Barrow or any of his cofounders would accept that I’m sure.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ David at 10 : 08 AM

    Each of us think our perspective is the one and best perspective and we defend it. That does not make it the absolute truth or best perspective. If it resonates with the majority, it becomes the new dogma by which we live. Very often it has a limited shelf life that comes to an end when the innocent little boy shouts : ” The Emperor is naked”.

    I hope that “palaver ” answers your query.

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  • @Dee Word

    Isn’t the decay pervasive? Why limit your concern to the DLP. Note the electorate voted for the BLP because there is not credible alternatives. We have to tackle the problem at the root. The lack of academic and spiritual awareness, this is not spirituality in a religion sense. How many individuals you know who are have a good understanding of self and how they are meant to optimize their relationship with the system in which they exist in order to add value to it?

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  • Bernard…in my experience and my same relative will tell you and am sure you already know…learning, be it academia or otherwise, is a continuum…….it does not begin or end with 11 plus…or CXCs…or CAPE…or associate, bachelor’s, master’s degrees or PhDs….

    …..to maximize it’s effectiveness and succeed, one must always be open to new horizons, frontiers and achievements..

    I refuse to stop studying languages because I became aware of the doors that can open, even now.

    Hence it is critical that foreign languages, skills training, trade schools etc become mandatory in the schools from primary level and on the landscapes of Barbados and the islands..

    The last 52 years have reached it’s limit with nowhere else to go but regress…

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Wily Coy at 10 :08 AM

    They were ably assisted by those who scored lowly in the 11+ CEE. But we have to live in hope ,do we not?

    From where I stand, as a learning organism , we do learn from past errors. Very often we over correct. But we are only human. Past performance is no indicator of future performance.

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  • ” among the Leading Developing Countries.”

    Are we truly one of the leading developing countries. It is self soothing phrases like these that blind us to reality.
    Are we still “punching above our weight?”
    You guys kill me.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    Well Well

    You are too pessimistic. I have a lot of faith in the youth of Barbados . Our problem is that we want to design the future for them . And it cannot happen.

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  • Not design the future for them, but open avenues for them to escape the first design that was created for us, so THEY do not fall into the same trap that we are now all viewing…..free them up to pursue opportunities, let their minds be free to soar, so that they do not develop the minds of the mentally enslaved..

    As things stand, they will only copy what obtained before, since children live what they learrn particularly when their minds are programmed with crap, learned from their elders..

    There is no legacy for them, nothing useful, what was created for our grandparents, parents and for us, was all an illusion…and a very destructive one, my parents thankfully saw that in the 50s, from that bloodline escaped the train wreck that now is….

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  • William Skinner

    In the interest of transparency and the right of the public to know, we should have Common Entrance results for all schools published and not just the top ten.
    It is high time that we remove the cloak of secrecy surrounding our education system. Also, if all schools “are equal” why are there different standards of entry into some?

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  • “In the interest of transparency and the right of the public to know, we should have Common Entrance results for all schools published and not just the top ten.”

    To serve what purpose?

    Liked by 1 person

  • I thought the information for the top 10 students, rather than the top 10 schools is what is published?

    Liked by 2 people

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    I thought the information for the top 10 students, rather than the top 10 schools is what is published?

    But why? It is not a competition. simply a transfer from primary school to secondary school. Or is it more than that?

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  • We should publish and ensure we allocate financial and HR resources to bridge the gaps which currently give advantage.

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  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    ,but simply…

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  • All results? Out of touch with what now happens in the school system Barbados, but this should be done only if everyone passes. If some children fail, then their names should not be published.

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  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    We should publish and ensure we allocate financial and HR resources to bridge the gaps which currently give advantage.

    The “gaps which give advantage” -wide reading, the arts of writing and conversing well and innate academic ability- are not within the province of the state, David.

    Liked by 1 person

  • These children should be left alone to grow as children and given all the necessary tools to develop their brain power, knowledge base and hone/highlight their skills set, why should they be exposed to the idiocy of adults who were brainwashed, programmed and miseducated from the 50s to present.

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  • @Jeff

    See the school environment as enabled to polish the diamonds in the rough. Ensure the political appointment of teachers is eliminated. The improvements to the physical is fairly dispersed. Give a chance for more schools to develop a culture of excellence.

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Jeff C.:
    “In their stead now arise matters such as the fiscal prudence of imposing additional financial obligations on the tourist trade in a destination already rated as one of the more expensive globally; the genuineness of collective bargaining by the public sector workers’ organizations that initially proposed surreal 15 and 23 per centum wage hikes to their employer and then settled ultimately for 5 per cent only from the same employer, though comprising different personalities; the fiscal responsibility of a blanket removal of all tuition fees for Barbadian students at UWI without regard to their individual abilities to cope; and the combined effect of the removal of the national social responsibility levy [NSRL] with the varied slew of taxes freshly imposed.”

    Would it be a hard case to argue (in your view) that there is great justification for the newly elected BLP administration rethink its plan “of a blanket removal of all tuition fees for Barbadian students at UWI” and apply a more targeted fiscal approach to funding?

    What would you say should the new administration decide to revise the ‘freeness’ available to students pursuing undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Law?

    Don’t you think that given the surfeit of lawyers in Barbados there is valid case to ‘suspend’ the luxury of training more c(r)ooks to further spoil the ‘lawyers’ broth?

