NIS Town Hall – The Golden Chip

Today is the scheduled NIS Town Hall for a concerned public to share feedback to the revelation our National Insurance Fund (NIF) needs another lifeline. In recent days the buzz is a concern the eligibility age for NIS pension will be extended to 72 years old.

The blogmaster is willing to bet Prime Minister Mottley being the political animal she is anticipated that NIS reform currently being contemplated will significantly deflate her popularity, she needs the time to implement reform and win back favour BEFORE the next general election, the perfect political gamble. Especially if she is serious about demitting office at that time. Therefore one of the reasons for an early general election call.

Follow the NIS town hall at Combermere School, Waterford at 6PM.

412 comments

  • @ Artax
    “…what would’ve happened to me if I had told the Director, Board and Minister they weren’t following accepted policy…… and refused to proceed as instructed?”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    We would have hailed you as a Bajan GIANT of the ilk of Emtage and Lionel Moe, and all like now so, your donkey would be in Parliament making wrong things right yuh we…..LOL

    Instead you set the tone for the Radical PS…..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “is that most of us ENVY the opportunity that this presents to ‘thief some BIG money’.”

    i have heard some of the dimmest people tell ya, if ya wanted to get rich ya shoulda been a politician….so stop complaining.

    ….it could never compute in the minds of the dimmest that said politicians are getting rich from TIEFING FROM THEM and their children..

    but that’s the blighted plight of pimps and fowls….they never fail to amaze…

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler August 16, 2022 6:47 PM

    Despite who agrees, disagrees or PURPOSELY INTERPRETS my opinion as PROTECTING POLITICIANS……

    …… corruption in government is PERPETRATED by BOTH public sector employees and politicians.

    Let me give you an example of corruption perpetrated by BOTH.

    We’re all AWARE that politicians have for years been facilitating the issuing of PSV permits (ZR, taxi, tour buses, mini buses), to CERTAIN INDIVIDUALS.

    Some of those same PSV owners or their operators do not have to:

    … file income tax returns and apply for tax clearance certificates so as to process the renewal of their permits, because somebody in the BRA gine ‘sort dem out’ for a ‘small fee.,’

    …queue in longs lines to have their vehicles inspected, because duh got uh fellow at MTW dat gine get de inspection certificate ‘sort out’ for a ‘small fee.’

    … go to Court when the ZR or mini bus driver was reported by the police for speeding, going off route, off loading and picking up passengers at an area other than a bus stop or and carrying excess passengers….. because he got a ‘police friend’ who, for a ‘small fee,’ gine mek sure he ‘get sort out.’

    This is the REALITY in Barbados.

    Like

  • Artax as usual you are 1000% correct this clique on here comprising Waru, Skinner, Bush Tea and Pacha main aim on here is in my view to pull down this elected government at all cost.This is as clear as day.Mr Skinner likes dropping a lot of childish remarks amytime his agenda is exposed.No wonder with his knowall personality he received less than 100 votes in his only failed attempt to wow voters back in the day.Today he is an expert in all things, poor fella.Stick to impressing Waru and the rest of your clique you will be a lot more sucessful
    I gone.

    Like

  • @ Artax

    While no one can seriously deny all the acts of malfeasance you have mentioned, you are missing one salient point ; these acts are often surreptitiously encouraged by the same politicians , who should be the guardians of the public trust .
    Therefore we have a culture of political corruption that is pervasive and its tentacles touch almost everything in this country.
    In other words , it is a known fact that one phone call from a politician can stop a civil servant or police from executing their duties.
    My position as stated earlier remains: if we did not have an historically competent public service the country would have gone under water every since by the weight of political corruption.
    In other words while we may choose to highlight the dishonesty of some public servants, we should pause and ask ourselves if there were not some very competent ones , where the hell the country will be today.
    And getting back to the topic: No public servant can sign off on an economic policy that causes the NIS to lose a billion dollars just so.
    No public servant can make the Central bank print money
    No public servant can write off taxes of the same business people that owe the NIS $56 million dollars.
    And no public servant could have touched Donville Inniss
    And no public servant can shut down this country
    And no public servant can determine what type of budget should be presented.
    You know that politicians run this place and anybody who gets in their way is socially and economically destroyed.
    The public servants, nurses, teachers, police and others have all at some time or other paid the price of visionless, poor management and leadership of this country by both the Dees and Bees.
    They created the cesspool of corruption and graft and it is now biting them in their backsides.
    Peace.

    Like

  • WILLIAM SKINNER

    I HAD A DAUGHTER BORN ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND AND WHEN GOING TO REGISTER HER BIRTH I WAS CONFRONTED BY NOT ONLY A BACKWARD SYSTEM WHERE ONE HAD TO WAIT FOR THE WHOLE DAY WHILST GOVERNMENT WORKERS SPENT MOST OF THEIR TIME GOSSIPING AMONG EACH OTHER WITH ONLY ONE PERSON REGISTERING THE BIRTHS MANUALLY AND THE OTHER STAFF WASTING TIME WITH A LONG LINE OF PARENTS WAITING AND AVERAGE TIME FOR REGISTERING EACH BIRTH ALMOST 45 MINUTES.

    AFTER SEVERAL HOURS OF THIS FOOLISHNESS I ASKED TO SPEAK TO THE MANAGER WHO WAS VERY RUDE AND HAD NO IDEA OF CUSTOMER SERVICE.

    WE ENDED UP HAVING A VERBAL CONFRONTATION AND SHE REFUSED HER STAFF REGISTERING MY DAUGHTER BECAUSE I DARED TO CHALLENGE THE FOOLISHNESS I WAS SEEING.

    MIA WAS MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND I MADE CONTACT WITH HER, SHE THEN CONTACTED THE SAME MANAGER AND MY DAUGHTER WAS REGISTERD AT A RAPID PACE.

    AT THE TIME I HAD A REGIONAL COMPANY AND WAS ONE OF THE CONSULTANTS/SUPPLIERS OF EDUTECH IN THE SECONDARY SHOOLS AND DEALT WITH MIA WHEN MINISTER OF EDUCATION.

    SO IF THE ISLAND HAD COMPETENT LEADERS THE BAD APPLES WOULD HAVE BEEN SORTED OUT LONG AGO BUT IT IS TO THEIR ADVANTAGE ON BOTH SIDES OF WHY THE SYSTEM IS BROKEN.

    Like

  • @ DPD
    “So yes you can have your duopoly narrative to your heart’s content but until people from Saturn start to vote in Barbados I am at a lost to understand why your view that the political class are THE culprits is more viable than the fundamental issue that we are all COMPLICIT in this malaise!”

    Well, my Brother if you really believe that we are all “ complicit” we could as well shut shop.
    No wonder the Duopoly can do as they like; they have our backing , according to you and others , who can’t accept that those elected and entrusted with the public trust set the tone for the country.
    Now, rather than support the need for those who lead to set standards , you want the Doris to come and pick up all ah we.
    What you have written above will be read with great glee in Roebuck and George Streets.
    Man, you gone to completely new heights and I hope you have prepared a landing for such a flight. Safe landing my Brother .
    Peace.

    Like

  • “MIA WAS MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND I MADE CONTACT WITH HER, SHE THEN CONTACTED THE SAME MANAGER AND MY DAUGHTER WAS REGISTERD AT A RAPID PACE.”

    “SO IF THE ISLAND HAD COMPETENT LEADERS THE BAD APPLES WOULD HAVE BEEN SORTED OUT LONG AGO BUT IT IS TO THEIR ADVANTAGE ON BOTH SIDES OF WHY THE SYSTEM IS BROKEN.”

    Now that’s the point I have been trying to make . The country has been led to this cesspool by the political leadership. They encourage the bull shit and allow their lackeys to do whatever they like.
    When I say Duopoly that is exactly what I mean.
    This is a well cultivated and encouraged culture.
    It will not be killed by those who have nurtured and nourished it , along with their lackeys.
    Here is the outstanding matter they don’t want to touch.
    Why did the NIS
    have to lose one billion dollars?
    You note the assortment of apologists are barely trying to answer this question.
    Imagine the same business people who owe the NIS $56 million dollars were given massive tax relief and millions upon millions were written off.?
    You are absolutely correct they like it so and apparently I am now hearing that we are all “ complicit” . The other day I was hearing about “ covert “ activities of public servants and we now have a dossier of every malfeasance committed in by public servants.
    So, if according to the truthful scribes on BU that the public servants just as corrupt ac the politicians , where the hell are we going to end up ?
    Peace

    Like

  • William Skinner August 16, 2022 9:06 PM

    YOU’RE the person who is “missing the salient
    point.”
    I did not “choose to highlight the dishonesty of some public servants,”
    I highlighted the dishonesty of BOTH politicians AND public servants…… under the SAME circumstances.

    If you’re suggesting SOME politicians created, supported and upheld an environment in which acts of corruption are perpetrated, I would be the first person to agree with you.
    You seem to be implying that, although you acknowledge there are SOME dishonest civil servants…… there AREN’T ANY HONEST politicians…… that ALL politicians are INHERENTLY DISHONEST.

    However, according to the older folk, ‘when you say ‘A,’ you have to say, ‘B.’

    According to you, “if we did not have an historically competent public service the country would have gone under water every since by the weight of political corruption.”
    Yet, you ‘said,’ for example, “Imagine a public servant calling in the police to arrest or charge a politician with corruption.”

