Barbados Must Stop and BREATHE

Many of us look to Singapore as the benchmark that represents the near perfect society on earth. Some key characteristics driving the behaviour of the average Singaporean  identify hard working, competitive, afraid to fail, self centred all encapsulated by the word kiasu __ a Hokkien word that captures the uniquely Singaporean trait of being afraid to lose out. What is starkly obvious is that the leadership of Singapore is always occupied with executing tactics to develop and support a national identity for its people that feeds the society it wants to sustain.

What is the national identity of Barbados?

Is there a strategy by our political and NGO leaders to create an identity that syncs with who we are as a people?

There is nothing wrong with benchmarking to Singapore but we know a wholesale comparison is not realistic. The cultural diversity between the two countries is too wide.

The other characteristic one discerns from reading the literature about Singapore is the discipline the government in this instance supports. Especially as it relates to enforcing the laws and customs of the country.

As the public prosecutor, the AGC enforces all laws “without fear or favour”. Whether it is charging a high-profile individual for corruption or serving as Singapore’s international lawyer, the AGC has a critical role, Mr Lee said.

“As public prosecutors, you ensure that everyone is accountable for their actions. You enforce all our laws, whether it is against drug abuse, organised crime, unauthorised money lending or terrorism,” he said. “Because our laws are enforced, Singaporeans and foreigners know that here in Singapore, they are safe and secure.”

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/upholding-rule-of-law-key-to-singapore-s-survival-pm-lee-8709316

Have a walk along most streets in Barbados and there is litter everywhere. We have many who have no fear about tossing an empty snack box out a car or bus window. Have a walk through our gullies or off trails to be reminded of the scourge of illegal dumping.

Stand by any junction controlled by traffic lights and observe motorists running red lights.  Not to forget the motor cyclists who hog highways to perform wheelies and other stunts in ‘broad’ daylight.

Everyday the blogmaster wonders if the ban on the use of mobile phones while driving was repealed.

Not too long ago an executive (Leroy Parris) of a leading insurance company (CLICO Insurance) refused to adhere to a stop sell order issued by the regulator.

Every year almost ALL state owned agencies break the law by not laying current financials in parliament to be accessible to the public. No where is the financial indiscipline best seen than at the National Insurance Scheme, arguable the most important state owned agency setup to pay social security benefits to citizens.

Have a read of a decade of Auditor General’s reports or the pages of Barbados Underground if you have been living under a moon rock in recent years to confirm the sorry tale of a country gripped by indiscipline. How often have we heard some leader or the other utter the empty words, “we are a nation of laws’. Barbadians have become numb to the meaning.

The rampant flouting of the laws and rules by officers of the court  has become  folklore. The Barbados Bar Association and Disciplinary Committee have not served the country well.

The ills are not exhaustive.

Mr Lee said emphasising the rule of law is a “vital national interest” for a small country like Singapore, and helped Singapore to distinguish itself from other developing countries and move from third world to first.

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/upholding-rule-of-law-key-to-singapore-s-survival-pm-lee-8709316

There is a heavy focus by the government of Barbados to rebuild the economy. However, we need an equal or greater focus on enforcing our laws in every sphere of life. We (not just the government) have to start holding every citizen accountable from top to bottom; in the private and public sectors. We must exercise a zero tolerance to illegal and unauthorized behaviour starting right now. If we do not arrest the  current situation, borrowing billions to develop the physical infrastructure will be for nothing if the social fabric is not addressed.

 

 

228 comments

  • fortyacresandamule

    @David Fair enough. Point noted.

    @Hal. ” They desprately wanted to be first world nation”. And might I add, without working to achieve such status. Having a one service industry won’t cut it.

    Like

  • @ John A

    It seems you only talk to old bare foot Broad Street cash boys who remember when they went to sleep hungry. Can someone plse remind me of pap and bakes and muffins and roast potatoes and stew food and soup and cou-cou and red herring and white rice and butter and fish cakes and cheese cutters. Going to sleep hungry? Wow! Even at school we got milk and biscuits Let us make up our social history as we go along.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I agree with john let the bad boys test the rope

    Like

  • @ Hal.

    Nice one LOL

    I as you tell me am the eternal optimist. The island has changed alot over the years as one would expect. What has happened though is we haven’t kept up with updating out enforcement arms. Stop and think of these examples. Clico, cement bond on spring garden, ZRs with 200 charges still driving, no brethalizer hence no penalties for drunk driving, red lights that mean “brek fuh yourself ” not stop. Squatters, illegal vending, illegal structures, government entities who haven’t filed financials for 5 years. I could go on and on but what is the one common denominator here?

    A LACK OF ENFORCEMENT.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal

    Ok think on this one question.

    If one police bike cop and one judge demanded respect for law on our roads in the 60s, how come with technology and nuff more police on the roads, we have a case daily of total mayhem by the PSVS and others?

    What has failed us between then and now to cause this?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @enuff

    To who and or what do you you refer?

    Like

  • @All…

    Only today I watched a woman pull into a handicapped parking spot, and step out.

    I said to her: “You don’t look terribly handicapped.” She scowled at me, and then locked her car and walked into the shop.

    I find it somewhat interesting that there are all these “Don’t park here; you will be towed.” signs. To the best of my understanding, even if you own a business or even a property and want a vehicle illegally parked to be towed no such service is available.

    I deeply respect different cultures.

    But “the tragedy of the commons” is not that difficult an idea to get one’s head around.

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule

    Singapore have managed, from top down, to inculcate a set of values and discipline in their people. Some will criticise their one-party state model and that’s a reasonable critique. However, I will take that system any day over any multi-party democracy that is a socio-economic basket case/ failure.

    The miracle of Singapore, in my opinion, is how they managed to build a discipline society with all it ultra-modernity. That is not easy to do. And that is why singapore is unique in this case. If it weren’t so, we would have had many copcats by now.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @40a: “And that is why singapore is unique in this case.

    I happened to watch a BBC report last night talking about why Estonia is so far ahead of just about every other EU nation with regards to its education scores.

    What struck me is their education system is “unstructured”. The teachers get to decide what to teach (from the ages of, like, four). The “evalutators” don’t even ever enter the classroom.

    Whenever I have had the privilege to teach I give “driving problems”. Here’s what you need to know. That’s the problem you need to solve. Feel free to ask questions.

    I have found, over time, that those with “degrees” tend to “crash and burn”, while high-school (NA context) drop-outs are very comfortable in such situations.

    YMMV.

    Liked by 1 person

  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/12/02/accused-tells-jury-prosecution-gave-you-nothing/

    Yet another “confession”?

    Police in Barbados are either to stupid or too lazy to do real police or detective work.

