NIS Town Hall – The Golden Chip

Today is the scheduled NIS Town Hall for a concerned public to share feedback to the revelation our National Insurance Fund (NIF) needs another lifeline. In recent days the buzz is a concern the eligibility age for NIS pension will be extended to 72 years old.

The blogmaster is willing to bet Prime Minister Mottley being the political animal she is anticipated that NIS reform currently being contemplated will significantly deflate her popularity, she needs the time to implement reform and win back favour BEFORE the next general election, the perfect political gamble. Especially if she is serious about demitting office at that time. Therefore one of the reasons for an early general election call.

Follow the NIS town hall at Combermere School, Waterford at 6PM.

412 comments

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “This statement by @ David is an insult to anybody’s intelligence.”

    “Why not ask : Who were the civil servants who worked “ covertly” to assist employers with owning $56 million to the NIS.”

    they are called energy vampires, don’t fall for it….ya int see the other one came out hoping to get traction..

    Like

  • “French descents in the household, but we never knew who made that music….”

    Of course they were, Russian, Filipino, Nordic, Mayan, Aztec and more.🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • Where it is found that a politician or a member of the business community is implicated and found guilty they should be given an immediate jail sentence. No name in Barbados should be above the law.

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    YOU MUST BE SMOKING POT.

    NOT ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND PARADISE.

    NOW IF THEY WERE IN AMERICA OR IN A DEVELOPED COUNTRY YOU MAY SEE JUSTICE BUT NOT IN THE CESSPOOL OF AN ISLAND WHERE BLACK LEADERS AND THEIR WHITE CO-CONSPIRATORS CONTINUE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OTHER BLACKS TO FATTEN THEIR WALLETS AND BANK ACCOUNTS AT THE EXPENSE OF THE TAX PAYING MASSES.

    Like

  • @Pachamama August 15, 2022 12:06 PM “Maybe Gearbox could have so won as well.”

    So the late Gearbox, may he rest in peace, could have won.

    But the DLP could not win???

    Do you think that it is because they wanted to lose???

    Enlighten me please

    Like

  • @William

    Are politicians members of Clearwater Bay board?

    Or are they current and former public servants in the main.

    Do members of boards under the companies act of Barbados have a fiduciary responsibility to make prudent decisions in the interest of the company or carry out instructions from politicians as you suggest.

    Finally, why as stated in the recent auditor general report there is an attempt through the court to reverse the decision to sell the paradise property. Why was it done ‘quietly’ by those concerned?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Slaves don’t get that luxury, they only know one thing…..”it does happen everywhere.”

    wunna int got no diversity….don’t even know who ya are…..so how are ya expected to know anything or have vast knowledge of life itself…

    Cult fowl look…..SHITHOLE SQUARED…

    “NOW IF THEY WERE IN AMERICA OR IN A DEVELOPED COUNTRY YOU MAY SEE JUSTICE BUT NOT IN THE CESSPOOL OF AN ISLAND WHERE BLACK LEADERS AND THEIR WHITE CO-CONSPIRATORS CONTINUE TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OTHER BLACKS TO FATTEN THEIR WALLETS AND BANK ACCOUNTS AT THE EXPENSE OF THE TAX PAYING MASSES.”

    Like

  • @ David
    There is nothing to prove that public servants acted in a “ covert” manner. No public officer is MOF.
    You cannot twist what you said. I know what you wrote.
    Kindly identify the “ civil servants” ( public servants ) who acted covertly in this matter.
    You really ought to know better.
    Peace.

    Like

  • Stay in your bubble William, as far as you are concerned public servants are untouchable. You are incorrect. There is a reason politicians do policy and the public service execute. Until you can explain how that land was sold quietly you need to stay in your lane. A politician is not legally able to sell land.

    Like

  • @ David
    I have never said public servants are untouchable. Public servants did not decide to cost the NIS one billion dollars by making an economic policy decision.
    Here we are trying to focus on how the politicians mismanaged the NIS and we are determined to put public servants as the chief architects. That cannot hold water.
    Did public servants decide to sell the National Bank ?
    Did public servants decide to bail out CLICO?
    Did public servants decide to cut down an ackee tree for $25,000?
    Did public servants decide to construct or refurbish public beach baths for hundreds of thousands?
    Do public servants decide to pay attorneys millions of dollars for legal work that do not merit those sums?
    Please put the blame for the mammoth corruption and wastage of public funds from Greenland to Cahill where it belongs.
    Peace.

    Like

  • Bushie
    Stupse. Uninformed.

    Like

  • Did public servants decide to sell the National Bank ?
    Did public servants decide to bail out CLICO?
    Did public servants decide to cut down an ackee tree for $25,000?
    Did public servants decide to construct or refurbish public beach baths for hundreds of thousands?
    Do public servants decide to pay attorneys millions of dollars for legal work that do not merit those sums?
    Please put the blame for the mammoth corruption and wastage of public funds from Greenland to Cahill where it belongs.
    Peace.

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    YOU SHARING BLOWS AND SPEAKING TRUTH.

    Like

  • @ Enuff
    Bushie uninformed?
    That is an oxymoron Boss. Better speak for Enuff
    LOL

    Like

  • @ Baje
    I hearing the same nonsense on Brasstacks about this poor public service we have.
    We have always had a relatively fine public service. The main problem has been politicians who victimized any public servant that they thought was not supporting their party.
    One exceptional exception, was when Tom Adams entrusted Sir Harcourt Lewis a known DLP , to run the national bank.
    If we did not have an historical competent public service, the country would have gone under water by the sheer weight of corruption and political interference, ever since
    Peace..

    Like

  • William why don’t you read the most recent article by Peter Laurie? Should we run with your view or his.

