Barbados Must Stop and BREATHE

Many of us look to Singapore as the benchmark that represents the near perfect society on earth. Some key characteristics driving the behaviour of the average Singaporean  identify hard working, competitive, afraid to fail, self centred all encapsulated by the word kiasu __ a Hokkien word that captures the uniquely Singaporean trait of being afraid to lose out. What is starkly obvious is that the leadership of Singapore is always occupied with executing tactics to develop and support a national identity for its people that feeds the society it wants to sustain.

What is the national identity of Barbados?

Is there a strategy by our political and NGO leaders to create an identity that syncs with who we are as a people?

There is nothing wrong with benchmarking to Singapore but we know a wholesale comparison is not realistic. The cultural diversity between the two countries is too wide.

The other characteristic one discerns from reading the literature about Singapore is the discipline the government in this instance supports. Especially as it relates to enforcing the laws and customs of the country.

As the public prosecutor, the AGC enforces all laws “without fear or favour”. Whether it is charging a high-profile individual for corruption or serving as Singapore’s international lawyer, the AGC has a critical role, Mr Lee said.

“As public prosecutors, you ensure that everyone is accountable for their actions. You enforce all our laws, whether it is against drug abuse, organised crime, unauthorised money lending or terrorism,” he said. “Because our laws are enforced, Singaporeans and foreigners know that here in Singapore, they are safe and secure.”

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/upholding-rule-of-law-key-to-singapore-s-survival-pm-lee-8709316

Have a walk along most streets in Barbados and there is litter everywhere. We have many who have no fear about tossing an empty snack box out a car or bus window. Have a walk through our gullies or off trails to be reminded of the scourge of illegal dumping.

Stand by any junction controlled by traffic lights and observe motorists running red lights.  Not to forget the motor cyclists who hog highways to perform wheelies and other stunts in ‘broad’ daylight.

Everyday the blogmaster wonders if the ban on the use of mobile phones while driving was repealed.

Not too long ago an executive (Leroy Parris) of a leading insurance company (CLICO Insurance) refused to adhere to a stop sell order issued by the regulator.

Every year almost ALL state owned agencies break the law by not laying current financials in parliament to be accessible to the public. No where is the financial indiscipline best seen than at the National Insurance Scheme, arguable the most important state owned agency setup to pay social security benefits to citizens.

Have a read of a decade of Auditor General’s reports or the pages of Barbados Underground if you have been living under a moon rock in recent years to confirm the sorry tale of a country gripped by indiscipline. How often have we heard some leader or the other utter the empty words, “we are a nation of laws’. Barbadians have become numb to the meaning.

The rampant flouting of the laws and rules by officers of the court  has become  folklore. The Barbados Bar Association and Disciplinary Committee have not served the country well.

The ills are not exhaustive.

Mr Lee said emphasising the rule of law is a “vital national interest” for a small country like Singapore, and helped Singapore to distinguish itself from other developing countries and move from third world to first.

Read more at https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/upholding-rule-of-law-key-to-singapore-s-survival-pm-lee-8709316

There is a heavy focus by the government of Barbados to rebuild the economy. However, we need an equal or greater focus on enforcing our laws in every sphere of life. We (not just the government) have to start holding every citizen accountable from top to bottom; in the private and public sectors. We must exercise a zero tolerance to illegal and unauthorized behaviour starting right now. If we do not arrest the  current situation, borrowing billions to develop the physical infrastructure will be for nothing if the social fabric is not addressed.

 

 

228 comments

  • When I was a boy, people did not litter the streets as is now the norm. As a matter of fact, walking and eating food on the street was frowned upon and seldom took place. Mail was delivered twice a day and if one posted mail on mornings it was delivered in the afternoon or early next morning. The post people either walked or cycled on the job. Roads were well maintained. Garbage was collected twice a day also. It would seem that the country has gone rapidly down hill with all the stealing by those in authority. The white masters have been replaced by black masters who have made robbing the island of its wealth, an art.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Those were the good old days. There is now a view, seen by some idiots through Googling and internet searches, that things in Barbados were never any good, that it is all fiction. I am at a lost as to how Barbados got its reputation for competence if things were that bad.
    We can locate this nihilism to the post independence generation, the Barrow free education lot, who know the price of everything but the value of nothing; the very people who turned our plantations in to middle class heights and terraces for an unproductive professional class.
    We have judges who cannot judge, police who cannot police, politicians who cannot rule, lawyers who steal, and teachers who cannot teach. Welcome to the new Barbados.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    In other words, as I said in Phartford Files: Hard Truths, we need to repent…all of us! This is not a call for some religious re-invigoration. It is call to a right relationship with the Sovereign One.

    The “problems” we have are not causes; they are “symptoms”.

    We have become a lawless society at every level because we have sidelined or outright rejected the source of all law in the Universe, the King of Kings and Lord of All Lords.

    There is a higher order, universal law which we seek to “break” but which will break and is breaking us: NATURE ABHORS A VACUUM! Physical or spiritual!

    Like

  • @Ironside

    There was a time in the distant BU past these kinds of discussions were had on BUs pages. Here is what we know/ nature abhors a vacuum. Until we are able to replace traditional values which are heavily influenced by the religious – to borrow a quote from a late prime minister- it will be a Herculean task to look for a black cat in a dark place.

    Like

  • (Quote):
    Have a walk along most streets in Barbados and there is litter everywhere. We have many who have no fear about tossing an empty snack box out a car or bus window. Have a walk through our gullies or off trails to be reminded of the scourge of illegal dumping. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    All of this is taking place in a country which likes to boast about its cradle to grave social services including highly subsidized if not totally free university education.

    Barbados, as recent, as 1992 was classified as the No.1 developing country sitting at No.20 on the UN Human Development Index just after Israel at No.19.

    Where is it today almost thirty years on?
    Where has been the social and economic returns from those billions of taxpayers’ money sunk into the mass education geyser and which is about to blow up in the face of the policymakers?

    How a 2×3 country- with a rather indiscipline foundation supported by an incompetent judiciary and rather shaky economy- that cannot even meet the social services and basic public goods needs (like reliable and safe public transportation) of its less than 300,000 population can ever be in a position to handle a million souls with the bulk of them unable to find meaningful jobs to sustain themselves?

    How about planting a tree on every piece of land on which so-called educated nasty dirty Bajans currently dump their domestic and commercial waste as if Mother Nature is a blind dog and Karma is a two-footed pussycat?

    What do you think the final planted tree count would be if not enough to reforest the Amazon?

    Where is the mirror image, Barbados? Don’t let message embedded in the national anthem and pledge die with its authors.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David BU

    Don’t forget government is set to reward people for engaging in the illegal activity of squatting.

    As I mentioned in this forum on several occasions, there are non-nationals who illegally constructed stalls around the environs of the old Fairchild Street market, (some of whom have more than one stall, which they rent to other non-nationals), where they are selling food and beverages in unsanitary conditions, without the required health certificates and liquor licenses.