    Who will guard the guards? Are these law men or lawless men?

    Like

  • The main reason i have no respect for any of those two colonial governments…they have both had ample time to rename all the slave plantations and slave master named schools after TONS OF BLACK people who are either domiciled on the island…NOT… political YARDFOWLS. imps or pimps…instead of leaving them in the names of cursed slave masters for over 50 years…

    …Tons of innovative, creative, genius black people descended from Bajan parentage across the globe.. could have changed the cloud of colonial blight still enveloping the island. They never recognize their own people. Chrisholm reached the political heights of the US and not even a street in Barbados named after her…..and she is not the only one……the two colonial governments should be ashamed.

    “And few would question that the American political landscape was forever altered by Shirley Anita Chisholm – who as a young girl in Barbados attended a school than ought now to bear her name rather than the plantation that enslaved her forebears, Vauxhall.”

    Like

  • @Donna: “Police in Barbados are either to stupid or too lazy to do real police or detective work.

    I dare you to do a day’s work as a Police Officer. Here, or anywhere.

    They tend to be distrusted and hated, right up until you need them.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Different people, different culture with different outcomes.
    May be it’s preordained — back in the late 1940’s we had a song at elementary school that went “Let dogs delight to bark and bite for god has made them so”.

    Like

  • @David

    Do you think the Atty Gen was in possession of the facts when he made his statement re Walkers?

    Like

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife

    @David December 3, 2019 9:54 AM “Suicide as an indicator of wellness in this scenario is not accurate. It is known that the suicide rate in the Asian population is higher compared to other ethnic groups.”

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2378023117743908
    “Out of four primary subgroups in the United States—white males, black males, white females, and black females—the latter group, black females, has and has always had the lowest rates of suicide (Centers for Disease Control 2012). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention Data and Statistics Fatal Injury Report revealed that in 2015, WHITE MALES HAD THE HIGHEST SUICIDE RATE AT 24.6 per 100,000 (30,658 deaths), followed by black males with a rate of 9.4 per 100,000 (2,023 deaths), then by white females with a rate of 7.2 per 100,000 (9,138 deaths), and finally BLACK FEMALES WHO HAD THE LOWEST SUICIDE RATE OF2.1 per 100,000 (481 deaths)”

    Why is this? It can’t be something as simplistic as believing that black women are dimbos can it?

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife

    @Miller December 3, 2019 10:19 AM “Why would a country like Japan with such a technologically advanced and well-off economy and society have such a high suicide rate?”

    Perhaps for the same reason that white American men also from a technologically advanced and well-off economy and society have such a high suicide rate.

    What if neither technology, nor wealth can protect against suicide?

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife

    @Artax December 3, 2019 1:54 PM “Children had to walk far distances to “bring water.,” cut grass for the pillows and beds, which were sometimes a haven for “chinks.”

    Sometimes Artax?? Sometimes???

    Those sour grass beds ALWAYS had chinks/bedbugs, except maybe for the first few weeks after Christmas. When i was young all like now so as soon as the rainy season ended and schools closed I would be out in the grass piece cutting sour grass with a sickle, spreading it out to dry, to have it ready to stuff the new flour bag bed casing. But a few weeks later the chinks back out in force.

    Thank God for flit-guns and for DDT.

    Yup I said “thank God for DDT.”

    Like

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife

    @Hal Austin December 3, 2019 4:51 PM. “In the old days ED Mottley fed the hungry from the Queen’s Park kitchen, now they go hungry.”

    Not true. The Salvation Army and multiple other churches still feed the hungry. And where does the Army and where do the churches get their money?

    From people like me who give generously and consistently.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    @Chris. I did a comparative studies on the baltic countries (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) some years ago. Comparing their success with other post -soviet countries. I was very impressed with Estonia. I think they score high on the PISA ranking along with Finland. I didn’t know their education system was that unstructured. Maybe could learn from them.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    Suicide rate or Murder rate? I would rather live in a country with a high suicide rate than one with a high murder rate. I am sure Japan or South Korea are not losing sleep over people who decide to self-harm in this way. And I am also sure Jamaica would trade places with any of these countries with their suicide rate vs jamaica’s civil war murder rate.

    Like

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife
    December 3, 2019 10:31 PM

    @David December 3, 2019 9:54 AM “Suicide as an indicator of wellness in this scenario is not accurate. It is known that the suicide rate in the Asian population is higher compared to other ethnic groups.”
    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/2378023117743908
    “Out of four primary subgroups in the United States—white males, black males, white females, and black females—the latter group, black females, has and has always had the lowest rates of suicide (Centers for Disease Control 2012). The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention Data and Statistics Fatal Injury Report revealed that in 2015, WHITE MALES HAD THE HIGHEST SUICIDE RATE AT 24.6 per 100,000 (30,658 deaths), followed by black males with a rate of 9.4 per 100,000 (2,023 deaths), then by white females with a rate of 7.2 per 100,000 (9,138 deaths), and finally BLACK FEMALES WHO HAD THE LOWEST SUICIDE RATE OF2.1 per 100,000 (481 deaths)”
    Why is this? It can’t be something as simplistic as believing that black women are dimbos can it?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I guess your Biblical advice to men would be just find a corner on the housetop rather than killing themselves!!

    https://biblehub.com/proverbs/21-9.htm

    Liked by 1 person

  • You just can’t make any of this up, am sure the person was some useless powerful foolish yardfowl put in that position to mess with people’s lives and they all knew. Go around that corrupt court at your own risk….so some of you here who believed ya were divorced and got remarried…well, ya better check this out…lol hope the idiot don’t decide to arrest those who did not know any of this, for polygamy…well, well, well.

    https://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/242963/divorce-fix

    Authorities are hastening to correct an error in the court system which left hundreds of couples believing they were divorced, when they were not.

    In some cases, the individuals had gone on to remarry.

    Yesterday, the House of Assembly debated a retroactive change in the law that would correct the mistake and make the divorces valid.

    In introducing the Family Law (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill 2019, Attorney General Dale Marshall said that the Master of the Supreme Court did not have the power to grant the divorces for more than ten years, even though the title-holder was doing so.

    Like

  • But wait, they ain’t done yet…MORE LIES….people on FB are calling this public nuisance a liar to his face..nearly 2 years on…he is telling you the SAME LIES…60 years later…you will hear…the SAME LIES….come election time…SAME LIES…while BEGGING YOU FOR VOTES…to return to parliament to TELL THE SAME LIES..

    https://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/163813/marshall-vows-hold-dems-liable?fbclid=IwAR34bBHbMWkBJq7Tv8of7Ad2G7M7AdUfOsrqJoy5jQwagOXWeOmAdbr4LEc
    .
    “ATTORNEY GENERAL DALE MARSHALL isn’t playing when he says he will be going after those who committed any wrongdoing in the last Democratic Labour Party (DLP) administration.