    Like

  • THE BELOW SHOULD BE VIEWED BY ALL SELLOUTS OF BLACK PEOPLE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    Like

  • Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol

    “NOW IF THEY WERE IN AMERICA OR IN A DEVELOPED COUNTRY YOU MAY SEE JUSTICE”

    There have been and still are several ongoing cases and investigations against Trump, who used ultimate power of office to implement several immoral and prejudiced rulings during his tenure like a gangster crime boss. He fights charges in cases with rumours and hearsay on social media and is now said to imminently announce his 2024 election bid early as a means to protect and defend himself from FBI prosecution in recent investigation of being in possession of classified documents illegally. His Team are also prosecuted on numerous charges. USA has more power, privilege and next level corruption with more options and levers to pull in dubious shenanigans globally.

    WAR

    Music Is the Weapon

    Like

  • What a circus!

    Dullard again is correct in sidestepping this latest dog and pony show.

    Talking heads like David BU will enjoy the performances but ultimately nothing serious has been done or even suggested by the naked emperor Mugabe.

    To suggest that audited statements of the NIS will just be “rubber stamps of the internal management accounts” this downplaying their importance betrays ingorance at best, political deception at worst.

    You people are blind so let me tell you what will happen here.

    In the short term: some cosmetic band aids to project the image of serious attempts to fix the NIS.

    Mid term: implementation of some recommendations from Derek Osborne and others. These will be partially useful but lacking rigour and the nuance necessary for the Barbadian context. They will ultimately fail meaning that in a couple of decades we will be here again.

    Long term: NIS is finished as we know it largely due to government incompetence and mismanagement. It will either become means tested, with a focus on the most needy, or the barriers to payout so high as to be if little use to the average person.

    You heard it here first.

    What a bunch of jokers…

    Like

  • @Dullard – adviser to actuaries

    We are still waiting for your 3 suggestions re NIS reform.

    Like

  • @Dullard – adviser to actuaries

    We are still waiting for your 3 suggestions re NIS reform.

    ++++++
    “Suggestions” don’t come free. That is for PLT.

    Advice is expensive — just ask Mugabe and her motley crew.

    Like

  • Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol

    Ubuntu is an ancient African word meaning ‘humanity to others’. It is often described as reminding us that ‘I am what I am because of who we all are’.

    Ubuntu

    Ubuntu Dub

    problems without solutions, moaning, criticising, blaming and pointing fingers is the Bajan way

    Like

  • “@Dullard – adviser to actuaries”

    Oh, is this meant to be a subtle dig? Try harder.

    I don’t know your background but where I operate actuaries are nothing special. They may be in your world.

    Besides, how do you know that the Dullard wasn’t an FSA or FIA?

    Like

  • BAJEAugust 15, 2022 10:41 PM

    THE BELOW SHOULD BE VIEWED BY ALL SELLOUTS OF BLACK PEOPLE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Check the Zanj rebellion a thousand years earlier!!

    You will realise slave rebellions in Barbados were strictly 1X1 operations.

    Like

  • @Dullard

    Fair enough. The blogmaster will continue to read your critiques which are free.

    Like

  • @Dullard

    Was it subtle?

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…these must think that everyone they speak to on and off island is their pimps and fowls who don’t know the TRUE DEFINITION OF CORRUPTION…

    insulting people’s intelligence and NO ONE IS IMPRESSED except those they believe are too dumb to be anything else but…

    “If we did not have an historical competent public service, the country would have gone under water by the sheer weight of corruption and political interference, ever since”

    the frauds are telling ya that the corruption ya seeing and have known about for DECADES is not really corruption….if it was ” they would tell ya” so they say….

    glad they ALL REVEALED THEMSELVES finally…the weight of DECEPTION must have gotten way to heavy to carry..

    Like

  • “Suggestions” don’t come free. That is for PLT.
    Advice is expensive — just ask Mugabe and her motley crew.”

    Well said. For a few,, we have to wait and see what is their final objective. Time will tell..

    Transparency is seen as a blame game
    When the wheels are coming off the bus, then we have townhall meetings as politicians want our input so as to transfer some responsibility for their screw-up to the backs of the people.

    When there is a buck to be made they pass legislation to benefit some and hide the names of the beneficiaries. We may hear a company get a contract, but we have no idea who are the owners of the company, Our best hope of getting information is that our rats meets bigger rats and get scammed.

    Did we ever figure out who is EWSB and what they do?

    Meanwhile, some bloggers boast of public engagement and a few seconds later laments that the public does not seem to be engage. They blame civil servants and conveniently ignore the chief culprits. (crooked MPs). No man can serve two masters (fairly)..

    Like

  • Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol

    “Transparency is seen as a blame game
    When the wheels are coming off the bus, then we have townhall meetings as politicians want our input so as to transfer some responsibility for their screw-up to the backs of the people.”

    Things always seem to get twisted
    Public are stakeholders in NIS and should have their say in Government fixes
    It is better to address problems than hide and deny them

    Wait a Minute

    Like

  • @ David
    “We are still waiting for your 3 suggestions re NIS reform.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Prepare a good eulogy
    Empanel a Commission of inquiry (Chaired by the Auditor G) to prepare a report for the DPP
    Have a nice official funeral for the NIS

    As we will see much more clearly soon, there is NO guarantee of good outcomes from brassbowlery….

    Like

  • “As we will see much more clearly soon, there is NO guarantee of good outcomes from brassbowlery….”

    Why is there even any expectation of a good outcome from brassbowelry
    CYA Cover Your Ass is a due diligence technique to absolve culpability and is industry standard

    Betrayed

    Like

  • I don’t know if there are any actual NIS pensioners on this blog or just the usual collection of naysayers, curmudgeons and anti-Bajans.

    But these are this pensioner’s facts.

    I worked for 43 years and 3 months, but had 3 periods of unemployment which added up to 12 months. I have always been fit and healthy and can still do outdoor work for up to 5 hours at a time in 30C+ degree heat and nearly 100% humidity, as long as I eat a good breakfast and drink plenty of water. I am still fit and healthy, so during my working life I made ZERO sick claims on NIS or any other system.

