DLP Supporters Must be Feeling Punch Drunk

The Democratic Labour Party (DLP)- that beleaguered twin of the duopoly- is in the news again, what is new?

It has been reported that the widely debated two appointments to the Senate will be made today at last by the President of the Republic of Barbados. The press report in today’s newspaper names the two to be Dr. Kristina Hinds and Dr. Charleston Brathwaite. This has come about because the government withdrew a proposed contentious constitutional amendment to allow opposition parties to appoint Senators even if they failed to win seats in the Lower House.

The second news of concern for the DLP informs of the suspension of Pedro Shepherd and Alwyn Babb from the public service with half pay for contesting the last general election under the DLP banner. The BU family will recall this matter was highlighted on BU in the lead up to the 2022 general election see link:

Picking and Choosing

Posted on by David 57 comments

The DLP leadership and supporters must be feeling punch drunk with all the blows it has been getting, and not just lately. It had to endure the enigmatic Freundel Stuart’s stewardship after he was selected the compromised candidate when perceived shining star late prime minister David Thompson unfortunately died in office.

The DLP may still have the last laugh and in the process recoup a little credibility if its acolyte in former Attorney General Adriel Brathwaite wins the appeal to the CCJ seeking to invalidate the decision to constitute the Upper House with 18 members. 

In related news he public was advised recently by de facto president of the DLP Steve Blackett 4 nominees have been selected to contest the vacancy left by the abrupt departure of Verla De Peiza. Time will tell if the leader selected will bring the leadership to whip the DLP into a fit for purpose shape.

The blogmaster’s regret continues to be the inability of others to step forward when there is a vacuum of political representation in the country. Where is the legitimacy in an argument which criticizes the two main political parties but worthy citizens are unwilling to offer themselves for public service to present a credible alternative.

#maninthemirror

204 thoughts on “DLP Supporters Must be Feeling Punch Drunk


  1. Those suffering from emotional constipation or diarrhea should try this stomp dance for emotional release


  2. What a bunch of hopeless BBs.
    While we are on and on and on about the ‘DLP and BLP’ and their mindless minions, the Trini are buying Collins…
    while next door in Dominica, we see a LEADER take steps to RE-ENFRANCHISE his people with energy.

    Can there be a people anywhere who are more deserving of being returned to a state of slavery..?


    • @Bush Tea

      The article was posted on Urgent Message to Prime Minister below. The question is if a local would have purchased? It looks like when white Barbados is looking to get a golden handshake the only option is to sell to non Barbadians? The same occurred with BS&T.


  3. Told you already David…
    Can’t you see that this has been a deliberate move to sell to ANYONE …but black Bajans.

    There are none so blind as those who WILL not see.

    .`..and what are you expecting the PM to do? Like Arthur, she is constantly looking for things to sell….
    next up will be our asses – cause our grand children have already been sold for generations to come.

    Compare and contrast Dominica, where Skerritt has ACTIVELY retaken control of the critical energy sector from the parasitic Canadians, who have been quietly decimating ours.

    Bajans need glasses…


  4. @David (and to the Bushman) a few matters of perspective this bright Saturday morning. First the ‘ridiculous’ and then towards the more sublime. …. I am upset that in reading the article above I discovered that Dr. Brathwaite is 79 years old … upset as hell because no where did I read how old is the female Senator! Wha is dat about … dese fellas is carry this female age thing too far sometimes. Now if the blogger @Hants was writing the article I suspect he may have provided the age and also expressed how pulchritudinous she was too. Wha loss!🤣🥳

    But seriously tho, that was a very interesting piece of writing by the journo and his editor. Just saying!

    Now a bit more sublime … you said “if there was another election general called or a by for that matter the DLP will probably lose again. This is the sad state our parliamentary democracy finds itself. A virtual one party state. Barrow’s ashes must be turning green.” …. I completely agree on the first sentence. I completely refute the remainder.

    We cannot rail here daily for years that in EFFECT our governance has been essentially different sides of the same coin and then conveniently fall into concern that this complete parliamentary control by the BLP is such a BAD thing.

    In simple terms that is mere semantics as we have EFFECTIVELY been living that for generations – the party in power changed but nothing else did: the problems noted in the Auditor General report remained; the spoils and victimization and misuse of govt coffers remained; the lack of transparent, non-conflict of interest money management remained; the legal system problems increased. In short, it was a VIRTUAL ONE PARTY STATE. … So respectfully to Mr Barrow there should be no damn way his ashes are discolored now !

    And on this final point of Trini ownership of all things Bajan. This one is particularly galling. Several years ago a Bajan brother with whom I had spent enjoyable years in the Boy Scouts in our youth saw me again in Jamaica and we reacquainted. He introduced me to the then very nascent thing called crypto. With all that I knew of the investment opportunity then (and even now) I was not impressed and graciously declined his offer to get in on it. Boy, did I screw up an investment opportunity … All that to say: why de hell are we continually railing about Trinis or Canadians buying up Bim if we Bajans are making bad investment decision (as I did) and NOT doing it ourselves.

    Unless (as someone suggested above) it’s a case of the current White Bajan owners REFUSING to sell to Black Bajans then this line of displeasure is also mere semantics.

    Oh, back to the ridiculous : if FIVE of the last eight Bajan PMs could step off island and marry a non-Bajan and if Bajans could spread their skills and knowledge the length of the region working and leading others isn’t it now just appropriate ‘KARMA’ (to misuse one of the Bushman’s favorite words) that all those expats we ‘exploited’ are now getting theirs back — BIG TIME! Just being ridiculously lukewarm, as usual!🤦‍♂️🥳

    I gone.


    • @Dee Word

      You will agree that for everything that has been in existence for a long time there comes a tipping point.