    I’m sure you’re aware the old market is about to be reconstructed and, as I understand, will take an appearance similar to that of Oistins’ Bay Garden. I was also told those illegal vendors have to remove their stalls by December 15, 2019.

    Would you believe they are calling the “call-in-programs” and approaching ministry officials asking where government is going to relocate them?

    I am anxiously awaiting to see if government is going to reward these illegal vendors by giving them stalls in the new market.

    Liked by 2 people

  • @Lucas &Austin keep reminding us the goid old days. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  • S/b keep reminding us of the good old days

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    We have to remove the politically partisan influence from decision making. We have to start uncompromisingly enforcing our laws. We have to decide quickly the society we want to fashion (holistically) and do it, quickly.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David December 3, 2019 7:26 AM

    RE: @Ironside

    There was a time in the distant BU past these kinds of discussions were had on BUs pages. Here is what we know/ nature abhors a vacuum. Until we are able to replace traditional values which are heavily influenced by the religious – to borrow a quote from a late prime minister- it will be a Herculean task to look for a black cat in a dark place.
    +++++++++

    And what are we supposed to be looking for (…to replace traditional values etc ) again?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Henry

    What is your point?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Artax December 3, 2019 7:57 AM
    “Don’t forget government is set to reward people for engaging in the illegal activity of squatting.
    As I mentioned in this forum on several occasions, there are non-nationals who illegally constructed stalls around the environs of the old Fairchild Street market, (some of whom have more than one stall, which they rent to other non-nationals), where they are selling food and beverages in unsanitary conditions, without the required health certificates and liquor licenses.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Yet these myopically stupid policymakers are calling for an economically sustainable population of around a million people on a rather indiscipline law-breaking tourism-dependent coral atoll in the Atlantic Ocean!

    If the country, as it stands, cannot even afford to house those who are squatting where would those additional immigrants be housed?
    In offshore abandoned fishing boats or the thousands of abandoned and derelict vehicles blocking the former donkey cart roads in the many depressed ‘villages’ around Barbados?

    Who else are you expecting to ‘occupy’ the stalls in any newly-built Fairchild Street market?

    Where are the jobs to be taken up by the imported readymade taxpayers other than what the vast majority of existing immigrants do as you have referred to in your frighteningly descriptive image of a growing shanty town ripe for an outbreak of some contagiously deadly disease?

    Liked by 1 person

  • This matter does not require any great or in-depth comment so let me put it in simple terms. Here is why we are where we are.

    Singapore has laws which are vigourslty enforced and those that live there know that.

    Barbados has laws but piss poor enforcement and a judicial system that allows PSV drivers for example, to continue driving even after having 200 convictions. The people that live here also know that.

    Singapore would of removed the first squatter at the Airport and probably jailed them too. BArbados allows 100 to build and then offers to pay them to move. Those living here know this too.

    How do we address this? Well we don’t enforce our existing laws then we create new laws to address the said matter which we also don’t enforce either. The people also know this.

    Fix the dam enforcement problem and everyone will fall in line quickly. Failing to do this will leave us with the ” Brek for yuself ” mentality we now have.

    People do what they do here because they know there is no consequence for doing it. It’s that dam simple!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal Austin: December 3, 2019 6:43 AM

    Those were the good old days. There is now a view, seen by some idiots through Googling and internet searches, that things in Barbados were never any good, that it is all fiction. I am at a lost as to how Barbados got its reputation for competence if things were that bad.

    We can locate this nihilism to the post independence generation, the Barrow free education lot, who know the price of everything but the value of nothing; the very people who turned our plantations in to middle class heights and terraces for an unproductive professional class.

    We have judges who cannot judge, police who cannot police, politicians who cannot rule, lawyers who steal, and teachers who cannot teach. Welcome to the new Barbados.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++
    A failure of free education then or is there something much deeper – and sinister?

    Like

  • @Ironside

    The struggle between secular and non secular.

    Like

  • @Ironside

    Education does not fail, whether free or paid for. The poor standard of education is but a symptom of a failed society, one that has lost its moral moorings.
    We have lost our vision; just look back over the last 25 years and you see the collective failure – 14 years of Arthur’s BLP, ten years of Thompson/Stuart’s DLP, and over a year of Mottley’s BLP. @William will call this the duopoly.
    Pick an issue and you will come face to face with failure – from gross incompetence, to arrogance, to normalised fraud. It is gangster capitalism on steroids, soon to be normalised as a dope dealing and using society. Our grand-parents must be rolling in their graves.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “What is the national identity of Barbados?”

    Suppressing and oppressing the Black majority..

    Making sure they can NEVER HELP THEMSELVES…

    Making sure they can NEVER PROGRESS OR ATTAIN WEALTH…

    mainting a slave society…

    Making sure their Black genuises and creatives are ALWAYS DISENFRANCHISED…

    Always putting minorites BEFORE AND IN FRONT OF their own people. Something that minorities will NEVER BE DUMB ENUFF TO DO TO THEIR OWN…

    case in point..Grantley Adams is the TINEST OF AIRPORTS….i doubt it can hold much more than 10 VENDOR’S STALLS, the spaces are very tiny……so why does this clown think it necessary…..TO PAY OUTSIDE PEOPLE TO DO WHAT….raiding the treasury AGAIN….

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/12/02/contract-awarded-for-airport-marketing/

    WHY CAN’T BAJANS DO THIS THEMSELVES….because parasites are always on the lookout for new parasites to RECRUIT, to rob and skim from the treasury…..something like useless Lashes hiring a Trini conman, pay him 20K per month, plus car, plus house to pick up a telephone to call US to order bus parts…

    Liked by 1 person

  • The island WILL NEVER PROGRESS…with that BACKWARD, SELF-DEFEATING MENTALITY…oozing from the parliament…for over 50 YEARS…

    Liked by 1 person

  • If the Head is bad the whole body is bad
    Barbados has reached a stage of moral social and political decay
    Hard now to turn back the hands of time
    When i was a child i thought as a child behaved like a child
    When i became an adult i discard all childish ideas
    Or we can Go to the ant and be taught the economic and important stages of the ways of life
    But then again what can be expected of a society that refuses to put the well known drug dealer behind bars
    Instead invite them to sit at a place in Parliament
    Then we wonder out loud how did we get here

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimple SimonPresidentForLife

    The suicide rate for Singapore is 7.9 per 100,000 people per year

    The suicide rate for Barbados is 0.4 per 100,000 people per year.

    The suicide rate for the United kingdom, is 7.6 per 100,000 per year.

    The suicide rate for Guyana is at 30.2 per 100,00 per year is the highest in the world. In as much as wealthy Europe has a suicide rate that is 15.4 I am wondering if Guyana’s already very high rate will go up as the country becomes wealthier, or will come down once the oil moneycome rolling in.

    Lemme run now before the bright boys of BU “kill” me (virtually of course), accuse me of expressing an opinion, or accuse me of being frivolous.