    He gave this assurance yesterday as he spoke to the DAILY NATION yesterdayat the Barbados Labour Party’s (BLP) celebration picnic at Bath, St John.

    “There were a lot of things that were uncovered, for example, when we were in the Public Accounts Committee, that we considered to be acts of misfeasance,” Marshall said.

    “I’m quite sure that as we unravel more and more of the things that have been done by the last administration, we will find more acts of misfeasance.

    “And I’m committed to pursuing all the Government’s remedies to hold those individuals accountable.”

    Marshall also made note of a number of contracts which were renewed by the last DLP administration days before the May 24 General Election.

    On this topic he said those individuals could not be sued or locked up. Instead, the Attorney General explained Government would have to “make decisions to deal with it”.

    Like

  • Ya would think that the jackass as attorney general would AMEND THE LAW to retroactive status…so that his tiefing corrupt bribemasters would be held accountable right……but no, he is looking people right in your faces…AND LYING…like he does not know how to amend laws that causes the corruption..I hope he is one of the first to have handcuffs put on his lying ass as soon as this toxic, deceitful corrupt governemnt is kicked out of parliament by the people they are lying to continously.

    “Our party is committed to holding them accountable for any wrongdoings. The problem with our law is that you can’t legislate retroactively,” he said.

    “Integrity legislation, making people liable, which is intended to be retroactive in operation, can have some challenges in the law courts. So the method of holding them accountable may not be through integrity legislation. We are going to have to find other means to deal with any issues of wrongdoing under them.”

    Like

  • Barbados is the only country in the WORLD..that cannot lock up criminal ministers in the government, lawyers from the bar association and in the minority criminal community…WHO ROB THE PEOPLE, TREASURY AND PENSION FUND.

    am sure they are all proud of that.

    Like

  • What really made me laugh, and not put a smile on my face, was when there was a suggestion to ask vendors at Oistins, and south and west coast hoteliers about US tourists spending more than those from the UK, some idiot wrote some nonsense about that was not his experience in the Bahamas, and referred to what the Yanks did to Viet Nam during the war (1954-1975). Isn’t that amazing?

    Reminds me of that time-share thing.

    Like

  • “Almost all true. Some exaggerations and hyperbole. But these help to make the stories more interesting.”

    Mr. Codrington

    Okay. All I can say is that you made me realize my elderly relatives and all those elderly people who talked to us youngsters were LYING……. and I guess I made up and exaggerated things as I went along, just to make things interesting.

    Perhaps the only people we should “listen” to, are you and Hal Austin.

    Like

  • David BU

    My friends thank you for posting their concerns on BU and they’re hoping the RBPF reads the thread and take the appropriate action.

    John A made a reference to a police officer named Cyrus and magistrate Walcott.

    At the risk of being accused by BU’s intelligentsia of writing nonsense, fabrication, exaggerations and hyperbole……. I often heard the older folk talked about how people used to fear a magistrate named Perry, especially those from the Pine.

    According to them, when an accused person from the Pine went before him, he used to say “P for Pine, P for Perry and P for Prison.”

    Like

  • When did anyone mentioned anything about people going to sleep hungry?

    Isn’t this also fabrication, exaggeration and hyperbole?

    Like

  • @Artax

    Thanks for highlighting the concern, please give us your usual feedback in due course on the matter.

    The matter was shared to the blogmaster’s FB wall as well.

    Like

  • @ WARU

    The Attorney General Teets Marshall said and I quote

    “…“And I’m committed to pursuing all the Government’s remedies to hold those individuals accountable….”

    But that article should actually have said

    “…“And I’m committed to pursuing all the Government’s remedies to hold those individuals accountable AS LONG AS THEY ARE NOT BLP PARTY FAITHFUL, in which case, we have already pardoned them UNDER THE “MUGABE COME TO JESUS” LAW!…”

    Like

  • Back to Singapore, I fear that WURA is correct in his analysis. as evidenced by the litany of cases he cited. I visited Singapore some years ago. I was impressed by the national discipline, pride, industry and creativity I witnessed there.

    By contrast, we seem to have been developing for some time a culture of deviance, delinquency, degradation and despair, facilitated by easy and unfettered access to the excesses of social media. There is therefore really no valid. over all comparison between Barbados and Singapore

    Thus,, any number of local atrocities, beyond littering, would not pass muster in Singapore, where chewing gum is an offense, and caning, I believe, is still a real possibility. The images of a Bajan young woman at Cropover with a young man with his mouth ensconced between her buttocks (he seemed a sort of Bajan Mozart in search of (un)savory dumplings, what if she had a leaky prolapse… yikes???); sex, recorded, in schools and widely disseminated; gambling; stabbings and the recent murder at Frederick Smith Secondary School, drug trafficking and increasing murders; “Bajan porn”; all seem to witness a society in crisis if not free fall.

    It would seem that such behaviors should normally attract the sanctions of the law. The A.G, sometimes known elsewhere as the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services, the Minister of Education, at a minimum, might have a role to play here beyond the rhetorical. But, good luck, in resolving such societal rot.

    Like

  • While there is much to remember about the good old days; I get a bit concerned, when people try to become over nostalgic.
    @ Hal
    I can’t agree with you that we had our glory days “ before Barrow”. As much as I ridicule Barrow for the Public Order Act and his failure to radically push economic enfranchisement, to state that after him there is nothing to shout about is grossly inaccurate.
    My same analysis fits the Grantley Adams era. Adams politics might have been conservative and he was justly hammered by the progressives but his contribution cannot be seriously denied.
    Your attempts to elevate certain figures such as Mottley to almost sainthood, might not be embraced by others who have critically looked at that period. One will not deny that he did some good but there are other schools of thought about that era.
    Sometimes childhood nostalgia is not the reality some of us are so eager to pronounce.
    I don’t consider any golden age to be determined by when black people could not go near Strathlyde or Belleville; when bright poor black people were denied entry into Harrison and Queens College; when we were basically treated as second class citizens.
    Some will claim and correctly so that history now seems to be repeating itself due to the comprehensive failures of the Duopoly.
    The good old days were not all that good my brother. Looking back and having wonderful childhood memories is one thing but declaring we were better off is a bit too much.

    Like

  • Here in Dover, we ‘enjoy’ the EXTREMELY LOUD noise of a yellow motorcycle, many times during the day & night, as the rider deliver drugs to the numerous ‘salesmen’ selling along the Gap…..hookers also among the ‘items’ for sale!! No helmet, no licence plates … yet this guy been doing his ‘work’ for months and never a Police in sight! What enforcement of laws we talking ’bout???