  5. @dpD
    Agreed with what you wrote, but unable to understand the last paragraph.

    One of the issues I had with Barbados was that one man could have 100 women and the other 99 could have zero. I suspect that others realize the potential of these young men (scholars) long before Barbadian women did. I met my wife at UWI – St Augustine.

    On the age of Brathwaite. Being an older person I am very much concern about age discrimination. However, it appears that Barbados has to choose between the ‘under-age’ and the elderly. On this matter, I am certain they could have found a younger person.

    Grandiosity-Psychiatry:
    an exaggerated belief in one’s own importance, sometimes reaching delusional proportions, as a symptom of a mental illness such as manic disorder:

    This would explain ‘punching above our weight’s and allowing foreigners (billionaires and millionaires) to purchase large tracts of land and be in competition with locals.

    I have no idea how to stop the sale of local companies, but unless we can identify and ring-fence some of our businesses we will always see these sales. Let me toss a few phrases here.. ownership must be approved by some agency and must remain majority (>50%) local.

    We must first accept how weak and impotent we are; it is time that the image we see in the mirror is real and not a figment of an active imagination.


    • Is it discrimination in this case or more an unconscious bias many of us have about some things.


  6. Correct @David but we disagree I suspect on when or where is that moment that we tipped!

    To use my personal example … when did I lose that investment opportunity: when I declined the offer or much prior to that when I may have ‘closed’ my mind to something so incredibly different. I actually am an opened mind equal opportunity type of person but my Bajan scouting brother (younger than I) was on a different much more open path clearly.

    That to opine, that many on the island are on different paths – but don’t realise – and for all practically purposes the tipping point was long ago passed … we now have to reset brother! … Bushie is not wrong when he says “our grand children have already been sold for generations to come.”

    So despite all the notoriously bad character flaws known of the PM there is every reality that history will record this period of Bajan life and politics as a point of ‘reset’ (politically anyhow). The complete ‘autonomous’ rule she has engineered may be a watershed (remember it was also experienced in Grenada – TWICE too).

    Again a bit of the ridiculous: we will read @AC making some of the most ABSURD hypocritical remarks on governance because unlike previously there is ABSOLUTELY very little possibility that they would EVER get such absolute control. So h/she is beyond crazy angry about that!

    Lata.


  7. We will be here in 2027 recycling the same ideas and discussions, unless… Barbados wakes up and be honest with ourselves..

    We believe in symbolism. We often focus on what is out of our control and refuse to fix the things that we control.

    Let us pray
    “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
    courage to change the things I can,
    and wisdom to know the difference.”


    • We will be discussing same or similar ideas because history shows us persistence seldom fails.


  8. This will soon be promoted to an esoteric discussion.

    A next national weakness. A love of words and making the simple become complicated


  9. Oh gee, thanks @Theo, there was other ‘ridiculous’ point I wanted to ‘rail’ about which your note reminded me of….

    So @David see how life does play out… although not directly related still tho, see how we went from an 18 year old in the Senate to a grandfatherly 79 year old. That evolution from the youth voice to one of broad international experience (particularly of China) with the wisdom too of age is remarkable ain’t it. What a thing! —-

    I don’t know of Dr. Brathwaite background but I would surmise that in HIS youth he was likely as bright a light as Kothdiwala so not taking anything away from the young man but coupled with that extensive experience I believe we are much the better for this appointment.

    Otherwise @Theo, I would add that you had an very important ingredient to be a political leader in Bim 🥳 The lovely spouse from climes non-local was always a plus! Oh, and it used to be 7-1 back when I was a boy (not that I benefited ever tho🤣) so that 100 -1 thing is a real massive change! Just saying. Anyhow, enough jesting for the day. I gone.


  10. None so blind!

    ‘Ownership’ has nothing to do with ‘missed opportunities to make money’.
    It is actually about the DIGNITY of being able to sustain one’s self AND FAMILY, by being in control of the basic amenities needed by the family.
    That ‘family’ is then extended to the community and to the country, depending on the level of leadership that one accepts.

    The good thing about Dribbler is that he lives up to his name…. the only improvement that Bushie would suggest is the ‘Lukewarm Pedantic Dribbler”.

    Any ‘family’ that depends on a stranger for their shelter, food, drink, electricity, banking, insurance and now medicines is no damn ‘family’, Those are SERFS. Just like our fore parents were, back in 1700. EXCEPT that they were put into that position ‘vi et armis’, …while we have TAKEN ourselves into slavery by misguided idiocy and pedantic dribbling.

    One recalls Petra Wicky on VOB aggressively supporting the sale of local assets to foreigners…”because of the FOREX we could get”…. then he goes off and marries one… In similar vein, we have others who, for their own petty selfish reasons, like Judas, see no problem with selling the country into serfdom – as long as they get their 20 pieces of silver.

    @ Theo
    Dr Brathwaite is an outstanding scholar and patriarch. However, he is NOT and achiever, and he has no history of revolutionary change management. Therefore he can NOT be expected to play any NEEDED transformational role in our Senate. He will just go there and talk shiite using nuff big words.

    For Example, Caswell DID create major ripples in just two years. Now HE has a history of rattling shiite institutions.
    Grenville also has a history of calling a spade a spade – even though GP3 may call it a bêche or pique.
    Atherley was just about to cause upheaval in the PAC…..

    It is not surprising to see why Atherley and Caswell needed to be expunged from the shiite senate, and why it could NOT wait until elections were due, and the Republic was settled.

    Steupsss…
    You can lead sheep ANYWHERE …. just control the Caswell’s and GP3s. and listen to the dribblers.