    Ah gone!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Strange thing is that if Hal Austin had penned this piece he would have been told that he is a bullshiiter from
    the Ivy.
    Oh well.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    What is interesting is that you would select ONE comment to extrapolate.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    What Barbadians want their society to be is staring you right in the face and you do not see it. Why? Because you do not want to see it. It is not glitzy enough for you. It is too unique. You have to see others in the world like it for you to feel comfortable. If you want Barbados to be a Singapore, go and live there.

    Religion is a system of internal rules of proper behaviour. Where the laws have been embedded in the hearts of men. Not the religion corrupted by GP and his ilk. But a religion whose yoke is light and easy to bear simply because there is no conflict between what we believe and what we enforce.
    David you have to make a decision . You have to decide whether you will serve the interests of all Barbadians or serve the interest of the greedy few.
    The choice is yours.

    Like

  • @ William

    Have you noticed that the accusation of bull-shitter is never followed by any factual analysis? The same way that the obsession of measuring ourselves against others is a sign of mental decay.
    If you say there have been two bits of paper on the streets, some dimbo comes up with figures to show that the UK has on average five, the UK ten, and France 20. So, ipso facto, we are not doing too badly. Sadly, they do not see anything wrong with this style of arguing; they think it is fine.
    @William, look at the mess at CBC; oar the hoax that White Oaks had found a solution to our debt problem but we are still waiting to see the final agreement; or the CARICOM issue with Venezuela or the Bahamas; we can go on.
    We are in the last chance saloon and wordy unscripted speeches, flaying hands, photo opportunities, and other bogus PR stunts will not rescue our society. Now some Moe woman will be having the last say in what appears on our TV as news and current affairs. Who is she, apart from being a friend of the president?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Vincent

    Your heart is in the right place, but some people are just too dumb. I blame Barrow’s free education.

    Like

  • Some are still wondering
    How did Charles Herbert was allowed to go free
    In meanwhile the go between black guy still languishes in jail awaiting a hearing
    Yet we asked the question how did we get here

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Simple Simon at 9 : 11 AM

    Welcome back.
    The suicide rate per 100 K is an excellent indicator of Societal Wellness. We note that Barbados’ rate is much lower. Thanks for educating BU household.
    We need to keep it low by getting rid of those stumbling blocks that are being put in our path.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Hal

    Our problem is our leaders since independence have always measured how will enforcing the law affect the vote. Then the opposition chimes in with “wunna want to hurt the small man”. They never of course stop to think that the same issues they will have to address should they gain power.

    Let’s look at just 2 issues to show how politics and the vote came first. Squatting and illegal vending. They have many similarities in that they before require ” squatting” on an illegal spot for whatever reason. One lead to 2 then hundreds followed. Why was it allowed? Simple vote before country. The laws were there but nobody had the backbone to enforce them as usual.

    Same story with the motorcycles, the PSVS etc. We even left the PSVS to do as they like for so long that we now refer to it as the “ZR culture”.

    Were it not So dam serious it would be laughable.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    Curious if you could point to where this blogmaster is promoting Singapore as the model Barbados must follow. The thesis of the submission is to show how a vision must be efficiently executed with discipline and enforcement of rules/laws key.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Suicide as an indicator of wellness in this scenario is not accurate. It is known that the suicide rate in the Asian population is higher compared to other ethnic groups.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu at 9 :54 AM

    What is the point you intend to make? I do not see how that piece of additional information is proof of inaccuracy. There are several ethnic groups in the Asian population. Is it a matter of Geography? Ethnicity? Religion? Political system? Please be specific.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    The point is the high suicide rate in Singapore in all probability not apply to Barbados. It is a side point not to be distracted from the substantive discussion.

    Like

  • Where we have diverged from Singapore is that we had a professional civil service and chose to politicise it. Singapore maintained their professional civil service.

    The different result in the management of public services is stark.

    Like

  • WHY CAN’T BAJANS DO THIS THEMSELVES….because parasites are always on the lookout for new parasites to RECRUIT, to rob and skim from the treasury…..something like useless Lashes hiring a Trini conman, pay him 20K per month, plus car, plus house to pick up a telephone to call US to order bus parts…

    but even worse…Donville hired a doctor from UK to head a department in the QEH, the doctor never gave up his practice in , oh no, not him, he ain’t stupid, the doctor was making more money than the then CEO Dexter James, with house, car and other perks, he never spent more than a few days in Barbados and when he was on the island he and Donville were always shut up in his office, therefore he did not work…his then US assistant a resigistered nurse did all the work until one day she got fed up told them all to go to hell and returned to US….and Donville’s doctor just never returned to Barbados after she left…..lots of taxpayer’s money wasted…

    your leaders are, stupid, arrogant and ignorant…all they ever do is see what they can get for themselves…

    …..and we have not even gotten to the Donville scam with Sparman and the other one Dr. Death yet….40 million gone to one doctor, but not to the people or QEH…

    …and if we go back further, the Jerome scam with my favorite punching bag…that one was a classic sellout.

    it is their pattern…

    none of the ministers of health, ministers of this or that…have ever looked out for the best interest of QEH, the people or anything else, they always look out for themselves and whatever they can get/tief/skim to hide OFFSHORE..

    Like

  • @ Hal
    That’s why when you read some people, regurgitating what you have been saying for years and being stupidly ridiculed for it, somebody has to tell them to respect peoples’ views rather than endorse and promote.the same nonsense that the Duopoly has been feeding them for the last fifty three years. Where there is no vision…….not a failed state yet but………….
    .

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu

    You are the person who in your submission has promoted Singapore as an Ideal Model for Barbados to follow. You did not put forward T&T or Jamaica.

    But comparisons are invidious,aren’t they?

    Like

  • David December 3, 2019 9:54 AM
    It is known that the suicide rate in the Asian population is higher compared to other ethnic groups.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Well said, Blogmaster!

    And it is grounded in their religious beliefs grounded in the spiritual concept of reincarnation. Death is seen as the ‘cyclical’ opportunity to be more ‘successful’ in another life.

    Why would a country like Japan with such a technologically advanced and well-off economy and society have such a high suicide rate?

    Like

  • I said all that to say this….bear in mind Singapore has at least 5-6 million people..

    Two completely different COUNTRIES and CULTURES who handle corruption differently, Barbados ignores corruption because there exists no ethics and no moral compass in the Supreme Court…, bar association or the parliament………….Singapore does not.

    the two countries…CANNOT BE COMPARED..at any time.

    “Singapore is well known for its clean and incorrupt system. The Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 2017 has ranked Singapore as the 6 th least corrupt country in the world. Singapore has also maintained its first-place in the 2017 Political and Economic Risk Consultancy (PERC) annual survey on corruption.”

    “Corruption in Singapore is generally perceived as low. Cases are mostly handled by the Singapore Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau, a government agency in Singapore that investigates and prosecutes corruption in the public and private sectors.”

