Health Issues for Barbadians – Diabetes, Hypertension, Alzheimer, Erectile Dysfunction

Submitted by Bentley

For years (article published in Barbados Underground in 2007) I have been saying that diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer, erectile dysfunction and several other similar conditions all have the same cause, the inability of the body to metabolise carbohydrates effectively, a condition named Chronic Metabolic Collapse Syndrome.  The medical community is only now recognising this.  It will take at least another 15 years before they start recommending effective methods to prevent these conditions.

See brief presentation:

262 comments

  • I refer to work as “good work” and “bad work” For our foreparents the experience with work in the New World was ofter “bad work” slavery, with its industrialised overwork, beatings and no wages. But before that people we worked for ourselves and their families. What I call “good work.”

    Good work is very satisfying.

    I feel good when I have good quality fresh produce, and I feel better when I can share some with extended family, neighbours, and friends,

    If I was being compelled and receiving no wages, the same tasks I happily do now would be “bad work” and I would not want to do it.

    We need to recall the period before slavery. Even while not forgetting slavery.

    Like

  • GP, what is your take on the latest blood pressure drugs warning?

    https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/more-blood-pressure-drugs-recalled-021000884.html

    Teva Pharmaceuticals has launched a voluntary recall into two drugs used to treat high blood pressure as yet more medications face concerns over a possible cancer risk.

    In a statement from Teva posted by the Food and Drug Administration, the recall affects all lots of combination tablets featuring the drugs amlodipine and valsartan and another combo drug featuring amlodipine, valsartan, and hydrochlorothiazide.

    The drugs could contain an impurity called N-nitroso-diethylamine (NDEA), which has been classified as a possible human carcinogen, the FDA said.

    Patients taking either drugs should contact their doctor or pharmacist for advice or alternative treatments. Stopping the drugs immediately with no comparable alternative could pose a greater risk to patients’ health, said Teva.

    Like

  • THIS IS VERY INTERESTING SIR
    IF TRUE IT IS WORTHY OF INVESTIGATION BY THE POWERS THAT BE
    NOTE I HAVE NOT YET HEARD OF THIS

    IF THE DRUGS DO INDEED CONTAIN ANY KNOWN CARCINOGENS THEY WILL NO DOUBT BE DISCONTINUED

    I NO LONGER DO ANY PRESCRIBING SO I AM HAPPY NOT TO HAVE A HEADACHE HERE SINCE IN RECENT TIMES combination tablets featuring the drugs amlodipine and valsartan and another combo drug featuring amlodipine, valsartan, and hydrochlorothiazide ARE VERY COMMONLY USED

    INTERESTING QUESTIONS ARE
    IS THIS A PROBLEM WITH THE PREPARATIONS OF ONE DRUG FIRM OR OF ALL THE FIRMS THAT MAKE THE DRUG

    IS THE CONTAMINANT PART OF THE VEHICLE FOR THE DRUG OR

    IS IT FORMED AS PART OF THE CHEMICAL PROCESS TO MAKE ONE OR OTHER OF THE COMPONENTS OF THE DRUG, OR

    IS IT THE RESULT OF COMBINING THE COMPONENTS OF THE PREPARATION

    WHY IS THIS NOW COMING TO LIGHT

    CAN PATIENTS STILL TAKE THE INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS SEPARATELY RATHER THAN THE COMBINATION PREPARATION

    IS THERE ANY EVIDENCE THAT THESE DRUGS HAVE CAUSED SYMPTOMS OF CANCER

    Like

  • Simple Simon December 2, 2018 10:11 PM
    I AGREE WITH YOU 100%

    Like

  • We need to recall the period before slavery. Even while not forgetting slavery.
    +++++++++++++

    In the 1817 slave returns for Barbados, there were 18 centenarians, 4 men and 14 women, the oldest being Moll at Haywoods in St. Peter.

    She was 114.

    The slave population back then was about 80,000.

    For Jamaica with a bigger slave population there were over 100 centenarians, the oldest being 115.

    There were also centenerians in St. Vincent (5, eldest 114), Grenada (4, eldest 116) and Dominica (3, eldest 120).

    https://dominicaexplorer.com/did-you-know/percentage-centenarians/

    The burials of many slaves and their owners (Quakers) were not recorded in parochial registers nor were they even buried in the Anglican Churchyards.

    For those who were in the parochial records from 1640 onwards few had their ages given.