    The image of lawyers as exhibited both in Parliament and in the local judicial system has become a real cause of concern to the Bajan taxpayers.

    Why should the Bajan taxpayers continue to fund university education of this group of elite tertiary-level students pursuing Law only to be later fleeced by the same ‘graduated’ lawyers with strong political ties that bind as witnessed by the massive fees bilked from the Treasury in respect of simple straightforward legal work which even a final year student in your class could complete “before the cat can lick his ears”?

    How much would you say ought to have been charged for the BWA and Cahill agreements? $1.5 million or $8.5 million?

    Don’t you think the recipients of such outrageously large fees should be made to repay at least a portion of the ‘costly’ education they received ‘free of personal cost’ while pursuing studies at your Law faculty?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    @David,

    No disagreement from me. But the home environment will;l still play a starring role in most, though not all cases. The boy who came first is the son of two doctors. Hismother is an academic at Cave Hill in charge of the first year Medico-Legal programme in which I teach.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Jeff

    Of course, remember it will never be a perfect system. We have to build a structure to maximize results. And importantly, align to national priorities with the objective of sustaining our global competitiveness to sustain our standard of living while satisfying personal ambitions.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2018/06/14/common-entrance-exam-results-announced/

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  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    What would you say should the new administration decide to revise the ‘freeness’ available to students pursuing undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Law?*

    Don’t you think that given the surfeit of lawyers in Barbados there is valid case to ‘suspend’ the luxury of training more c(r)ooks to further spoil the ‘lawyers’ broth? 🙂

    The image of lawyers as exhibited both in Parliament and in the local judicial system has become a real cause of concern to the Bajan taxpayers.

    @ Miller, I was not thinking, as you seem to be, of one programme specifically, but I was wondering if there should not be some sort of means testing for university course funding by the State.

    Even though it was not so articulated at inception, it is not unreasonable to assume that the idea was for those who had “ascended” by means of tertiary education should be called upon to fund their own children’s, rather than having the statal enablement continue in perpetuity.

    Note that Law has already been excluded from the sphere of National Development Scholarships…

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    @David, thanks for the link. If your objective is to be realized, then we should enable even more youngsters, and not exclude those who score below 30% in English or Mathematiics. Mr Skinner might have a point,m in that regard.

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  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    Dr ole man jes get back.

    I see dat in me absence dat a new regulation was passed to the Barbados Underground Constitution that made it illegal to use the words yardfowl.

    De ole man just needed to know effing the BU senate when its membership was convened applied that to the use of photographs as well?

    @ the Luminary Jeff Cumberbatch

    I noted that several persons commented on the 11+ and more commented on the equality of the schools secured

    De ole man wondered as to this equality in 2018.

    Let me explain why.

    In an age of internet, whiteboards and teleconferencing I am at a serious loss as to how Edutech has not been expanded to include virtual classrooms where a synchronised curriculum being taught at any privileged school can be simulcast at the lesser schools.

    I mean that you could for example be at UWI using de ole man’s proposed enhancement to instruct students at the Garrison in a case on contract law where one of the litigants had falsified a document by changing the decimal point from 0.07 % interest to 0.7%

    My point is that we simply DO NOT HAVE PEOPLE WITH THE BRAIN MATTER TO THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX

    Maybe this is why Luis Moreno of the IDB is being invited here next week to revisit Edutech Part OK?

    The ONLY WAY FORWARD IN THESE 9 MONTHS before the $$ comes from the IMF is going to be through National Indicative Programming loans.

    But these loans HAVE TO BE FOR PROJDCTS THAT WILL DELIVER SOMETHING and not for the customary badword that these thought leaders that surround Madamoiselle Prime Minister Mottley

    Your thoughts are appreciated

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  • @ Miller….
    What would you say should the new administration decide to revise the ‘freeness’ available to students pursuing undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Law?

    Don’t you think that given the surfeit of lawyers in Barbados there is valid case to ‘suspend’ the luxury of training more c(r)ooks to further spoil the ‘lawyers’ broth?

    The image of lawyers as exhibited both in Parliament and in the local judicial system has become a real cause of concern to the Bajan taxpayers.

    Why should the Bajan taxpayers continue to fund university education of this group of elite tertiary-level students pursuing Law only to be later fleeced by the same ‘graduated’ lawyers with strong political ties that bind as witnessed by the massive fees bilked from the Treasury in respect of simple straightforward legal work which even a final year student in your class could complete “before the cat can lick his ears”

     They are crooks, thieves, criminals, malefactor,shysters, swindlers.  Use any adjective to describe them.   I have first hand experience with these wolves in sheep clothing.  To the writer you are so on point regarding the freeness that seems so pervasive in Barbadians culture.
    

    Like

  • @ Miller….
    What would you say should the new administration decide to revise the ‘freeness’ available to students pursuing undergraduate studies at the Faculty of Law?

    Don’t you think that given the surfeit of lawyers in Barbados there is valid case to ‘suspend’ the luxury of training more c(r)ooks to further spoil the ‘lawyers’ broth?

    The image of lawyers as exhibited both in Parliament and in the local judicial system has become a real cause of concern to the Bajan taxpayers.