    So how does NIS factor into my retirement income?
    NIS makes up 42% of my income
    Pension from my former employer 27%
    Rental income 20% [I inherited this, but I pay for repairs, taxes and insurance, advertising etc.]
    Pension from working over in away 10%

    I had another work pension but cashed it in years ago to get start on building a house.

    If these numbers don’t add up to 100% I rounded to the nearest dollar but wunna dun know that I int too good wid numbers.

    So do I need my NIS? Yes please.

    Can I afford a cut? NO, NO, NO.

    As a good Bajan I had the requisite number of children to replace me when I go the way of all flesh. And if I may so so myself I raised them well, sent them to school [the teachers educated them, not me, lol!] and sent them out to paid work, neither in government service as in my family we int “lucky” in getting government picks or government contracts regardless of which party is in office.

    Like

  • Good one Bush Tea at 6.47 re David’s request re

    “We are still waiting for your 3 suggestions re NIS reform.”

    I don’t see the Blogmaster asking President Mugabe or Ian Carrington or William Layne or mock prof Avi Persuade for ” 3 suggestions re NIS reform”

    Smh

    Like

  • “Off message. Check out the music from this product of the plantation system from Martinique. I enjoy classical music, yet I have never heard of this guy.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    I’m also a lover of classical music and I’ve heard about ‘Chevalier de Saint-Georges.’
    He was born in Guadeloupe…… not Martinique.

    I mentioned him in a contribution to the “2020 US PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION” blog, in response to a regular contributor who criticised Dr. GP and I for discussing classical music, which he described as ‘white people music.’

    Artax November 6, 2020 11:08 AM

    “I WAS NOT AWARE OF THE SEVERAL COMPOSERS YOU CITED OR THAT THERE WERE OTHER COMPOSERS CLASSIFIED AS BAROQUE PERIOD.”

    Dr. GP

    That was a list of my favourite composers and not all of them were from the Baroque period. There are other composers, such as JOSEPH BOLOGNE (Chevalier de Saint-Georges or Knight of St. George), Blind Tom Wiggins and William Mercer (Marion) Cook, whose music are not as popular as the others mentioned, but they are worth listening to and you’ll be surprised to know who they were.

    Like

  • @Dullard

    Isn’t the objective to counter what the persons you named are doing?

    Keep up Mr.Advisor!

    Like

  • Reply to report coming

    GOVERNMENT WILL BE laying a response to the Auditor General’s damning report in Parliament either today or tomorrow.
    This was made clear by Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley during a press conference at Ilaro court yesterday evening.
    Responding to public demands that Government speak on the report, Mottley reminded that Ryan Straughn, Minister in the Ministry of Finance, had indicated Government would speak on the matter.
    She said the necessary research on the various issues highlighted in the report had to be undertaken.
    “Minister Ryan Straughn told the country that the Government would be responding to that report and, clearly, if you are going to respond to a report that is substantive like that, you can’t do so from the top of your head,” she said, pointing out that the Director of Finance, who was the person to respond, was on leave.
    However, the Prime Minister added: “Suffice it to say he has been able to garner all the responses from the various departments and with a covering letter. I would anticipate that that letter and those
    responses would go down to be laid digitally in Parliament sometime between tomorrow and Wednesday.”
    In his report, Auditor General Leigh Trotman pointed to a number of deficiencies in financial accounting management, the lack of proper internal controls at many state entities, and the need for greater accountability on the part of public sector officers charged with managing public funds.
    He expressed concern that Government ministries and departments were being delinquent in providing timely financial information to his office and wanted “credible sanctions” introduced to improve the situation.
    Trotman also revealed that Government had been paying millions of dollars in pension to some of its former workers even though they were dead – some for more than ten years.
    The Prime Minister said the deficiencies in the report were not because of “corruption”.
    “I want to also reinforce in people’s minds and to give the public and the wider public outside of Barbados who may feel that we are doing things that are the subject to corruption or improperly, that that is not the case,” she said.
    Mottley laid part of the blame on Government’s accrual system of accounting, arguing that the transition from cash-based to accrual had never really been made.
    “That has been at the source of a lot of the difficulties that you see and a lot of commentary that you also see in the Auditor General’s Report. Is that the only thing that is wrong?
    No, it isn’t, but that is responsible for the large problems that we have.”
    In terms of the much talked about National Insurance Scheme, the Prime Minister also urged Barbadians to attend the town hall meetings which started last night and make suggestions on the way forward with the scheme.
    Meanwhile, when asked about the noticeable reductions in press conferences relating to the COVID-19 pandemic, Mottley said she no longer felt that giving updates on a regular basis was necessary.
    “I am not so sure that there is any merit in a daily update anymore on COVID when the whole world has gone beyond that,” she said. (MB)


    Source: Nation

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    *glad they ALL REVEALED THEMSELVES finally…the weight of DECEPTION must have gotten way TOO heavy to carry..

    Like

  • @Dullard
    Isn’t the objective to counter what the persons you named are doing?
    Keep up Mr.Advisor!

    +++++
    No! Not at all.

    The objective is for you to fly kites and run interference on behalf of your paymasters.

    Like

  • @Dullard

    The blogmaster has been accused of worse so you are not in the worst company it must be said.

    Like

  • @ Dullard
    Take it easy.
    David has always been a provocateur extraordinaire.
    If he wanted to ‘run interference for Mugabe’ he needed only shut down the blog….

    …Unless of course you are suggesting that BU has been highjacked by nefarious forces, and that a new ‘David’ has been installed in order to subtly steer the Blog in the direction of GIS and the other HOARDS of associated BLP Propaganda organs, to hail the supreme leader and her minions such as Enuff and Lorenzo….