    “No public servant can” do some of the things you mentioned, because THEY’RE NOT RESPONSIBLE for developing policies or making political decisions.
    So, you’re essentially ‘comparing apples with oranges.’

    “No public servant can write off taxes of the same business people that owe the NIS $56 million dollars.”
    But, they can facilitate a process whereby “those same business people” WON’T have to PAY income or corporation taxes, which is essentially a ‘tax write-off.”

    Shouldn’t you likewise ask yourself if there weren’t any competent politicians that implemented progressive policy initiatives that were subsequently corrupted by civil servants?
    UDC and RDC, for example, provide houses and house repairs for poor people.
    I know of cases where persons charged with approving house repairs, sought sexual favours from women so as to ‘fast track’ the approval and facilitation of those repairs.

    “……it is a known fact that one phone call from a politician can stop a civil servant or police from executing their duties.”
    And, it is likewise “a known fact that one phone call from a” colleague in the civil or police services, on behalf of a relative or friend, “can stop a civil servant or police from executing their duties.”

    “No public servant can sign off on an economic policy that causes the NIS to lose a billion dollars just so.”
    But, public servants could engage in activities that, over a period of time, “cause the NIS to lose a billion dollars just so.”

    Like

  • I am confused. One minute leading the charge for good governance and the next minute an unapologetic apologist.

    Hal Austin used to say that our problem was not one of corruption, it was incompetence. Perhaps he is right.

    Ignorance of our GoB officials is the main reason why we get scammed. The second reason being corruption of the politicians. Perhaps we are expecting too much from the square pegs in round holes. things just have to fall apart.

    Like

  • Anytime they have to figure out the price after the purchase… a scam. Not a billion dollarl scam, but definitely millions will be lost.

    From BT
    “Speaking to another section of the media, Ishmael had said he would not be pressured to prematurely release the figures.

    “I am going to provide the public with the costs related to this project very soon,” he had said, adding that when the cost was eventually made public, it would include a comprehensive breakdown of everything involved.

    “We have the information relative to the cost [but] that information is spread across many financial years, many different components, many different agencies, departments and ministries.”

    Like

  • Caswell is on top of them like white on rice.

    However, his language is much too refine to accurately describe the shenanigans. Notice he says
    ‘backward’ and not ‘ass backward’. His
    Talk of “building a house and don’t have money” translates to ‘writing a check your ass cannot cash’ and his “it should have been costed before … ” translates to ‘now they gun fiddle de books and gi we bogus numbers’

    From BT
    However, Franklyn said that was not good enough.

    “His response is arrogance,” he said.

    “Government always does things backwards. You do not do something and then try to find out how much it costs, you work out the costs and everything and see if it is feasible and then you start the project. You don’t build a house and discover halfway through you ain’t got no money.

    “It should have been costed before and put to the Estimates so that the world would know how much it cost when they roll it out. That is what a government does, that is how government is run,” Franklyn added. (KC)

    Like

  • “……and we now have a dossier of every malfeasance committed in by public servants.
    So, if according to the truthful scribes on BU that the public servants just as corrupt as the politicians……”

    Mr. Skinner

    Despite the shiite and silly, snide remarks you’re spewing…… I will stand by my comments that BOTH civil servants and politicians engage in corruption.

    And, that is the fundamental point you’re CONTINUING to PURPOSELY IGNORE.

    What are the significant differences between Susan going to a politician for assistance in receiving her passport the same day…… and paying an immigration officer a ‘small fee’ for him/her to render the same assistance?

    What are the significant differences between Mike asking the Minister of Transport or his constituency representative to arrange for him to get his driver’s license, without going through the rudiments of the driving test…..
    …… or, asking his Testing Officer friend to make similar arrangements for a ‘small fee?’

    RE: “The country has been led to this cesspool by the political leadership.”

    RE: “They encourage the bull shit and allow their lackeys to do whatever they like.”

    Are you suggesting politicians are solely responsible for the perpetration of corruption in Barbados?

    I’ve come to realize that you and some other persons in this forum, SEEM to believe you have the ‘monopoly on intelligence.’

    That we should come in this forum on a daily basis to focus only on those issues you want to discuss…… and in a manner you want them to be discussed.

    That we should describe ALL politicians as ‘generational thieves and black faces in Parliament, stealing from the Treasury and pension fund.’

    That it is ‘either your way or the highway.’

    And, any opinions that differ from yours and those in your club, mean we are an “assortment of apologists protecting and defending politicians.”

    ‘Keep up the good work.’

    As-salaam alaikum.

    Like

  • The A guy -both to blame
    W guy- politicians
    D guy – civil servants
    HA – incompetence
    Wura – corruption
    Me – genetics.. the thiefing gene is found in some civil servants, most politicians and some citizens

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @William, those blinkers again are being worn by you!😎🙏🏿

    Why do you persist in mischaracterizzing what @Artax or Bushie, the Blogmaster and DEFINITELY what the blogger Baje is saying about Bajan society … why, brother Skinner!

    You are engaging in a very circuitous argument … 1st, no one disputes your point that the political class leads us and are thus entrusted to guide with integrity and lead us with no corruption.

    Did you MISS the 1,000% agreement the same Baje made with Artax’s post about malfeasance by civil servants !

    Did you miss that you are agreeing with his 9:51PM post where you say “that’s the point” YOU are making when in fact his remarks clearly disputes YOUR argument! He is clearly condemning the incompetence of the public servants even as he launches a backhanded critique at how easily the Minister caused said civil servants to expeditiously do the job that should have been done WITHOUT her intervention!

    As @Artax noted … YOU are the one missing the point, brother!

    If the public service was competent then of necessity some of the elected MPs and govt ministers who went to the SAME schools, SAME universities, churches etc ALSO must be just as competent, not so!

    (As so obviously noted above by Artax)

    And thus if some politicians are corrupt then so too must be some public servants!

    The duopoly was created by Bajans …so absolutely my remarks cannot cause any glee at party HQ as they know quite well the inherent corruption on which they have built their extensive graft !

    You present this unreal description that our LEADERS alone have failed our nation! SMH.

    A wish you well on that strange journey!

    Like

  • @DPD
    Do you know the failure to computerize and bring modern technology.
    +++++++++
    Allow me to add to that bit of misinformation.

    In 1969 the US Gov’t provided an IBM 1401 computer to the Barbados Gov’t to enable it to get in on the ground floor in the world of data processing. The Gov’t then established a new Dept. named the Data Processing Unit under the leadership of the late Harry (Sir Harcourt) Lewis. To staff this Dept. the Gov’t instituted a Civil Service wide search to identify employees who were viable candidates to work within the Dept. and it did this by having all applicants take an IQ test to determine who were best suited to complete training and work in the Dept. Twenty-four candidates were selected and out of this complement were supposed to be systems analysts, programmers, and computer operators. Those who completed the training and didn’t make the final cut were returned to their respective Depts. to act as liaisons for the changes that would be implemented because of this new technology. The computer training was done by a Peace Corp volunteer provided by the US Gov’t.

    The above is a brief snapshot of when computers were introduced to the Barbados Gov’t 53 years ago and I am flummoxed at the suggestion that from that small beginning time there has been a failure by the Gov’t “to computerize and bring modern technology”

    BTW I believe that Lewis” experience with the DPU made him the ideal candidate to transition the Barbados Savings Bank to the Barbados National Bank and the start up of its fledging computerize systems..

    Like

  • Hmmmm……

    Now…… I’m confused.

    If we accept civil servants and politicians come from amongst the general ‘pool’ of citizens, then, I’m finding it hard to understand how “the thiefing gene” can be found in “SOME civil servants” and “SOME citizens”…… but, yet, “in MOST politicians.”

    Unless, politicians come from Pluto or some other planet?

    But, if the gene is found in SOME citizens, then it means there are citizens who do not possess the gene.
    Or, is it that they actually have the gene, but it remains dormant until they join the public sector……
    ……and, politics provide an environment conducive for the gene to mutate…… thereby becoming aggressively active as soon they enter the political fray?

    Like

  • “But, if the gene is found in SOME citizens, then it means there are citizens who do not possess the gene.
    Or, is it that they actually have the gene, but it remains dormant until they join the public sector……”

    Food for thought.. Possibly a research area.. a gene that is spread by proximity.

    I would not take it that serious.

    Like

  • You must admit that we have mastered the act of doing nothing whilst making it look as if we are doing something…
    A good read
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/08/12/unnecessary-bill/

    Like

  • Sheron Inniss aka Sunlight Creations

    Concerning the NIS debacle, I would like to share my thoughts in the form of a poem. It’s a long one, so I’ll just write the 1st verse for now. Maybe, I’ll come back and post the rest: – I runnin’ pun empty, I runnin’ pun empty. I am barren. There is nothing left. In times of plenty, you misuse and abuse me. Wuh you expect now? Green trèes in a desert? Well you must be hallucinating, ’cause it’s only dried up stumps I seeing. I runnin’….

    Like

  • Does the average Bajan understand the wheels are falling off the bus? The system is being screwed from all angles

    Who was Bostic? A civil servant, a politician, an ordinary Bajan, aman with contacts

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/08/15/i-didnt-know/

    Suggest importing a ton of vaccine. Lubrication should make it easier.

    Like

  • In the same way we finally have citizens talking about NIS because they perceive the threat of losing benefits, the same spotlight must be focused on the public service. We need a strong and relevant public service especially in these times.