    Why should the Bajan taxpayers continue to fund university education of this group of elite tertiary-level students pursuing Law only to be later fleeced by the same ‘graduated’ lawyers with strong political ties that bind as witnessed by the massive fees bilked from the Treasury in respect of simple straightforward legal work which even a final year student in your class could complete “before the cat can lick his ears”

     They are crooks, thieves, criminals, malefactor,shysters, swindlers.  Use any adjective to describe them.   I have first hand experience with these wolves in sheep clothing.  To the writer you are so on point regarding the freeness that seems so pervasive in Barbadians culture.
    

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  • Just posted comments but they are not showing….????

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  • Jean

    There are many Bajans with an LLB who do not practice law, some haven’t even attended Hugh Wooding. A law degree does not mean one must practise law; it is antiquated thinking. Maybe if we had more law degree holders in key areas across the public service, bad decisions, contracts and agreements would not pervade the service.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The questionable contracts being signed off in the public sector has nothing to do with if those handling the contracts are qualified and you know it enuff.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I believe Jeff meant the elections of 1999 and not 2003 given that it was Clyde Mascoll and not David Thompson was at the helm of the DLP in 2003 when the results were BLP- 23 DLP- 7. In the 1999 the DLP won 2 seats.

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  • Taxpayers paid to educate them and it is such an embarrassment to the island that too many lawyers have given themselves, the island and the judiciary over the decades such a horrible reputation, right on par with the African countries who are ironically cleaning up their judiciaries presently and locking up their dishonest lawyers…and judges.

    The present government is responsible for making sure the legal fraternity and judiciary change their modes of operation or things will only get that much worse…

    …..it’s horrible that taxpayer’s educated them ALL for the last 50 years and their thanks were to rob the same taxpayers, their children and grandchildren who paid for their legal education.

    That is beyond savagery…nothing can justify those crimes against the people.

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  • David
    You mean like the recent 30-year Port lease, even though the Port’s lease with the MoH ends long before 30 years expire? The fact remains that our approach to matching degrees and posts is fish bowl mentality thinking, and is obsolete. Look no further than BU’s very own Jeff Cumberbatch.

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  • @enuff

    Do not disagree with your larger point, the secondary issue is that the corrupt agreements signed off by successive governments has nothing to do with being qualified.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    I mean that you could for example be at UWI using de ole man’s proposed enhancement to instruct students at the Garrison in a case on contract law where one of the litigants had falsified a document by changing the decimal point from 0.07 % interest to 0.7%

    @ Piece, Hahahahahahah! Oh shirt!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    In an age of internet, whiteboards and teleconferencing I am at a serious loss as to how Edutech has not been expanded to include virtual classrooms where a synchronised curriculum being taught at any privileged school can be simulcast at the lesser schools.

    @ Piece, the new Education Minister says that she wants to make use of the available technology. Good intentions…I taught and examined a Comparative Labour Law class this semester and have as yet to meet any one of the students in the flesh. A Spanish class at St Leonard’s might be taught online to students at HC or SMS

    Like

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    I believe Jeff meant the elections of 1999 and not 2003 given that it was Clyde Mascoll and not David Thompson was at the helm of the DLP in 2003 when the results were BLP- 23 DLP- 7. In the 1999 the DLP won 2 seats

    Anon, Apologies and thanks, you are, of course, correct

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  • Are-we-there-yet

    Someone hinted on this blog that The Minister and Ministry of Education needs to provide more annual BCEE statistical information for the general public on not only the students who scored the 10 highest combined marks and the primary schools that they attended and the secondary schools that they opted to attend, but that more indepth statistics should be also provided on the cutoff marks for each secondary school as an indication of the changes in popularity between schools from year to year.

    From the meagre statistics provided by the newspapers it seems that HC has plummeted from the top spot in national popularity vis-a-vis the BCEE and that QC now holds the top spot. St Michaels also seems to have eclipsed Combermere in this regard also for the 3rd and 4th spot. This may or may not be true, but only overall statistics, not just those from the top 10 performers, can prove this.

    In addition, Jeff made the point, that is oftimes made, that the best performers come from the privileged homes of Lawyers, Doctors, perhaps wealthy contractors, etc. etc. But would granular statistics show this to be true if the full range of available annual statistics were used to get proper trends. For example, amongst those high fliers were some students from the homes of non professional types.

    It has been my impression, from watching and interacting with BCEE students, almost every school day since they were in Infants class as a grandparent of one of them, that there was somewhat of a societal levelling that went on from year to year in the ultimate, Class 4, performance of many of the students, that seemed to have more to do with the resolve and interest of the parents and to the strength of purpose of the student himself or herself, than with the station in life of the parents. I would really hope that the Min. of Education would carry out an indepth study of this observation using some UWI researchers as it might add some grist to the mill of their stated purpose of upgrading all the schools to a level that it could rightly be claimed that all the Secondary Schools are now equal. Indeed, if one closely examines the BCEE booklet for 2018 it would appear as if that objective has already been reached but I suspect that the brochures do not tell the full story.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Can someone tell me which schools are “privileged” and which are “lessor schools”. What qualifies the schools for their respective categorization?

    Why should my child not get state funded university education because I earn a taxable income? I believe those who contribute should also benefit.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Are-we-there-yet

    Ping Pong;

    Re. your 2nd question above; In normal times I would agree with you. But these are abnormal times. I agree with means testing for now. Parents who might soon find it a tad difficult to send their children to Ivy League Universities overseas should be required to pay for their stop-gap UNiversity education here. When times return to a steady state situation that could be reversed. But perhaps there will be few such cases as nearly everyone will be scrunting over the next 3 or so years, if not longer.