    Also, all are invited to witness the many ZR’s, off-route, short-cutting the through same Dover road in early morning traffic …… enjoy!!

    Like

  • What can we do about it Ks?

    Like

  • P.S: All BARBADIANS should be made to read the Barbados Constitution. So far as I can determine, it may well be that nothing in that document, prohibits explicitly or implicitly, any judicial sentence imposing a little hard labour on many of the errant, criminally disposed. Consider the possible benefits.

    Like

  • @David:

    Many years ago when the ‘short-cutting’ started, the authorities installed speed-bumps along many residential roads that motorists utilized to gain a few seconds off the journey to their work-place. While this slowed average speeds, it did not decrease the traffic density.

    Regarding the lawbreakers, what more can we do but inform the Police and wait for action to be taken….. ??

    Like

  • @ Caleb Pilgrim

    You said and I quote

    “…By contrast, we seem to have been developing for some time a culture of deviance, delinquency, degradation and despair, facilitated by easy and unfettered access to the excesses of social media….”

    While I absolutely agree with the first part of your statement THE SECOND PART IS AN UNFOUNDED NON-SEQUITUR!

    How does this work when you say “…facilitated by easy and unfettered access to the excesses of social media…?”

    What are these “excesses” of social media? Please define!

    The first part has NOTHING TO DO WITH THE SECOND else you must be saying that Singapore has no access to social media or, IF THEY DO, these “excesses” which you alone know of, are mysteriously blocked or have no effect on them, like kryptonite!

    I am however going to return to the first part of your statement.

    Deviance, delinquency, degradation and despair.

    The recorded origins of Think Tanks date back to Athens and Plato

    People set aside time for this practice, like Hyde Park on Sundays in London or that place in Manhattan in Lower New York, I is an ole man so I forgetting this now.

    My point is that things that nurture people and positivity DONT AUTOCOMBUST!!

    In the absence of nurture, nature breeds these 5 D’s

    You forgot DICTATORS!

    Let me see if I can get you to discuss specifics AS OPPOSED TO THESE AIRY FAIRY ABSTRACTS that abound here on Barbados Underground

    What ethical moorings do these politicians bring to this matrix of nurtured growth you seem to be suggesting?

    Trevor Prescod, Patrick Todd, Michael Lashley, Dennis Lowe, Denis Kellman, Johnny Tudor, Mark Williams, Owen Arthur, Mia Mottley

    Pich a name Pilgrim ANY name, and extrapolate for us, to this place where these 5 D’s will find Death & Destruction and be replaced with Love, Light, Liberty, Liberation or whatever litany of linked letters you like and think would support your suggestion adequately

    My point is simple, WE VOTE FOR LOOSE LACKEYS WITH LILLIPUTIAN IDEAS, veritable waste foops yet we expect Singaporean outputs!

    Oh Rass**le!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • “And I’m committed to pursuing all the Government’s remedies to hold those individuals accountable….””

    he knows he is lying..then he DOUBLED DOWN on the lies…

    oh…we cannot lock them up or sue them…

    oh …there is no retroactive legislation that could work…to bring them to justice..

    oh…this..

    oh.. that…

    dude should be in prison…all of them…..

    Liked by 1 person

  • WE VOTE FOR LOOSE LACKEYS WITH LILLIPUTIAN IDEAS
    WE DEFEND AND PROMOTE LOOSE LACKEYS WITH LILLIPUTIAN IDEAS
    WE SEEK TO SHUT UP AND CRAMP DOWN ON TRUTH TELLERS
    WE DO LIKE THE DOG…WHO WE LIKE WE LICK THOSE WHO ARE TOO SMART ND TOO ACCURATE WE SEEK TO SHUT UP

    WHO REALLY LOSES ?

    Liked by 1 person

  • the past is the past and we will never get back there.

    i am a proud product of so called free education and dont know how my parents would have paid for secondary education. for that i thank Barrow and especially for the introduction of the text book rental scheme in 1975. we couldnt even afford second hand books. thanks again Barrow.

    Re Estonia – it should be noted that Estonia is the least organised religion region in Europe

    Modern day Singapore and i have seen it referenced here, was built on anti public corruption laws and a professional civil / public service. Bim is not and it is quite fashionable for Bim politicians to become rich in office and ridiculed if they dont. for them to defend the lawless in the guise of supporting the black population e.g. the longstanding minibus fiasco and general lack of law enforcement in Bim. the civil service as Barrow referred to it is “an army of occupation.” They do nothing to make the system run smoothly. in fact the opposite.

    remedies-
    politicians declare their assets fully on coming into office and demitting office. failure to do so or to do so honestly should be a jail term.
    an anti public corruption body set up to monitor and investigate all manner of public corruption.
    litter laws should be strictly enforced.
    police service should be well paid, well trained, well resourced and held accountable.
    disband the BDF except for the Coast Guard and shore up the police service.
    and a civic code (the responsibility of citizens, the responsibility of govt and their interaction with each other) should be agreed and taught from primary schools.

    Like

  • Both governments encouraged this DIRTY thief for a woman in her crimes against black bajans for decades, only now that it suits their purpose they decide to expose, decades worth of damage and thefts they allowed her to get away with to colllect their bribes…so when will they lock her up for stealing water and when will they CHECK ALL THE TIEFING MINORITIES FOR ILLEGAL WATER CONNECTIONS….they know they exist..

    ah want her to start calling all the names of the scum she bribed am sure she not only has a book of names but also audio recordings….

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/12/04/serious-health-and-safety-violations-at-liquidation-centre/?fbclid=IwAR0kGumPK92_poAH7WkXMfaw6e7domEDeyndiVoCUzZ1ZaXAgaJ2W_Yj_QA

    “Liquidation Centre was a vermin-infested former warehouse store that no fewer than four Government agencies have condemned as a fire hazard and a serious threat to human health, Attorney General Dale Marshall said tonight.

    And Barbados TODAY has seen a report confirming the findings on the former warehouse store of the Mirchandani Group of Companies on Bay Street where government agents were forced to don protective gear as they investigated the building that the Government compulsorily acquired to make way for a hotel project.