    Like

  • Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol

    Camp David
    There are many camps on BU but there is no reasoning amongst brethren
    #THROWASHADECREW like to make out they are more intelligent but clearly aren’t
    There are Team Players who blindly support and agree with their favourite messy people

    Mind the Gap

    But I would like to turn attention to the 2 Camps of Barbados
    the Rich and the Poor

    I could go on and on the full has never been told
    Voice of the Poor

    Like

  • Private sector not the villain here

    by CHARLES HERBERT

    THE TOPIC OF REFORM of the National Insurance Scheme (NIS) is a large one. This analysis is not exhaustive and deals primarily with the principal long-term benefit of NIS pensions.
    By law the NIS is subjected to an actuarial review every three years. The most recent one was undertaken at December 31, 2020 and the previous one of 2017 was finalised in December 2021.
    The long-term patterns presented in this report are not substantially different from previous reports except that the fund exhaustion has been brought forward by the depletion of the fund by $1.3 billion. This is a result of national debt restructuring, and the lost revenue and increased benefits occasioned by the pandemic. The broad picture is unchanged from what we always knew and some of the recommendations made, and ignored, are in previous reports: 1. reduce investment in Barbados Government debt (target 40 per cent, actual 70 per cent).
    2. improve administration, and 3. improve corporate governance and accountability – the last completed audit was in 2010.
    There is no doubt that we need to take decisions and action. Often there is the will to do so only when the crisis looms closer. Some decisions need no debate, just action; others have social consequences and need the broadest possible support of all Barbadians.
    History
    The introduction of the NIS in 1966 was a great step for Barbados but it should not blind us to thinking that every aspect of its implementation was ideal. If we do not acknowledge the errors, we will not improve for the future.
    The NIS provided pension benefits for many employees who would never have received pensions, mainly transient workers such as artisans and people employed by individuals or smaller companies. For these it has really been a “lifeline”.
    At the same time: (a) It was not needed for public sector employees who already had an adequate if not generous pension arrangement; for them (hired before 1985) it duplicated benefits at a cost that the nation could not afford and these benefits will continue to be paid for many years. For post-1985 hires, the Government pension is abated and the duplication has been largely eliminated and employees now contribute to a large part of their pension.
    (b) For the employees of private sector companies who had pension plans there was no change in benefits but the total benefit now came from two sources.
    ( c) There was doubtless also a category who saved and provided for their own retirement but these numbers are not known.
    For employees in categories B and C, the effect was to transfer significant amounts of future savings from private arrangements to NIS control. These funds should have been invested to build private sector businesses and start new ones. Unfortunately, most of these funds were lent to Government and new investment was left to foreigners, who bought our companies and started new ones, while others were never started. In short, the economy did not grow as it could have and where it did the growth did not belong to Barbadians.
    NIS has traditionally been suspicious of the private sector: ( a) It trusted employers to collect contributions but not to pay benefits.
    ( b) It will not report to employers on benefits paid to employees.
    ( c) I was once told by a former NIS director that they would never invest in a private sector company because the private sector’s governance was too weak. This requires no comment, as NIS has not published an audit for ten years while our listed companies publish quarterly financial results and audits within four months of year end.
    “A” is important because paying benefits through employers is faster and could result in reduced administrative expenses by NIS. Late payment of sickness benefits can be a huge burden on employees.
    “B” is important because it would allow employers to accurately “harmonise” benefits and plan better employment packages for employees. Despite what some think, many employers care about their employees and would like to be able to better plan the “total” benefit package to employees.
    Vague statements are made about outstanding contributions that gives the impression that employers deduct from employees and do not pay over to NIS. I would like to see the facts:
    • what proportion of expected contributions are outstanding after one month, six months and longer than one year, and
    • what proportion of each category are public sector employers.
    I expect that their track record will show that the vast majority of private sector employers pay promptly and have been good partners with NIS, but let the facts speak and put a stop to idle speculation. Certainly all defaulters should be pursued and action taken where possible and written off where not recoverable. This happens in all businesses.
    What fixes should not need debate
    Although it is unlikely that the NIS reserve will grow, there will be Government bonds that mature, and where not all of the funds are required to pay benefits and expenses. These funds available for new investments should be managed by private contractors to invest in local businesses. Details such as rules, tenders and removal of low performers should be developed by the Social Partners.
    Improved administration for better records and faster payment, possibly in partnership with employers, is also not controversial, as is a reduction in the cost of this administration. A reduction from seven per cent of contributions to five per cent would be similar to 0.5 per cent increase in contributions (two per cent x 21 per cent = 0.42 per cent).
    Options that do deserve deep debate
    These are the thorny issues that do need debate: If we increase contributions, then when should we do it: ( a) Now when earnings are already under strain? ( b) In two years after some recovery and in the meantime draw on the reserve?
    ( c) Should the increase be split equally between employer and employees?
    ( d) Should we increase the ceiling for earnings so that higher paid employees pay more?
    ( e) Should we draw down the fund, then contribute at the “pay as you go rate”?
    ( f) Should we transition in some way to a “defined contribution” arrangement as is popular in Latin America?
    If we alter benefits, then we should consider alternatives such as: ( a) Longer accrual rates. ( b) Lower benefit rates for higher paid employees while we maintain the safety net for the lowest paid.
    ( c) Should retirement ages be increased further? ( d) Should retirement ages be held but benefits increase at a later age to reflect increasing dependence with age?
    How can we encourage more contributors into the Scheme? We know that many self-employed and contract workers do not contribute and that some number of employers and employees agree not to contribute to so achieve higher net pay and/or reduced costs. This will get increasingly difficult as contribution rates increase.
    Do we need to increase our population either through incentives to have more children or through immigration?
    My opinion is that the size of the population is not as important as the number of jobs that the economy can support. To have a larger population than there are jobs will not help NIS and will increase all other social benefits and costs. This needs full debate and consensus.
    I do hope that over the next few weeks there will be meaningful national consultation and that the key issues will not be clouded by political mudslinging, “red herrings”, and pontificating that so often overwhelms similar discussions.
    To conclude, my own suggestion is that the NIS sponsor publicised debates on key issues where the panel tries to clearly enunciate the pros and cons of alternative courses of action. The objective of these debates would be to inform and educate the public and not to score political points (perhaps politicallyaligned people should be excluded).

    Charles Herbert is a retired actuary.

    Like

  • The blogmaster inquired in an earlier comment why did the inspectors stop visiting employers. We know the answer, blame the politician.

    NIS keeping eye on cheques

    THE NATIONAL INSURANCE SCHEME (NIS) is on alert for the number of “dead” people who have received pension cheques, says director Kim Tudor.
    Amidst complaints from the public following the Auditor General’s recent report highlighting the problem, Tudor said they were addressing the situation. She was speaking on Monday evening during the first in a series of town hall meeting titled How Can We Revitalise The NIS – For Us, Our Children And Grandchildren. It was held at Combermere School in Waterford, St Michael.
    Processing payments
    “The life certificate was discontinued years ago, so we depend on updating our records based on the Registry and the goodwill of families to notify us that the person has died. Right now we are processing payments for the end of August into September, so we are always going to be mailing out pensions ahead.
    “However, we have looked at how often we should get the updates from the Registry, and how often we should update our system and we are certainly addressing it,” Tudor said.
    The town hall meetings are being held following a press conference last week at which Government announced that the NIS would be in jeopardy from 2034 and on if changes are not made.
    Tudor said that monthly about 48 000 pensioners were paid, a handful of whom were flagged by their system.
    “The fact that the system was able to identify five out of 48 000 does show that we have a system in place. When I mail out cheques at the end of August, somebody will get a cheque for the end of September, but God forbid, they may die in that period,” she added.
    Jade Garner, who said she has worked in accounting for 46 years, was among those at the meeting expressing concern.
    “I heard the Auditor General say that the NIS is paying dead people and that I have a problem with. I believe if there is an audit and things are put in perspective, we will be able to move forward from a better position,” she said.
    She recalled that when she worked as a programmer at Plantations Trading Co. Ltd, NIS inspectors visited to ensure the correct procedures were followed.
    Garner suggested that a similar measure should be taken again, along with encouraging more people to contribute to the Scheme.
    “An officer from the NIS used to come around, and her visit was a pleasure. She came to see if all of the calculations were correct and that we were doing our duty. However, that stopped many years ago and I think what we should do is to try to encourage people, without threatening them, to file and pay National Insurance, whether they are selfemployed or employees. “I am happy that I performed my duty and responsibility for 46 years and, please God, when I reach 67, there will be money inside there for me to get my pension because I have worked my tail off for 46 years,” she added.
    Deputy chairman of the NIS board, Rawdon Adams, said although compliance was an issue, the NIS problem was more structural as it was still operating in the way it was designed over 55 years ago.
    People born today are expected to live longer, he said, adding that while the average number of children in households in 1967 was under four, these days it was less than two.
    Adams said although targeting entrepreneurs would be useful, it would not allow
    them to make up the $980 million deficit projected by the mid-2030s.
    “Let’s pretend for a moment that we could regularise the entire informal sector. We can infer that represents about 33 000 to 34 000 people and that may be worth about $220 million, but to get half of the deficit is a structural problem.
    “The Scheme was not designed for the time we live in now. It’s a structural problem we are facing today. Although it may be daunting, many countries have faced this issue and there is a precedent,” he added.
    (TG)


    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Wadada ♡ ♥💕❤😘
    Ahmaric
    means: LOVE
    It can also be used as a greeting such as “Hello” and “Goodbye.