    The earliest centenarian I came across in the burial records in Barbados was a Shepherd in St. Philip, 1803, so born in 1703.

    She got an honourable mention because not only was she 100, she was also the grandmother and great grandmother of a “race of mulattos”!!

    Like

  • For Jamaica with a bigger slave population there were over 100 centenarians, the oldest being 115.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Sorry, 77, not over 100 … data search was double counting in some instances.

    The slave population in Jamaica in 1817 was from what I can find on the net, over 300,000.

    Like

  • Another source on populations with the most centenarians

    View story at Medium.com

    Japan

    To make the above list a country needs to have over 1000 centenarians so most islands in the Caribbean don’t make it.

    https://nia.gov.kn/skn-may-have-highest-percentage-of-centenarians-per-capita-in-caricom-region-health-minister-phipps-says/
    .

    Like

  • @ JOhn
    I know from my research of a 126 year old, a 120 year old and also a 114 year old slave!!

    Elizabeth Holder at 120 was buried in Westbury in 1878 I think, need to check where she died.

    The 114 year old slave who appears in the 1817 returns I believe was Ch Ch or St. Philip but I would need to check.

    The 126 year old woman, Elizabeth Philips, was either Ch Ch or St. Philip, would need to check.

    That was in the 1800’s.
    ++++++++++++++++++++++

    Regardless of what your “research” said, this is 99.9% likely to be untrue. 126 years? In the 19th century? Slave?
    Sounds like nonsense.

    Like

  • In this instance John is probably right. The enslaved population was initially likely healthier than the slave holding population. Remember also that those people who were not super tough died on the journey across the Atlantic and never arrived in the Caribbean. I have a friend who will be 80 next birthday, she was born and raised in the upper St. Peter area in 1939. When she was a girl there was still a formerly enslaved woman living in her community. The woman was about 114, born in the 1820’s. Abolition was formally declared in Barbados in 1834. After a period of “apprenticeship” slavery was fully abolished in 1838.

    Even though they did not know her this formerly enslaved woman was a contemporary of my 2 elder siblings, who are in their 80’s

    So yes there are still Bajans alive who remember people who were enslaved. It is after all not so long ago.

    Like

  • no sidewalks more centenarians …barbados has it covered

    Like

  • Bajan in NY

    What could you possibly expect Georgie Porgie to add to the recalled hypertension drug? You speak as though this man is an expert … and the concerned is that great … had it been they wouldn’t have advised people who are on the drug to continue taking it until they contact their doctor…

    Like

  • Bajan in NY

    There isn’t any special about Georgie Porgie … he just one out of the millions of doctor in the US … so don’t let the title fool you brother … he hasn’t done anything that would warrant the admiration of the Bajan public … Dr. Banister who used to practiced medicine on Roebuck Street and not to far from the Coca Cola factory is more noted in Barbados than Georgie Porgie …

    Like

  • @SS
    In this instance John is probably right.
    +++++++++++++++
    No he is not. Age exaggeration was common place (and still is) among the elderly and it has been proven that most claims to exceptional longevity are false. Without the correct documents to verify high ages, all such claims ought to treated with suspicion.
    Because someone looks old or says they were born 100 years ago does not mean that they were.

    Like

  • A. Dullard

    When I was a teenager I visited the parish of St. Thomas and in that parish lived a woman who was supposely 110 years old … but I was told there wasn’t a birth certificate to substantiate this claim … and she knew not when she was born …

    Like

  • “When I was a teenager I visited the parish of St. Thomas and in that parish lived a woman who was supposely 110 years old … but I was told there wasn’t a birth certificate to substantiate this claim … and she knew not when she was born …”
    ++++++++++++++++

    Exactly! And this is often how it goes…

    Like

  • Regardless of what your “research” said, this is 99.9% likely to be untrue. 126 years? In the 19th century? Slave?
    Sounds like nonsense.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Here is the burial record for Elizabeth Philiips dated 3rd October 1773 aged 126 years!!

    That means if she indeed was 126 years of age, that she was born in 1647!!

    Her status not mentioned and her colour is not mentioned which means she was neither a slave nor a freed slave.

    https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRSK-9W44?i=13&cc=1923399

    Like

  • Take the @yahoo.com off the username and hit sign in!!

    Like

  • Here is the burial record for Elizabeth Philiips dated 3rd October 1773 aged 126 years!!Here is the burial record for Elizabeth Philiips dated 3rd October 1773 aged 126 years!!
    ++++++++++++++++++
    John, without a corroborating birth record, the burial/ death record alone is useless.

