UNEMPLOYMENT Fund is Broke, Time for Straight Talk Chairman Leslie Haynes

The following was posted as a comment by Walter Blackman to the Walter Blackman’s Political Insights blog – David, Blogmaster

Based on the link to the NIS investments, provided by NorthernObserver, all BU readers can now sing from the same Hymn sheet – see link https://www.nis.gov.bb/investments-2/

Here are the facts, and the questions to be asked:

The unemployment Fund is broke. Not a cent is left. No bonds, no cash. Nada. Zilch. Rien.
Where will the money come from to pay current and future unemployment benefits? Remedial action has to come down the pipeline very soon.

Government owes (i.e the politicians misused our money) $2.8 billion to the National Insurance Fund, and $0.1 billion to the Severance Fund. There is no cash in the Severance Fund. Where is the money currently coming from to pay the workers’ severance that employers are refusing to pay?

Is the law being broken with respect to the payment of unemployment and severance benefits?

The only way Government can repay the money owed to the NIS is through taxation. Who will the Government tax to get the $2.9 billion for the NIS?
The Baby Boomers have started to retire and will do so by the thousands every year until 2033. How will their retirement benefits be paid? Something has to be done very soon

At the beginning of 2015, the NIS was paying roughly $40 million per month (just think about the multiplier effect this has on our economy) in NIS retirement pensions. That amounts to $480 million per year, and $960 million over two years.
We can therefore understand what the Chairman of the NIS meant when he said: “there are sufficient funds there that we can see this through at least for the next two years.”

However, the Chairman went on to say: “So there is no cause for concern.”

Every BU reader can now look the Chairman of the NIS fully in the face and say: “We do not agree with your assessment of the NIS, Mr. Chairman. There is great, great cause for concern, and in fact, we are very, very concerned. Next time you speak, please tell us what is the Board’s solutions to the massive NIS problems we face.”

…what are the Board’s solutions?

483 comments

  • @ Northern

    We have raised the issue of MMT on BU before. I suggest you follow the young Democrat radicals, especially Ocasio-Cortez. It has also been raised in relation to the Mottley government, as an alternative to her awful default.
    We do not discuss economic theory in Barbados.

    Like

  • More than 300million went towards the leaking basket call tourism
    What about all them berthing fees which were sunk like an anchor
    I suspect when all monies accounted for that were meant to save tourism the number would be closed to 1billion when the Covid expenses are applied for the visitors
    Any how bajans idiots

    Liked by 1 person

  • Just going for the laugh.
    MMT
    Mia Motley “trick-uh-nomics”
    Mark Maloney tourism
    Rocking and mocking
    I ain’t joking
    Mia is choking

    Some plagiarism went on there

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  • @JohnA
    I prefer pecuniary production, to other more descriptive terms, and I see an expansion, only in the short-term of course, (didn’t income tax begin as a method to fund war), of statutory bodies to employ the recently unemployed. After all, I am sure they include party faithful who didn’t require public employment until this time. I think governments everywhere should employee at least 80% of the population, and in lieu of that, all should be granted a guaranteed income.

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  • @ Northern

    Wait you move to Qatar?lol

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  • A parent is responsible for a child. A next of kin cannot be made responsible for a relative even if it is a parent. The parent makes a decision to have a child. A child does not make a decision to have a parent.

    That is one of the most stupid suggestions I have ever heard.

    The most that can be done is to seize the assets of the abandoned person and appoint a guardian to take care of them and their finances. If they are in government facilities, their assets should be used to pay their way rather than be left for the absconding offspring.

    Donville Inniss had proposed this when he was Minister of Health. Nothing came of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  • TLSN,

    I also have the option to live where Hal lives. I was born there. I CHOOSE to live here.

    But Hal is not comfortable at all. Just recently he was worried that he, being black, would be left in the cold outside the COVID ward to die. I guess that would also apply to his mulatto children. I don’t have that worry. I have other concerns. But not that biggie.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @HA
    So you are likely well versed in MMT? Maybe you could provide the blog with periodic updates? It’s beyond my capacity.