    Ask me no question
    I tell you no lie
    Ask me no question
    I play music

    Jah Works
    knowledge wisdom and understanding
    is what the sensimila bring

    It’s like the same song everyday..
    but a next generation of new singers
    sing new versions of older last generation song lyrics
    with Reworks

    Riddimwise
    We specialise

    Be Grateful
    De Dubful

    Voice of the Poor (x2)
    Voice of the Poor Dub Voices Nish Wadada

    Voice Of The Poor, Fred Locks & Creation Steppers, Poor Man’s Story, Levi Roots & Sir Coxsone Sound

    Like

  • 1st Come Jah

    Wicked Can’t Dub

    Like

  • @ TheO
    The A guy -both to blame
    W guy- politicians
    D guy – civil servants
    HA – incompetence
    Wura – corruption
    Me – genetics.. the thiefing gene is found in some civil servants, most politicians and some citizens
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Bushie – Brassbowlery to blame. (all of the above and spiritual karma)

    Like

  • Revelation 5:5: Then one of the elders said to me, ‘Do not weep. See, the Lion of the tribe of Judah, the Root of David, has conquered, so that he can open the scroll and its seven seals.’ This is widely regarded as a reference to the Second Coming among Christians.

    Salute Him
    Dub Salute

    Like

  • @ Sargeant
    So you are contending that a computer installed in 1969 is equivalent to brining the entire public service up to scratch for the next 50 years.
    Therefore all the talk over the last two decades by both administrations about computerizing and bringing technology to enhance the service was one big reinvention of the wheel.
    I stand by what it is widely known , the public service. was and is still lagging in technology.
    Peace

    Like

  • Yes Mr Adams but if you all did not right off a billion dollars of the NIS money you would not have a $980 MILLION dollar deficit by 2034 would yuh!

    That is why all talk bout ” dont worry its a wash” is total BS in real terms. It really was an insult to the intelligence of the bajan shareholders of the NIS to make such an assanine statement.

    Like

  • David
    “In the same way we finally have citizens talking about NIS because they perceive the threat of losing benefits, the same spotlight must be focused on the public service. We need a strong and relevant public service especially these times.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    To do what exactly David?
    How did it help David Thompson to FINALLY access the best possible medical experts – after reaching the stage he did?
    How would the Titanic have fared any differently, if the top boatbuilders were on board after the idiot captain impacted the iceberg?…

    Boss
    There is a time and a place for everything…
    We missed our time to build…
    Not we have reached the time to pay.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    So who is surprised these incompetent frauds can’t get from point A to point B 53 years later…the only thing they can see is a way to run a scam…

    i bought my first computer an IBM in the early 90s, never looked back, but taxpayer funded departments can’t take the first step from a DONATION…lucky they did not leave the system out in the rain to rot as they do the baby incubators, the onion drying machine and other life saving equipment….donated to them.

    Bushman….and she is STILL LYING…..won’t STOP LYING…..while people who KNOW WHAT IS GOING ON because it’s their field of expertise are saying one thing….the LIES still ooze out of the parliament…

    government should not touch the people’s money anymore…TOO MANY THIEVES between them and civil servants…..according to what some on here say, and none can stop the other..

    no one with commonsense will believe anything coming from the likes of CH.

    “Barbadians are being encouraged to invest in private pensions and not solely depend on the National Insurance Scheme (NIS) to support them in their retirement years.

    The advice has come from president of the General Insurance Association of Barbados (GIAB) Randy Graham, who contends that the NIS can no longer afford to support pensions for every Barbadian.

    His advice follows the recent revelation that the National Insurance Fund was in danger of being depleted within the next 12 to 20 years if urgent action was not taken.”

    Like

  • @ David
    Boss…
    Wuh you could as well bring back ac…..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Here is Caswell…….all politicians are painted and tainted with the TIEFING brush….the politicians who do nothing and say nothing are equally guilty as collaborators and enablers………silence is violence, silence is ACCEPTANCE………many say the civil servants are ALSO THIEVES………don’t know how many….but birds of a feather flock together…..liars and THIEVES, wicked and greedy, only looking out for THEMSELVES…like Caswell is pointing out in this comment..

    “A friend told me that Gline Clarke, who served as a minister in the Owen Arthur Administration, has made a call for increased pensions for parliamentarians when the current economic fortunes turn around.
    Even though my friend is usually reliable, I had difficulty believing him because I found it hard to understand why anyone, who is still in possession of all their mental faculties, could make such a call, in the Barbados context.
    I decided not to repeat that bit of news before I read the report for myself. My caution turned to complete amazement when I went about searching and found a story headlined Give Us More in the June 3 edition of Barbados Today which confirmed what my friend had said.

    Mr Clarke was quoted as saying: “After spending so many years in here [Parliament], there should be something where parliamentarians can have a decent pension to live on comfortably. We don’t want to be rich. What we get is meagre . . . in terms of living from day to day, it’s really meagre.”
    He also said that some MPs are left in degrading positions, unable to survive on their meagre pensions and forced to rely on family for financial support.
    But before we start feeling sorry for retired parliamentarians, it would be useful to contrast what they receive against what others, who also give public service, receive. Mind you, as MPs they have been able to legislate some of the most generous pension terms and conditions for themselves. Except for the Prime Minister, all other MPs are pensionable under the Retiring Allowances (Legislative Service) Act.

    Originally, both MPs and public servants were able to access their pensions from 55 years of age, but over time Parliament has lowered the qualifying age for MPs to 50 years, and increased the pension age for public officers to 67 years. They are therefore entitled to receive their pensions 17 years ahead of other public servants. That is bad enough, but it gets worse.
    Former, and in some cases, sitting MPs, qualify for pensions of half of their highest salary, after serving eight years. On the other hand, public officers qualify for one-fifth of the three-year average of their salary after serving ten years. While former employees of statutory boards, who are pensionable under the Statutory Boards (Pensions) Act, qualify for one-sixth of their salary after serving ten years. That is bad enough but it gets worse.

    MPs qualify for a full pension of two-thirds of their highest salary after serving 12 years; public officers are entitled to receive a similar pension after serving thirty-three and one-third years; and employees of statutory boards qualify for the same entitlement after 40 years.
    Tomorrow, if a minister demits office after eight years, he would be entitled to receive a “meagre” pension of $6 349.25 per month, and after 12 years’ service, the “meagre” pension would be $8 465.67 per month. In order to appreciate how meagre that pension happens to be, a deputy principal of a secondary school and a senior administrative officer in a ministry both receive a salary of $7 348.54 per month. That is bad enough but it gets worse.
    In 1975, legislation was passed in Parliament to provide that persons who join the Public Service, after September 1, 1975 would have their public service pensions reduced by the amount of their National Insurance pension.
    In effect, it means that public servants would qualify for the higher of the two pensions. Interestingly, the reduction did not apply to MPs so they would continue to receive both pensions. At their level, MPs should qualify for the maximum NIS pension of $2 419.21 per month, at today’s values, which would give them a total of $10 884.88 per month. A deputy permanent secretary receives a monthly salary of $10 112.48.

    In order not to mislead, I must point out that an MP who served 12 or more years, and who opts for a gratuity and reduced pension, would receive a gratuity of 25 months’ pay and a reduced pension of half his highest ever salary.
    Also, when a former parliamentarian finally goes to meet his maker, he can do so secure in the knowledge that his widow and children would not end up in the poorhouse. Sections 10 and 11 of the Retiring Allowances (Legislative Service) Act make generous provisions for the widow, while she remains unmarried, and for the children who are under the age of 18 years.
    On the other hand, while retaining theirs, Parliament abolished the pensions that were payable to the survivors, in respect of public officers who were appointed on or after April 1, 1978, in accordance with section 3A of the Widows and Children Pensions Act.

    The foregoing should be enough to debunk the myth that former ministers are not well taken care of in terms of pension entitlements. But could the former minister have been speaking of former prime ministers? I think not. Their pensions arrangements are the most generous that I have ever seen.
    Both Gline Clarke and I agree that there should be some reform in the pensions paid to former parliamentarians, but that is the extent of our agreement. Unlike him, I believe that pension entitlements for MPs are overly generous. Rather than give them more, I propose that some equity should be brought to the pension system by bringing the pensions paid to MPs in line with those paid to former public officers.
    Mr Clarke’s revelation that some former MPs cannot live comfortably on their already lucrative pensions clearly demonstrates why they should not have been allowed to manage the country’s finances.
    • Caswell Franklyn is a trade unionist and social commentator.

    Like

  • @John A

    Agreeing with you. The actuary seems to justify calling it a wash because it relieves the public of the 1 billion liability BUT after that the NIF remains undercapitalized.

    Like

  • The issue of installing computer hardware Dee Word can describe better than the blogmaster – it not about installing hardware, there must be a good design of systems and procedures to map all functions, continuous training etc

    Liked by 1 person

  • Let me tell you now
    as an experience IT Guru
    The only good system
    Is a Sound System

    Can’t Ride Computer

    King Kong

    Tempo

    Anthony Red Rose

    “AC” was a mindless soulless bot that generated random text copied cut and pasted from others works of wisdom and original ideas like the white man and his spies in Babylon, but we Jah Children the Chosen Brothers March Against Babylon Mash Down Babylon Dub Babylon to nice up the dance nice up the lawn and nice up the land

    That’s why
    The 0, Harold Harry Hal Austin, Bushman, Afrika Dub are big fans

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…apparently in their delusions these still tell themselves they will get away with all their lies, fraud, thievery, broad-based corruption and crimes against the people, although it’s being SHARED EVERYWHERE….

    some thieves and liars have no shame…

    Like

  • @ David

    Its like saying If i dont pay my hunderd dollar water bill and keep the hundred dollars its a wash because i now have the money in my wallet. Of course i now got to bathe under the standpipe, but dont worry over the water gettig cut off cause its a wash!