    The Fire Service also found multiple fire hazards and recommended the public not be allowed inside for any reason while the Water Authority discovered several illegal connections to the water mains there.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William

    I am not elevating ED Mottley to any sainthood,, that is your interpretation. Mottley was a member of the National and Conservative parties.
    What I am saying, and have said, is that we cannot omit him from our social history; he did a lot of good, from feeding the hungry to providing scholarships for bright working class boy and girls. I also said, that compared with Barrow, Grantley Adams did more for the nation. Prove me wrong.
    In terms of Barrow’s contribution to the development of Barbados I am willing to be taught. I have listed his 1961 policies numerous times, many of which I though were good at the time, but on reflection were not that good. I am hoping others will list his post 1966 progressive policies.
    About Belleville, you are falling for fake histories. Let me state it simply: Bellevile and Pine Gardens were the homes of the well to do; black people worked as the domestics. The controversy was that after dark black people seen in the area, especially men, were often stopped by the police and asked for an explanation, if they could not give a good reason for being there were often assaulted.
    The one legitimate excuse, or the most acceptable one, was if the employers were having dinner parties and the cooks had to work late, then men (often with their bicycles) would go to meet their girlfriends or wives. Like most stories, the more often it is repeated the more it becomes like Chinese whispers. But that is the factual reality, how that is interpreted is up too the individual.
    I do not like your reference to youthful nostalgia; in fact, I will treat it with contempt it deserves. It is vile and I leave it at that. It is also stupidity to talk about a colonial experience as a golden age; your words. I was talking about people being happier, more contented, in those days than they are now. I reference the rate of murders; I also referenced that ‘poor’ people were not aware they were poor until they were told they were by sociologists and economists. It is easy to re-interpret our history from the comfort of 2019.
    And I gave personal examples and my preferences. Overall, I preferred my life in Barbados to that in the UK. Are you telling me I do not know what I am talking about, what made me happy?
    You cannot tell me what the quality of my life was in those days and what they are now. Where did I say people were ‘better off’ – stop interpreting what I have said to suit your own politics. I am very careful with my use of language.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    Yes ! We need to stop and breathe.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal at 9:28 PM

    I concur with the views you have expressed. They mirror very closely my experiences and interpretation of the events in the second half of the last century. The parents of that half century did their best. We never grew up with a sense of being poor. We grew up with a heart of gratefulness and the where- with-all to improve our situations.

    Like

  • @ Caleb Pilgrim December 4, 2019 7:34 AM
    “P.S: All BARBADIANS should be made to read the Barbados Constitution. So far as I can determine, it may well be that nothing in that document, prohibits explicitly or implicitly, any judicial sentence imposing a little hard labour on many of the errant, criminally disposed. Consider the possible benefits.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Neither does the same Constitution prohibit the killing of those found guilty of murder by a duly ‘constituted’ court in Barbados.

    Why aren’t the ‘lawful’ decisions of the country’s judicial system not being ‘executed’?

    Is it because the ‘State’ has signed away its ‘constitutional rights’ to international ‘governance’ bodies which consider both ‘State’ executions and ‘forced labour’ as cruel and inhumane treatments and blatant violations of the human rights of prisoners?
    Rights as ratified by a country punching above its weight and being a ‘big’ signatory to international conventions and treaties.

    Caleb, you need to revisit that ‘retrograde step of a request to deal with the current criminal behaviour of the extreme kind.

    How about using the same Constitutional provisions allowing ‘Forced’ labour as a legal justification to ‘invite’ the country’s Defence Force to initiate and wage war against the environmental enemies stalking Barbados?

    These public enemies to the environment are doing just as much harm to the country as those criminals which you would like to see put to productive but forced labour.

    At least the Government would not be in any breach of either the local Constitution or signed international treaties and conventions.

    The Bajan society is Not that of the 1960’s when you were a rather bright lad steeped in the ‘Classics’ at Waterford and the Judiciary allowed to violate people’s Constitutional and human rights with no legal’ objection and social outcry.

    Like

  • Part of the lyrics of a song by The Ray Conniff singers:

    Happiness is
    Different things to different people
    That’s what happiness is
    Happiness is!
    +++++++++++++
    In other news I have applied for a permit to operate a booth at the next Exhibition in Queens Park

    I will be selling Rose coloured glasses.

    Like

  • @ The WURA-WAR-on-U December 4, 2019 9:21 AM
    “Fire Service also found multiple fire hazards and recommended the public not be allowed inside for any reason while the Water Authority discovered several illegal connections to the water mains there.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    These ‘alleged’ illegal connections to the water mains are in themselves blatant violations of the law governing the operations of the same Barbados Water Authority.

    We shall see if this will be another case of having laws for “Two Barbadoes”.

    Will the perpetrator(s) of these alleged illegal connections be prosecuted as required by the law and made to pay for the ‘estimated’ non-revenue water gone down into Carlisle Bay or would there be another cover-up and avoidance of legal proceedings and the write off an imaginary debt like the millions in VAT collected but not paid over?

    The situation with the illegal connections lies squarely in the bucket of the management of the BWA.

    How could such a large commercial outlet be allowed to operate for so long a period without the ‘collusive’ knowledge of the BWA?

    Where was the water to flush toilets coming from if not from the buckets of sea water drawn by the modern-day store slaves from the fountain of kickbacks and corruption called the Carlisle bay aquifer?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Vincent

    I have a mental picture of my late mother, struggling to do her best for her children But we did not feel poor; we felt loved. My grand-mother lived around the corner; my mother’s friends all lived in the Ivy; we walked from house to house, we played in the streets (before Blenheim was created), we set fly sticks and shot our gutter perks in the Eerie, long before the community college. We were happy little boys and girls.
    Then people started telling us about per capita income and about white goods and overseas holidays and university education and upstairs and down stairs homes and suddenly we started feeling poor. This is the materialism that drives fraud.
    I know people who left Barbados in the 1960s and have never returned, or have returned once for a parent’s funeral; that is fine by them, but I can only imagine their youth must have been very tough. Some do not even like talking about Barbados.
    As I have said before, Barbados had voting at 18 years before the UK; the Transport Board was an efficient public transport system when huge numbers of Barbadians were leaving the rock to work on London Transport. We can compare the two and I do and often we have real bragging rights. My uncle worked for Lincoln, the Transport Board and London Transport, he is still alive and has fond memories of all.
    Material possessions do not necessarily mean progress; when Bajans in the UK get together we often talk about the ‘old’ days, when we lived in one room with a paraffin heater, but were a community. Now many of us are property owners, even developers.
    Within a month of my cohort of Bajans arriving in London they all registered with local colleges. Now we have ministers of government who visit the theatre capita of the world and never once go to the theatre. That is not progress, it is philistinism.
    We cannot turn the clock back, but we can compare how things were objectively. I will end with Brexit: here is a nation divided about the good old days and the majority (17m) are prepared to risk the progress we have made over the last 40 years to go back to those days. This is not a uniquely Bajan thing, all over the world people are looking back and comparing.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Miller

    There is a Miss Ram blog running below, why would another another conversation be started here?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Chris HalsallDecember 3, 2019 8:38 PM

    @Donna: “Police in Barbados are either to stupid or too lazy to do real police or detective work.