    I know you would be well aware, your reigning monarch would not be, were it not for her uncle’s pursuit of a DIVORCED woman. In fact, said Queen ruled against her sister’s marital wishes for a similar reason. Even her eldest son? And 3 of her 4 offspring are divorced. Divorced persons were once seen as social outcasts, a life limiting event. Particularly harsh on the wife. Similarly, for those who declared bankruptcy (defaulters). Times change, attitudes change. While it is not a goal to aspire to (default), it happens. In 1960 it may have been awful, even horrendous. Today, it’s a default. They deal more in reality, than national pride. There is an extensive list of countries, it’s no longer an exclusive category
    https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/sovereign-debt-crisis/sovereign-debt-defaults-restructuring/

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  • Dirty litte fraud Lorenza…yall are the ones getting exposed from coast to coast for one thing or another, ignorant little slave, do you see my name anywhere out there….show me.

    don’t know how Mia expects to want to shut down the press from defending Black people on the island, but can’t touch any international platforms, she can try though, many are waiting for her to show how big she is..

    ..the nerve of telling Black people not to protest their family’s hunger and thefts of their salaries and severance pay by nasty, racist hoteliers, let her try to stop that information from hitting international circles…,,oops…plus tard….

    don’t worry Fowl, ah got something even better…….2021 will be hoot.

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  • But Hal is not comfortable at all. Just recently he was worried that he, being black, would be left in the cold outside the COVID ward to die. I guess that would also apply to his mulatto children. I don’t have that worry. I have other concerns..(Quote)

    ??????????

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  • (Quote):
    The most that can be done is to seize the assets of the abandoned person and appoint a guardian to take care of them and their finances. If they are in government facilities, their assets should be used to pay their way rather than be left for the absconding offspring.

    Donville Inniss had proposed this when he was Minister of Health. Nothing came of it. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    And that is a ‘universally principled’ position which can be morally, socially and legally justified.

    That is what prevails in the UK, your soon-to-be divorced mother-country.

    Why should any able-bodied person who refuses to acknowledge or care (directly or indirectly) for their aging relatives be entitled to have access to or inherit the worldly possessions of those same old or sickly relatives after they go to their final resting place?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Caswell in today local newspaper C described the leading Union and govt in three words
    Hypocrites ..sell outs..and traitors towards workers
    This govt would be remembered as all of the above downgrading and rejecting workers at every chance possible while rewarding business who thief from its workers and govt

    ######:big works at play

    .

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  • Government trying to cover this up is pure wickedness….taking advantage of those who accepted slavery condictions, racism, exploitation, discrimination, disenfranchisement, setting up Black people to remain in generational poverty AND THEFTS OF THEIR MONEY AND FUTURE from the 1970s, and believe she can still get away with these crimes against ONLY BLACK PEOPLE…

    “Describing the current labour relations climate as the “lowest” in his 62-year lifetime, Franklyn contended that with the trade union movement “neutralised”, Barbados’ traditionally “docile” working class was not expected to fight back.

    “It is [Mottley]’s actions that have caused this. The workers are just reacting to her behaviour… This is a labour party that has no regard for labour, forgetting that it was the masses who put her in power in the first place and it is her actions that have caused the problems in the country. The workers are only reacting to it and she is trying to throw blame away from herself when the buck stops at her,” Franklyn argued.

    “What the Prime Minister has complained about will continue to happen, and God forbid that the police would try to force the people into submission, because from there things will erupt.

    “The best thing for the police to do when they see the people demonstrating is to let them do it peacefully, because it will not go down well because people are hurting.

    “People are coming into my office and just crying. You have parents out there with children and they have nothing to feed them with, and if that is not addressed something will happen. So the Government has to take measures to prevent any kind of uprising because they are the ones that have caused it,” the labour leader added.