    Some statements are better left unsaid. It also showed a lack of respect for those that contributed the billion dollars to the system as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Artax
    You are entitled to your opinion and so is everybody on this blog . If you and others believe that corruption is inbred in every Bajan, that’s your opinion.
    I maintain that it is a culture that has been cultivated , nurtured and nourished by the political class.
    There are two political parties that have governed this country and in my opinion they have allowed , encouraged and engaged in widespread corruption.
    They have never put proper governance and accountability as bench marks of development.
    They have now succeeded in wrecking the NIS.
    Hopefully we will find the one billion dollars that a policy decision cost the fund and hopefully those who owe it $56 million will have a change of heart and pay it in.
    I come here with only one purpose , to share how I think with my brothers and sisters. And I respectfully believe that you and others do exactly that. At the end of the day we are all Bajans.
    We don’t have to always agree.
    Peace.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…they are trying to gloss over the fact that civil servants are also lackeys, political pimps and cult fowls for one party or the other..like many fowls on here….and would do ANYTHING to maintain that status….just like the BU fowls..

    ..there are only two corrupt parties…for the last how many decades…where else would corrupt civil servants reside…

    Like

  • Sugar Me
    This is a Dancehall Murder
    In a Reggae Computer Style

    Like

  • @ David

    That is why i said from day 1 all this talk shop and old talk is a waste of time when you have a basic problem with one solution.

    You will have a shorfall by 2034 of $980 million based on todays activities. You decided to write off $1 billion dollars of liability to the NIS. Central government must therefore inject THE 1 BILLION DOLLARS IN CASH back into the fund that it wrote off. Its that simple so left out the talk shops and start looking for the money. Oh and for the record when i say money, i mean liquid negotiable cash not another promisory note known as a government bond.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    despite the circular, around and around argument….there is NO ESCAPING THE FACT……that ALL POLITICIANS ARE CORRUPT and the civil servants accused of corruption are their followers, party members, family, friends, bed partners, etc …they can’t tief millions and BILLIONS by themselves…..the MINISTRY OF FINANCE has to SIGN OFF on checks….that i know…

    at the end of the day they are A SYNDICATE OF THIEVES both them and the politicians….none can be separated from the other…

    so WHAT NOW?

    what is the solution to END THESE CRIMES against taxpayers, pensioners, young people, children etc…

    instead of arguing nonstop….what is going to be done…TO END THEM ALL..they MUST BE TAKEN DOWN….unless yall want them continuing permanently so yall can have something to argue, post and TALK SHITE ABOUT..

    Like

  • @John A

    What is the implication if government injects 1 billion? Where will it come from?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Carry on Dubwise

    It’s a love affair
    you know there’s
    money going down the drain
    I don’t know what to do
    that’s a love affair

    That’s why I have to
    box you down
    kick you down
    and don’t you come
    running to me
    crying to me

    This is the best that I can do
    this is something you must understand

    Like

  • @ David

    That is the leaders problem not mine. They could borrow it from china or Timbuktoo for all i care, but if we really want to fix the fund this is the only solution. Anything less will be a useless short term patch. As long as its borrowed at an interest rate that is lower than the current fund yield that is my major conceren.

    Like

  • @ WARU
    All we need to fo is accept it as a culture that has been allowed to flourish. There is no accountability within the political halls of power.
    Now we are supposed to accept that a policy decision which caused the NIS to lose one billion dollars is no big thing. They are calling it a “ wash”.
    I am now being told that civil servants by a series of acts can eventually cost one billion dollars as well.
    Imagine a country that has children whose parents cannot find the means to feed them during the summer vacation can just so decide that wiping out one billion dollars from a fund established to give comfort in our old age is really no big thing.
    I therefore posit that if we are a nation of corruption and our civil service is as equally corrupt as the politicians , it is time to shut shop.
    From the offerings of some on this issue, I have no choice other than to suggest that we are all corrupt and the most corrupt with the backing of their supporters and assortment of lackeys will survive.
    Peace.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “All we need to fo is accept it as a culture that has been allowed to flourish. There is no accountability within the political halls of power.
    Now we are supposed to accept that a policy decision which caused the NIS to lose one billion dollars is no big thing. ”

    straight up, that’s the bottomline, they want everyone to ACCEPT THIS CRIMINALITY…..these LYING THIEVES……so they can continue pretending they are experts in neocolonial politics…WHILE THE PEOPLE SUFFER because of those THEFTS….

    do they even know or care WHY a World Food Program truck would be on the island….i only saw photo of one, there could very well be more………according to what was posted yesterday……the sleight of hand, if accurate…they can no longer IMPORT EXPENSIVE GARBAGE…these trucks are seen in countries that CANNOT FEED THEIR PEOPLE…

    did i not tell yall something scummier, skeezier is afoot, and they are using a useless town hall meeting to cover it up…

    wuh if ya tief BILLIONS of dollars over MANY DECADES………and no one can say where any of the money is……wuh YUH CAHN FEED DE PEOPLE because you and ya fella TIEVES holding the money…but ya feeding ya tiefing greedy corrupt selves though….and this is what the BU brigade seem to admire……..go figure.

    Like

  • @ David

    To me the refinancing of the fund is the most important thing we need to do. More important that fixing roads or planning fetes. If the fund ever collapsed it could well mean the collapse of the Barbadian economy as well. Think of not only the social fall out but the economic fall out we would be facing. Most pensioners spend every cent of their pension money back in the economy. If this was to faulter what do you think would happen to our economy? I dont think alot of us have stopped to see the bigger picture here. Many are saying ” dat is a old people problem” not realising their supermarket job is also at stake here.

    Like

  • @John A

    Unfortunately borrowing that about is not practical. The PM alluded to injecting about 77 million in the first year based on what is before her from the actuarial work done. One suspects this is the best path but would it conflict with a possible IMF rollover plan.

    Like

  • @John A

    Sadly you may be correct about the contagion effect. It would define exert enormous pressure on private pension funds.

    Liked by 1 person

  • / It A Ring
    / Trouble Again
    / Champion Sound
    / Rock Them One By One

    / #comments
    / Turn On The Heat
    / #KING JAMMY’S : SELECTOR’S CHOICE
    / Roots Reality and Sleng Teng
    Under Me Peter Green
    Under Me Sleng Ting

    Like

  • @ David

    Her other option is to borrow $82 million a year for the next 12 years then!

    Point is you wrote it off and now you need it so it must be found one way or another.

    Like

  • @John A

    Yes they can do that however the concern will be to address the threats and weaknesses in order to avoid an encore 10 to 15 down the line. Given the current state the NIS model is not sustainable it seems .

    Like

  • A question that must be asked:
    What would have driven the Minister of Finance to have made a decision
    that would have such deleterious effects on the NIS to the tune of one billion dollars.
    Remember we saw the catastrophe caused by the former minister’s obsession with printing money and over usage of NIS funds.
    How then could his successor come and further damage the fund and apparently is not being hall over the coals for such a decision.
    And where are all the voices of condemnation who were once so protective of the fund.
    Oh well, the civil servants did it.
    The archives of BU make interesting reading.

    Peace.

    Like

  • Hauled not hall.

    Like

  • Put up your hand
    when you see your enemy
    sing a song because them no ready

    Them people never like my Psalms 21
    You have to come with Revelation 3
    The people never like Revelation 1
    You have to sing a song of Psalms 21
    It’s a hard road to travel
    and a mighty long way to go
    I know that the strength of the Father
    will guide me along the way
    Yes I know

    They just a watch just a watch we
    They just a fight just fight fight we

    Jump up on one called E20
    Jump in a van to run the country
    Jah Jah knows he guide me you see

    E20

    Three Times A Lady Thanks for the times that you’ve given me, The memories are… Under Mi Sleng Teng Way in my brain, is way in my brain Is way…

    Like

  • The above is a brief snapshot of when computers were introduced to the Barbados Gov’t 53 years ago and I am flummoxed at the suggestion that from that small beginning time there has been a failure by the Gov’t “to computerize and bring modern technology”

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    LET ME ADDRESS THIS AS I LET THIS TALK ABOUT COMPUTERS/IT PASSED YESTERDAY.

    I PREVIOUSLY SUPPLIED AROUND BD$400,000 OF DELL BRAND NEW COMPUTERS AT THE TIME UNDER A LEASE AROUND 3 YEARS TO THE NIS WHEN IAN CARRINGTON WAS IN CHARGE.

    THE NIS HAD ALL THE RELEVANT SOFTWARE NEEDED TO FUNCTION EFFECIENTLY AND EFFECTIVELY HOWEVER IF YOU HAVE ‘SMART’ INDIVIDUALS WHO KNOW HOW TO WORK THE SYSTEMS AND BENEFIT FINANCIALLY BECAUSE OF NO PHYSICAL OVERSIGHT BY MANAGEMENT WHO MAY OR MAY NOT BE COMPLICIT IN SCAMS.