    Like

  • @A. Dullard

    None of us remember our birth so we depend on others to write it down or to tell us. When my grandmother died in 1969 I recalled that the “breastplate” on her coffin said 80 years, and I saw her still working up to 1959, so I believed that she was indeed 80. However some years later I went to the Archives and could not find her birth record. Does that mean that the family was exaggerating? No. The archivist told me that sometimes people are unsure of their birth dates, and that I should look some years before and after the supposed birth date. I found her birth record. She was born in 1879 and died at 90, not at 80, which means that she continued working as a field labourer until she was 80. My father died at 94, my mother at 85. How do I know this? I have seen their birth records, and my eldest sibling is 82, so either my mother gave birth at 20 years and 9 months, or perhaps she gave birth ten years earlier at age 10 years? Virtually impossible in a young woman who was herself a field labourer. Menarche tends to occur later in girls who are engaged in heavy manual labour, and who eat a low fat diet. My father was working in his own fields and climbing ladders well past his 90th birthday. One of my father’s school friends is still alive. Before my father died they both told me that the friend was the elder by one year. They were at Black Bess school together as little boys. The friend will be 109 in February.

    Being old does not have to mean mean being decrepit. Did two hours in the field myself this morning, and my day has not yet started. Lots more to do and all day, God willing, to get many things done.

    Like

  • Georgie Porgie

    To avoid some of the chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol etc … we have to learn how to discipline our mouth because there is where part of the problem lies … and no matter what GP endeavours to bring to this discussion to counter the obvious … salt and sugar consumed in moderation will avert the early onset of the above mentioned chronic medical conditions… and I don’t have to ramble through a lot of medical higwash to arrive at such a conclusion because basic common sense tells me this …

    Like

  • @SS,
    “None of us remember our birth so we depend on others to write it down or to tell us.”
    ++++++++++++++++++
    This is obvious, though, isn’t it. The point is that without a reliable system of record keeping or multiple sources of independent, verifiable evidence, self-reported extreme ages are usually inflated. You yourself verified your parents ages with their birth record.
    And yes, records are available to verify Mr W’s age.

    Like

  • Just put on a pot of ground food, cassava, carrots, pumpkin, spinach and some fish. While I wait for that to cook I had a glass of soursop punch and half a pear (avocado) for a little snack.

    Like

  • Even if birth records are not available, birth dates cannot be exaggerated to a great degree, because we know that most human beings, especially those engaged in heavy manual labour are unlikely to give birth before age 13 at earliest, and even thirteen is early. I have some siblings born between the 1930′ and 1950′ some of whom did not reach menarche until after their 16th birthdays. We all engaged in heavy manual labour as children and as teens, in adulthood, and some of us now even into old age. So one method is to look for the birth records of the woman’s children. An assumption can also be made that few women (before the age of reproductive technologies) few women give birth after age 45.

    So look at a woman’s first birth and last birth and extrapolate from there.If a woman has an 85 year old “child”, chances are the woman is older than 100.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @SS
    There is a massive difference between age 95 and 100. An even greater difference between 100 and 105 and an extreme difference between 105 and 110. So any age inflation has massive implications for the study of the biodemography of ageing.

    You may have the last word.

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    When all that is digested … have yourself a glass of baking soda water to alkaline the blood … a powerful agent in the prevention of cancer …

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    And with that amount of starch in your diet … you gine really need tah drink 8 glass of wata tah neutralize dat starch …

    Like

  • Lexie I good. Going outside now to work it off.

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    I hare yah … but understand this … everything we put in our mouth impacts our bloodstream … so it is wise to put the right things in our mouth as we are get older … you may have noticed that everything that taste good is bad

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    I hare yah … but understand this … everything we put in our mouth impacts our bloodstream … so it is wise to put the right things in our mouth as we are get older … you may have noticed that everything that taste good is bad for us … and everything that taste bad is good for us?

    Like

  • My carrots, spinach and fish tasted very good and i believe that they are good for me too. Had some tomatoes, sweet peppers, onions and your favourite garlic with the fish too.

    Like

  • Tomatoes are scarce!

    Like

  • It is possible that Elizabeth Phillips never married and kept her surname.

    In which case we would be looking for a birth in 1647 of an Elizabeth Phillips.

    There is a 1650 Baptism of an Elizabeth Phillips(I), daughter of Josias Phillips!!!