    “Wildcat” demonstrations have so far been launched by employees of Caribbean Aircraft Handling at the Grantley Adams International Airport; the Savannah Hotel in Hastings, Christ Church; The Club Barbados Resort and Spa in Vauxhall, St James; and the Accra Beach Resort in Rockley, Christ Church.

    The common bone of contention has been the non-payment of severance payments and other outstanding entitlements owed.”

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  • Ryan Straughn: CoVid has had an impact on government projections for financial year 2020/21. Don’t say! What a wonderful piece of economic insight. Give the man a Nobel Prize.

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  • “That is what prevails in the UK, your soon-to-be divorced mother-country.”

    ah can’t wait to see it happen, the entertainment will be priceless.

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  • I wonder when the recently displaced workers will get their money???

    After all is legally theirs. Held back by WHITE BAJANS employers which they have no right to do. In this they are encourage by the Barbados Labour Party Govt.

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  • We now have Gordon Seale complaining that the government is putting jobs before hoteliers debt. What? This government is prioritising jobs before the debt of the wealthy and well-connected. How terrible?
    In a moment of generosity, he suggested that the redundant should claim unemployment benefits until hotels become profitable again. I am not sur e if this includes the Bds$300m bailout.
    He also called for an extension of the period for claiming severance pay. Nowhere does he mention those employees living hand to mouth with mounting bills and threats of being made homeless. Of course, that is small beer. Black live do not matter.
    Mr Seale, who owns two hotels, claims BEST is hurting the hoteliers and he is losing a combined average of $450000 a month. Of course, he can always sell the businesses, or enter a sale and lease of the freehold.
    It will be interesting to see what this incompetent government does about this perverse idea. If you can’t stand the heat, you know what to do.

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  • @HA
    https://www.nationnews.com/2020/11/22/tough-times-ahead-tourism/
    Has Seale changed churches, or singing to a different audience?

    And what does this mean, in the middle of the BT article I am guessing you got your info from
    “Dame Sandra noted that the resources would only be made available if tourism numbers and revenues remained below the levels required for the industry’s survival.”
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/12/09/seale-says-hotels-need-urgent-help/

    Have you read BEST?
    https://gisbarbados.gov.bb/download/barbados-employment-sustainable-transformation-programme/

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  • @ Hal
    This is the “thank you “ we get for removing the NSRL and giving them a break of one billion dollars of VAT and other taxes. Yesterday they were all marching , with big smiles on their faces. We could not question anything that this administration was doing. We reap what we sow. The Democratic Labour Party and the Barbados Labour are incapable of managing the country , in any progressive manner. For fifty years they have fooled the masses ,giving them scraps while they looked out for the rich.COVID has taken off all our clothes .Mottley is in naked surrender mode because they put her in power. The Duopoly will now have to determine whether it will go back to the drawing board and start to correct the injustices and atrocities it has committed since November 30 1966.
    It is now confirmed we did not lose a decade -we lost almost six .
    The struggle continues
    Peace

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  • The blogmaster read what Seale stated then compare with the what was posted ad there is a gulf in the interpretation.