    I dare you to do a day’s work as a Police Officer. Here, or anywhere.

    They tend to be distrusted and hated, right up until you need them.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    My man, what makes you think I couldn’t be a policewoman? Am I not human and in possession of my mental faculties?

    The police in Barbados are behaving like thugs. Recent experience has taught me that.

    Here I am a law abiding citizen who has taken great pains to raise a son who is no bother to the police and they would threaten to beat him to a pulp. My son was a five foot five, skinny fifteen year old at the time. He was simply preparing to defend himself against some rock throwing children on the way to Oistins The police were called. Everyone ran away but my son because he had not done anything wrong. Now the police arrived, saw a school child standing alone. He had dropped the piece of wood he was holding and instead of asking a few questions that thug grabbed my son to take him to the station. My son, never having had contact with the police before, was surprised and instinctively struggled slightly in his grasp asking why he was being manhandled “just so” whereupon he was told he would be beaten to a pulp.

    This was a situation where there was no perceived threat to the officer. There was no need to manhandle my son. Furthermore a few words alerting the poor child to what he was going to do would have prevented any resistance. He was taken to the station in the police vehicle, questioned without my knowledge and released.

    I could tell you other stories I have been hearing first hand about their interrogation techniques such as forcefully hitting an innocent woman on her head with a telephone book on the basis of a malicious tip. Public strip searches, home “invasions” and business place raids perpetrated on this woman that turned up nothing. And complaints to the authority that went NOWHERE! The woman’s business never recovered. I have been trying to help her get back on her feet but her brand has been DAMAGED and her health has been compromised from the stress.

    But you would not know anything about that would you? You spoke about stepping in landmines before. If that is your photograph posted here I think you have stepped into one. As I told the police when I went to lodge my complaint. If my son were white he would not have been treated in that manner.

    So you can go fly a kite with your sanctimonious self. I have typed flying a kite in deference to the readers but flying a kite is not what i was thinking.

    Like

  • HAL
    THERE IS MUCH MERIT IN YOUR SENTIMENTS

    CH CH CHOIR SANG THIS AT KENSINGTON OVAL IN THE CELEBRATION OF ATTAINING INDEPENDENCE IN 1966
    HYMN OF PRAISE MENDELSOHN
    ALL MEN ALL THINGS SING TO THE LORD

    IN THOSE DAYS SUCH CLASSICAL MUSIC WAS APPRECIATED AND CALLED CULTURE

    WE ALSO HAD THE PUERTO SYMPHANY ORCHESTRA AT THAT CONCERT PLAYING DVORAK’S NEW WORLD SYMPHONY

    DO ANY OF YOU REMEMBER OR KNOW OF THIS CONCERT ?
    WHAT DID WE HAVE IN CONTRAST THIS YEAR WHILE WE WERE HAVING THREE MURDERS IN ST ANDREW

    Like

  • @ David December 4, 2019 10:33 AM

    Well do us a favour by transferring it to the appropriate blog.

    I can repeat it on the Ram blog while you delete this one.

    Or does it show up too much the hypocrisy of those tasked with the responsibilities of enforcing the laws and regulations especially those relating to the collection of revenues due to state-owned entities?

    Like

  • I can’t even find the Ram Blog, if Blogmaster will be so kind to bring it higher…because it is unfair TO TH PEOLE this ugly old racist witch and slave driver to not only be stealing water for her raggedy old filthy hotel, spent decades bribing both corrupt governents AND CIVIL SERVANTS but also STEALING WATER for her raggedy dump of a store and IS NOT IN PRISON YET..

    Like

  • @Hal

    i didnt agree with your previous post about free education and Barrow but that post at 10.30am is spot on.

    Liked by 1 person

  • While yall breathing and buying up smart TVs and smart this and smart that, while clearly still living in the uselss Barrow era… be careful, the hardest thing is to know.

    https://trib.al/C50aCCe?fbclid=IwAR1bRFqugv5liqzyL3Gjk2D49NjxZfUcdygAQibegCJXRt9sqBsTa93353o

    Like

  • @Miller

    You found it, good.

    Just check recent comments on the sidebar to determine which blogs are active.

    Like

  • @ David December 4, 2019 12:03 PM

    It was a innocent response (deemed rather pertinent at the time) to a comment made by “Waru Waru” on the same blog.

    A blog which personifies what is slowly killing Barbados by the inhalation of polluted gases through its contaminated lungs of piss-poor management.

    Poor Management, especially at the top, is what is slowly killing the developmental spirit of Barbados. Too much bullshit and bold-faced lies.

    Oh, how the country longs for another Tom Adams to drive it forward in the vanguard of change to meet the challenges of current century!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Greene

    Thanks. All I am saying about Barrow’s so-called free education is that bright boys and girls from poor homes got in to ‘good’ schools (there was no university) before the policy was introduced. It was Grantley Adams who expanded secondary education. That is not youthful romanticism, but fact.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Barrow never impressed me…he KILLED BLACK NATIONALISM IN BARBADOS…being the house negro he was…

    Adams even worse, he allowed a racist nightclub in the height of the world fight against South African apartheid to be opened on the island, which is still there today…not one of them can be elevated to any kind of anything except as HOODLUMS in those eras….killing anything that is Black and wholesome….destroying the African memory..

    hoodlums protecting racism and wannabe slave masters while destroying the African history, keeping poverty alive in the black majority…..none of them saw the need for African history that should have been taught in the schools from that time..shitehounds that they were they all saw themselves as europeans…they never FOUGHT FOR THE MAJORITY…it was not on their agendas….they were useless, all they did was keep the majority population barely alive so they could be a source of taxation to be ROBBED LATER BY THE SCUM IN PARLIAMENT and the parasitic minorities and that is exactly what has happened over the last 4 decades..

    so yall can twist and turn it, sugar coat it…THAT’S THE REALITY…

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin

    Actually when free education was introduced in 1961 school fees at the good schools were 10% of the economic costs per pupil at those schools. So it was not really at high cost to the Treasury. But was high for the working class family.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I am not a barometer of anybody’s happiness. Go into any bullet ridden inner city and chances are you would find happy children as well. There is nothing that you experienced in those times that was unique. The whole island was like a village. I know all about “ going away “ to England. Only one of the grands was born in Barbados.
    No one is questioning the contributions of Barrow Mottley and Sir Grantley. Anybody who deems the fifteen years after independence as a complete failure is perhaps looking at Barrow only and not the entire island. I don’t normally engage anybody about who was better between Adams and Barrow. They still remain the most revered leaders we have had as far as the people are concerned.
    My point remains I don’t think that that the good old days were only about childhood joy and a feeling of being loved.
    There are thousands of Barbadians who even after they achieve professional and other success will tell you very quickly that they barely survived that period.
    I enjoyed them too but I am a realist when it comes to how this society has developed and how it’s developing right now. We can’t separate a relatively enjoyable childhood from the reality of what was going on around us. Reflections are good but sometimes we only want to talk about what was good but avoid the abject poverty and racial discrimination oof that period. A period when a brown skin person was more guaranteed a job than a brother or sister two shades darker.