    There is another Baptism of an Elizabeth Phillips(II) in 1653, daughter of George Phillips

    There are other baptisms of Elizabeth Phillips’ in the 1600’s, one in 1663 (III), one in 1677(IV) and one in 1691(V).

    There are two marriages in the records of an Elizabeth Phillips in the 1600’s.

    One took place took place in 1678, the other in 1698.

    The 1698 marriage is probably of the Elizabeth Phillips(IV) baptized in 1677, 21 years earlier.

    The 1678 marriage could be Elizabeth Phillips I or II.

    The first recorded burial of an Elizabeth Phillips took place in 1718.

    Could be I, II or V.

    There is also the possibility of a Phillips male marrying a female named Elizabeth ?? in the 1670’s.

    Can’t find any in the records.

    Like

  • A BRIGHT SPARK CALLED BENTLEY START A THREAD CALLED HEALTH ISSUES FOR BARBADIANS – DIABETES, HYPERTENSION, ALZHEIMER, ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

    BUT HE NEVER RETURNED TO SHARE HIS EXPERTISE

    THE BLOGMASTER AFTER 200 POSTS THAT DO NOT ADDRESS THE ISSUE SINCE NO ONE ON BU WAS ABLE, OR WILLING IN ADDRESSING THE MATTER FOLLOWED THE IGNORANCE PROCLAIMED BY THE DEVIL CALLED BUSH TEA THAT HE WOULD GET SUPER INFO ONLINE BY JUST GOOGLING. SO THE BLOGMASTER GOOGLED AND POSTED SOME PITHY PUERILE POWER POINTS APPARENTLY MADE BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    WHY IS THE DEVIL BUSH TEA TELLING US HOW LOVELY THESE POWER POINTS ARE AND INFORMING US OF THEIR INTENT CONTENT AND EXTENT?

    WHY WONT ANY ONE RISE UP AND STEP UP TO THE PLATE AND DO AS I USUALLY SAY TO MY MED STUDENTS AS I LEARNED LONG AGO FROM MR AMETEWEE “SAY SOMETHING SAY ANYTHING!

    I WILL OFF COURSE LARRF LOUD AT ANY SHIT THAT IS SAID, BUT WE WILL STILL BE FRIENDS.

    THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN IGNORANT PROVACATEURS ARE ALLOWED TO MOCK EXPERTS IN THEIR AREAS OF EXPERTISE

    COME ON BUSH SHIT FIND SOME STELLAR SUPERIOR SLIDES AND OPINE MAN

    COME ON MAN THE TOPIC IS HEALTH ISSUES FOR BARBADIANS – DIABETES, HYPERTENSION, ALZHEIMER, ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

    COME ON BUSH SHIT GOOGLE AND FIND SOME STELLAR SUPERIOR SLIDES AND OPINE MAN

    Like

  • GP, and Simple Simon,

    That is exactly how iI have often described it – good tired from accomplishment goes away after rest and is actually even a good feeling: bad tired comes from boredom and inactivity and does not go away after rest but after productive work. John is obviously right about the mind and its effect on physical health. If one is not interested in living one the next step would be to die. I too had a neighbour who was riding his bicycle and taking care of himself and working in the garden well into his nineties. When he stopped working due to a giddy head, he soon got bored with living and decided he was ready to die. I cannot remember if he made it to 101.

    G.P.
    There are not many people I know who do not wish to work. Often it is the type of work or the work environment that demotivates them. In the public service it can often seem as though your work will come to nought or as though you are running around in circles. Sometimes you need to see your work make a real difference in order to be motivated. That also contributes to the satisfaction you spoke about earlier – that the work must be meaningful.

    Like

  • Simple Simon,

    I would eat some of your food now. I do not have my grandmother’s or my mother’s touch at the old time steamed food.

    Like

  • So would I dat food sound good

    Like

  • It isn’t only the strength of the old person’s mind that matters.

    The other aspect which ensures longevity is the respect due from younger persons to older people.

    As you get older, you need help from younger people.

    If that help is given grudgingly and not out of love and respect the natural result is that the older person will feel they are being a burden.

    Their will to live, as strong as it may be will ultimately be broken and they will literally choose to die.

    The treatment elders get from juniors is as crucial as the elder’s will!!

    That’s why Japan has so many centenerians,

    It is a two way street.