    However, when that recent mysterious one-week BU ‘lull’ is explained to the bushman’s satisfaction, any such theories being held by you and others, will be summarily dismissed by the bushman… LOL

    Like

  • Trotman also revealed that Government had been paying millions of dollars in pension to some of its former workers even though they were dead – some for more than ten years
    ++++++++
    What am I missing? I thought it was SOP that
    1) when people die that their National ID cards were turned over to the funeral homes for onward transmission to the Govt so their benefits can be terminated.
    2) Were the pension cheques mailed or were they paid as direct deposits? If they were mailed who is cashing the cheques? If they were direct deposits (and this is a big if) and the banks was notified that the beneficiary is deceased, why did they not return the payments?
    3) Doesn’t the Gov’t routinely send out notices to recipients of pensions requesting confirmation that the individual is still above ground?

    There are gross inefficiencies in a system where pension is still being paid after a person has been dead for ten years.

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    The NIS needs to be a little more efficient. The CEO of NIS explained that cheques are mailed in advance therefore there is the possibility of a dead person receiving a cheque in the short term. The bigger problem seems to be syncing information between relevant government departments about recent deaths. Seems manual, nothing that a easy process of exchanging an electronic file between the departments shouldn’t fix but how long will it take to do so is the question.

    Like

  • @Sargeant August 16, 2022 8:55 AM “1) when people die that their National ID cards were turned over to the funeral homes for onward transmission to the Govt so their benefits can be terminated.”

    Ooops!! Looks like I may have broken the law. I still have the ID cards for both of my dead parents. But I did take the death certificates to NIS and NIS terminated the pensions. Paid the undertaker (a cousin) cash before he interred the parents. The way I look at it if the parents raised nearly a dozen of us there was no point making the undertaker wait for his money, so I advised [ordered really, lol!] siblings to “walk” wid ya money when ya show up to the funerals so the undertaker was paid in full the day BEFORE the funerals.

    Like

  • @David August 16, 2022 9:01 AM “Seems manual, nothing that a easy process of exchanging an electronic file between the departments shouldn’t fix.”

    Dear David: Barbados does not have a population of billions. In our small population about 10 people die everyday, Ten David. 10. How difficult can it be for the most junior clerk to go to the Registry every Monday morning and pull the 70 death certificates, which nowadays include the national ID number and include that information in the NIS system? I have training and years of experience in records management. A competent clerk can do this work in about 4 hours each week. I could even volunteer to do it for the government FREE.

    Coming soon some smart man [ALWAYS a MAN] selling the government a “sophisticated” computerized system, likely designed for a population the size on India’s to do the work that a competent clerk can do manually in half a day.

    Why do we like to make easy things difficult?

    Lord come fah ya world!!!

    Like

  • What about other public and private agencies that would find the information useful if it is automatically generated from source and made available? Think big.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I take it only few people are dumb enuff to offer suggestions so that CROOKS can keep a slave society intact to benefit them and their CRIMINAL PARTNERS…

    Like

  • David oftentimes “Small Is Beautiful” AND efficient.

    Like

  • Capture those not paying!

    by TRE GREAVES tregreaves@nationnews.com

    TARGET THE HANDYMEN, VENDORS, attorneys and doctors who currently do not contribute to the National Insurance Scheme (NIS).
    And while you’re at it, do more to ensure Government officials cannot use the fund at their will.
    Those were some of the recommendations put forward by actuary Derek Osborne and the public during a robust town hall meeting last night at Combermere School’s Major Moot Hall, in Waterford, St Michael.
    NIS chairman Leslie Haynes, his deputy Rawdon Adams and director Kim Tudor were also present.
    During his presentation, Osborne stressed that the NIS was unsustainable because it was still designed as when it began over 55 years ago.
    He suggested therefore that a larger economy and better governance were some of the ways to prevent a collapse.
    “We have to find a balance between the adequacy of benefits, the affordability of contributions and long term sustainability. We want a bigger economy; whether that is due to migration, a higher birth rate, higher productivity or employees working smarter, more investment from the diaspora, or foreign investment “However, we have to find a way to catch vendors, plumbers, carpenters, lawyers, doctors, whoever they are that are working on an informal basis, to pay contributions and contribute to the state in general,” Osborne said.
    He also suggested that pensions of those not yet in the system could be reduced and that the pensionable ages could be increased.
    “We can look at the new pensions people get and reduce that slightly so that going forward you can reduce long term costs.
    “Currently 60 is the earliest age to receive a reduced pension, 67 is the age for full pension. We could move from 60 to 62 or 65, or move from 67 to 68, 69 or 70. All of these are options. However, nothing is off the table and everything is up for discussion,” he said.
    His comments came after Government announced last week that if changes were not made, the $4 billion fund would be in jeopardy by 2034.
    Several members of the public present last night voiced their concerns.
    Sandra Squires said more should be done about non-contributors.
    “I don’t think we are aggressive enough in going after persons who should be paying. That is an area we should be paying more attention to,” she said.
    One woman who did not identify herself chastised governments’ use of the fund over the years and called for more accountability.
    “We didn’t tell you to dip and no one asked, but now we are here and you are asking us for solutions to a problem you guys created.
    “We are law-abiding citizens who sat and contributed faithfully to a scheme thinking that when we get 65 and then 67, we were assured a pension. It’s not fair,” she lamented.
    “So the first thing you need to do is stop governments from dipping into our money,” she said as the audience applauded.
    In response, Osborne said the policy was already in place but agreed that NIS board members may have to be strong-willed
    to prevent excessive usage of the funds.
    Weakness
    He said: “For the last ten to 15 years, they’ve exceeded the maximum limit in the investment policy, which means that even though the policy existed, boards still allowed further investments to be made in the Government and that is where I think the weakness lies.
    “So if a board is resolute that we are not investing anymore in the Government, a phone call can’t change that unless there is a directive from the minister in writing . . . . So hopefully board members of the future can be strong enough to say, ‘The agreement policy we have in writing and we are not going to change from this policy and say no to investments, whether public or private, does not meet the investment policy,” he added.
    Haynes said the current board was solid and workers were vigorously represented. He added it was made up of representatives from the National Union of Public Workers, Barbados Workers’ Union, Barbados Employers’ Confederation and the Barbados Hotel and Tourism Association as stipulated by law.
    He also pointed out that funds were used for public goods.
    Audience member Cassandra Bowen said a holistic approach was needed to address the issues facing the country.
    She, however, questioned why the public was unable to see audited financial statements.
    “I have a concern that money was borrowed from the NIS and not paid back and I feel that somebody should be held responsible for that. Plus, if we have all of these top people inside here and we cannot get audited reports on a regular basis, then somebody should get fired,” Bowen said.
    In response, Adams said they were aiming to settle accounts from 2012-2017 by the end of this year.
    Similarly, Tudor offered an apology and said they were working with the Auditor General to rectify the issue.
    “Each fund has its own income statement and balance sheet. We take our responsibility for managing those funds very seriously and on my desk are July 31, 2022 financial statements.
    “The Auditor General is working with us to implement a framework that will satisfy internationally accepted accounting standards and provide a supported schedule that can be validated. These financial statements are prepared. The smaller funds have been audited up to 2015-16, so don’t feel that we don’t do statements. They are done and prepared. We will apologise because you haven’t had sight of them because they aren’t public documents but rest assured, they are there,” she said.