    Seale knocks BEST plan
    THE BARBADOS Employment and Sustainable Transformation (BEST) plan is not an attractive option for many hoteliers, as it is likely to see them sinking into greater debt.
    This is according to former president of the Barbados Hotel & Tourism Association (BHTA), Gordon Seale, who said yesterday that Government made a miscalculation when it forged ahead with the plan, instead of extending unemployment benefits as well as the period for triggering severance.
    He said some owners might have to cede majority shareholding of their hotel to Government by the time the COVID-19 health crisis was over.
    Seale, who owns two major hotels, was guest speaker at a luncheon lecture hosted by the Barbados Yacht Club.
    He contended that hotel owners had very little by way of alternatives at this juncture, and it was therefore baffling to hear the narrative that hoteliers were being provisioned for at the expense of labour.
    Looks after labour
    “The BEST plan looks after labour while the hotels run up debt. Furthermore, after running up debt, the hotel still has the severance liability around their neck. The conversion of preference shares into common shares after dilution of ownership, especially for the financially weak hotels, could result in the change of ownership, possibly to Government,” he said. The BEST programme is designed to see Government pumping $300 million into the hotels in exchange for preference shares, which were convertible to ordinary shares if not repaid within a specified time. This was done on condition that the participating hotels retained staff for retooling and retraining until occupancy picked up again.
    With the loan, the hotels are required to pay staff 80 per cent of their insurable earnings.
    20 per cent more
    However, Seale argued there was much more to these considerations than met the eye. He contended that hotels were being asked to pay 20 per cent more than what the National Insurance Scheme would have incurred had the unemployment insurance been extended.
    “I have a real problem when I hear people saying that the hotels are getting everything.
    Under the BEST programme, in addition to paying the wages, owners had to pay 80 per cent of the service charge paid by the guests. The year that was used to calculate this was the best year on record, which was 2019.
    So, in the worst year ever, we are being asked to pay 80 per cent of the best year ever. This is 20 per cent more than the National Insurance was being asked to pay in that 26 weeks that went by.” He added: “What should be made clear is that this is not free money or subsidy as is often referred to in the public. It is cash injection which must be repaid with interest and carries demands in terms of numbers of employees and secured by companies having to issue shares to Government every two months.”
    He said it was a challenge finding functions for staffers to perform with many hotels at under ten per cent occupancy. He also told those in attendance that no hotel had set aside funds this year to pay for severance en masse, noting this was more onerous for companies that were “good employers”, retaining members of staff for many years.
    A challenge
    “To put that into perspective, in our two hotels we employ about 480 people. So imagine having 480 staff and 40 guests; it is really a challenge regarding how you can utilise those staff. So, in other words, the scheme is funding losses and is diluting ownership of the hotels. “How can anyone who understands the programme claim that Government is looking after the businesses at the expense of labour?
    Government is happy that hotels have to cover this liability and the workers are happy that they are getting 20 per cent more than they would have from National Insurance. What about the investors whose investments are seriously at risk?”
    he queried.
    Last month, Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley announced that several tweaks would be made to the BEST programme to allow for more buy-in, noting at the time that only 20 hotels had subscribed to the initiative.
    “In fairness, the programme has only been in operation for only a couple of weeks and the BHTA has written to us, asking us to tweak the programme because there are others who may want to come in but are finding it difficult,” Mottley said then. (CLM)

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  • @WS
    “giving them a break of one billion dollars of VAT and other taxes”
    who is them? The public and quasi-public bodies who weren’t remitting VAT?
    Ahhh…see, you don’t know. And neither do I.
    Another example why so much in Barbados boils down to a lack of transparency and accountability.
    If the GoB writes off taxes, why are a list of the beneficiaries NOT published in the Gazette? Surely when the tax payers are forgiving money rightfully owed to them, this is a matter for the public record? But Alas, no Official Gazette has been published since Jan 2020. And you can bet, it will not include such a list, whenever it is published again.
    By hiding it, we get can generate maximum talk, for nobody has any proof, merely conjecture. It is said “we like it so”.

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  • @ William

    It takes a certain kind of chutzpah to claim that the government is putting the jobs of low paid people before the wealth of the hotel owners.
    Gordon Seale is a man with his own ideas, but to make this suggestion shows it has not been thought out. It IS the job of government to minimise unemployment, not stabilise the profits of small hotels.
    But then suggesting that the redundant should have an extended period on the dole until hotels return to profitability is a continuation of the BLP/DLP policy of transferring wealth from the poor to the relatively wealthy.
    As I said a few days ago, there is a reason why Barbadian politicians do not talk about equality and the distribution of wealth, opting instead to talk bilge about patriotism and the flag. Trump has done this in the US and Boris has done it in the UK and Macron is trying to do the same in France.
    It is the position of the political coward. Workers of the world unite, you have nothing to lose apart from your shackles. The BWU capitulated to the president by giving her 36 hours breathing space. She was playing for time.
    They should have said no. And if Toni Moore did not agree, then drive her out of the union. By the way, I am told that a previous post was a misinterpretation. The person making that claim should point out the errors.