    “Cases of corruption
    SLA (2011)
    Former Singapore Land Authority (SLA) deputy director of technology and infrastructure, Koh Seah Wee, and former SLA manager, Christopher Lim Chai Meng, were sentenced to jail by the High Court on cheating and money laundering charges. Koh was sentenced to 22 years of jail after admitting to 59 charges and Lim was sentenced to 15 years imprisonment after admitting to 49 charges. Of the $12.2 million laundered, $7.5 million was recovered from Koh. Koh and Lim cheated SLA by using false invoices issued by ex-swim coach Ho Yen Teck who set up seven sole proprietorships to provide fake IT maintenance services and goods that were not delivered. Ho was jailed for 10 years for the conspiracy.[11]

    SCDF and CNB (2012)
    In January 2012, two senior civil servants were arrested under graft charges. Former head of the Singapore Civil Defence Force (SCDF), Peter Lim Sin Pang,[12] was arrested on 19 December 2011, while Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB) chief, Ng Boon Gay, was taken in for questioning on 4 January 2012.[13] Both men were arrested in connection with the Prevention of Corruption Act relating to an IT contract,[14] and in late January 2012, it was announced that both men are also facing disciplinary action by the Public Service Commission, which oversees the conduct of civil servants. After being interdicted, a step only taken when an individual “faces serious offences for which ‘criminal proceedings or proceedings for his dismissal or reduction in rank are being contemplated’”,[15] the case provoked comment from Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong who promised to punish both men if they are guilty of misconduct.[16]

    The CPIB’s silence on this investigation came under the scrutiny of a number of MPs during a parliamentary sitting in February 2012. Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Home Affairs, Teo Chee Hean then defended the CPIB, stating that any announcement on the outcome of the probe would have been premature and may have compromised the investigation. He also assured concerned MPs that all the findings of the investigation would be publicly reported once they had been finalised.[17]

    Peter Lim Sin Pang was eventually dismissed from service formally in August 2013[18] and found guilty while Ng Boon Gay retired[19] after being acquitted.

    NParks (2012)
    In July 2012, National Parks Board’s (NParks) purchase of 26 Brompton bikes costing $2,200 each sparked a nationwide uproar after it was revealed by a whistleblower on online forum HardwareZone of possible corruption due numerous red flags in the way the procurement was done.[20] Khaw, who initially defended NPark’s purchase of the high-end foldable bikes, was criticised for handling the saga poorly.[21] Subsequent investigation by the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau resulted in National Parks Board assistant director Bernard Lim Yong Soon being fined $5,000 for lying to auditors about his relationship with the bicycle firm which was awarded the tender.[22]

    CPIB (2013)
    On 23 July 2013, Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) assistant director Edwin Yeo Seow Hionh was charged with misappropriating at least $1.7 million from the anti-graft agency between 2008 and 2012.[23] Yeo was interdicted from his position as head of field research and technical support at CPIB to assist in a Commercial Affairs Department (CAD) probe into his suspected financial impropriety. Eight of the charges were for misappropriating funds and criminal breach of trust, one was for forgery and the rest were in using part of his ill-gotten gains to gamble at the Marina Bay Sands (MBS) casino.[24] On 20 February 2014, Yeo was sentenced to 10 years jail.[25]

    MFA (2014)
    On 20 February 2014, former Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) protocol chief Lim Cheng Hoe, 61, was sentenced to 15 months’ jail for cheating. From February 2008 to May 2012, Lim made false claims for $89,000 worth of pineapple tarts and wine as gifts for foreign diplomats.[26][27]

    Ang Mo Kio Town Council (2016)
    General manager and secretary of Ang Mo Kio Town Council (AMKTC), Victor Wong Chee Meng, was removed from his position and placed under investigation by CPIB, after a complaint was lodged in September 2016 over “the way he handles contracts and dealings in the town council”. Wong, a Public Service Medal recipient, was concurrently an employee of CPG Facilities Management, which is the appointed managing agent of the town council.[28][29] On 14 March 2018, Wong is charged with 55 counts of corruption offence for receiving some $107,000 in bribes from Chia Sin Lan and Yip Fong Yin, directors of two building and repair companies.[30]

    Keppel Corporation (2017)
    According to US prosecutors, Keppel’s offshore and marine arm, Keppel O&M, agreed to pay a US$422 million settlement to avoid a criminal trial for bribing Brazilian officials. Court documents released by the US justice department revealed that Keppel O&M paid US$55 million in bribes between 2001 and 2014, to win 13 contracts with Petrobras and Sete Brasil – two Brazilian oil companies deeply mired in the country’s wide-ranging Operation Car Wash graft scandal.[31] Keppel Corporation is one of the Government-Linked Companies (GLCs) under Temasek Holdings.[32] It is currently the biggest corruption case involving a GLC in Singapore’s history.

    Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) (2018)
    Rajkumar Padmanathan, 49, was jailed 25 months and six weeks on 27 July 2018 for 28 counts of corruption, cheating and breaching the Official Secrets Act while working at Tengah Air Base and Sembawang Air Base. He leaked tender quotations in order to secure contracts for companies set up by his wife, Jayashree, friend, Jeevan Arumugam, and acquaintance, Kamal Kishore. The total value of contracts awarded to GAS, EFAS, Duratech and GTW set up for the scam was $1,817,379.87 over the period from 2008 to 2014.[33]”

    Like

  • I wish someone would point out the era of “the good old days”. Was it the turn of the last century? 30’s 40’s 50’s? I know in the 50’s and 60’s many people left the island in search of better education, jobs etc. and if the postman always rang twice, there was always the occasional dead dog in the street and “stuff bin” on the outskirts of the village. I also saw barefoot children at school with “patchy” pants who I later realized were also very hungry because that “biscuit and milk” was a life savior.

    How about those standpipes? What about electric power? Our home was the first in the area to have “electricity” because you had to “buy” a pole and I think at the time it cost around $40.00 a princely sum at the time, yeah bring back the good old days when we met at the standpipe to discuss the affairs of the day.

    Don’t let me touch education when 7th standard was the best we could hope for……

    And oh yes, it is all Barrow’s fault that we are in today’s predicament.

    Like

  • @William SkinnerDecember 3, 2019 9:15 AM
    Strange thing is that if Hal Austin had penned this piece he would have been told that he is a bullshiiter from
    the Ivy.
    Oh well.

    lol – don’t get between me and Hal. I regard you Sir.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Grenville II

    Before there was a Singapore,there was a Barbados. Singapore was based on the Barbados model of Social and Economic Development. It was modified to suit the cultural differences of Singaporeans.

    I agree that the politicising of the Public Service was a catalyst in the present malaise in which we now find ourselves. And it is being magnified .