    Source: Nation

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  • Dear David:

    Before we spend millions or tens of millions buying a “system” designed for populations of millions or billions can you please name the “other public and private agencies that would find the information useful”

    Thanks very much.

    David I know more about records management than you do. It is half a day’s work.

    Honestly.

    Like

  • In two hours I could teach the grans who just did the 11+ how to do it.

    It int. hard.

    Why do we always like to make easy things difficult?

    Like

  • Thinking BIG is about the possibilities to improve efficiency and business facilitation in the country by feeding a central database with information. Hope this helps.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Some are way too comfortable, accepting of and wallowing in never ending corruption

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Blame the vendors and others for a 56 MILLION NIS DEFICIT….and that does not include the BILLIONS GONE..

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David and @William there is definitely comedic cynicism in the progression (illogic really) in describing: 1) “If we did not have an historical competent public service, the country would have gone under water by the sheer weight of corruption and political interference, ever since” … and then in the same breath also asserting (2) “The bigger problem seems to be syncing information between relevant government departments about recent deaths…nothing that a easy process of exchanging an electronic file between the departments shouldn’t fix but how long will it take to do so is the question

    That’s quite ‘risible’, as the former Dean would say!

    Quite clearly both of you are right in some measure but by your own words also wrong about our Public Service competencies being ‘dulled’ by political corrupters … so on balance the scale shows nothing up, nothing down!

    After all this time in lil Bim the matter of cleaning up the death records to ensure accurate voting data and the equally important NIS data base is couched in terms of “how long will it take to be done” and we are really debating competency or lack thereof of our govt departments or how literate we are or what are our lettered qualifications!

    Alright den … onwards and upwards to NIS Town Hall meetings … nuff sterling competencies should be forthcoming AND MOST importantly they will be competently implemented in a TIMELY efficient manner.

    Reminds me of the equally sterling Sir Henry Constitution Review Commission meetings … somerhing about timely implementation of awesome recommendations comes to mind … but heh … we sure were real competent and quite smart, tho!

    We too sweet … 😎🤦🏾‍♂️🙏🏿

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I see they have to resort to putting a survey out there…..but no one in their right minds would pay any attention to IT OR THEM……FRAUDS and their fraudulent supporters..

    Like

  • @David August 16, 2022 9:59 AM ‘Thinking BIG is about the possibilities to improve efficiency and business facilitation in the country by feeding a central database with information. Hope this helps.”

    NOPE

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    A good conversation to be had with the PS of some of these government departments?

    Like

  • “Sandra Squires said more should be done about non-contributors.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    @David

    Interesting comments.

    Is there is a law requiring Barbadians to
    contribute to the NIS?
    If not, then, those persons who choose not to pay NI wouldn’t receive pension.

    But, what upsets me is the fact that we’ve had people who never contributed to the scheme, yet, they receive a non-contributory pension which is financed by a 2% deduction from an employed person’s salary/wages and 2% contribution by employers.

    Both employers and employees contribute 0.50% to a ‘training levy.’
    Why?????
    What is the purpose of this levy and how is it utilized?

    Like

  • No surprise Simple Simon, we know there is a steely resolve to hold positions.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    pay in more and we will TIEF LESS…good plan….nothwithstanding the BILLIONS MISSING ALREADY,,,

    Like

  • @Artax

    You know the purpose of non contributory pension. From what is being said it is a relatively small amount with most of it funded by central government?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Did anyone bother to explain where the multi-millions scammed to build the apes hill clubhouse and pool that the new owners dug up……that no longer EXISTS…….gone to….multimillions of NIS pensioners money down the drain…..

    did anyone bother to ask…..

    another write off….

    Like

  • Some MAD soundbites in a Bajan Stylee
    (also known as a BU ‘Holding Letter’)
    (you can type any old shit in a comment box)
    (also known as “Mental Health Issues Tissues”

    “Government is ‘managing expectations'”
    “‘they’ rob and gone with all the money”
    “problem reaction solution paradigm”
    “new world order conspiracy theory”
    “working as a slave until ‘they’ push you to grave”

    Global Warning

    Like

  • Listening to Brasstacks right now.

    A real real Bajan lady made a good contribution to the program.

    Like

  • Given the known (suspected?) state of the NIS, why would the self employed see any benefit in contributing?
    The challenge here is much wider than the NIS. The nation of Barbados has consistently (past decade) SPENT considerably more than it COLLECTS. This is why the controllers of GoB went dipping into social security monies to fund Central Government. (Unadvisedly or not)
    And when those cupboards were empty, they withheld NIS contributions deducted from their employees. (Monies replaced with a Series J Bond)
    The island has an EXPENSE challenge.
    Today, they continue to ‘print money’ to get the money to run the island (as is)
    The ultimate solution is bankruptcy?
    I will suggest several of these issues which have become ‘suddenly current’ (but have been festering for a while) are related to the imminent IMF decision.
    Despite the pleasantries between the IMF and GoB, they ARE issues. And they haven’t ‘gone away’.
    And despite all the talk about “more people”, they are costs associated with this. Where is the revenue coming from? Or are all these ‘new citizens’ bringing buckets of money to spend in their new home.
    Nobody said governing was easy.