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  • By your logic (?) the government should allow the hotel industry to collapse. No revenue stream since March, fyi.

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  • @ Hal @ NorthernObserver
    This is obviously a cop out by the BWU. While Toni Moore was surreptitiously plotting her political future in cahoots with Mottley, the workers were being ignored. Moore has allowed the Labour College to become dilapidated and was focused on other things. There is no way, that the BWU can claim it was unaware of the plight of workers at G4S and other places.
    Having said that, Mottley should now tell G4S, or whatever they are called, to either fo what is right or get to hell out of the country. If she does that I would back her one hundred percent.
    As for the hoteliers and Gordon Seale,I hope you guys and others are paying attention to where the meeting was held.
    I am pro worker and always will be. Read the comments by readers in today’s Nation and you will see that there has been a systematic destruction of workers rights. The BLPDLP has been complicit. Jordan himself knows about how the workers were being treated. He was a point man in the tourist industry. Like Moore and Rudy Grant , another point man , they were all looking to feather their political nests.
    The free lunches ,fancy free dinners and cocktail circuit , all have a price. That’s what they like -perks. And the hoteliers know this. COVID makes us wear masks but it has ironically unmasked the political hypocrites.
    This is no time for pseudo intellectual BS.
    I say publicly to the PM: If this G4S or whatever don’t come to its senses , kick their ass out of Barbados. You will have my support.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • As the comments from readers in the Nation indicate union representation by ALL unions and governments of the workers in security has been neglected. It is known by all. Covid 19 saga and the dynamic of Moore joining the BLP has given the workers a platform to attract attention to their concerns.

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  • @William

    Curious to know if Leroy Trotman, Bobby Morris, Evelyn Greaves and a few others were in cahoots with the DLP leadership when they joined the DLP.

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  • @ William

    I am not a logician, but the hotels should be forced to let the market decide if they survive or fail. Government’s jobs is to create jobs, and that can be done without the support of incompetent hotel owners.
    My concern is not the profitability of hotels, but the ability of ordinary people to put food on the table and pay their bills. Anything else is a bonus.
    You can bet that if a hotel fails there will be an army of would-be buyers lining up to get their hands on it. This is what capitalism is all about.
    @ William, following the CoVid lockdown in the UK, the government gave supermarkets over £1bn in waivers. But CoVid was a God send for the supermarkets, with people bulk buying, from toilet paper to electronics. You must have seen the long queues on TV. Yet government largesse.
    Ask them to pay more taxes and they complain.

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  • (Quote):
    THE BARBADOS Employment and Sustainable Transformation (BEST) plan is not an attractive option for many hoteliers, as it is likely to see them sinking into greater debt. (Unquote)
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    What’s the difference between ‘BERT’, ‘BOSS’ and ‘BEST’ and the many other iterative plans ‘initiated’ by the previous DLP administration (under the de facto PM and MoF Sinckler) which were deemed necessary to restructure and transform the Bajan economy since the 2008 recession?

    The only ‘real’ difference is the ‘official’ presence of the IMF involving external borrowings to prop up a lifestyle glaringly unaffordable based on the country’s capacity to earn forex.