    Re. your first question; Yuh mekking sport. You have to look no further than the cutoff marks in the BCEE and other data that the MoE could provide. The data on funding of the schools might also provide some indicators for the respective categorization.

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  • William Skinner

    If all schools are equal we need to see which schools are producing the cream of the crop and which schools are not. The public should have a published account of all schools , placements and vital information. No need to mention students’ names. I noticed that the parents of one of the “early” students who passed the exam , refused to have him interviewed for the press. He passed for the Lester Vaughan School. His contemporaries passed for the established old grammar schools. Pay attention.
    I also noticed that a relatively high number of those who did extremely well took “lessons”.
    It is pure nonsense to send students who are academically challenged into to the mainstream. The experiment called the Vocational Centres of the 1980s , was a disaster. Eductech never took off, it was nothing but political PR hype. Some teachers are themselves not equipped to use the computer and there has been reluctance to move with the technology
    Since 1962, when free education was introduced ,there has been no reform of the system. Anybody who believes that Grantley Adams and Ellerslie( just naming two, no slur on schools intended) are on par with Harrison and Queens College, need to get a long bush bath.
    Of course there will always be exceptions because a child could have an off day at the exam, pass for a new comprehensive school and still end up with a first class honours degree. There are some students who excel at testing and after they enter a top school, never do anything academically. Those examples are exceptions to the rule.
    Any morning I wake up and read that a student who excels at maintaining the schools vegetable garden or is outstanding in animal husbandry, carpentry, cricket etc, given the same prominence as those who do well in English and Mathematics, I would know we are going some where.

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  • The MoE provides NO data. Are you suggesting that schools are unequally funded? I do not know what the cut off marks are for any school but I am at a loss as to why a cut off mark makes a school “privileged” or “lessor”.

    “Stop-gap university education”?? Speak for yourself! For me UWI is the only game in town.

    Liked by 1 person

  • What makes Ellerslie a presumably “lessor” school and QC a presumably “privileged” school? Is it the buildings, the grounds, the teachers, the school administration, the books and other material used, the subjects taught, the sports played, the extra curricular activities offered (cadets, scouts, science club, music etc), the uniforms the students wear or the food served in the school canteen? Help me before I take the bush bath!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Enuff, your statement is not entirely accurate. Having more law degrees doesn’t improve contracts, etc. It’s a culture, a system and personal greed in addition to having the opportunity that these crooks are able to operate. And then try prosecuting them. Good luck. I worked in a large contracting agency and saw first hand how they operate. Not to help, but to hinder in every way while covering their asses. Then they blame everyone but them selves for everything. No personal responsibility. Not all lawyers are like that. But there are less of the good ones and more of those who give the rest a bad name..

    Liked by 1 person

  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Enuff June 17, 2018 3:35 PM
    “There are many Bajans with an LLB who do not practice law, some haven’t even attended Hugh Wooding. A law degree does not mean one must practise law; it is antiquated thinking. Maybe if we had more law degree holders in key areas across the public service, bad decisions, contracts and agreements would not pervade the service.”

    But is this a luxury taxpayers can afford at this time of vital fiscal housecleaning?

    Were the Permanent Secretaries and the other very senior Administrative officers of the past -when Barbados had a model civil service which was much admired in the English-speaking Commonwealth- in possession of law degrees (whether ‘articled’ or not) except in the Solicitor General’s Office?

    If there is some kind of deficiency in areas of law in the Management/Public Administration programme, which most senior public sector managers are expected to complete, why not expand the programme to make it compulsory that some modules involving legal studies be pursued?

    How about Principles of Law and definitely Contract Law?
    Can there be other modules of law which can be offered to beef up public sector managers’ knowledge in certain areas like labour relations and international law?

    Maybe there is already in place some kind of symbiotic relationship between management studies and law on offer at the UWI.

    Jeff Cumberbatch our BU legal luminary should be able shed some light on the menu on offer on the Hill

    Liked by 1 person

  • Miller you hit the nail on the head. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    How about Principles of Law and definitely Contract Law?
    Can there be other modules of law which can be offered to beef up public sector managers’ knowledge in certain areas like labour relations and international law?

    Maybe there is already in place some kind of symbiotic relationship between management studies and law on offer at the UWI

    Jeff Cumberbatch our BU legal luminary should be able shed some light on the menu on offer on the Hill

    Miller, All University courses are on offer to the general public. There is no need to pursue a full degree. Courses in Administrative Law, Revenue Law, Corporate Law, etc. are availed of by public officers from time to time. The notion of the occasional student is well entrenched at Cave Hill

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ millertheanunnaki June 17, 2018 2:28 PM

    “Don’t you think the recipients of such outrageously large fees should be made to repay at least a portion of the ‘costly’ education they received ‘free of personal cost’ while pursuing studies at your Law faculty?”
    ……………………………………………

    One of the most egregious revelations during the last campaign was from former Education Minister, Anthony Wood.

    He said that when he became minister and looked at the outstanding loans of the student revolving loan fund and realised that there were many bad debts. He saw that many of the debtors were gainfully employed and were in a position to repay their loans. He was prepared to publish the names to shame these persons into taking responsibility for their indebtedness to the fund.