    ASO SUPPLIED WITH EITHER IBM OR DELL ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND:

    CORPORATE AFFAIRS
    COMMUNITY COLLEGE
    URBAN AFFAIRS
    HIV COMMISSION
    MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
    CENTRAL PURCHASING
    DATA PROCESSING

    WILL STOP THERE THE PROBLEM IS NOT THE TECHNOLOGY BUT THE INDIVIDUAL WORKING IN THE DEPARTMENTS WITH NO OVERSIGHT OR COMPLICIT WITH OTHERS TO FLEECE THE SYSTEM FOR FINANCIAL GAIN ETC.

    Like

  • ONE LAST INPUT ON THIS TOPIC:

    I WAS ONCE APPROACHED BY AN ACCOUNTANT IN THE MINISTRY OF TRANSPORTATION WHO ALSO FREELANCED IN OTHER MINISTRIES DEPARTMENTS MOVING AROUND.

    I WAS ASKED TO PROVIDE A SOLUTION SO THAT AS THEY PROCESSED CHECKS THEY COULD HAVE THEM INPUTED IN A COMPUTERISED SYSTEM WHICH WOULD ALLOW THEM TO STORE AND RETRIEVE AT WILL UNDER SPECIFIC SEARCH CATEGORIES.

    I RECOMMENDED A PARTICULAR MICR CHECK VERIFIER AND GOT ONE OF MY TECHNICAL GUYS TO WRITE A SHORT CUSTOMISED PROGRAM TO DO WHAT THEY WANTED.

    BEFORE I SENT IN A QUOTATION I TOLD THE ACCOUNTANT IT WOULD COST AROUND BD$6000 HE SAID SEND IT IN FOR BD$18,000 SO HE COULD GET A CUT.

    HE THEN SAID AS HE MOVED AROUND MOST OF THE GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS HE COULD GET A SIMILAR SOLUTION AS THEY ALL HAD THE SAME ISSUES AND THAT EACH WOULD BE BILLED FOR THE SAME BD$18,000 IM MORE THAN 12 DEPARTMENT IN OTHER MINISTRIES.

    THIS WILL GIVE A SNAPSHOT OF HOW THINGS ARE DONE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    tief not, want not,,,

    now they are in PERMANENT, IRREVERSIBLE debt….

    the people are the ones to suffer with children for generations to come…..because of their scams and heists…

    told yall YEARS AGO….leave these scum with their billion dollar debt,,,it’s theirs and their criminal partners, it does NOT BELONG TO THE PEOPLE….

    Like

  • @ Sargeant
    SargeantOctober 4, 2014 10:46 AM

    @David
    No Sargeant todays lingo in IBM mainframes is as400.
    ++++++++++
    “I was making light of the technology that existed in 1969 that was available to the Gov’t and linking it to today’s problems. Incidentally the technology in those early computers is less than what exists in my IPad or phone today.” (Sargeant)

    That’s the exact point I tried to make. Technology is not stagnant, it changes by the hour. Hence to talk about Barnes and Company (@DPD) and some computer given to the Data processing unit in 1969 (Sarge) all of that history bears no relevance to today’s reality.

    Peace.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    BAJE….standard operating procedures (SOP)……..for the last half century from these FRAUDS…

    started by the politicians who would order medicines from florida or whereever for the QEH and bill the taxpayers 3 and 4 times the amount because they must have their cut….still happening…

    same thing recently with the port scammers….costing a few thousand when we googled them and embarrassed THE LIAR……..but someone the politician’s mathematics concluded that they cost multi-MILLIONS…. same with the garbage trucks that cost so much less from manufacturers……..all for their cut…

    Like

  • Back to the matter in hand
    We are living in a serious times
    “The Golden Chip” in the title is an Enigma

    What does it mean?!
    Is it a token Chip for gambling in a Casino? /
    Is it a Chip on the Shoulder of the people? /
    Is it the Microchip for a Hi-Tex Computer? /

    This is about the story that has never been told
    Let me tell you all about the African Gold
    UK Government won’t admit liability for torturing Mau Mau which they settled out of Court
    UK Government won’t admit liability for slavery and the tricks they played on me
    GoB won’t admit liability for spunking the NIS Pension Pot and Unemployment Benefits

    Anyway beloveds /
    Back to lessons /
    Dancehall 101 /

    Tenor Saw – Golden Hen
    Tic a tic a toc, tic a tic a toc
    My golden hen, my golden hen
    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen

    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    She layin’ eggs for the gentlemen
    Sometime nine and sometime ten, oh
    And whenever she lay, she make an alarm
    Cotcotcotcot me lay out, lay out, whoa
    Lay out, whoa, whoa

    Searching from morning for my golden hen, hey
    Got a little girl at my home
    She wake up this morning, she didn’t eat no breakfast, no
    She wake up this morning, she no eat no breakfast
    She leave at my home and she faint in the cab
    She gives my neighbourhood a lots of remarks
    Lots of remarks, she gives him lots of remarks
    Lots of remarks, it was not my fault
    When she faint in the cab (Lord God know)
    Hey little girl don’t be like a rolling calf, oh
    Before the wind you gonna be like a chaff
    If you live like a rolling calf, no oh
    Don’t live like a rolling calf, no

    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    She layin’ eggs for the gentlemen
    Sometime nine and sometime ten, whoa-oh
    Whenever she lay, Lord, she make an alarm
    Cotcotcotcot me lay out, lay out, lay out
    Lay out, whoa, lay out, whoa

    But I’ve been searching from morning
    For my golden hen, whoa
    Well, I’ve been searching from morning, morning
    For my golden hen
    Because she’s my best friend
    Because she’s my best friend
    Searching from morning, morning
    Because she’s my best friend, whoa-oh, whoa

    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    Come on back, come on back
    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    Come on back, Lord, come on back
    Whoa-oh, I beg you please come on back, girl, so

    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    She layin’ eggs for the gentlemen
    Sometime nine and sometime ten, whoa-oh
    And whenever she lay, she make an alarm
    Cotcotcotcot me lay out, me lay out
    Lay out whoah, lay out, whoa

    Girl, you know that I love you badly
    I wouldn’t like to end up sadly
    Girl, you know that I love you badly
    I wouldn’t like to end up sadly
    Girl, come on, girl come on
    Don’t be a run around, don’t be a run around
    Please come home

    (..)

    Tic a tic a toc, my golden hen
    She layin’ eggs for the gentlemen
    Sometime nine and sometime ten, whoa-oh
    Whenever she lay, she make an alarm, whoa-oh..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…there have been warnings FOR YEARS….while these are hot and sweaty to introduce some crypto scam on the people….apparently now they will BE RESTRICTED from that heist..

    the one scam they have worked overtime on BUT COULD NEVER GET OFF THE GROUND….

    “UN Agency Urges Authorities to Curb Cryptocurrency Expansion in Developing Countries

    A United Nations trade body has recommended a set of policy actions to “curb the expansion of cryptocurrencies in developing countries.” The intergovernmental group stressed that if cryptocurrencies become a widespread means of payment, it could jeopardize the monetary sovereignty of countries.”

    UNCTAD is a permanent intergovernmental body established by the United Nations General Assembly in 1964. It is part of the U.N. Secretariat. The group reports to the U.N. General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council. UNCTAD has 195 member states and 204 projects in 70 countries, its website shows.

    “Global use of cryptocurrencies has increased exponentially during the Covid-19 pandemic, including in developing countries,” the group noted. “While these private digital currencies have rewarded some, and facilitate remittances, they are an unstable financial asset that can also bring social risks and costs.”

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @William, for all practical purposes I would clarify that for me corruption is not ONLY inbred in all Bajans but in my TnT family (where the term ‘bobol’ was made famous) and all others across the globe.

    There is absolutely no differentiation with your duopoly hypothesis and that presented by others about the endemic corruption ‘gene’ … you simply want to hang your ‘hat’ on that political peg as, I can only presume, it better aligns with your philosophical outlook! So be it.

    However, for you to opine that “… in my opinion they [the two political parties] have allowed, encouraged and engaged in widespread corruption” is amazingly tortuous psychologically and philosophically.

    WHERE did that intent, desire and interest in being corrupt originate @William? Where?

    Does it automatically appear as soon as a Bajan is elected; or does it come about when they decide to run!

    Who started the political parties, brother. Did Adams have a proclivity for corruption, or did Barrow or Tom or Bree!

    Did Thommo develop his in 6th form at Waterford, in George St. or back in England at birth!

    And what about his dear spouse did she grow that part of her persona after she met him or at the feet of her deeply political parents!

    Tell me bro, as a simple example, are any and all of dem Bajan men who disgustingly abuse their girl children corrupt of mind and soul or not ! …. and did they learn and develop THAT form of corrupted gene from the bad politicians!

    Or where did any of the Bajans who stole money from their employer or parents or their friend learn their corruption !

    Your argument simply does NOT make logical sense: psychological aberrations CANNOT be conveniently removed from the society in which it is found and blamed on some singular segment of that same society UNLESS there are UNIQUE characteristics infused into that same segment that are NOT originally found in the overall society.

    Can you please tell the blog what unique elements were so infused to our politicians that made them more prone to corruption than their fellow citizens!

    Thanks brother.

    I gone.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @William I saw this late so excuse this additional post.

    Looka, there are some things I post for clarity; some I take FOR GRANTED the smart folks here OVERstand without nah lotta long talk and then some I would not say out loud (like @Mr Baje) … so for clarity sake.

    SERIOUSLY you said dat @William re: “That’s the exact point I tried to make. Technology is not stagnant, it changes by the hour. Hence to talk about Barnes and Company (@DPD) and some computer given to the Data processing unit in 1969 (Sarge) all of that history bears no relevance to today’s reality.