  11. @BT
    Please…..
    I have given you credit before for understanding some of the dynamics between the skin tones in Barbados…but
    They are cashing out….they could give a rats ass WHO buys, it’s about the money.
    It is really about WHO sees value, for that determines the money.
    And w.r.t current sale, isn’t the wife/mother a Trini?
    We can beat our chests about Dominica or Antigua, yet they are creating some potential GEMS. While capping value.
    ICBL was an interesting case. We all knew why the Bermuda owner wanted out…and Bim has more insurance firms than most…yet some Canadian with no industry experience wins? And it was a ‘fire sale’.


    • It is about money, would be interesting to know if this was a private deal or if it was widely known to give others a chance to bid?


  12. 30 love
    60 love
    Mind-boggling and nothing to show in ways of progress and productivity
    Country is on a slow dance to nowhere


  13. “We will be discussing same or similar ideas because history shows us persistence seldom fails.”

    It fails up to the point just before it succeeds. “Success delayed is not success denied”.


  14. Even blind crazy or delusional the evidence shows a country economic failure and poor management
    A citizen tired of being tired
    Not my fault
    I speak from observation
    Hoping that the last barbadian leaving Barbados remembers to turn off the lights
    A people that have produced so much for other countries have been denied opportunities to produce at home
    Hence we have Trinidad overtake
    Chinese overtake and the PM making a promise of adding more outside influencers to take up and own what little is left
    BTW what happened to those glorious promises of Marijuana fields belonging to we
    Don’t smoke but can become co-jointed if the price is right


  15. @ DPD
    Why are you so pissed off at a sister country from the region investing in another.
    You and others fail to understand that the private sector in Barbados is not interested in national economic development. They leave the door wide opened for others.
    Why are you not pissed off with the former chairman/ president of Coca Cola buying up all the properties in Bridgetown. The same properties that the traditional white private sector owned since slavery and allowed to become dilapidated.
    Furthermore, go and ask any black Bajan manufacturer who was their biggest customers in the 70s through the late eighties. Ask them
    Which country used to buy their products. Let me tell you :Trinidad.
    Sometimes before jumping into anti- Trini foolishness , we should research the facts.
    Who forced BST to sell out ? No damn body. At one time they managed and controlled dozens of plantations; the car dealerships, the lumber companies; the major retail stores and much more. Raped the economy dry. Never wanted to spend a penny on IT and then sold out so that they can spend their days shooting birds; sailing their yachts. Why blame the Trinidadians for that.
    Name three major multi million projects that the private sector has invested in that were designed to essentially assist with economic development consistent with where the world was heading in the last forty years.
    And don’t come telling me about creating jobs. That is elementary. I am talking about creativity and innovation through the new technologies.
    Name them my Brother


  16. @David 10.54
    Everything is for sale, you just have to ask?
    Frequently business owners a) over value holdings b) think ‘who would buy this’.?
    You sound like the fella who really likes a girl, but in Bajan terms, never poses the question.
    The large majority of owners aren’t professionally packaging, and soliciting bids.
    Everything is for sale, just a matter of timing and money.


  17. “Can there be a people anywhere who are more deserving of being returned to a state of slavery..?”

    coming soon, don’t worry, ya won’t even recognize it in the new blueprinted form, saw some aspects of it and no one can say it won’t be deserved….

    “BTW what happened to those glorious promises of Marijuana fields belonging to we”

    still laughing at that one, they are still looking for nonblacks to lead the charge of selfishnessmand oppression, disenfranchisement…etc…using the usual weapons….that’s why most refuse to get involved…

    “Any ‘family’ that depends on a stranger for their shelter, food, drink, electricity, banking, insurance and now medicines is no damn ‘family’, Those are SERFS. Just like our fore parents were, back in 1700. EXCEPT that they were put into that position ‘vi et armis’, …while we have TAKEN ourselves into slavery by misguided idiocy and pedantic dribbling.”

    ya forgot to mention education

    AND

    as a Guyanese put it so eloquently this morning,” they are, live for the moment only people” and have NO VISIONS FOR THE FUTURE…easiest way to lead them straight into the new age slavery…and they will thank their slavers….and cuss anybody who tries to point it out..

    “we have others who, for their own petty selfish reasons, like Judas, see no problem with selling the country into serfdom – as long as they get their 20 pieces of silver.”

    the traitor blooldline, alive and well…

    Bushman….don’t know EXACTLY what the new environment will look like in 2 or 3 years, got a clue based on what the beasts in Guyana are trying to sell the people and other information shared out there, but it’s obvious it won’t be pretty……at least no one can say they were not warned, the more intelligent already insulated themselves….everyone is on their own, just because they do not want to unite, want to fight down those who have what they need to know, consistently, with their crab mentality…they will bear the brunt of their recklessness and can only blame themselves, no one else.


  18. “Why are you not pissed off with the former chairman/ president of Coca Cola buying up all the properties in Bridgetown. The same properties that the traditional white private sector owned since slavery and allowed to become dilapidated.”

    it’s instructive who is fought down or attempts made to sabotage…while admiring their new masters…a weakness, a stockholm syndrome…

    William…wait a while until things really unfold..then we will see EVEN MORE of who is who….just protect you and yours from what’s in the pipeline.

    i have absolutely no sympathy…


  19. AC

    Hush do!

    Who bring in the Chinese? Sandals? Wanted to sell off Hilton and the oil terminals. All of which u supported and now here cryi?


  20. @ NO
    “Everything is for sale, you just have to ask?”
    ~~~~~~~~
    Really?
    Gotta cute sexy daughter…?
    You may have been overly exposed to the intricacies of albino-centric thinking.

    Boss..
    When it comes to how Bushie’s family eats, sleeps, and has it’s BASIC being….
    NOT FOR SALE…. not for shiite!!