    Like

  • When you know not that you know not…it can be a source of great comfort…steuppps

    Like

  • @ William

    I agree with you. But your analysis is distorted. I remember when black boys could not get jobs in Broad Street as cash boys; I can talk about the bad old days too. But how do we define that.
    From the advantage point of 2019, Cave Shepherd seems to me to be badly managed and should be put out to grass. So by not employing black boys as cash boys they were doing us a favour.
    I went to a school where the Welsh headmaster smacked boys, whether they did anything or not. I know because I suffered from it.
    Once Livy Greaves, my Latin master, send me down to get the detention book, the Major looked up, saw me, and gave me six without giving me an opportunity to ask for the detention book.
    The culture we now celebrate at that school is that created by that Welshman, who had a taste for rum. The Barbadian who followed him was despicable, awful. That Barbadianisation was not progress, but going back in time.
    My mother ran a rum shop in which police officers in uniform used to gamble,; I witnessed with my eyes a senior detective coming in to the shop and taking money from my mother to ignore the gambling. I saw the officer later celebrated as an outstanding officer. In those days police officers were not enemies.
    @ William, we were poor but we were not starving, we were no better off than our neighbours. If people did not have enough to eat they could ‘trust’, borrow, until pay day or until they got money.
    We exchanged that to go shopping in so-called supermarkets where everything was cash (we used to call them cash and carries) and in the process threw away one of the great social adhesives that bound us together.
    Young people learned skills because parents and family friends could ask tradesmen to take on their sons and daughters as apprentices, from mechanics to dressmakers, in other words, to give them a skill for life.
    We have had debates on BU about these issues under the guise of ACME making buses for the Transport Board and the Barbados Foundry developing the HARP project which later became the Iraqi Supergun affair. Both were denied by Googlers. I can go on.
    We are talking about our collective values, of what mattered to us, not the accuracy of historical 20/20 vision. We lost that compass when we became obsessed with wanting to punch above our weight.
    I have said before and say again: I remember myself and a Trinidadian friend spending a London evening with one of our senior lawyers and his wife and all he talked about was how good a lawyer he was and that he was just as good as named English lawyers.
    Until then I was under the impression that this man was one of the better lawyers of his generation – black, white, Bajan, English, male, female, short, tall. His lack of confidence in himself destroyed that belief.
    I will end by talking about my craft. In the mid-1950s Barbados had seven newspapers, including an evening newspaper. We had some great journalists: Carlton Proute, Robert Best, Jimmy Cozier, et al. I have worked with some of the great British journalists of my generation. Those great Barbadians can fit comfortably in that company. That is not nostalgia.
    We now have one newspaper (the Nation), the Advocate and Barbados Today, the quality of which I leave you to judge for yourself.
    With the exception of Carl Moore, there is not a single Barbadian journalist working in Barbados that I would put myself out of the way to read. That, I submit, is not progress.
    @ William, this is not youthful nostalgia, but long periods spent in the British Newspaper Library at Colindale and at the Public Record Office, reading about the history of Barbados, information that is not held in our Archives department in Black Rock.
    We have complete collections of Black Star newspaper in the UK; do you have any in Barbados? I spent great parts of my youth reading in the British Library, the library of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and Birkbeck College library, until they started charging £20 a day. So, call me what you like, but plse do not dismiss years spent cramming knowledge as youthful nostalgia.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Was George Headley better than Viv Richards or West Hall better than Michael Holding?

    What are the reference points to accurately measure happiness across epochs?

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I have not called you anything. You know me better than that. I have not dismissed everything you said as nostalgia. I merely stated that sometimes these trips down memory lane may paint a true picture but not the whole picture.
    In other words my brother the good old days were not all good. We can also say that the bad old days were not all bad.
    The foundations however built have been damaged and the roof is leaking. We need to radically fix it and that is the consistent and persistent message of @ WURA, one with which I concur and one which citizens such ac you and I along with other comrades have been calling for since the mid sixties.
    The Duopoly has failed and the Duopoly Rules.

    Like

  • @ William

    These things are very subjective. According to the latest United Nations World Happiness Report, the UK is happier than during the boom years of 2005-2008. Yet, there are more food banks, rising mental health problems etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    Do not be a hypocrite, where was ac calling for anything during the lost decade. The most DLP partisan person on the blog?
    Really now!

    Like

  • Now Vincent you are hitting to the crux of the matter. Many poor people were unable to access education because of the affordability factor, did they find ways to make themselves happy? Of course!

    Like

  • @ David

    What are you talking about ? Read my response to Hal that was a typo. That should read : “Where citizens such as you and I “no reference to ac . The word was “as”. You should be astute to recognize a simple typo.
    But you jumped and called me a hypocrite. Read it again I meant “as “ not ac. Thanks you.
    I hope you have the decency to apologize.
    Thank you!!!!

    Like

  • Ok my apology, was doing a Vincent, speed reading.

    Like

  • @ David

    Accepted.

    Like

  • Funny the nostalgia brigade got them asses parked off in the modernised metropoles where duopoly rules too. But them ain’t leaving, not even visiting Bim.

    Like

  • @ Enuff December 4, 2019 4:50 PM

    Good observation there, Enuff!

    Especially that armchair critic living in some warm flat in cold north London who- despite bragging about his excellent basic education he received from the St. Giles college of Know-it-Allogy- stoutly and arrogantly refuses to return and give back.

    To whom much is given much is expected; even from those who can only talk and write to earn a BS (Bachelor of Shi**t).

    Like

  • “But them ain’t leaving, not even visiting Bim.”

    they say yall are not only trying to “gather” souls but new victims and their land, bank accounts and estates…..so it’s better to be safe than sorry, some might come, but with the amount of worldwide coverage alyuh getting…me thinks they will leave all their earthly possessions in the metropolis and walk with security……ya know, for PIECE of mind…

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Enuff

    Is nostalgia a bad thing? The purpose of life is to be happy not to satisfy the whims and fancies of some one other than oneself. Surely the purpose of this blog is not to reduce us all to some single idea or ideology that some idiot think is the correct idea or ideology.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    @Enuff is not used to the idea of talking to black people in a conference setting. He has a perception problem. By the way, he has an account with Harrods, or was is Debenham’s or some other ‘top’ store. So he is not in our league.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    Many never- the- less received their education and reached top positions in this country. It does not matter which school you attend. It matters how one plays the hand that he is dealt. One must be careful not to put stumbling blocks in the path of others.