    One such person was David Estwick, he owed $52,000. Somehow before the name and shaming was to be done…….unbeknownst to the minister……..someone whom he did not named took it upon themselves to forgive the loan.

    One law for me and another for thee.

    Go to You Tube and watch the BLP meeting at St Patricks.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    There used to be postgraduate Diploma and Certificate in Public Administration which would have covered the appropriate mix of courses including Public Finance. Since then they up the thing and required Bachelors and Masters degrees with no appreciable increase in productivity.

    Like

  • One of the most touching stories coming from the CEE this year was a story of a little girl who is the top student at her school.

    I read the article and I teared up………the child lost her mother and her brother. Her dad said that although her mother tried to prepare her in a way on how to cope after she passed, he had to be there for her. He said at times he did not want to push her because he did not want her to go into depression…….but just encouraged her to do some work.

    For me she was the best this year…….for a little girl to go through so much and still get in the high 80’s was remarkable……..and what is so touching is that it seems that the dad is a working class dad but is determined that his child succeeds. I pray God will bless them!

    Liked by 1 person

  • I may be wrong but I recall that the names, marks and schools to which a child was allocated were published in the Sunday papers at least up to 1970.

    i would appreciate if anybody else recalls this or has evidence of this.

    And so far as I know nobody came to any harm.’

    I recall too that both BCC and UWI publicly posts’ students grades semester to semester, and also piblishes the names and class of degree in the booklets which are publicly available at each year’s graduations.

    Like

  • @Jeff Cumberbatch June 17, 2018 2:31 PM “No disagreement from me. But the home environment will;l still play a starring role in most…”

    Maybe. Maybe not.

    Some years ago one of my children was in the 11+ top ten. The child of a Simple Simon and an entirely absent other “parent.”

    I would say that parents should be available to their children. Even the poorest and most poorly educated parents can still take their children to the library. Can still borrow books for free from the library. Can buy books instead of nonsense. I got a good deal on good quality hard cover books just last week. $3 BDS each, about the same as a sweet drink, and much less than a snack box or a $300 cell phone.

    And by the way why is there 17.5% VAT on books, especially on children’s books?

    Are we a serious people or not?

    And I don’t recall ANY party mentioning a new public library, or upgrading of current libraries during the recent election campaign.

    Are we a serious people or not?

    Liked by 1 person

  • The more pressing issue is the extent to which some poor households have these types of issues uppermost in their minds given the vagaries of everyday life they have to contend.

    Like

  • If the brother-in-law to the Spanish King is not above the law http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5855941/Spanish-kings-brother-law-begins-serving-six-years-jail-fraud.html
    And the CEO of Volkswagen can be arrested http://money.cnn.com/2018/06/18/investing/audi-ceo-arrested-volkswagen-rupert-stadler/index.html
    Even an ex-Prime Minister is made to pay for his sins Ehud Olmert – Prime minister of Israel from 2006 to 2009, cabinet minister 1988–1992, 2003–2006, mayor of Jerusalem 1993–2003. Convicted of breach of trust in July 2012, and of bribery in March 2015. In May 2015, Olmert was sentenced to six years in prison, but his sentence was reduced to 18 months in December 2015.

    PM MAM, we watching yuh, nuh!

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    @ Ping Pong

    The lesser and more prestigious school comment referred to previously was not an assignment that I would have ascribed but one that obtains in our socially stratified settings.

    I personally don’t really care which school you come from or who is you muddah or fahr

    I assess each sentience I encounter in its own merit.

    My submission spoke to how a so called literate and technologically progressive society as we to it ourselves to be, can, AFTER US $236M INVESTED IN EDUTECH, still be in a backwoods that is segregated on those same archaic lines of lesser and more prestigious schools.

    Do you have a smartphone? Does it have WhatsApp or FaceTime?

    Then extrapolating to a matrix where education can be employed using a similar technology in our geographically separated schools on this 2×2 rock in the Atlantic CANNOT BE A BRIDGE TOO FAR FOR YOU TO CONTEMPLATE IS IT?

    What I am saying to you is that , notwithstanding the several other issues about the anachronistic curriculum, we have the technology to facilitate the simple virtual integration of our school plant AND CERTAINLY SHOULD HAVE MOVED TO THAT 15 YEARS AGO.

    Ooops but that would mean an overlap of 10 DLP years with 5 BLP years wouldn’t it? which would bring certain people with impeccable credentials into view, wouldn’t it?

    I sorry for my blasphemy

    Like

  • Are-we-there-yet June 18, 2018 8:44 AM
    .

    I am disappointed at not seeing classifications for Bushtea and Millertheanunnaki – lol

    Like

  • Are-we-there-yet

    Bajan in NY;

    That post and my other related post totally vanished from off BU.
    Something weird might be happening.

    Like

  • Are-we-there-yet

    Oops!
    Those posts are still there in the Mottley … Mugabe blog. My apologies to David

    re. partisan classification. I would place Bushtea in the B group and Miller in the C group. Another frequent poster that I forgot is Artax. I think he is a group B.

    Like

  • HENCH FORTH “yardfoul” should be referred to as “COUP CRAP”.