    As to the sale of our formerly white owned businesses, you can continue to delude yourself. Some of these businesses were actually run by DEDICATED employees who gave their LIVES in service to the owners. It takes a special kind or resentment, and feeling of ‘NOT RELATED’, to then sell off the fruits of such life’s work to strangers – rather than allow for continuity and smooth transfer of control to what SHOULD by then be ‘family’….
    …and what money what??!!
    What do they do with the damn money? … put it on the same Trini/Canadian bank and watch it erode away with negative interest and charges?
    Steupsss..

    You and Dribbles should REALLY consider Jah Messenger’s (Luciano’s) warning to “Come Away…”


  21. @Skinner, re your 11:00 AM … you got me a lil kerfuffled ! You direct the query and commentary to ME about “Why are you so pissed off at a sister country from the region investing in another“, WHY EXACTLY!!

    I know I was perhaps a bit too ‘playful’ or facetious in my earlier post so I went back and re-read it to see if I was soooo badly out of synch that you perceived as you did … and I was still kerfuffled. So to be CLEAR … I am NOT pissed off about regional investment … I was pissed off at the rhetoric about those purchases! …

    So let me repeat what I said with highlights: —- “And on this final point of Trini ownership of all things Bajan. This one is particularly galling. […] why de hell are we continually railing about Trinis or Canadians buying up Bim if we Bajans are making bad investment decision (as I did) and NOT doing it ourselves.” […] “Unless (as someone suggested above) it’s a case of the current White Bajan owners REFUSING to sell to Black Bajans then this line of displeasure is also mere semantics”.

    Hope that helps … and in the TMI category I was like three of those PMs in the regional marriage union sweepstakes … I would be one of the last to complain about my regional brethren, trust me!

    And BTW @Bush Tea that latter has nothing to do with your lambasting me about a ‘lukewarm’ status … if anything it would make me a spitfire of word, action and deed actually!🥳


  22. Seriously though DPD, you see nothing wrong with your neighbor owning your house, ordering about your wife and children who they ‘employ’, providing your food, financial services, energy, and medicine…?
    …while you barely earn Enuff to pay his rent and the charges he that imposes for these services?

    Steupsss ..What the hell is YOUR idea of what being a MAN represents? …or of what DIGNITY means?
    No wonder BBs find themselves able to bend over so comfortably…. even minus vaseline.

    Ask ANY one of your albino-centric role models if THEY would contemplate such a posture…. They would die first.
    sh…..
    It is even worse with us than Bushie feared……


  23. @BT
    For ‘BBE’ sakes the topic was trading businesses.
    Your community centric works well for small entities, particularly where you an owner/operator. But a management buy out is very rare in larger entities.
    @David
    The NDA is designed to ‘tie up’ the owner and prevent them seeking alternate bids.


  24. Alice in Wonderlandism!! The PM says the population too small, BU intelligentsia talk shyte. Tdad-based Pan-Caribbean company buys Collins, BU intelligentsia still talk shite. Mek wunna mind up!!


  25. @ NO
    “For ‘BBE’ sakes the topic was trading businesses.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    You are beginning to sound a bit too defensive for a man of your obvious intellect.
    If you need to declare an interest in the issue please feel free to do so… (such as if you sold your local business to a Trini buyer and moved to the land of milk and honey up North LOL)

    Let Bushie explain the concept of ‘business’ in the NON albino-centric sense.

    Life requires that a number of BASIC services be satisfied by humans. This is reflected at the individual level, the family level, the community level, the regional level, the national level and the global level.
    “Business’ is the process of making provisions for these basic requirements, as well as providing for continuous social and human development. (ie that our children are better off than we were).

    Therefore, Business IS about family Northern.
    So while you have no price to exchange for your blood daughter, you have no issue with selling out your employees of 4 decades service…?
    Boss…Who is your neighbor?
    who is NOT your daughter?

    If you happen to be the family member with control of the kitchen, how the hell do you then sell it to a stranger just because you can get a premium price (which the stranger will IMMEDIATELY squeeze out of YOUR family’s asses anyhow)

    Your albino-centric mentors’ obviously tend to see things differently.
    Time to ‘Come away from the land of the sinking sand…” N.O.


  26. @ Enuff
    “The PM says the population too small”
    ~~~~~~~~~
    Too small for what? …a proper dictatorship?
    Who died and made the PM an expert on anything? … apart from talking pretty?
    What is she saying about Covid now…? … or can we just move on to population science?

    You know Enuff, back when the BLP were in opposition you used to sound quite coherent. Perhaps back then you were free to think rationally for yourself – instead of having to stick with the party line – even when you can smell the stench.
    LOL
    Bushie also estimated that there were three honest lawyers back then… LOL ha ha ha


  27. Collins Limited Pharmacists Est 1888 office in Bridgetown, Barbados, Lesser Antilles, Caribbean

    Collins family goes back to the 17th Century in Barbados.

    Their name is on a small plantation in St. Lucy next door to Lamberts.

    They were Quaker family, based in Speightstown, merchants.


  28. @BushTea good analogy: it’s stark and intentionally humiliating graphic thus of course there is ONLY one practical response of being a man or woman in that scenario … but that’s NOT the situation as @Northern so dispassionately noted.

    Let’s clear the fog first. Leaning on your reference I AGREE with you that our grandchildren’s future has been compromised … but u are WISE and have been in the trenches of the Bajan business and life long enough to know that “our grand children [were] already sold for generations to come.” long ago by the scheming behaviour of our leaders over these last 50 years.