    Like

  • @NO

    If self employed people do not see the sense to contribute the state will have to pick up the tab later anyway via welfare department?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Given the known (suspected?) state of the NIS, why would the self employed see any benefit in contributing?
    The challenge here is much wider than the NIS.”

    indeed, have a young relative as a self-employed wondering what the hell is going on and don’t want to contribute tens of thousands only to hear later…..there is a replay….and then left in the cold..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    What i don’t understand is why no one wants to ANSWER the HARD QUESTIONS….and seem only interested in GLOSSING OVER REALITY….to reel in the gullible and weak..

    trying to PRETEND that the THEFT of PENSIONER’S MONEY….just like the THEFT OF VAT…….DID NOT HAPPEN.

    Like

  • Bushie
    You know I’m good, damn good. You need the Mottley reference to invalidate me. Others the million dollar errand boy. Up to now wunna can’t win a ting. Everyday like stuck records.

    Like

  • @ DPD
    Are you suggesting that a screw up with pensions being paid to dead people is enough reason to deny that we have had an historical competent public service.
    Do you know the number of promises made to restructure or reform the public service that did not see the light of day?
    Do you know the failure to computerize and bring modern technology , as a priority, into the public service was an act of gross incompetence by both administrations?
    Are you unaware that most high ranking public servants on retirement are swallowed up by the private sector.?
    Do you not understand that the professional lives of public servants are almost at the mercy of egotistical, don’t know a damn thing politicians.
    I stand by my word. Many here apparently only started to examine the public service recently and decided to blame them for every mess up made by their political masters.
    I am not saying that there all public servants are competent but to beat up the service to protect political leaders is pure ignorance.
    Please tell me the name (s)of the public servant responsible for Greenland; Cahill and refinancing / restructuring the national debt , that cost the NIS to lose one billion dollars just so.
    Peace.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…you will be going around and around while smoke and mirrors are thrown up to distract you…….good news….they no longer work..

    the people have to UNDERSTAND THE POWER THEY NOW HAVE IN THEIR HANDS….or they will be ROBBED and trapped in bondage, oppressed, suppressed and every lowlife minority these could find would walk all over them…they have to choose..

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @WS
    The issue with ‘senior’ public employees is largely restricted to CBL.
    And appreciate had it not been for ICIJ dump of CAIPO records, it would not be public knowledge THEY were the sole directors of CBL.
    The circumstances around their nomination and tenure is not known. However, while the announcement of CBL (Act?) was laid in the House, not one RH since.
    Subsequently, without official facts at any point in it’s life thereafter, we now get mixed messages.
    The one which seems totally accurate, is the taxpayers of Barbados are currently out of pocket BDD$124M +++. Nobody is denying this.
    And subsequently some feel betrayed by these employees, who as Directors,
    “Under the fiduciary duty of loyalty, directors and officers are to act impartially and place the interests of the corporation first”, there is no public information this occured. Not that it did not occur, but nothing is publicly available.

    Liked by 2 people

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I must have torn out a WHOLE NERVE…

    Northern…..these are very cheeky…and their supporters, there are no words to describe them…..mysterious why they keep overreaching, no one with commonsense will entertain them or their backward trajectory..

    Like

  • @NO

    There many examples where public officers do crap. The blogmaster can cite the educational system and decisions to transfer teachers and principals in the system who committed egregious acts.
    If William continues with his head in the sand the blogmaster a willing to resurrect blogs sleeping in the BU Archives.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    No @William I am NOT suggesting “that a screw up with pensions being paid to dead people is enough reason to deny that we have had an historical competent public service”.

    I am bluntly saying that the act of cross referencing deaths with NIS disbursements is one of the minimalist and most basic aspects of data base management … thus this NOT a recent “screw up” brother Skinner but fundamental, incompetent indifference.

    You can blame the political masters surely but to absolve professional, expert technocrats is not rational!

    Obviously our Public Service has performed well over the years but realistically THEY have also screwed up … often under the misguided belief that they are achieving desired “good” results for their political masters or otherwise … Thus I am NOT as sanguine as you are in dropping all the weight on one side of the scale.

    Re your substantive notes:
    “Do you know the failure to computerize and bring modern technology.”

    Sorry bro, but that’s a red herring. I recall visiting the old Data Processing office in Fairchild street and learing first hand about the I-O bytes and bits punch card tech … YEP, that long ago … JUST before the advent of the integrated chip mainframe technology and the related PC seismic shift.

    Thus, I know how IBM (under CEO Castilho) and BBM (under owner/CEO Barnes, if memory serves well) were at the forefront in sales pitches to update the govt departments with the new tech!

    Yes we can assert that systems were likely implemented with “gross incompetence [corruption] by both administrations” but THAT does NOT mean that simply operational processes should be so deficient today.

    Thus for us to be debating in 2022 the proper use of basic database development tools/data management across depts. is RIDICULOUS…

    “Are you unaware that most high ranking public servants on retirement are swallowed up by the private sector.?”

    Yep, happens all the time … they are skilled in how to manage the systems and they then go over at excellent wages and help the corporate chieftains to best benefit from said systems.

    “Do you not understand that the professional lives of public servants are almost at the mercy of egotistical, don’t know a damn thing politicians”

    And absolutely yes again … but does that mean that cross checking deaths to avoid erroneous disbursements is being mercilessly mandated from on high!

    I GET your point brother … but I am simply saying that these are basic elements of the professionals’ work and such failures REFLECT badly on THEM (their incompetence or fraud), not their political masters!

    I gone.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Thought we were discussing all the MISSING ……and unaccounted for MONEY….from the Auditor General’s report…so yall saying it’s the civil servants responsible…

    they better come forward and clear their names if they are not guilty….wait…they can’t talk under the official secrets act..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William….what did i tell you only hours ago..