    Like

  • @ Bajan in NY

    Well oh chap , I didn’t know you were in the line up. Were you among the suspects?Not getting between you and Hal at all- some love affairs start out rocky and then go to the altar. Lol.
    I regard you as well my brother😀

    Like

  • @Miller

    How about planting a tree on every piece of land on which so-called educated nasty dirty Bajans currently dump their domestic and commercial waste as if Mother Nature is a blind dog and Karma is a two-footed pussycat?
    +++++++++++++++++

    Are you trying to steal the PM’s thunder? Hasn’t she initiated a program where the goal is to plant a million trees? Did you not notice that the first tree she planted was a sour sop tree? I don’t know the symbolism of the sour sop tree but if she planted a lemon tree it would be a case of art imitating life as she has some lemons in her Cabinet.

    Yuh know we wouldn’t need a million trees if so many weren’t removed in the building up of the various heights and terraces and we lost some valuable trees including a Baobab during the construction of the now abandoned complex at Paradise.

    As per Joni Mitchell

    Don’t it always seem to go
    That you don’t know what you’ve got til its gone
    They paved paradise
    And put up a parking lot

    Like

  • Often it is not what you say but how. Sure you have heard this old time saying.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    There was a period in our post adult suffrage history when the roles of the Public Servant and the Politician were clearly defined and respected. I have observed that the lines of demarcation are getting blurred. Political appointees believe that their roll is to second guess the politicians and to carry out their whims and fancies even when they are repugnant to commonsense and the laws and regulations of the country. The result is sometimes chaos.

    Like

  • Senator Caswell has posted voluminously in this forum the extent to which the civil service has been compromised by a high number of acting appointments. How was the Barbados civil service establishment penetrated?

    Like

  • “And it is grounded in their religious beliefs grounded in the spiritual concept of reincarnation. Death is seen as the ‘cyclical’ opportunity to be more ‘successful’ in another life.”

    Singapore people KNOW THEIR CULTURES, they KNOW WHO THEY ARE…they KNOW THEIR HISTORY, including their SPIRITUAL HISTORY THEY KNOW WHERE THEY CAME FROM ……Black .Bajans do not….or Mia would never have touched spirits that were buried for centuries…..

    Asians tend to take these things very, very seriously because THEY KNOW…..and have a WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH SPIRITUALITY…

    The black population have no SPIRITUAL MOORINGS…thereore they are STILL ADRIFT…

    thank both corrupt STILL VERY COLONIZED governments…for your predicament..

    i was speaking to some older folk recently and they told me people are very careful how they speak about thinks spiritual on the island…REAL SPIRITUALITY…because decades ago, if anyone spoke of things spiritual, particularly African in nature…they were chased off the island…because only the WEAK, DESTROYED COLONIZED black mind was ever accepted into the dumbed down slave society..

    i did not even know that and was dumb struck…

    Your black leaders are useless and always will be..get the shit in the parliament OUT…or the island will NEVER MOVE FORWARD…it never has…

    Like

  • Until we are able to replace traditional values which are heavily influenced by the religious – to borrow a quote from a late prime minister- it will be a Herculean task to look for a black cat in a dark place.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Why would we want to replace something that actually works.

    If it works, don’t fix it!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • It is amazing that all the criticism of Barbados on this “topic” is about the Civil service.

    Not one wrasse whole word about the capitalist business owners and the plantocracy.

    buh doan mine me. I does write bare foolishness most of the time an too besides I may be feelin guilty cause Babadus was good fuh me especially when I did a youngsta.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I see the years…1948 – 2000 as a colonial grooming, but bad luck for them, ENUFF OF THE PEOPLE WOKE UP…..in the last 19 years…

    fire will burn the remaining cursed and blighted plantocracy….the spirits on the loose ARE REAL..

    Like

  • @WURA-WAR-on-UDecember 3, 2019 11:27 AM

    Asians tend to take these things very, very seriously because THEY KNOW…..and have a WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH SPIRITUALITY…

    Presidents Ferdinand Marcos and Park Geun-hye of the Philippines and South Korea respectively was/is Asian as far as I understand, and both were reportedly as corrupt as you accuse Caribbean leaders of being.
    How did they working relationship with spirituality work out? Stupse

    Liked by 1 person

  • Why would any one respect those in charge of managing the affairs of a country when those at the top of the economic ladder are always given financial support from govt
    Just take a look back at the past few months in which money galore was handed to the top tier in business and the poor got nothing but empty promises and told to pull the debt laden wagon and hold strain
    Give me a brek in that case a poor man struggling to mek ends meet wouldnt give two wukups about the social or economic conditions affecting the country

    Like

  • “I wish someone would point out the era of “the good old days”. Was it the turn of the last century? 30’s 40’s 50’s?”

    Sargeant

    I hope you didn’t use Google or internet searches as the basis for your December 3, 2019 10:24 AM contribution?

    Some people seem to be of the silly opinion other people’s only source of information is the internet…… somehow believing these people did not have grand parents, great-grand parents or even elderly neighbours and relatives, from whom they would have received a wealth of historical information about Barbados.

    My great-grand mother, born in 1889, was 96 years old when she died in 1985 (at a time when the internet was unavailable to many households), while my great-grand father was about 98 when he died a year later; my paternal grand-mother was 100 years old in 2000 when she died and my maternal grand-mother’s journey in life ended 2015, when she was 93 years old.

    I learnt a lot of Barbados’ history from these elderly relatives. My paternal grand-mother told me she had to leave her Orange Hill, St. James home at 3:00 AM and walked to Bridgetown to sell her produce…. and would walked home in the evening. She talked about working hard
    “keeping stocks” and hawking to support her children.

    My great-grand mother told me of the events leading up the 1937 riots and about one of her relatives who was killed by police while he was in Bridgetown. His name is on the list of persons who lost their lives during the riots. My great-grand father said he was in town at the time and had to run for his life.

    They told us about hurricane “Janet” and other memorable events.

    I was told about children having to attend school “bare-footed” and the only cream they had was “lard-oil.” School uniforms, bags and clothes in general, were “passed down” to younger siblings or to other relatives. Some children and to attend to pigs, sheep, goats and the “kitchen garden” before going to school.

    A lady told me her mother stopped her from attending school, so she could to remain home to do house work and take care of her younger siblings. A guy told me that, as eldest boy, he was sent to learn “a trade,”…. carpentry…. and would have to work without earning wages. When he did actually received wages, his mother would collect it from the carpenter and keep it to assist in sending school his siblings and buying food.

    One older gentleman said his parents were so poor that some evenings the only things he and his siblings had to eat after school, were dunks, gooseberries, ackees, mangoes or guavas. A “good meal” was on Sundays. What would garbage being picked or the mailman visiting twice a day mean to people like him?

    Children had to walk far distances to “bring water.,” cut grass for the pillows and beds, which were sometimes a haven for “chinks.”

    What about the hardships parents had to endure so they could keep their jobs as maids, labourers, gardeners etc., to provide for their children….. in areas such as Belleville and Strathclyde….. where they were restricted from entering after certain hours……

    ……….while the dogs were “let loose” and barricades erected to enforce those restrictions?