    We have had this discussion before (and time does not allow me to re-engage with prolix, anyhow) so I simply say: I am convinced that you are likely more angry and upset that you were complicit in that sell-out or [ideally I would hope] that you worked hard to rectify the “stinking” situation but it was just too overwhelming.

    Anyhow to back track to your insightful analogy, if I married my neighbour’s daughter or one of my children did to one of his then rents and orders etc become an ENTIRELY different matter.

    So with deepest respect Mr Bush Tea, but the fix has been in for a long time wid all the lovey-dovey of courtship and now if u cuss my neighbor you cussing me .. so ‘seize and settle yuhself’ brother.

    Just being REAL.

    I gone.


  29. Dribbler
    If your neighbor is related by marriage (or adoption) he is NOT a neighbor anymore. He is family. How lukewarm can you get?
    steupsss
    Does Bushie REALLY need to spell THAT out for you?

    Do you understand the concept of a STRANGER?
    it is someone with DIFFERENT history, different morals, different objectives and different NORMS.
    When you sell your family (including inlaws and adoptees) to such STRANGERS you expose them to SLAVERY….. but you probably will now tell Bushie about how ‘kind hearted’ your neighbors are to you..

    LOL
    Besides, Northern can MORE than defend himself…


  30. BushTea
    We clashed back then too. My position has not changed. I got licks for being pro-CSME. I am still very coherent.


  31. @ David
    “the blogmaster feels embarrassed about the sale of our ASSets.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Skipper, that is more than can be said for most Bajans. Imagine we have LEADERS constantly looking around for more things to sell? Why do you think Bushie wears his pants well up on his backside..?

    @ Enuff
    You done know that Bushie enjoyed our clashes…. HOWEVER…
    Pity that you had to draw reference to the most retarded of your positions back then (CSME), since you have subsequently been PROVEN to have been completely WRONG.
    How do you sleep at night knowing that you got Owen to spend so many millions on that nonsense – and to destroy our laws (which is why Trinis can LEGALLY buy every shiite in Barbados, while neither YOU or Dribbles or ANY Bajan, can buy a shiite in T&T unless wunna jump over a thousand walls)
    Your conscience still wukking?
    LOL


  32. “you see nothing wrong with your neighbor owning your house, ordering about your wife and children who they ‘employ’, providing your food, financial services, energy, and medicine…?
    …while you barely earn Enuff to pay his rent and the charges he that imposes for these services?

    Steupsss ..What the hell is YOUR idea of what being a MAN represents? …or of what DIGNITY means?
    No wonder BBs find themselves able to bend over so comfortably…. even minus vaseline.”

    i had a fit when finding out that Cow was pretending to help workers get house and land or some such, but he owned them lock stock and barrel….and they worked for him, he paid no NIS…for them..one dropped down at work and there was nothing for him to pay his funeral or leave for his family…..

    .i could not believe Black people degraded themselves to that level, crooks owning and controllimg their lives….and actually believed that the crook was helping them….now look at the island and the state of the people…

    but they still believe in politicians so the only route is DOWNWARD…happens when you believe others and NOT YOU should be in control of your destiny….slavery is right around the corner.


  33. BTea
    What stopping Bajans, the same rules don’t apply? Maybe if we get some more people, the right ones too.


  34. Enuff
    “What stopping Bajans, the same rules don’t apply?”
    ~~~~~~
    You playing that you don’t know..!!
    Go down there and try buying T&TEC or HiLo…

    Before Arthur and his consultant ‘Enuff’, outsiders could NOT just buy our Bajan assets willy nilly either.
    Barrow and Adams were too intelligent to allow that. In fact, our Laws back then FORCED outsiders to INVOLVE locals in local investments.
    Thus – Bartel, and BLPC etc, sold shares locally. THIS REMAINS THE CASE IN MANY other COUNTRIES AROUND THE WORLD, including big (but sensible) countries.

    You and Owen came up with the ‘brilliant’ idea that Bajans need no such protection, so wunna CHANGED ALL OUR LAWS THAT REQUIRED THIS….talking shiite bout CSME… and the Trinis encouraged wunna too – but did NOT change theirs.

    Obviously outsiders jumped at the fire sale that followed.
    It was sweet in the mouth at first, wunna had lots of cash to waste, but then the new owners started extracting their pound of flesh…now it burning us in the tail…

    But you know all this. You just playing dumb in hopes of getting some sleep when the nights come….


  35. There are only so many ways ya can tell people..

    a little local, regional or external shock and everything goes into disarray, a pandemic, volcanic ash, hurricane elsa….a war,.and now this…

    “Recession shock coming,’ major US bank warns

    The macroeconomic picture is deteriorating rapidly and could push the US economy into recession as the Federal Reserve tightens monetary policy to tame surging inflation, Bank of America (BofA) warned on Friday.

    “Inflation shock worsening, rates shock just beginning, recession shock coming,” BofA’s chief investment strategist, Michael Hartnett, wrote in a weekly note to clients, seen by Reuters. He added that in this context, cash, volatility, commodities and cryptocurrencies could outperform bonds and stocks.”


  36. Bush TeaApril 9, 2022 6:43 PM

    Enuff
    “What stopping Bajans, the same rules don’t apply?”
    ~~~~~~
    You playing that you don’t know..!!
    Go down there and try buying T&TEC or HiLo…

    Before Arthur and his consultant ‘Enuff’, outsiders could NOT just buy our Bajan assets willy nilly either.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Success has nothing to do with neither blasted local politician.

    They can only ensure failure.

    Not one has a successful business, not one is linked to the land and its business.

    All are thieves.

    The reason Bajans kept their assets was because they utilized them sensibly and profited from their business acumen.

    .. and they gave God his due.

    Why sell a business and/or its assets that is working just fine?

    Assets are useless on their own, in fact they are not assets at all, they are liabilities.