    Like

  • @ WARU
    Apparently the NIS losing one billion just so is of no concern. Employers refusing to honor $56 million is of no concern.
    We are just looking to give the corrupt political class, the green light to do whatever it pleases.
    No surprises here at all. Business as usual.
    The Duopoly rules supreme.
    Peace

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “We are just looking to give the corrupt political class, the green light to do whatever it pleases.”

    once they do it to THEM ONLY….and don’t believe they can pull their next scam on everyone else….weeee have no problem at all with that..

    everyone, except for those who could actually SEE are dancing all around the subject of the MISSING MONEY…and apparently expect everyone to just FALL IN LINE….wonder who led them to believe they had that much power.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    So are the World Food Program trucks on the island…asking for a friend…….just saw some photos..

    Like

  • “…… and such failures REFLECT badly on THEM (their incompetence or fraud), not their political masters!”

    @ dpD

    Employees have been fired from the NI Department after it was discovered they used ‘creative methods’ to facilitate the payment to themselves, of deceased people’s pensions.

    Who is responsible for granting ‘unapproved duty free concessions’ to their relatives and friends, who either pass through the airport with luggage or import goods through the seaport?

    …… or, the reported theft of over $850,000 from the NIS……
    …… the theft of over $1M from the Psychiatric Hospital……
    …… thousands of dollars stolen as a result of dead people being included on the QEH payroll……
    …… the unreported theft of approximately $800,000 from Inland Revenue……

    …… officers from the BRA filing income and corporation tax returns for relatives, friends and other persons to prevent them from paying income and corporation taxes?

    All of which, although just a few examples, if calculated in their totality…… over an extended period of time, would clearly indicate a significant LOSS of government revenue as well.

    This is not an attempt to “beat up on the service to protect political leaders,” but, the reality is, whether or not we want to admit it, corruption in ‘government’ is perpetrated by BOTH public sector employees and politicians.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    First time in over 100 YEARS years, post emancipation, the PEOPLE FINALLY HAVE THE UPPER HAND…they better make very good use of the opportunity….

    Like

  • This is not an attempt to “beat up on the service to protect political leaders,” but, the reality is, whether or not we want to admit it, corruption in ‘government’ is perpetrated by BOTH public sector employees and politicians.

    “Xxxxxxx

    1000 PERCENT

    Like

  • Come on, let’s be realistic.

    A politician does not have access to the bank accounts of any department, statutory or quasi government organization falling under his/her portfolio.
    Nor, do they complete or sign expenditure vouchers, approve payments or sign payable orders and cheques.

    You cannot, in all seriousness, blame a politician for the discrepancies in VAT receipts or missing funds from government departments the Auditor General mentioned in his reports.

    A politician could order the Chairman of a statutory corporation, for example, to direct the Board of directors to approve a tender submitted by one of his mates….. and receive a ‘draw back’ for his efforts.
    I’m sure BU remembers when Michael Lashley and Denis Lowe were Ministers of Transport and Environment respectively…… Transport Board buses and SSA trucks were being sent to Trans-Tech Inc. for repairs.
    And, the owner of Trans-Tech subsequently admitted the SUV’s driven by both gentlemen, where registered under his business.

    We’ve also heard of a particular insurance company that was given the contract to insure TB buses, at a time when government vehicles were insured by the then state owned ICB.
    The company had full sized advertisement on the TB’s 2004 Mercedes-Benz Marcopolo Torino omnibus, BM124.

    There are also cases where the approval to provide goods and services was granted to businesses that were actually owned by politicians, but using a ‘front man.’

    I can’t remember if it was ever mentioned in any of his reports, but, some time during the late 1980s, the Auditor General complained about a statutory corporation outsourcing its accounting duties to a private firm named Brian Griffith & Company, which was also contracted to conduct audits for a number years…… at $50,000 per year.

    Like

  • Who signed off on the contract with Hadley Byer to faulty supply water metres? Was it a politician or public servant. The blogmaster rest, those who have eyes will see.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Bushman…how yuh quiet so…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    So if the public servants running things without oversight…

    .wuh yuh need politicians for….

    Like

  • If a Minister is responsible for directing government policy and making decisions relative to national issues and presenting bills and proposed laws from departments and statutory corporations falling under their portfolio, for example……

    …… then, commonsense would indicate they are NOT RESPONSIBLE for micromanagement of public sector employees, especially if it is taken into consideration that each Ministry has a Permanent Secretary, while each department has a ‘Chief’ or Head of Department (e.g Chief Welfare Officer, Chief Environmental Officer, Chief Librarian etc)……

    …… and SOE’s are either managed by a Director (CBC, NAB, NCC, UDC and RDC); or CEO (Enterprise Growth Fund, Transport Board, NCF).

    Payments for goods, services, personal emoluments, travel etc, are approved by the Departments’ Accountant and funds disbursed by the Treasury.

    Payments are approved and disbursed by the SOE’s Accounting Sections.

    Like

  • William Skinner August 16, 2022 3:43 PM #: “Apparently the NIS losing one billion just so is of no concern. Employers refusing to honor $56 million is of no concern.”

    Mr. Skinner

    Any reasonable Barbadian would be concerned about “employers refusing to honour $56M.”

    NIS should confiscate and auction the properties of those business owners who are indebted to the fund.

    But, who are responsible for allowing the payments to accumulate, especially when NI Department has a Compliance Section?

    We’ve had situations in Barbados where the rents at some NHC units were $75 per week and some tenants who were gainfully employed, had accumulated over $8,000 in rent arrears.

    Could you imagine the rent for stalls in Golden Square Market was only FIFTY (50) DOLLARS per month…… and some vendors accumulated as much as $7,000 in arrears?

    People are indebted to the Students’ Revolving Loan Fund, because they benefited from loans they have refused to repay.

    Those same people would make an effort to pay Consolidated Finance or Simpson Finance for their vehicles…… or make alternative payment arrangements if their accounts fall into arrears, simply because those institutions have aggressive collection and repossession policies.