    Like

  • JOHN
    CAN YOU HELP THE BLOGMASTER AND BUSH TEA TO UPDATE THE MEDICAL STUDENT PPTS HE POSTED TO STANDARD STELLAR GP PPTS?

    Like

  • @David December 3, 2018 3:00 PM “Tomatoes are scarce!”

    I row a few of my own. Also when tomatoes are plentiful and cheap, say 50 cents a pound I buy some and put them in the freezer. I don’t eat much met so my freezer is used mostly for surplus vegetables. Once you are ready to cook, hold them under running water, slip the skin off and in a minute or two they are ready to chop and add to soup, stew or gravy.

    Like

  • That, .John, is also true.

    Like

  • Thanks GP and Donna. I am enjoying life. Not rich. Still I am happy.

    Like

  • @SS
    “Just put on a pot of ground food, cassava, carrots, pumpkin, spinach and some fish. While I wait for that to cook I had a glass of soursop punch and half a pear (avocado) for a little snack.”

    Good for you. I am envious

    Like

  • Simple Simon

    We start out eating and drinking those things that have no nutritional value … and over time has contributed to these chronic medical conditions we have …

    Like

  • Dear Lexicon. I have to eat. We all have to eat. What would you suggest that I eat?

    Like

  • DEAREST DARLING DONNA
    RE Donna December 3, 2018 3:17 PM
    Simple Simon,
    I would eat some of your food now. I do not have my grandmother’s or my mother’s touch at the old time steamed food.
    I DONE WID YOU SWEETHEART
    I DONT MIND YA CUSSING MA I COULD TEK DAT
    BUT YA MEAN YA CANT COOK? I CAHN TEK DAT.
    I GONE. I DONE. MURDAH

    Like

  • One day we will become octogenarians and as we get on we will all need help from the next generation.

    If we have shown them our lack of respect for our elders, we will get it too!!

    Like

  • G.P,

    I can cook other things very well.. But my steamed food does not taste like the old time steamed food. There is just something missing that I cannot determine.

    Like

  • G.P.

    I actually think you and I would get on famously. We cuss but we have respect for each other, faults notwithstanding. .

    Like

  • True again, John.

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE Donna December 4, 2018 9:50 AM

    G.P. I actually think you and I would get on famously. We cuss but we have respect for each other, faults notwithstanding. .

    TRUE! AGREE 100%

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Donna who wrote ” steamed food does not taste like the old time steamed food.”

    You can compensate with well seasoned steamed fresh fish.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hants,

    My grandmother and my mother both made their own seasoning. I helped but never made it entirely on my own. That is what makes the difference.

    Did you check out my posts to the diaspora corner? You brought back great memories with your posts.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I grow some of my own herbs, but I also buy some from a dreadlocked gentleman near to Cheapside market, opposite St. Mary’s church wall. B buy a bunch or two of whatever he has on hand, wash the lot, put it out on paper towels to dry, then chop with a pair of scissors (easier than using a knife) then process in a food processor with some salt. I put in jars and keep refrigerated. Use a clean spoon each time as you dip. Season fish, chicken, pork, add a little to your scrambled eggs and your fishcake batter. A lovely complex flavour, and much tastier than heavily processed seasoning. But it is a fresh product so please don’t make too much at a time.

    I use eshalot, chives, thyme, marjoram, leaf garlic, parsley, onion,garlic pods, scotch bonnet pepper, sweet basil, flavour peppers, black pepper, salt, and whatever other herbs are available. The more the merrier. I make enough to last me for about a month, and the same for the adult children.

    Liked by 1 person

  • You can probably grow chives and sweet basil, and leaf garlic yourself. They are easy to grow. In fact both the garlic and the basil grow as fast as weds, so you might want to confine them to a large pot, or they will try to take over your whole garden.

    I buy from the man opposite St. Mary’s because he seems to always have the widest selection, especially on Saturday mornings.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Simple Simon
    December 4, 2018 11:12 AM

    I grow some of my own herbs, but I also buy some from a dreadlocked gentleman near to Cheapside market, opposite St. Mary’s church wall.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Isaiah?

    Liked by 1 person

  • SS,

    Will do.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John December 4, 2018 1:10 PM “Isaiah?”

    Yes.

    Excellent selection.

    Always fresh.

    Good manners.

    Liked by 1 person

  • i like this article! i have a blog also about how to help persons with diabetes and its fastest solution please have time to read..thanks.
    https://wordpress.com/block-editor/post/livehealthybody1.wordpress.com/69

    Like

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