    My father said during the early 1960s, he got a job as a driver/office messenger for a factory owned by a Lebanese. His boss also wanted him to perform “personalized duties,” such as clean and polish his shoes, take his children to school and bring his lunch. The employer also told my father he had to address his children, for example, as Mr. Tom, Mr. Bill and Miss Sally. This Lebanese, along with Indians and white people, obviously believed that, in the 1960s, black people were still slaves.

    During the “good old days,” black men could only work in Cave Shepherd, DaCosta or Harrison’s as “cash boys”… or women as maids. Black people could not get jobs as tellers in Barclay’s Bank, Nova Scotia or Royal Bank. Is this fiction or truth?

    It’s totally dishonest to suggest anyone mentioned things in Barbados were never any good. But all what occurred to black people during “the good old days” WASN’T fiction…… it was reality.

    All this so called competence came as a result of poor black people working hard, under inhumane conditions, for low wages and unrecognized for their efforts………while their white employers reaped all the benefits.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Artax at 1 :54 PM

    Almost all true. Some exaggerations and hyperbole. But these help to make the stories more interesting.How does their experiences compare with your actual experience. Do you see any improvements between the three generations?

    Did you notice anything special about your grands and great grands? Their characters? How they carried themselves? Their relationships with their families and neighbours? Did they appear mostly happy? Hard working? Self supporting?

    Like

  • @All… I am a bit hesitant to step into this thread; many “land-mines”. But…

    I personally don’t subscribe to any particular religion, having spent a /lot/ of time reading, discussing, and thinking about the various “options”. I rejected the “western” options very early in my life, because it seemed no one could actually answer my questions with definitiveness (including, “I don’t know”) within those frameworks.

    It was actually a bit of a personal epiphany in my late teens when I began to wrap my head around quantum mechanics, and I realized that I couldn’t prove that any particular god /didn’t/ exist. That’s when I moved from atheist to agnostic. An import distinction.

    I most resonate with Buddhism, although I don’t believe in reincarnation. I do subscribe to the idea that “the Universe Reflects”; “Good brings Good”. Yes, you can have “bad” Buddhists, just like you can have “bad” Christians.

    Lastly, without question there have been terrible atrocities against many different peoples over the years — and still today. And many went through great hardship in the past. I myself have history in my (poor, white) family of hardship and sacrifice, including the “ultimate” during WWII.

    I would argue that while one should never forget history, what actually matters is what we all do now, and in the future. History, by definition, is done.

    Namaste.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Sargeant

    You want to know what the old days were? There is now a body of work that measures progress of a society, not by GDP, but by the happiness index. I had the good fortune of being invited to the LSE when Professor Layard launched his index.
    My days of ‘poverty’ were far happier than any material advantages of later years. In fact, I only realised we were poor when sociologists told me so.
    I have dined in Michelin restaurants and I used to buy 10cents pones from Miss Sealy at the school gate; I enjoyed Ms Sealy’s pones far more than the Michelin dinners.
    I still measure the pleasure from food by how my grand mother used to cook, rather than the celebrated chefs (including Gordon Ramsay) who came to the front of the restaurant to say hello to diners, including myself. I have dined at Sandy Lane and at Oistin’s, I prefer Oistin’s. I have dined at Muster’s and at the Shard; I prefer Muster’s.
    I used to walk home from school with friends whose company I still miss; I have also had the luck to drive a high-performance car and the walk was healthier and more enjoyable. I can, but won’t name some of the boys whose company I enjoyed at school, including @Bajan in New York (you cannot predict how sensible school boys can grow in to bitter and twisted pensioners, but life is not perfect).
    @Sargeant, those are the days we call the old days. For me, anything before the Barrow days. There is nothing romantic about it, but the quality of life; of neighbours who knew each other and respected each other. In short, the days when Barbados was a gentler, more decent society.
    Anyone who thinks modern Barbados is far better than those old days must have had a very hard time growing up.
    By the way, @ William, it is interesting how we pick and match bits and pieces from Singapore – does that include democracy. For 54 years Singapore has been ruled by the same political party (and family). What a model!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Wuhloss …alyuh going back to Africa…did they tell you ..lol..ah know they usually tell alyuh NOTHING..but tell everyone one else, the whole damn world.

    Now it’s not a bad thing the 360 degree…anti-African, anti-Black stance …NOW AT AN END…but ah still won’t go nowhere with them..

    https://mobile.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/NewsArchive/Barbados-seeks-help-from-Ghana-to-organise-their-version-of-Year-of-Return-GTA-CEO-804812?channel=A1&fbclid=IwAR0MJMXLQud9ITr3epuTgdGXt1nFLMo8NxF5xGvosN0Ldm5LVs1HHuCzcBA

    “Authorities of the eastern Caribbean island, Barbados, have called on Ghana to assist them organize their version of the Year of Return initiative in 2020, Nana Akwasi Agyeman, Chief Executive Officer for the Ghana Tourism Authority, has said.

    Mr Agyeman said a lot of interest have been shown in the Year of the Return initiative, hence the need to consolidate the programme.

    He told Francis Doku, host of the Travel Pass Exclusive Show on 3FM Sunday December 1 that : “Barbados called us that they are doing a similar thing and they want us to help them. They told us that that they are doing ‘Gathering 2020’ but we told them we haven’t finished with ours so they should wait till we finish ours in Ghana.”

    He added : “So there is real interest, numbers have moved up but it should inform certain policy directives and decisions on improving the product that we have in order to make Ghana the pilgrimage for the African diaspora like we are pushing”

    Ghana has designated 2019 as the Year of Return to commemorate 400 years since the first enslaved Africans arrived in Jamestown, Virginia in the United States. The government has been running a massive marketing campaign targeting African Americans and the diaspora, and various events have been arranged.

    To make Ghana a key travel destination for African Americans and the rest of the African diaspora. To rebuild the lost past of these 400 years. To promote investment in Ghana and foster relationships with African Americans and the African diaspora.

    Jackson Lee linked the initiative with the 400 Years of African-American History Commission Act that was passed in Congress in 2017.

    American actor and director Michael Jai White visited Ghana towards the end of 2018. Over 40 African diasporans participated in the “The Full Circle Festival”, which aimed to attract visitors to the country. The list includes, but is not limited to Idris Elba, Boris Kodjoe, Naomi Campbell, Anthony Anderson, Kofi Kingston, Adrienne-Joi Johnson and Steve Harvey.

    Source: laudbusiness.com”

    Like

  • @Artax

    No, I didn’t use the internet those examples that I mentioned are from memory but we are on the same page. I have an elderly mother and anytime we sit down to talk I discover something that I didn’t know about the hardships she encountered while she was growing up. My own grandmother died in her 90’s and one of my regrets is that I didn’t record all the incidents and events that she relayed to me.

    The “good old days” are really a figment of people’s imagination, I wouldn’t want to return there and I suspect neither would they.

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Romanticizing old time days is normal for old people. Who wants to sit on a pit toilet again?

    Like

  • “And it is grounded in their religious beliefs grounded in the spiritual concept of reincarnation. Death is seen as the ‘cyclical’ opportunity to be more ‘successful’ in another life.”