    Like

  • Apparently the politicians know nothing ; see nothing and do nothing and are responsible for nothing.
    Here we are discussing the wreckage of the NIS and suddenly we are zeroing on corrupt public servants .
    Who wrecked the NIS ?
    Who with a stroke of a pen cost the NIS to lose one billion dollars just so?
    Those public servants who engage in corruption and who are caught , end up before the courts; or even get fired.
    Nobody ever argued that all public servants were honest . Of course there are corrupt public servants .
    All I have stated is the fact that we have had an historically competent public service.
    These red herrings designed to deflect from the activities of mismanagement by elected politicians are laughable.
    Every time our political masters wreck anything with their poor and visionless leadership, we come here with one objective : protect them at all costs ; hold our noses and try to convince ourselves that the stench is coming from elsewhere.
    The question remains:
    Who wrecked the NIS ?
    Who cost the NIS one billion ?
    Peace

    Like

  • @Artax

    If you followed the town hall last night you heard an admission by CEO Kim Tudor they want to get the NIS Inspectorate functioning again like back in the day.

    Like

  • William you are so one dimensional and blinkered it is not funny. What if some of these PSs grew balls, many of the transgressions by the political class would see the light of day. In any system there must be checks and balances. There is a reason the public service in our setup is designed in theory to be independent of the executive. If we have the tail wagging the dog what are we to do?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    All government departments should have OVERSIGHT…..

    it’s a NOBRAINER…

    is that not what the Auditor General keeps ASKING FOR… and the SAME POLITICIANS IGNORE HIM..

    so if they can’t implement that function for the people……what do yall need them for…it’s seems only the weak need them to tell lies and talk shite so they can admire it…

    Like

  • @ David
    Stick to the script and not the “ what ifs”. Now you are asking the top civil servants to be police. Really.
    Let the Governor of the Central Bank tell any Finance Minister, he’s not following government policy and see what happens.
    Imagine a public servant calling in the police to arrest or charge a politician with corruption.
    You need to get through your head that the guards are guarding themselves.
    The main person to get rid or bring corruption exposure might be the PM in our system.
    Imagine you. want the PS to be an enforcer.
    Peace.

    Like

  • @ Mr. Skinner

    You are being VERY DISINGENUOUS.

    EVERYONE who has been discussing the plight of the NIS over the past few years, from John A, NorthernObserver to Bush Tea, has ACKNOWLEDGED the FACT that SUCCESSIVE BLP and DLP administrations “wrecked the NIS,” and the current administration’s debt restructuring “cost the fund one billion dollars.”

    WHO in this forum has DENIED those facts?

    Also, you have been consistently and conveniently giving the impression that many of the financial improprieties outlined in the Auditor General’s Reports are the fault of politicians.
    Hence, contributors have responded accordingly.

    @ David

    As I have mentioned on several previous occasions, it seems as though certain contributors developed a set of ‘rules and guidelines’ to criticise politicians, which they believe everyone must adhere to, otherwise they’re accused of protecting and defending politicians.

    All one has to do is share ideological and philosophical similarities…… repeat the same shiite every day with monotonous regularity…… and you’ll automatically become a member of the ‘club.’

    I prefer to ‘call things as I see them.’

    I’m not here to ‘sing in the choirs’ of certain individuals, while being deceitful in remaining silent anytime they attempt to mislead BU……

    …… or, immediately come out to admonish and condemn non choir members for engaging in similar practices.

    What I also find interesting is the fact that some people often criticise what they refer to as the ‘duopoly,’ yet, their criticisms are always concentrated in the direction of a particular political party and its supporters.

    The level of deceitfulness exhibited by some persons in this forum is simply amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @William,I wouldn’t say you are being one dimensional as your bud the Blogmaster opined but you surely can be blinkered tho 🤣.

    We ALL agree that the politicians run tings and thus they absolutely effect greater ‘divestment’ of corruption 😎 but we also must accept that our society is unfortunately extensively corrupt … thus WE also have our hands in the till.

    I am making no grand pronouncement beyond what has been said here many times: corrupt politicians come from amongst US, they are not from Mars or Jupiter. We are inherently as honest and dishonest as they are.

    So yes you can have your duopoly narrative to your heart’s content but until people from Saturn start to vote in Barbados I am at a lost to understand why your view that the political class are THE culprits is more viable than the fundamental issue that we are all COMPLICIT in this malaise!

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Anyone got any ideas WHERE DE BILLION DOLLARS GONE..how come no one at NIS can account for it……………..and that does not even take into account all the rest of money still missing…..which am sure is much more than what’s being said…

    William…I don’t know of anyone on BU responsible for those THEFTS….unless others know something we don’t…

    Like

  • ….the fundamental issue that we are all COMPLICIT in this malaise!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    You can say that again Dribbles.

    In fact, Bushie posits that one of the reasons that ordinary Bajans literally worship politicians, is that most of us ENVY the opportunity that this presents to ‘thief some BIG money’.

    Do you know that plenty Bajans actually SCORN any politician that allowed HONESTY to get in the way of his or her ‘political opportunities’?

    The WHOLE damn society is lost….
    Those crooks in Parliament REPRESENT us …in more ways that one….

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Let the Governor of the Central Bank tell any Finance Minister, he’s not following government policy and see what happens.
    Imagine a public servant calling in the police to arrest or charge a politician with corruption.”

    Hmmmmm…… interesting.

    Some time ago, I mentioned that the Director of a SOE where I worked, on orders from the Board of Directors, instructed me to deposit the funds remaining from the previous financial year, to the Consolidated Fund.

    I complied with the instructions.

    Caswell Franklyn ‘said’ I didn’t know what I was doing…… subsequently supported by Bush Tea and de pedantic Dribbler.

    Similarly, what would’ve happened to me if I had told the Director, Board and Minister they weren’t following accepted policy…… and refused to proceed as instructed?

    Like

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