    A house with a mortgage on it is useless to the owner if there is no income from the owner’s business activity or no job for him/her to service the mortgage and upkeep the house.

    Ownership of assets has a price that is often overlooked.

    It is not a right, it is an earned privilege, a blessing.

    Nothing to do with any politicians post independence.

    The Collins family were clearly good at business in the market where they operated.

    They gave God his due.

    It may very well be that they got a good deal on THEIR assets and THEIR goodwill attached to THEIR name and THEIR business that was blessed by God..

    The only reason Bajans should worry about the sale to foreigners of assets and businesses in Barbados is because those sales indicate a deterioration in the business climate of Barbados and will ultimately lead to hardships for them.

    How does it go again in the Bible …. Hosea 8:7, “For they have sown the wind, and they shall reap the whirlwind: it hath no stalk: the bud shall yield no meal: if so be it yield, the strangers shall swallow it up.”

    All Bajans can do is watch as strangers swallow it all up because the time when the wind was being sown by the past politicians is long gone and they did nothing.

    They forgot God.


  37. ONE: $1,000 is not a lot of money.

    TWO: countries everywhere are looking for bright well educated young immigrants.

    THREE: The USA too is looking for bright, well educated, young, English speaking immigrants

    FOUR: Young Bajans [even those without doctoral degrees] and in spite of what many on this blog may sometimes say are among the brightest and the best. They are hard working and well disciplined too just like many of the overseas Bajans who have gone before them. The students, parents, teachers, the Ministry of Education and the various educational institutions ought to be commended by all of us.


  38. @John “The Collins family were clearly good at business in the market where they operated.”

    Clearly their employees were also good, hard working, honest, loyal etc.

    Surely the customers were also good, hard working, loyal, honest etc.

    Surely the success of any business is not dependent on the management alone.


  39. Cuhdear BajanApril 9, 2022 10:23 PM

    @John “The Collins family were clearly good at business in the market where they operated.”

    Clearly their employees were also good, hard working, honest, loyal etc.

    Surely the customers were also good, hard working, loyal, honest etc.

    Surely the success of any business is not dependent on the management alone.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Take the family and its honouring God out of the equation and all the rest of the stakeholders don’t benefit.

    It is the same principle in the Bible.

    The farmer must make sure all benefit for the glory of God.

    … otherwise, he can’t flourish.


  40. You take the talents God gives you and you invest them.

    If you bury them you lose.

    You have to invest them for everyone’s benefit because God wants it so.

    Isn’t that what Grenville’s article is saying?

    “Unpack your bag and get ready to leave.”

    That’s why you don’t find any Quakers in Barbados now.

    They have unpacked their bag and moved on, preparing to leave.

  41. Magnificent a.k.a Magno – Yu Heard Formula: C₂₁H₃₀O₂ IUPAC ID: (−)-(6aR,10aR)-6,6,9-trimethyl- 3-pentyl-6a,7,8,10a-tetrahydro- 6H-benzo[c]chromen-1-ol on said:

    The concept that Bajans are stakeholders in Bajan Owned Businesses is naive and deluded.
    They are customers who are shortchanged in Public and Private Sectors.
    Businesses go bust are sold on the regular, mergers and acquisitions are common. Workers are dispensable.
    Bajan Blues go deep in their marrow and they have issues in their tissues they have got to release

    Deep Moanin’ Blues


  42. Antiquated or not it is the law.

    Antiquated Public Service Act

    By Carlos Atwell carlosatwell@nationnews.com
    Barbados is robbing itself by not allowing public servants to serve the public.
    This is according to some political scientists who agree the Public Service Act needs reviewing in light of the suspension and disciplinary charges being brought against two teachers who took part in the January 19 General Election.
    Former Barbados Union of Teachers president Pedro Shepherd and coach Alwyn Babb have both been suspended with half-pay by the Ministry of Public Service pending the outcome of disciplinary hearings related to their candidacy for the Democratic Labour Party’s campaign, prompting cries of victimisation from the party.
    Yesterday, political scientists Senator Dr Kristina Hinds, Dr George Belle, Devaron Bruce and Peter Wickham weighed in on the hot topic.
    Wickham said this matter has been plaguing the region and it is time for something to be done.
    “The crux of the issue lies within an antiquated piece of legislation which doesn’t fit well into a small Caribbean democratic society. I’ve always felt the prohibitions on public servants were unfortunate and it’s a pretty backward regulation which needs to be changed.
    “The teaching service especially carries a substantial quantity of our intellectual talent, not only in Barbados, but the Caribbean, and it is unfortunate these issues keep coming up,” he said.
    Wickham drew reference to Antigua, and St Vincent and the Grenadines, where similar issues arose but said it was not a political matter.
    “People are looking at this incorrectly. It is not a political witch-hunt but rather a matter relating to the fact that public officers who engage in political activity breach the regulations. Those regulations need to be changed and I have no doubt in my mind the time has long since passed for them to be looked at.”
    Bruce said it was important for a democratic society to follow its rules and regulations, but the real question was about the quality of those rules and regulations. In this case, he added, they were inadequate.
    “Quite frankly the law states a public servant is not supposed to run for political office without first resigning, but that being said, there are other tenets that contribute to a healthy democracy such as freedom of association, freedom of thought, freedom of conscience, freedom of speech. We really have to think about how our current legal system may very well be extremely dated,” he said, referring to how St Kitts made the appropriate changes to allow its public servants to run in elections.
    Bruce said the Public Service Act was dated in the 1970s and while it made valuable contributions to the development of the Public Service, its current form may not have a place now, especially in the new republic of Barbados.
    He said Babb was a veteran public servant with decades of experience and it was ironic he was in breach of the Public Service Act
    by trying to further his service to the public.
    “This is an individual who may very well be the most successful coach in Barbadian history with 37 years under his belt in the teaching service, yet somehow we have found ourselves in a situation where someone like that is now being suspended for six months as if he has committed a crime or done something draconian.
    “It is really a question of how we manage individuals because the Public Service is in essence 30 000 Barbadians. Are we going to tell them they don’t have anything to contribute outside of their jobs? I really feel the Public Service Act needs to be reviewed,” he said.
    Hinds, who was sworn in as senator on Friday, said Barbados could well be doing itself a disservice by not allowing public servants to participate in elective politics without penalty.
    “This may be a piece of legislation we may want to relook because the Public Service in Barbados employs a lot of people, so saying none of them can be involved in elective politics really is quite restrictive. We are really robbing ourselves, so I would hope that we could at least think about having a clause, if it does not already exist, to allow public servants the opportunity to participate in elections and if successful, they would then resign [from their original job],” she said.
    Belle said he had been surprised to see Babb and Shepherd on the political platform, but assumed they had the appropriate permissions. He said it was possible the act needed reviewing but declined to give a position on the matter.
    “They are civil servants so they are either in breach of the act or they are not, but changing the regulations relates to changing the Constitution and that has to be part of a much broader discussion rather than a simple comment [from me],” he said.