    Asians tend to take these things very, very seriously because THEY KNOW…..and have a WORKING RELATIONSHIP WITH SPIRITUALITY…

    Baje in NY…if you had read the whole comment which was BASED ON THE ABOVE AND WHAT MILLER SAID…you would not have gotten so LOST….which has NOTHING TO DO WITH THE CORRUPTION WE SPOKE ABOUT…

    see lost spirituality…you have gone out to sea….you chose the one thing that had nothing to do with the other…so go steupppss some more..

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Chris Halsal at 2 :26 PM

    Many land mines indeed!
    A statement that there were periods in Barbados economic and political history when there were few if any charges of corruption in the Public Service metamorphosed into a claim that the old days were Halcyon days . Shifting debating goal posts is as old as the hills.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    That is the normal course of conversations.

    Like

  • More of the same waffle. Tiring.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    Wow! I am really enjoying the discussion here. Very edifying indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    OK Boomers 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  • Good one Peter. You are ‘relegated’ to the top of the class.

    Like

  • @ PLT

    So you have adopted a Kiwi put-down term? It is better to be a boomer and know what you are talking about than to make it up as you go along. That is why we urgently need our social history to be written.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ PLT

    It is time for the millennials to have their say then. I would relish that. Too much warmed over soup.

    Like

  • When you know not that you know not…IT IS QUITE COMFORTING…lol

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal Austin

    You are actually writing social history now. Be careful what you key board.These files are being stored.

    Like

  • @ Mr Vincent Codrington

    Of late de ole man notes that NOT ONLY YOU DONT DRINK THE COOLAID, (I ALWAYS KNEW THAT OF YOU FROM WHEN YOU WAS @ ***) but you skinning OVAH de bowl dat de Blogmaster pissing in daily and putting pun de table AS PINE JUC!!!

    you said and I quote

    “…David you have to make a decision .

    You have to decide whether you will serve the interests of all Barbadians or serve the interest of the greedy few.

    The choice is yours…”

    And, in his customary style, when he is dealing with big names in Barbados, he genuflect AND MOVES ON!

    No STEUPSEEE no nothing!

    But he is starting to recognise that a few of us ARE DEMANDING MORE OF HIS SELLOUT SELF!

    Because we recognise that THE SAME MUGABE HE FOLLOWING, IS PART OF DE BADWORD PROBLEM!!!

    If a political party were to come here, and see the elements of this article AND ENFORCE IT!

    Dem would beat Mugabe Mottley!!!

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    A social history that tells us that there was a time when black boys could work in Broad Street ONLY as cash boys. That is the problem right there.
    I am not a historian, but the nonsense puts a smile on my face.

    Liked by 1 person

  • fortyacresandamule

    I prefer the simple life. Modernity, with its convenience and comfort is overrated. Plus the huge cost to the environment. Walking back in the days were good exercise for our ancestors. Today we are an obese society. Not to mention traffic congestion and pollution. I prefer the various fruits in season as a child, than today’s processed or quick service food. I don’t mind using an outdoor toilet, the city sewage eventually ends up polluting the sea coast anyway. I could go on and on. People were more gentlier and caring then as Hal alluded to. I guess it depends on what definition of quality of life you adhere to.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal at 4:35 PM

    I saw them and smiled as well. I opted not to step on anymore land mines.

    Like

  • @fortyacresandamule

    After expressing your view revert to being the pragmatist you have shown yourself to be on the blog over the years please!

    Like

  • @ Fortyacres

    There are still outside loos, as we call them, in the UK – the fifth biggest economy in the world. In the old days ED Mottley fed the hungry from the Queen’s Park kitchen, now they go hungry.
    Simple does not mean primitive, that is the problem with many Barbadians. They prefer to buy chlorinated chickens from unhealthy food joints than to cook at home. They prefer to borrow money to go shopping than to save. They prefer overseas holidays they cannot afford than to stay at home.
    They desperately want to be a so-called first world country.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The following comment submitted by Artax:
    David BU
    Some friends of mine that live in Ridgeway Road, Pinelands, St. Michael, have been trying without success, so far, to have an issue, which has been affecting them for over two (2) years, solved.
    It concerns a PSV driver who drives 2 vehicles, ZM208 and ZR159.
    According to them, this guy, whose name they say is Jerry Bourne, parks BOTH vehicles in the road, especially during the night, obstructing the free flow of traffic. Sometimes when he parks both vehicles in the road and uses one, he would leave the other vehicle parked there for the entire day.
    Because of this, and since they are also unable to gain uninhibited access their homes, they have asked the guy on several occasions not to park the vehicles to block the road. They have also called the police to assistance them in the matter. Police officers came to warn him a few times. However, he has refused to adhere to the requests of the residents or police….. and is ADAMANT he will continue to block the road.
    And according to them, calling the police is NOW a waste of time, since they (RBPF) don’t respond to their complaints.
    What they are also concerned about is if the RBPF would rather wait until, unfortunately, an emergency occurs, whereby a resident became ill and died or a house catches afire and spreads, since vehicles from the ambulance or fire service respectively, would be unable to access the area, because the road is blocked…… before they take some sort of legal action against the guy.
    This a clear situation where the RBPF has refused to ENFORCE the law and the selfish PSV driver is refusing to ABIDE by the law.

    Below are photographs of showing the vehicles.

    Screenshot 2019-12-03 at 16.48.42Screenshot 2019-12-03 at 16.49.05

    Like

  • @ Mr Hal Austin

    Hal,

    You said and I quote

    “…Now some Moe woman will be having the last say in what appears on our TV as news and current affairs.

    Who is she, apart from being a friend of the president?…”

    Lucille Moe is one of the Political strategists of the Barbados Labour Party!

    De ole man will NOT NEED TO EXPLAIN anything else to you as to the nature of this appointment and the discontinuance of FAIR, BALANCED AND TRUTHFUL REPORTING!

    Yes EVERY BADWORD TIME DE OLE MAN SAYS THAT MUGABE IS A DICTATOR my posts does get moderate and I does got to ask nicely to get the items posted!

    But slowly and surely PEOPLE AND SHEEPLE catching up!

    Like

  • @ David.

    Another classic example of what I mentioned earlier which is a lack of enforcement regardless of an abundance of laws. In a developed country the vehicles would be towed to an Impound lot while action is taken.

    Again people do what they do as their is no enforcement of law in this country and people like this clown know it oh so well.

    Like

  • @John A

    People doing as they Rh like and nobody reporting it, doing anything about it. Then we howl and bray when the murder count goes up. The murder count is a symptom of an indisciplined and lawless country.

    Like

  • @ the Honourable Blogmaster

    What happened with 10 flat tyres, properly slashed, 3 times?

    Let the police come then

    Why did this article get stick in here?

    Does it not deserve it’s own space?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David.

    What also happens is law abiding people try to get the police to do their job. When that doesn’t happen they then get frustrated and take matters into their own hands, hence foolishness follows.