    Brother, you are really off your game here!

    The POINT made by citing BBM and the local IBM office’s (and many others) sales efforts back then was to HIGHLIGHT the simple fact that our government had access to VIABLE TECHNOLOGY TOOLS for many years and that BASIC operational stuff SHOULD NOT be discussed as being insurmountable and definitely not the reason for being unable to cross reference deaths between depts!

    @William any and all of us here MUST be familiar with Moore’s law even if not by name: Absolutely computer tech improves rapidly as microchips get better, faster and smaller every few years.

    So again. I say … seriously you misconstrued my reference and @Sargeants as you did. SMH!

    And all I would say re @Baje’s remark is again we see how so many people are complicit in the corruption malaise…

    Edutech has been cited by many as one of the most corrupted public affairs programs in Barbados … the blogger just further opened the lid beyond that on the pervasive nature of business life on the island.

    I had the pleasure (and displeasure in some cases) like him of operating here, regionally and beyond so all I would say is that what he described is ABSOLUTELY NOT specific to Bim!

    I gone, gone again ..

    Like

  • @ DPD
    It will be difficult to find a response so eloquent that bears no reality to what I have said.
    I have never opined that the only group in Barbados that is corrupt is the politicians. However, I cannot accept that we are all corrupt.
    My major thesis is about the two major parties encouraging a culture of corruption and doing precious little to impede it.
    I cannot answer whether people become corrupt when they became politicians neither can I say that they were corrupt before they became politicians. However the same applies to the civil servant or the bank worker.
    All I am saying is that once corruption is promoted and endorsed by those who lead, it would spread.
    What you and others are trying to establish is that everybody born corrupt. That’s not what I am dealing with.
    So, if we are all corrupt or born corrupt let’s just try to be the baddest in the pond .That is the only conclusion I can come to at this point.
    I have never seen so convincing a defense of political corruption on BU until the last twenty four or so hours.
    It shows that whenever all is said and done even a corrupt political order would have some extremely fluent defenders.
    Yes , my dear Brother, I have determined that a culture of political corruption has been engineered by the the two political parties that were supposed to uphold the highest office of governance and integrity in public life. They made a very conscious decision not to do so.
    Peace.

    Like

  • @DpD
    Thanks for the clarification Re: technology. As for @ Baje. I also noted the reference to Edutech. It was indeed a rather shady operation
    Peace

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    wuh i glad enuff the gravy train RAN OUT of gravy….

    let them tief the loans signed for in the people’s name….they are not shy about that one either….

    …they already made one radical attempt to swipe approx 50 million or more….right under the noses of the IMF……am sure there have been several such attempts since then….

    when they can’t repay the alphabet entities…..it’s THEM THEY HAVE TO ANSWER TO….cause they could care less about being accountable to the people…but when they see PRISON STARING BACK AT THEM…then they will know..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “What you and others are trying to establish is that everybody born corrupt.”

    i would appreciate it if these CLOWNS SPOKE FOR THEMSELVES ONLY…

    “it does happen everywhere” has now morphed into “everybody born corrupt”….so what other idiocy and overwhelming IGNORANCE is next..

    anything to justify thievery and corruption from stinking politicians….

    i never stole anything from the treasury, vat or pension fund and if YOU HAVE AND WERE BORN CORRUPT….speak for yourself only..

    Like

  • William Skinner August 17, 2022 7:26 AM #: “If you and others believe that corruption is inbred in every Bajan, that’s your opinion.”

    @Mr. Skinner

    You’re being disingenuous.

    “If others believe that corruption is inbred in EVERY Bajan,” I certainly DID NOT mention ANYTHING to SUGGEST I SHARE a SIMILAR belief.

    All I ‘said’ was, similarly to the fact there are corrupt politicians, whether or not you want to believe or accept it, some civil servants are corrupt as well.
    And, I provided the forum with examples to substantiate my claim.

    Also, it is NONSENSE for anyone to suggest ‘that ALL politicians are corrupt and civil servants accused of corruption are their followers, party members, family, friends, bed partners.’

    However, weren’t you an aspiring politician having ‘ran’ for the NDP?
    If you want us to believe ALL politicians are inherently dishonest and corrupt, does that mean you’re admitting to being corrupt as well?

    How about your ‘friend’ Hammie Lah? Do you believe he is corrupt also?
    Didn’t he defend the $11,000 a businessman who charged UDC to cut down an ‘ackee tree’…… under his watch as Minister of Social Transformation?

    Also, a Special Audit of the UDC revealed the following:

    … 5.64 Investigations revealed that a number of temporary posts at the UDC were not approved by the Ministry of the Civil Service as directed by the Cabinet.

    … 5.65 The Minister, under whose responsibility the UDC falls, supported and approved the creation of six temporary posts for the UDC. The approval of the Ministry of the Civil Service was however not sought. The Commission having been informed that the Minister had approved the posts, proceeded to fill the positions.”

    Is ‘Comrade Trevor Prescod another corrupt politician?
    Or, is he excluded from that characterisation because he identifies as a Pan Africanist and both you and him share ideological and philosophical similarities?

    Like

  • @Artax

    It is a useful reminder that the auditor general reports is primarily about a review of business done by public servants in the public sector, not to exempt politicians who have policy responsibility.

    We can’t have it both ways if we take the AG’s reports seriously. When we talk about corruption – it requires more than one hand to clap.

    Like


  • “you are 1000% correct this clique on here comprising Waru, Skinner, Bush Tea and Pacha main aim on here is in my view to pull down this elected government at all cost.”


    “The 0, Harold Harry Hal Austin, Bushman, Afrika Dub are big fans [of AC Angela mariposa Cox]”

    Perhaps all of these fellows with their male complex
    and excessive testosterone with a deficiency in Estrogen or oestrogen
    love stupid women and are afraid of intelligent women like Mama Mia
    (although I have a theory that even intelligent women are too emotional like these dirty fellows)

    Ring The Alarm (Quick)

    estradiol, the predominant form of estrogen, also plays a critical role in male sexual function. Estradiol in men is essential for modulating libido, erectile function, and spermatogenesis.

    Like

  • William Skinner August 17, 2022 10:20 AM

    RE: “What you and others are trying to establish is that everybody born corrupt.”

    In the interest of clarity, please identify those persons and their comments that gave you the impression they’re trying “to establish everybody born corrupt?”

    RE: “I have never seen so convincing a defense of political corruption on BU until the last twenty four or so hours.”

    Again, in the interest of clarity, please identify where in the comments of those individuals who contributed to the issue so far, gave you the impression they are “defending political corruption?”

    All that has happened is after realizing you were advancing a SILLY ARGUMENT, you decided to PURPOSELY MISREPRESENT what persons actually mentioned so as to take control and make yourself appear as being correct…. a form of redirection.

    It’s similar to someone setting, answering and matking his own exam questions,……and then, declaring himself to be a genius.

    Like

  • “It is a useful reminder that the auditor general reports is primarily about a review of business done by public servants in the public sector, not to exempt politicians who have policy responsibility.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    @ David

    I’m aware of the purpose of the Auditor General’s reports.
    I made a similar comment in a previous contribution and was told I was defending politicians.

    However, I don’t understand your comments or the basis for them.

    Like

  • @Artax

    The comment is a reminder as stated corruption is not something we can ascribe to one or the other group. A politician needs a complicit public servant to engage in corruption.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “…but as we can clearly see, posting has become a pappy show for some to post endless shite that has no substance, bears no resemblance to reality, and is counterproductive to any progress…”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    Agreed…… 100%.

    Posting 80% of contributions, some of which are IRRELEVANT, to every thread is definitely “counterproductive to any progress.”

    “LESS IS MORE.”

    Like

  • Let us have a toast for the solidarity of the middle classes.. I know this is not the 80s when people were entitled to voice strong opinions against racial minorities women and gays.. but I would like to make a stand like a psyops internet troll on the main stream “underground” and sing some lyrics in a computer style sound vibration with the chorus about banning the brassbowelry slavery duopoly by any means necessary

    E20 (Dub Version)

    Like

  • @ Artax
    My views are opened to critique, and so is everybody else’s.
    As I have pointed out , I don’t know who is was born a genetic crook whether they are politicians or public servants.
    I believe that what I have read here is a deliberate attempt to let politicians off the hook therefore I see it as a defense of their corruption. Others have said that I only want to blame politicians.
    I don’t think that is what I said. I merely said that they have nurtured and nourished the corruption.
    I stand by that.
    I have deduced from what I have read that since the politicians come from amongst us , we have the same inclinations. I can’t buy that.
    Finally , when corruption was raised in this forum before , I don’t think that the spotlight fell on public servants , in as strong terms , as is now the case.
    I rest my case for now.
    Peace.
    .

    Like

  • @ David

    Okay, now I understand the point you’re trying to make.

    However, if you were to read the UDC Special Audit report, for example, staff complained of being intimated by the Chairman and other directors.
    Something we should also take into consideration as well.

    UDC’s Response
    5.52 In response to a number of the issues raised, especially those relating to
    unauthorized loans and breaches of Internal control, the UDC management indicated as follows: – The approval and disbursement of the kind of loans highlighted were carried out to the exclusion of authorized staff of the Urban Development Commission During these periods of breaches and break-down in
    internal and other controls, (that is October to December 2002 and May 2003) the Director was not present at the Commission. Every internal procedure established to direct the operations of the Urban Enterprise Loan Scheme was overruled, superseded, by persons other than the management and staff of the Commission. UDC staff SUFFERED HUMILIATION by members of the Board, THREATS to their employment, COERCION to ACT in CAPACITIES BEYOND THEIR REMIT. VERBAL ABUSE and THREATS of physical violence by persons accessing the Commission’s services, commandeering of payment vouchers, applications to incur expenditure and Cheque books by persons other than the accounting officer.