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  • The COVID-19 pandemic has inflicted devastating effects on the U.S. economy, with job losses especially concentrated among women, minorities, and low-wage workers.
    Economists have described the uneven and unequal economic recovery from the COVID-19 recession as a “K-shaped” recovery, characterized by divergent recovery trajectories for the affluent relative to those of less means.
    While considerable attention has been devoted to examining the preexisting disparities in labor market outcomes that left some households more vulnerable than others to the COVID-19 recession, less attention has been paid to the role of wealth in determining a household’s ability to buffer the pandemic’s economic shocks.
    Wealth (defined as the difference between a household’s assets and debt) provides a critical safety net to households during economic downturns.
    Wealth holds several advantages over wages as an economic resource: In particular, income from wealth is taxed at much lower rates than income from work, and wealth can serve as a source of savings to absorb temporary setbacks such as a loss of employment income….(Quote)

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  • @ David
    “ David December 9, 2020 8:09 AM

    @William

    Curious to know if Leroy Trotman, Bobby Morris, Evelyn Greaves and a few others were in cahoots with the DLP leadership when they joined the DLP.” (QUOTE)
    Of course they were. Why would you or anybody else think I would say differently.?Have you ever read on your blog or anywhere else where I criticized Toni Moore for running for the BLP? I don’t care about the BLP or DLP, they have always been in bed with the unionists going back to Sir. Grantley.
    You need to stop this BLP DLP comparison , by now you should know there is no difference. And that’s where you and I part company.
    BTW, I was in a meeting, as an active member of a trade union. We were fighting Barrow on collective bargaining. We asked the BWU for support. Frank Walcott told us that “ flying fish don’t swim
    with sharks” In other words , he would not support us. The BWU was too big.
    I hate to tell you this but I must : William
    Skinner did not start taking an interest in what goes on in his country yesterday. You need to take your puerile responses to my posts somewhere else. All you do is sit there and remind people of what the DLP did 2008- 2018. I got news for you -the people kicked their sorry asses out almost three years now. Go and read the papers, they don’t have a seat in parliament and just got their backsides kicked in a by election. Furthermore well known members are fleeing to the BLP. And one of their former ministers may go to prison on corruption charges. Now that I have brought you up to date. Let us deal with Barbados to day. No more time for your foolishness.
    The struggle continues
    Peace

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  • Thanks William, it seems we are dealing with a systematic issue or one that will always be in play given the culture of the region of trade unionists getting involved with political parties.

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  • @ Hal
    Let’s be real. There are many businesses that are making more profit now. They have laid off workers; have one person doing the work of four or five; paying him/her the same wages. They have cut overheads and are technically making a bigger profit. We have to be careful . During one of the world wars, a prostitute bought up all the bombed out buildings in a European country. Immediate after the war she became a very wealthy real estate tycoon.
    I would not be surprised if there are fancy insurance policies covering all these “ losses” businesses complaining about.
    We need to keep vigilant in protecting what little the working class has.
    I’m afraid that as the old people used to say: Too much education is a funny thing” I say education never beat common sense.
    When I listen to Abed, Seale and all of them, I get the impression that they have NEVER made a profit.
    The struggle continues
    Peace

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  • @ William

    Check the terms of their business insurance, in particular the key worker and business interruption insurance. You are on to something there. The chaos of the Mutual all over again.
    By the way, now that G4S has been sold to the Yanks, how does that change the Barbados dynamic? Does Toni Moore even know her members have new bosses?

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  • @William

    Which businesses making more money now? Based on the balance sheets being published of late this is not the case. Generalizations will not help the argument in this case.

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  • @ David
    Somebody needs to whisper in Mottley’s ears that she will probably be PM for at least fifteen years or at minimum ten. It may be even twenty. She should be bold and imaginative before she squanders the massive goodwill.
    It is time for her to show her experience; intellectual stamina and much heralded ability.
    She needs to move from ordinary to exceptional very quickly.
    She needs genuine progressive advisers.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

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  • @ David
    Any good accountant will tell you there are two reports. The one for the public and the other one that robs the treasury .
    You lose $100 and you all over Broad Street looking to borrow. Another man loses twenty million and he buys a seventy five million yacht.
    Try covering a meeting at the yacht club; they complain and then go sailing in their yachts.
    Time to get real.
    I don’t generalize nor fantasize.
    The struggle continues
    Peace