    Source: Nation


  43. Politics . . . and so long
    World politics is fraught with multiple issues, problems and concerns, simultaneously competing to be addressed, managed or solved.
    Whether going by the name of world politics, international relations, global politics or some other synonym, this area of human interaction is a fascinating field of study.
    Beyond being an area of study, though, seemingly external affairs can be difficult to disentangle from domestic politics and our daily lives.
    As residents of Caribbean small islands, thrust into global engagement through processes of imperialism and colonisation, our openness and exposure to the wider world are both undeniable. Indeed, our historical placement within systems of empire has meant that our little islands helped build the world as it exists today. We are so knotted into the world that financial crises and shocks occurring abroad affect our economic fortunes, as the 2008/2009 financial crisis made apparent.
    Environmental concerns that can only be solved by global action and that are principally caused by larger states and footloose corporations threaten to have dire consequences on the Caribbean. Top of mind among environmental concerns is climate change which may even create an existential crisis for all humanity.
    The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic provides palpable evidence of the significance of our exposure to public health emergencies, wrought by our ever-increasing interconnectivity, often termed globalisation. And then of course there are security issues, including the large worries about international peace and security that become ever more heightened when great powers and those with nuclear capabilities are involved. Such conflicts can affect supply chains and commodity prices that ripple around the planet to influence even those far away from the heart of the fracas.
    The current war between Russia and Ukraine makes this evident.
    So how should Caribbean states prioritise our activities in world affairs? We often obsess about domestic political considerations, and of course we must stay attuned to these, but we may also need to consider the extent to which we should invest in our relationships with other states and with international actors.
    How truly valuable is Caribbean state visibility on global platforms?
    I really have no great answer to this question. Yet I offer the suggestion that care needs to be taken to balance domestic and external priorities so that we are not just “punching above our weight”, but doing so strategically and in ways that deliver tangible outcomes, not just name recognition.
    Citizens and residents of small states like ours need to understand how and why external initiatives,
    voicings of support or disdain and other engagements redound to us all. Beyond broad claims and assertions, we need to understand the “nitty-gritty”.
    Experience inefficiencies
    When people experience inefficiencies in public service delivery, poor roads, seeming inattention to the concerns of many marginalised groups, how can they care about events or meetings abroad? When there are the continued anxieties about growing the economy and diversifying it, it may seem a bit far-fetched to expect most to really care about global politics. After all, home drums must beat first, right?
    Now, there are those like me who find interrogating relationships between states and other entities the world over wildly exciting, though often puzzling and maddening, but many find this a bore. Further, elections are hardly won or lost on foreign policy concerns.
    Quite rightly, the internal stewardship of a country’s affairs are priorities in electioneering. Moreover, internal governance is critical for handling things external, planning for them and addressing crises once they occur.
    Therefore, the focus on home drums first makes sense.
    Yet maybe things are less straightforward. The inside and the outside may instead continually be in process and at play. Again, then, it becomes important to strategically consider how our political processes balance internal and external affairs to the benefit of people. I know this is easier said than done, but some things are just difficult.
    With these few, perhaps meandering, ruminations on world and domestic politics, I say “so long” to writing on these pages. I am indebted to Editor-In-Chief Carol Martindale for generously offering me space to discuss the January 2022 General Election in a column called Hindsight, and for encouraging me to continue taking up space here over the last few months. I am grateful to have shared my thoughts and analyses which, in hindsight (pun!), I hope at least some readers found worth the space they occupied.
    Dr Kristina Hinds is a senior lecturer in political science and head of the Department of Government, Sociology, Psychology and Social Work at UWI Cave Hill.
    A moderator of VOB’s Down To Brass Tacks, she was sworn in as a senator last Friday.