    @ Hal
    I am happy that you, a Barbadian, were able to reach the position you reached in British Journalism. It took competence to reach there. Nothing to be ashamed of. But go a little easy on the braggadocio. It may be misinterpreted.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    Braggadocio????? I was just an ordinary working lad. Plse do not misinterpret what I have said. Reading in a library is not bragging, it seems like a misspent youth. I should have been out partying.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal

    Is that so ? In my younger and conspicuous consumption days,I used to shop at those stores. I wish I had known Enuff then. Lol !!

    @ Enuff

    I now understand why you are promoting austerity. You are part of the 1% of the population that is enjoying 90 % of the world’s wealth. Good luck to you.

    Like

  • Submitted by John A

    Like

  • There is a saying “You can never go back”.

    Although it is true that circumstances things changes with time, one of the reason that you can never go back is that things were never as good as you thought they were (“ignorance is bliss”). And whilst some would recall the good old days, I am certain that there are pockets of people who would describe those good old days differently.

    Make America great, again./

    Like

  • Vincent
    I know nothing bout shopping in them stores. But on this same thread Hal Austin told us about Michelin dining and eating in the Shard, whatever that entails. Sounds hypocritical to me.🤣

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ TeoGazerts

    No one on this blog stated that he wanted to return to the past. That is impossible. The issue is that some bloggers claim the past was unendurable ,while others claim that theirs was enjoyable. This diversity of opinions should be acceptable in an educated society.. But the wannabe bullies think that their perception of the past should prevail. We are not ready yet. We need to grow up.

    Like

  • After reading the comments I don’t think we want to go back to the past as such. What I think many want is a return to the principles and respect we had for each other. Some of of us recognise that without law and order a society breaks down as is currently happening.

    I don’t think anyone should believe that any of us want to replace the electric bulb with the kerosene lamp, or the car with the buggy.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A at 8:17 PM

    A timely intervention that should remind us what the moot is really about. We have a tendency to waffle.

    Like

  • I was pointing out that a trips down memory lane and actually returning to visit a place or an old friend friend often make us aware of things we ignored or did not considered.

    I also wanted to point out that whilst some of us remember a pleasant past, to some it was a horrible time.
    Whilst some can describe the food that was on the table, there are some whose cupboard was bare.

    This is not an attempt to negate the nostalgic feelings of others, but a simple reminder that some did not have it as good as others.

    Like

  • Dominica looks like it is gone!!

    I suspect there will be a clean sweep in the elections like Grenada before it … and Barbados!!

    Did you know that the murder rate in Dominica (25.7) is almost double that of Grenada (11.1) …. or Barbados (10.5).

    Antigua and Barbuda is (10.33) just below Barbados.

    Don’t look at St. Lucia (29.6) or St. Vincent and the Grenadines (36.46) or St. Kitts Nevis (34.23).

    Rwanda of all countries has a murder rate of 2.52 per 100,000 people!!

    It is 5 times “safer” than Barbados!!

    …. if Wiki is to be believed!!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_intentional_homicide_rate

    So what’s going on in Rwanda?

    Like

  • ” Arthur , professor of practice at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Cave Hill, said Prime Minister Mia Mottley kept him “very very busy helping Government on several matters, including the development of a new industrial policy, and the arrangements for next year’s United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD15) quadrennial meeting here, October 15-23-2020.”
    Nation News 5-12-2019

    Well there you have it. The cool aid drinkers and political pot lickers, who get on BU and cuss anybody who even suggests that they don’t agree with government policy should take note. Remember the vicious attacks on Mottley by Owen?. Now you stupid misfits who want David to shut up people on BU should now get the picture but then again I don’t expect you to. Read the entire article in today’s nation and you will see that Arthur is saying the same things that @ John A ; @Hal Austin and @ PLT are saying.
    You gallows baits should spend more time concentrating on Barbados rather than blindly following Mottley , Depieza, Atherley.
    While you spend your time cussing and trying to humiliate decent people on behalf of Mottley; she is building bridges and putting money in a man’s pocket, who said she is not fit to be Prime Minister. You Jim Jones short sighted fanatics. That’s why they can kick you in your backsides any given morning. @ WURA is more than right about you political dummies.

    The Duopoly Rules.

    Like

  • @William

    This is a good example when we want to define political class.

    Like

  • @ David

    You mean it’s a good example of the Duopoly.
    Well, with Arthur in there and all the consultants, we should expect some good results in the months ahead.

    Like

  • @William

    Same difference as they say in the parlance.

    Like

  • @ David
    Politically speaking it’s an interesting and pretty smart move by Mottley and Arthur’s acceptance is also a very astute move.
    Like others say: A day in politics is a very long time ago. Less than two years ago Arthur was calling Mottley a “despot” and said the BLP had “lost its soul”.
    The Duopoly Rules

    Like

  • @William

    The former PM has bills to pay and his legacy to secure.

    Like

  • David
    This was in the newspaper monthsssss ago and fits the “many hands” narrative. What about Henderson Williams?

    Like

  • @enuff

    What about Williams? He and his team feel they have a case to bother the courts. We will see if taxpayers will have to foot another bill because of injudicious decisions by politicians.

    Like

  • David I have as I said before no problem with PPPs, what I need to see though before we dive into this head first is legislation that will ensure their ROI does not exceed a specified percentage. As PLT mentioned in the case of BAA in the UK, this was not done initially and later had to be addressed.

    If we do that and can shed our money pits like the TB, then power to them if we can benefit from a better service for the same $3 fare.

    Now whether the ROI laws are overseen by the ministry of finance or the FTC, to me doesn’t matter. What does matter is that the legislation is enforceable by heavy fines and can be acted on quickly.

    We are in 2020 in a few months not 1960 so change must now come. Added to this the tax payers are dam tired propping up inefficient government entities.

    Like

  • @ William Slinner December 5, 2019 10:28 AM

    Billy the ‘Slinner’ Skinner shooting from the hip of the political kid, you have been warning us ad nauseam on Bu about the same difference within the Duopoly.

    Based on the recent outburst of fraternity among the incestuously political class- as can be seen in the MAM & OSA entente cordiale- how can any one in the future bring your wise counsel and foresight into question?

    Not even your ‘apologetic friend’ the Blogmaster can now question your wishes for the B or D Duopoly to be broken up and some third party of refreshing hope has to emerge to save Bim from its imploding self.

    Like

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