    Like

  • @Artax

    How would you categorize senior management at the SOEs? Politicians or public servants or quasi.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    I have never said that all politicians are inherently corrupt. And I actually don’t believe that .
    I simply said that the corruption is driven by the politicians and in many cases encouraged by them and the culture of corruption that they have refused to impede because it may benefit their cause.
    That’s it for me.

    Peace

    Like

  • @ Mr. Skinner

    Last/last

    There isn’t anything you can ‘say’ to convince me that persons, by their contributions, ‘said’ people were “born genetic crooks” or that they are “defending politicians.”

    I cannot convince you otherwise.

    If you interpreted my ‘saying’ there are corrupt politicians and civil servants in Barbados to mean everyone is born corrupt and I’m defending politicians…… then, so be it.

    I’m not going to waste any more time trying to convince otherwise.

    We’re essentially ‘going around in circles.’

    ‘Let’s agree to disagree.’

    Like

  • @ David

    Yes. I understand your point.

    I forgot the Chairman, board members, management are usually aspiring politicians, friends of the Minister or from his/her constituency…… with one common similarly…… being members of the incumbent political party.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @William, I will do like my fellow blogger and say: “last one” on this 🤣😎 … I have always been intrigued by psychology and that’s why I have long gone pass my post limits on this lil side debate!

    When you say ” I merely said that they have nurtured and nourished the corruption. I stand by that.” … do you reflect on the area in Developmental Psy of ‘NATURE VS NURTURE’.

    You noted that you ‘cannot answer whether people become corrupt when they became politicians neither can [you] say that they were corrupt before they became politicians. However the same applies to the civil servant or the bank worker.” … Or when you say that “I have deduced from what I have read that since the politicians come from amongst us , we have the same inclinations. I can’t buy that.” then what should I sell you then 😎… Afterall, that’s the genesis of any reasonable psychological debate of LIFE, not so!

    Are these characteristics inherently “nurtured” which is defined as ‘… the view that people are shaped by the environment around them, which includes people they meet, the culture they grow up in, the knowledge they encounter etc” or is it a natural (biological) occurrence innate to their life!!!

    In my view it’s both of course … but the point as it relates to our political leaders is that it STARTS before their political career.

    Thus to your point, ALL I (and others) AM saying is that we are all to blame .. there is NO coddling or any attempt WHATEVER to “let pols off the hook”. How can I lambaste myself and Bajans as having been nurtured and naturally inclined to some corrupt behaviors and then let the leaders slide free… NO brother they are the biggest criminals and should pay the harshest penalties but too many of us (never said ALL) facilitate that crooked behavior because as the blogger said above: some too are hoping for their handout!

    Anyhow, last, last on this matter of the psychological ‘mascara’ of my fellow Bajans!

    Later, bro.

    Like

  • By Any Means Necessary (after Malcolm X) – Observe and Interpret

    The Title of my Next Book:
    “Under Me Sleng Teng Version Jammy’s Super Power Smashes the Brassbowelry Slavery Duopoly (by any means necessary)*”

    (*) By any means necessary is a translation of a phrase used by Martinican intellectual Frantz Fanon in his 1960 Address to the Accra Positive Action Conference …
    ..fight oppression and exploitation. The title of the painting, By Any Means Necessary, is a quote often used by Malcolm in public speeches to challenge his listeners to organize and take action to gain their rights, respect and freedom: “We want freedom by any means necessary”.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “challenge his listeners to organize and take action to gain their rights, respect and freedom: “We want freedom by any means necessary”.

    and that’s what people are realizing they must do to ESCAPE THE REPEAT…..the replay……

    Like

  • @ David

    It is important to note that the Chairman, other board members and management of state owned and quasi government organizations……

    …… are NOT career civil servants, similarly to those in ‘central government.’

    Therein lies the DIFFERENCE.

    While the Director/CEO is employed by contractual arrangements…… the Board members are paid a monthly stipend.

    And, all of them resign when there is a change of ‘government,’…… or management is subsequently terminated to be replaced by a supporter of the new administration.

    And, the cycle continues.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    People actually realize where all of this is leading because it’s already SET IN MOTION….we got the full outline of the nasty plans…

    They also realize although it must proceed WITH SPEED, just not under the glare of social media, saboteurs, spies, or judases…

    Like

  • started by the politicians who would order medicines from florida or whereever for the QEH and bill the taxpayers 3 and 4 times the amount because they must have their cut still happening…

    same thing recently with the port scammers….costing a few thousand when we googled them and embarrassed THE LIAR……..but someone the politician’s mathematics concluded that they cost multi-MILLIONS…. same with the garbage trucks that cost so much less from manufacturers……..all for their cut…

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    DONVILLE INNISS AND HIS BOY FORMER QEH CEO DR DEXTER JAMES WHO I USED TO TEASE ALL THE TIME WHILST SEEING HIM PLAYING GOLF REGULARLY AT BARBADOS GOLF CLUB (BGC) IN DURANTS CHRIST CHURCH THAT I WOULD CALL THE NATION NEWSPAPER AS HE SEEMED NOT TO SPEND HIS TIME AS CEO OF QEH BUT GOLF WAS HIS JOB.

    WE WOULD BOTH LAUGH IT OFF ME NOT KNOWING HE WAS INVOLVED IN AN IMPORTING AND DRUGS BILLING RACKET AT THE QEH.

    STRANGELY I WAS APPROACHED BY ANOTHER BUSINESS MAN WELL KNOWN IN ANOTHER PROFESSIONAL CAPACITY WHO WAS ALSO A GOLFER TO MEET WITH DONVILLE INNISS AND THE CEO WHO WE BOTH KNEW FROM (BGC) TO SETUP A LOCAL COMPANY TO BRING IN PHARMACETUICAL DRUGS FROM ABROAD INCLUDING INDIA. WE NEVER DID SETUP THE JOINT COMPANY AT CORPORATE AFFAIRS AS I WAS TOO BUSY IN OTHER AREAS.

    IN HINDSIGHT IF I KNEW THAT THE KIND OF MONEY DR DEXTER JAMES AND DONVILLE INNISS WERE MAKING FROM IMPORTING SUPPLIES AND DR JAMES BEING AT THE GOLF COURSE VERY VERY REGULARLY I MIGHT HAVE BEEN TEMPTED TO JOIN THEIR TEAM OF BANDITS.

    SOMEONE WILL TELL ME THAT DR DEXTER JAMES WAS NOT A KNOWN GOLFER. LOL.

    PORT SCANNERS, GARBAGE TRUCKS ETC ARE ALL PART OF THE TYPE OF RAKETS AND MORE GOING ON DAILY ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    I make a single prediction, there will be another debt restructuring in the next 5 years.
    The factors which could avoid/delay this, are finding new sources of cheap borrowed funds, a large grant from somewhere, or taking money from citizens and giving them Bonds.
    There remains too wide a gap between revenue and expenses.
    And given the number of Ministers and Consultants, cutting expenses seems off the table, unless, the IMF makes it a condition.

    Like

  • Some of the biggest talkers on BU are also some of the biggest con men/women around.🤐

    Like

  • Some of the biggest talkers on BU are also some of the biggest con men/women around.🤐

    Xxxxxxx

    THE SAYING GOES IT TAKES ONE TO KNOW ONE MR/MS BILLION $$$ PROJECT/MARKETING MANAGER.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    lol…

    he should be telling us where de people BILLIONS of dollars in taxes, vat and pension money gone….none ah we int tief it, at least none of the people i discourse with………he should be telling us WHICH CON MEN AND WOMEN DID..

    ah birdie tell muh ********…ya will soon see the fallout from that….too..

    Like

  • @ N.O.
    “…or taking money from citizens and giving them Bonds.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    You know full well that this plot is already well in train….

    After seeing how meekly CLICO investors parted with their savings..
    And how Government paper holders took their haircuts like real ‘men’..
    And how the NIS savings have been so quietly “disappeared” into clear waters..

    Why do you think that there are so many references in HIGH places, to the ‘folly’ of Bajans having such HUGE savings accounts in the banks at 0,1% interest?
    …when the BOSS promises 5%…?

    SURELY the supreme one will be inclined to force BBs to act ‘in their OWN best interest’…..

    Not to worry, sheep mostly go quietly to the slaughter…. And the butchers have had ‘Enuff’ practice to pull this one off smoothly…

    Like

  • Taking ac off the field was BU’s loss. Instead of refreshing and thought provoking comments we get some bloggers repeating the same thing ad nauseam.

    The brilliant HA .. . gone
    Thought provoking a c …. gone
    Remaining.. J2, enuff, Lorenzo …

    Like

  • Surprised there are only 200 plus downloads of the presentation.

    <object class="wp-block-file__embed" data="https://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2022/08/nis-presentation-2022.pdf&quot; type="application/pdf" style="width:100%;height:600px" aria-label="Embed of The Current State & Future Outlook of the National Insurance Fund was created and presented by Actuary Derek Osbourne.
    The Current State & Future Outlook of the National Insurance Fund was created and presented by Actuary Derek Osbourne.
    August 19, 2022
    Download

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s