    Like

  • The truth is that child raising is extremely labour intensive. It is like working the land. You have to do some hard work everyday. This hard work applies to wealthy parents, even moreso for middle class parents and is absolutely mandatory for poor parents. The thing is though that poor people, middle class people, and rich people are given equal amounts of time everyday. Everybody gets 24 hours. All parents have to decide how they wish to spend that 24 hours. I would advise that after giving 8 to 12 hours to work and its related commuting, parents should give all of the rest to their families, and by family I mean principally to their children. Much of the volunteer work, much of the social service club work, much of the partying, much of the lodge meetings, much of the drinking with the boys, much of the church going and its related demands, much of the TV watching, much of the video watching, much of the partying, much of everything else should be left to those people who do not yet have children, and to those people whose children are grown.

    It is actually not that hard to have a child score between 70% and 100% in the 11+. Most children (except those with severe learning disabilities) including most poor children can score between 70% and 100% on the 11+. But parents must be prepared to give to their children the only asset with which we are all equally endowed. Time.

    But the $6 million question. Are we all WILLING to do this? And if we are not willing to do this for our OWN children, who then do we expect to do it?

    Of course we could offshore our elementary school aged children. We can send them to a boarding school like the one described below, where for a hefty fee, of up to $46,000 USD per year SOME OTHER HUMAN BEINGS will make our children go to bed on time, get up on time, make them take their baths, comb their hair, make their beds, cook their meals, wash and iron their clothes, take them to church, take or send them to school on time, and SUPERVISE their homework EVERY DAY.

    But the $6 million question. Are we all WILLING to do this? And if we are not willing to do this for our OWN children, who then do we expect to do it?

    For those who are not willing or able to parent your children, here is a school for you, and there are hundreds more schools like this in the great white north.

    @Saint Andrew’s School. Address: 3900 Jog Road, Boca Raton, FL 33434. Website: http://www.saintandrews.net/
    Saint Andrew’s School is a private Episcopal school located in Boca Raton, Florida. The school was founded in 1961 and currently serves approximately 1,300 students from all backgrounds. The campus itself is situated in coastal Boca Raton on 81 acres of land.
    The school became co-ed in 1972, converting from a boarding-only school to a mixture of both day students and boarding students.
    Tuition ranges from as low as $19,240 for Junior Kindergarten day students to $46,600 for boarders.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • And the truth is that poor people perhaps have less demands on their time that middle class or rich people, therefore more time to give to their children. For example Professor Jeff [thank you for the good work which you are doing at Cave Hill and elsewhere] likely has to take work home, papers to set, papers to correct, curricula to revise, board meetings to attend, some people have Cabinet papers to write etc.

    The truth is that when you are doing a “low level” labouring, clerical or service job, you can take up your bag and go home to your family at the dot of 4:30, since nobody expects you to take work or work related worries home. So go home to your families and supervise your children’s homework, so that our children like mine can do better in the 11+, at secondary school and and at university than the children of Cabinet ministers and others with “high level” jobs.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    The truth is that when you are doing a “low level” labouring, clerical or service job, you can take up your bag and go home to your family at the dot of 4:30, since nobody expects you to take work or work related worries home. So go home to your families and supervise your children’s homework, so that our children like mine can do better in the 11+, at secondary school and and at university than the children of Cabinet ministers and others with “high level” jobs

    @ SS, all that you say might be true in theory, but how many of those parents will be seen by their children writing or even reading a book? How many of such parents will see it as more more critical to watch the latest soap opera or a movie on cable of an evening? I am the product of parents, not highly schooled but who perceived and drove home the great significance of education and learning.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Are-we-there-yet

    Simple Simon;

    I almost fully subscribe to your last 2 posts (except for the info on the St Andrews Boca Raton school). I think that the majority of Bajan children who do well in the Common Entrance Exam, do so mainly because of the influence and hard work of their Parents or Guardians allied with the hard work put in by their Class 3 and 4 teachers, especially if they find themselves in the A or B streams of Class 3 and Class 4. (i.e class 3A or 3B or class 4A or 4B). Class A and B stream teachers are normally driven to extend their charges to their limits to get the best results possible while stream C and D teachers, I think on the whole, tend to be satisfied with minimal performance by their charges. e.g. The children in the A streams tend to get a much higher amount of homework to do than the other streams and are also likely to be more up-to-date with the syllabi and less likely to have to catch up with new concepts in the third term of their class 4 life..

    Jeff;

    I think, fwliw, that Dr Simple Simon’s point is a good one. I am also a product of 2 parents who perceived and drove home the great significance of education and learning but I think that there are significantly greater numbers of parents than you think, who are role models and strict guides for good learning practices for their children even if they do watch a little soap opera or TV of an evening.

    What might detract from that number might well be the seemingly large number of single parents who bring up children these days. Indeed, I think that single parenting, at all levels of the society, might be a significant factor in influencing the final grades that individual children might get in the BCEE of current times.

    Like

  • In the animal kingdom the survival of a newly born depends on its mother.

    Sometimes the mother dies or is killed but the new born may still survive.

    The others in the herd/pack/group see to its survival.

    … plus the urge to live is strong.

    Children need to be shown the ropes.

    Some can learn for themselves.

    Some don’t need as much help as others do.

    But it is far easier for a child to grow to adulthood if care and nurture are given!!!

    It isn’t true to say that Barbados Scholars or children excelling in 11+ have perfectly functioning families.

    But it is true to say that families of most for the most part get the important things right.