    It’s like the gang of 50 scrambler motorcycles that take to our roads every Sunday unchallenged. Do you not think that started with one bike?

    Every single problem we have on this island leads to one thing and that is a lack of enforcement. Whether it’s the police taking action, financials not being filed annually, you name it. This all happens as there is no consequence for failing to do what is required. Those that break the law know this only too well so they continue with impunity.

    To fix this enforcement must start at the top and come down, not from the bottom up. Of course that may be wishful thinking given our history of taking action on anything.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John A and @David…

    From personal experience, the issue is the people affected are not reporting their complaints forcefully enough to the authorities.

    I used to have a twit who enjoyed flying kites near my home. I would call the police, and the kites would come down. Ten minutes later two kites would be flying.

    It sometimes ended up with four kits…

    After a bit of time, including my going down to the Police Station to file an official written report, finally the Sergeant got fed up and met me at my home.

    It was a bit ominous — I received a call later that week saying “Mr. Halsall. I don’t think the kits are going to be a problem for you any longer.

    My understanding is the guy flying the kits was actually here in Barbados illegally.

    Like

  • Pieces l agree with you as this type of behaviour is chapter two of the original article. It shows what happens when the system fails and some Do as they like.

    I was told by my dad how a motor cycle cop called Cyrus and a magistrate called Wallcott I think it was, basically kept our roads safe in the 60’s.

    What happened after that breed passed on?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John A

    How difficult is it to plan a dragnet and confiscate the bikes, toss the idiots in a holding cell overnight for endangering the lifes of the public? Also the insurance companies have a role to play by cancelling their insurances.

    Like

  • @ John A

    We are her e talking about the good old days, then the revisionists came on talking about modernity. Now we are told that violence s a symptom of an indisciplined and lawless society.
    Contradictions are part of reasoning, but which is it in this case? Are we now a lawless society and the old days were better, or are we a lawless society, but it is still better than the old days?
    I am sorry I did not get a job as a cash boy in Broad Street in the bad old days.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    What insurance? These bikes have no lights, numbers, indicators and are therefore not licenseable and therefore not ensurable under our act. I have been told of a case in Tudor street where one of these idiots hit a car and just ran and left the bike.

    No insurance will touch any of those bikes as they too would be liable under the law for ensuring a vehicle not valid for the road under the road traffic act.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “In the old days ED Mottley fed the hungry from the Queen’s Park kitchen, now they go hungry.”

    not true, i see Rastas feeding the hungry,

    not some lowlife, low class politicians feeding the hungry so they can rob them their land and estates because they have no money…..just because they had access to their title deeds, or witnessed their wills….the scam was feed the hungry find out what properties they have to TIEF IT with their scum bar association lawyers……those days are done..

    Like

  • @ John A

    He was nicknamed “Ghost” I think, after the Phantom comic strip character as in the “Ghost that Walks and Could Not Die”

    Like

  • @ John A

    In the old days those motor bike guys would have had bicycles. We had murders in the old days, but many Barbadians still remember when Chickler killed Matoe. Chickler was short and slim, Matoe big and muscular. People remember those events because they were so rare. Now we have about 50 murders in one year.
    People remember Cyrus and his old because there was discipline; look at the schools, if a teacher talks to a child the rogue parents make a complaint.
    How times change? Which do you prefer? To be barefoot and safe, or wearing expensive shoes and be scared?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal

    Interesting question there. I think our society is infected by a lawless few who became that way as a result of a lack of enforcement. In other words one squatter built a house by the Airport and nothing happened. So a second and a third followed and we now have an illegal development up there.

    I think in every society you have the element that will break the law if they feel they can get away with it. I also feel birds of a feather flock together. So those idiots on the scramblers have alot in common.

    Now take note it is not a biker issue. I say that because on the same Sundays the guys with the Harleys go out riding. They obey the law, ride within the limit and are respectful to road users. I say this haven driven behind them more than once.

    So yes where enforcement is weak the “bad boys” will come and test the rope. First one then 50.

    Like

  • @Hal A
    Yours @2.36 pm

    That was a wonderful trip down nostalgia Avenue

    Like

  • Just bear in mind ya have other things AND BIGGER THINGS to also worry about, outside of ya usless leaders who do not know if they are GOING OR COMING and ALWAYS NEED SOMEONE ELSE…always foreign… TO DO SOMETHING FOR THEM…because they do not know how to do it themselves….at taxpayer’s expense of course..

    might want to start making plans, just in case, self preservation is a thing.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnmauldin/2019/12/03/we-are-on-the-brink-of-the-second-great-depression/?fbclid=IwAR1OC1xQ3En_AY4cdtrVG8Bl2-vx9KhfIxP__KYrmKHxS2vwYNYv3hqxj1I

    Like

  • @Hal

    Yes and if you drive our roads now you will see teenagers riding their bicycles on the rear wheel as well. In 5 years they will graduate to the said scramblers too no doubt.

    To be honest I would be happy to sacrifice materialism for a safer and more humane island. Especially seeing that the lust for materialism as shown by the American System, has in my view helped to fuel crime. The boy that wants a pair of Jordan’s at any cost is the problem.

    Like

  • @ Pieces

    So this police guy Cyrus ruled in the 60s then? From what I was told by the old people if Cyrus reported you and Walcott charged you your goose was well cooked!

    Like

  • Let’s see if we can get books written by Bajan children in the next few years and put in the schools….hearing their experiences will be important, what they think, how they feel, this cannot be done half way and not just to COVER UP WHAT WAS NOT DONE BEFORE, WHAT WAS NEGLECTED by slimy governments…… ….dismantle the nasty colonial society and watch the difference.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/12/02/lesson-in-reparations/?fbclid=IwAR1fFPYsNA6o-Owq7DlyNt5Jz-0CTg5sT2d1HjCsO3ACvzOApofQsB7FJdo

    Like

  • @ John A

    You never know what you have had until its gone. Why do you think all those old retirees want to retire in Barbados and not in some developed, first world nation with their sophistication?
    They have had opportunity to compare and contrast and have concluded that apart from jobs and good customer service, they all prefer the Caribbean of their youth. Why? Don’t throw out the baby with the bath water. The grass is always greener.

    Like

  • Didn’t the residents of Walkers report that they contacted the Police several times about the guy menacing them? What was done about it? Then the Atty General makes a speech in which he advises people to use the Courts to resolve issues, Yeah right, the Police are cavalier in their duties and the Courts are woefully backlogged and people are expected to use the Courts.

    Can someone give this man a pair of “L’s” for Xmas? A career Atty General and still learning

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  • @ Hal

    Yes it’s true every Bajan I meet overseas tells me they hope to return home to retire some day. That is why those given the job of enforcement must maintain discipline in all aspects of our society. I don’t think we are too far gone yet, but I also don’t believe we have years left to leave things as they are either.

    Like

  • @Sergeant

    How would you have scripted the AG?

    Like

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