    Source: Nation


  44. A developing Senate
    By Ezra Alleyne
    The Senate is in the news again.
    I am not surprised. Too many people regard it as a rubber stamp chamber.
    Others, equally innocent, see it as a training ground for future politicians.
    As I have written before, to me, its most important role is as a potential roadblock to Government policy on constitutional change.
    I often marvel at the beauty of our governance structure. It gives Prime Ministers and their Cabinets absolute power in relation to ordinary legislation, but it modifies that power on some constitutional matters. Here is how: Combined with any election majority in the House of Assembly, a Prime Minister nominates 12 of the 21 senators. The others are seven Independents and two Opposition senators. For an ordinary Senate majority, 12 (or 11) will beat nine any day.
    But some changes to the Constitution require a two-thirds majority of the 21 senators. Without at least 14 votes that legislation will not pass. It is here that the rubber hits the road. On such matters, the nine senators have real “roadblock” power, but if the rationale of that power is misunderstood, its “use” may needlessly disrupt Government policy. That is Dr George Belle’s point.
    In these constitutional situations, any government, even one with a 30-0 margin in the Lower House, has to attract the support of at least three of the nine non-Government senators to pass those changes.
    Notice I said three, because Senate presidents are usually chosen from the 12 Government senators.
    Now to specifics. At present, Miss Crystal Drakes is an Independent senator. In the previous Senate she was an Opposition senator. Does that matter? I do not know, but wait, she may be in good company.
    Precedent
    When Prime Minister Errol Barrow called the 1971 General Election, one of his long-standing Members of Parliament since 1956 was Sir Theodore Brancker, a Member for St Lucy. The Democratic Labour Party (DLP) won the election and Sir Theodore, who did not run, immediately became an Independent senator. There is therefore Senate precedent for such movements.
    But of more moment, Sir Theodore was also elected as President of the Senate in 1971 with the support of the DLP’s 12 senators. I regarded his election as President as easing the Senate’s brake on constitutional change. With all his 12 senators
    intact, Mr Barrow needed only two of the “other” senators to support his controversial 1974 amendments to the Constitution.
    Senate history!
    Were he alive, Prime Minister Tom Adams might tell what happened when, on considering his nominees for the Senate in 1976, he raised the “precedent” of Sir Theodore’s appointment. Now, thereby hangs a tale!
    Had young Khaleel Kothdiwala been born in Australia, he would qualify for election to its Senate. Down Under, people of the “full age” of 18 years and over are eligible to be nominated as senators.
    Mind you, the tenure of a Senate appointment is insecure. We know of two DLP senators being “removed” from the Senate “under a street light”. The then Leader of the Opposition announced that he was going to recommend their removal on the following day. Egged on by the crowd, he declared that “as a matter of fact, they are not now senators any longer”. Crowd gone mad!
    In 1989 Barbados Labour Party senators Billie Miller and Louis Tull, as they then were, lost their Senate appointments in a strange manner.
    Dr Richie Haynes, in his fight with the Sandiford leadership of the DLP, broke away and, with three other members, became Leader of the Opposition and nominated his National Democratic Party colleagues as senators. Miller and Tull became collateral damage from that DLP nuclear implosion.
    Curious incident
    Then there was what Sir Arnott Cato called a curious incident.
    A by-election arose for a seat in the House of Assembly. Choosing a senator as the man he thought likely to succeed the Prime Minister of the day, Errol Barrow recommended the termination of that senator’s seat.
    The ex-senator contested the election . . . and lost!
    After a brief sojourn from the legislature, he was re-recommended and re-appointed to his old seat in the Senate. Matter fixed.
    The Senate is a serious chamber with a gripping and developing history.
    Ezra Alleyne is an attorney and former Deputy Speaker of the House of Assembly.

    Source: Nation


  45. On the subject of Public Servants and their apolitical role in politics
    Needless to ask
    What if all these issues were iron out before Barbados stepped knee high into becoming a Republic
    These Acts and Constitutional issues that keep resurfacing all speaks to a govt expecting to have good results after place the cart before horse
    The chaos and confusion within this Republic is mind-boggling and begs to ask who is in charge
    Dr. Kristian Hinds in her last columns makes a pointing statement
    Quote
    “Yet I offer the suggestion that care needs to be taken to balance domestic and external priorities so that we are not just “punching above our weight”, but doing so strategically and in ways that deliver tangible outcomes, not just name recognition.


  46. Bushie your concepts of community centric are well known. And whatever doesn’t fit is albino centric.
    The transfer/sale of a business rarely means it’s closure. It is expected to continue, the change is ownership.
    Ultimately you want employees to inherit ownership, which rarely happens.
    Many times in entities which pay/bonus employees with shares (ownership) we also rarely see those employees seek to acquire more. And this isn’t a black-white thing.
    Barbadian owned entities have been acquiring and starting businesses, the challenge, it hasn’t been IN Barbados. Is this a case of grass being greener, or opportunity?
    While several note correctly, certain job categories are underpaid, many are not. Buhbaydus isn’t a low cost place
    I was somewhat surprised nobody took a run at GEL when their share price tumbled. But that’s another BHL, difference being the wide ‘family’ still has control. Yet, you see any family working there? Soon the owners will be ferners, family ferners, who having waning ties to the island. It will be a BS&T all over, where due to marriage, you got a whole mix-up and a battle between those who live in Bim and those who do not. Just like here on BU.


  47. The punishment of the two DLP teachers is perfectly legal. The law explicitly orders punishments for this case. More precisely, the leader’s will is the law.

    If our Supreme Leader wants to punish the two perpetrators, we must accept this decision as an unquestionable judgment of God.

    In any case, I see no reason to doubt our Supreme Leader. Unconditional loyalty to the state and the party is the order of the day.


  48. @Tron April 10, 2022 3:16 PM ” Unconditional loyalty to…the party is the order of the day.”

    I am not loyal to any party.

    Has the time come when I should hide under my bed and never come out?


  49. @ NorthernObserver April 10, 2022 9:24 AM

    Bush Tea must finally understand that the world is not ruled by black communards but by white capitalists. Even the Chinese are only yellow copies of the white capitalists.

    So far, all attempts by daydreamers to run alternative economic models have failed. Barbados, for example.

    Time to join our Supreme Leader and learn from the winners! Try more capitalism, smash the welfare state!

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