    The child responds to the expectations of their parents and close family members because they want to do so.

    While the child of a disadvantaged family can make it too, it is much harder and more unusual.

    … and guess what, the Constitution addresses the important issue of Family.

    “Now, therefore, the people of Barbados (a) proclaim that they are a sovereign nation founded upon principles that acknowledge the supremacy of God, the dignity of the human person, their unshakeable faith in fundamental human rights and freedoms and the position of the family in a society of free men and free institutions;”

    … the position of the family in a society of free men and free institutions;

    Liked by 1 person

  • And there are still many parents like yours.

    The truth is I don’t know the answer or answers either. I don’t understand how your parents and mine though not highly schooled understood the value of education. Maybe we need to talk to our parents? Maybe the churches need to do more to encourage good parenting, maybe the NGO’s. Maybe communities.maybe we need to talk more about where we came from, not seeing it as a negative, but as a way of showing people that lack of money must not define you. But that time and commitment to children can make a difference

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Are-we-there-yet June 18, 2018 2:24 PM “What might detract from that number might well be the seemingly large number of single parents who bring up children these days. Indeed, I think that single parenting, at all levels of the society, might be a significant factor in influencing the final grades that individual children might get in the BCEE of current times.”

    Single parent here. Since I was 14, I have been parenting. In my late 20’s my own children, but from age 14 other people’s children. Ask yourself why would a 14 year old have to supervise the homework of 8, 10, 12 year olds when the parent (s) of the children are alive, well, working, but has made a decision to cease parenting?

    When one parents defects/disappears the other parent must redouble her efforts [it is often a her who is left to raise the child or the children] Sadly too often when one parent abandons his parental duties the other parent cuts back on her commitment as well [if he is not doing anything, I won’t do much either] when in truth she needs to redouble her efforts, that is to go from 100% effort to 200% effort.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Barbados must be one of the few places in the world where heads of government, well supported by the taxpayers, and with significant tax funded domestic help still choose to live apart from their own minor children.

    Like

  • Are our children important?

    Or do we still see OUR OWN CHILDREN as lil’ pickney in massa’s nigger yard?

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Simple Simon

    @ Jeff

    I agree with both of you that the interests of parents whether single or not is the key to the academic success of children in the Common Entrance exams,. Very often the child is ready to learn but he/she gets no support from his parents. Too many of them go to school with no breakfast and no books.
    These same parents expect the teachers to work miracles.

    Like

  • Single parent here. Since I was 14, I have been parenting. In my late 20’s my own children, but from age 14 other people’s children. Ask yourself why would a 14 year old have to supervise the homework of 8, 10, 12 year olds when the parent (s) of the children are alive, well, working, but has made a decision to cease parenting?

    That is indeed a very sad question to ask, Maybe the answer will be more saddening.

    I will try to answer it this way. Humans get tired. They become fatalistic. They don’t see the outcome as being rosy. Promises made promises broken. A whole slew of things can get u down. Drugs alcohol and other addiction serve to pull u deeper into a hole that only u can pull yourself out of. But do u really want to leave the comfort of your hole?

    Mental illness is often described and diagnosed by the unprofessionals as someone being lazy and acting in anti social and and in anti-societal ways. Many out there need help; but don’t know they are ill or prefer to be called lazy etc than be seeing a medical attn; that they may or may not be able to afford. The madhouse is bajan society is not a holiday resort. No one wants to go there.

    Unfortunately; these citizens have children of all ages, and they suffer because of the parents neglect. Mental illnesses are more wide spread than we may to acknowledge. Many go undiagnosed.

    Like

  • Sir Fuzzy

    The legacy of Barbadian politics of the last 15 years (and including those now in authority) will be the widespread sad characterization of many simple Barbadians as described in your 4:57 p.m. post.

    Like

  • Fuh true?…. fuh real?

    ” But while the Chief Justice was unsure about whether the new provision in the Evidence Act had in fact been proclaimed, Pilgrim told the media on the sidelines that police were aware of the change and electronic recording was being done since December.

    He said: “The days of moving through without confession evidence being electronically recorded are now over. That is the effect of the law effective December 11.”

    Like

  • Jeff must be embarrassed that this proviso in the law was activated since last year and the CJ expressed publicly that he was blissfully unaware.

    Like

  • Why are we attacking parents? The one remarkable thing about parents of past generations is that although they themselves were of limited education, they knew instinctively that education was the way out.
    They outsourced that responsibility, a singular outstanding decision, to teachers and the teachers responded. Those were the days before parents beat up teachers.
    Parents sent their kids to ‘lessons’, teachers offering private tuition after school and at weekends. Schools also assessed their pupils. At St Giles, the best school of its kind in the country during the 40s, 50s and 60s, people such as J.O. Morris, Atherley and others offered a kind of class-room management and tuition hardly matched today.
    If parents have the skills and knowledge to help their children with their homework, that is fine, but that is not a key parental responsibility. Good parenting is to know when help is needed and getting that help.
    Santia Bradshaw, one of the outstanding young politicians in the government, has a huge task at hand. She must not hesitate in carrying out a widespread reform of the educational system.

    Like

  • pieceuhderockyeahright

    Do you think that Andrew Pilgrim QC can get the police to retroactively review their evidence concerning the interrogation and subsequent arrest of Nazzim Blackett for 6 months this past DECEMBER 2017?

    This is the same young man they held previously.

    Just in case you forgot one of their usual Mugabe style apprehensions, this the same young man, OTHER OF THE POOR BLACK BAJANS WHO WHEN YOU POOR DE RBPF does do what dem like to you.

    DEM HAD TRY TO KILL HE in 2017

    Ironically Nazzim, who is now lock up for months to mek an example of he, was Andrew Pilgrim’s client as well

    Like

  • Jeff Cumberbatch

    Jeff must be embarrassed that this proviso in the law was activated since last year and the CJ expressed publicly that he was blissfully unaware.

    David, the proclamation would have been published in the Official Gazette. Perhaps Sir Marston missed it. The media should publish these things in the public interest however.

    Like

  • Enuff (3.35)

    Spot on. But it is very difficult to get this over to some Bajans. Same thing with accounts and other vocational courses. Because you have a degree does not mean you are a historian.

    Like

  • @pieceuhderockyeahright June 19, 2018 2:36 PM “OTHER OF THE POOR BLACK BAJANS WHO WHEN YOU POOR DE RBPF does do what dem like to you.”

    But aren’t most of the police poor and black also.

    Some people, not me, might even ask if not so poor as not to have a po’ to piss in nor a window to throw it through?

    Like

  • @David June 19, 2018 1:02 PM “Jeff must be embarrassed that this proviso in the law was activated since last year and the CJ expressed publicly that he was blissfully unaware.”

    Why should Jeff be embarrassed?

    I don’t see where Jeff has done anything wrong.

    Isn’t it the Chief Justice’s responsibility to keep himself up to date?

    Jeff must do hand holding?

    Stupseee!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Media Invitation

    Official opening – Bayview Hospital Intensive Care Unit (ICU)

    Bayview Hospital invites your media house to attend the official opening of our new Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The new two-bed ICU will support doctors to perform more complex surgeries onsite and allow for the provision of 24-hour care by an experienced intensive care doctor for any patient warded in the Bayview ICU.

    Date: Friday 29th June, 2018

    Time: 3pm

    Venue: Bayview Hospital, St. Paul’s Avenue, Beckles Road, St. Michael.

    Overview:

    The Minister of Health and Wellness, Lieutenant Colonel, the Honorable, Jeffrey D. Bostic MVO MP will deliver the feature address to attendees and officially declare the new ICU open.

    There will be a blessing of the facility by Father Paul, as well as opening remarks by Hospital Administrator Jules Reid and a vote of thanks by Assistant Hospital Administrator Major Marilyn Patrick. Guided tours of the new ICU will also be conducted for invitees.

    More information:

    Amy Goulding, PR Consultant

    +1 (246) 820 8695, +1 (246) 844 8273

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    ” At St Giles, the best school of its kind in the country during the 40s, 50s and 60s, people such as J.O. Morris, Atherley and others offered a kind of class-room management and tuition hardly matched today.”

    Obviously you have never heard about Bay Street/Bay Primary. We have the distinction of producing Sir. Garry Sobers, the greatest West Indian to date. The only one, in his chosen field, whose skills have never been surpassed.

    You are forgiven for this glaring blunder. LOL.

    Like

  • I see that angry and twisted woman Cuffy-Sargeant is now calling a complainant a ‘victim’. I am sure someone can explain to this woman that the idea of a criminal trial is to find out if the complainant is really a victim. With a distorted sense of justice, I would not be surprised to hear that she sends more people to Dodds than the other magistrates combined. What are the qualifications to be a magistrate, other than a bit of paper saying you are a lawyer?

    Like

  • “iam Skinner June 21, 2018 8:23 AM

    @ Hal
    ” At St Giles, the best school of its kind in the country during the 40s, 50s and 60s, people such as J.O. Morris, Atherley and others offered a kind of class-room management and tuition hardly matched today.”

    Obviously you have never heard about Bay Street/Bay Primary. We have the distinction of producing Sir. Garry Sobers, the greatest West Indian to date. The only one, in his chosen field, whose skills have never been surpassed.

    You are forgiven for this glaring blunder. LOL.”

    I am proud to have completed my elementary schooling at Baystreet/Bay Primary and am also proud of the achievments of Sir Garry who attended Bay Street and of the greatman personally for the way he has conducted himself throughout his life having never lost the common touch despite the accolades he has received. I am also proud of those other persons of renown who attended the school such as Mr Rose (artist and musician) and his son Erskine of Selby, Rose and Mapp fame;
    Mr Maurice Drakes Artist and tailor of distinction; Mr Hubert Brathwaithe Artist and painter of distintion,;Mr Robin Garnes of Basketball fame whose contribution to the Police Girls and Boys club is unmatched. and they are many more of distinction who would have benefited from the tutelage of Headmasters Cuffley and Lorde in my time.

    Like

  • charles skeete June 29, 2018 10:49 AM

    RE Obviously you have never heard about Bay Street/Bay Primary.
    OBVIOUSLY HE HAS NOT!
    TOO YOUNG TO HAVE MET MR CUFFLEY BUT HEARD ABOUT HIM
    S O. LORDE IN 1958 PREDICTED THAT I WOULD WIN A BARBADOS SCHOLARSHIP
    UNLIKE YOU, I COMPLETED MY PRIMARY EDUCATION AT ST LAURENCE

    Like

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