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  • @ William

    Ignore the financially illiterate background noise. We are in a mess because it is a cultural feature of Barbadians to get involved in things they know nothing about, usually on the basis of having a degree in law or some nonsense.
    LIAT is not the only business which our ignorance has led to local investors losing money. The Mutual is still the benchmark. Look at G4S, a company with an annual turnover of £7bn a year and 500000 global employees on its books. It also has a pension fund with a deficit of over £500m.
    What does the BWU know about G4S? What research do they do on these overseas firms? In a more financially sophisticated country, locals would be putting together a plan to buy out the local business – encouraged and backed by the government.
    But once we get a monthly pay packet we are happy. Anyone, in particular white people, can always tickle our bellies and we will giggle.

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  • @William

    Mottley is on record that she will do two terms. We will have to see how that materializes.

    Even a buffoon knows that hotels that have been closed or seriously impacted by Covid has suffered negative cash flow. In addition the properties have to be maintained. Last but no least businesses in Barbados have undergone financial stress suffered during the so-called lost decade.

    It is a pity some here cannot debate issues without being disparaging. What is shows is an immaturity that does not align with being a codger. Some of us live here and therefore privy to what is happening in the market. There is a place for generalizations and then one has to be specific.

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  • (Quote):
    Skinner did not start taking an interest in what goes on in his country yesterday. You need to take your puerile responses to my posts somewhere else. All you do is sit there and remind people of what the DLP did 2008- 2018. I got news for you -the people kicked their sorry asses out almost three years now. Go and read the papers, they don’t have a seat in parliament and just got their backsides kicked in a by election. Furthermore well known members are fleeing to the BLP. And one of their former ministers may go to prison on corruption charges. Now that I have brought you up to date. Let us deal with Barbados to day. (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You ought to be a bit ‘careful’ before you are ‘accused’ of giving out umbrellas to ‘shade’ Bajans from the scorching heat of reality.

    It is almost 1 year that the “Don” of porn has been convicted for a serious felony charge yet not one of his associates aka co-conspirators in the same matter which originated in the Barbados jurisdiction has even been charged far less tried in a court of law.

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  • @ Hal
    We are dealing with those who think that things happen “ just so”. Tourism had three straight bumper years 2016-2019. We need not mention all the great years they had before. Refused to honor their obligations and now we got bankroll them.Where is our tourism product today. Did you ever see a massive Bajan buy of prime time TV ads? Why after sixty years in the market potential travelers believe Barbados is a part of
    Jamaica?
    Tell them to produce individual audits of all overseas agencies and what sell did their offices made of the country.
    A lot of hocus pocus BS.
    Excuses , excuses . I the meantime St. Lucia is promoting local cuisine and in real terms out performing our product.
    I going to bet you a few dollars that very few knew that G4S , was or is just another absentee plantation owner.
    They want us to seriously believe they did not know the anti- worker practices of this company?
    This is donkey years that those sectors of workers have been openly exploited
    This whole episode stinks to the heavens.
    The struggle continues .
    Peace

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  • @William

    What does 3 years bumper season mean? What would have occurred after to stress said industry? Be specific please!

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  • @ William

    There is a Bajan logic that goes: we are members of the global financial network; but when the EU or OECD tells them if they are members of the club they have to behave in a certain way, they cry racism.
    If they want to be members of the club, they either obey the rules or get out, they are told. They claim we are independent, you cannot tell us what to do.
    Fine. Then they go to international bodies and ask to borrow money and are told there are conditions to the loan, follow the rules. Then they claim racism, why can’t they lend us the money without conditions, as they do to X and Y?
    It is always someone else’s fault, never theirs.
    By the way, do you notice how people who profess to be experts on all countries, cry special knowledge when it comes to Barbados? We are on the ground, so we know something you do not.
    They never say what this special knowledge is, it is just a hint, what I call the Owen Arthur economic expertise. In the one or two times I have met him, he never gave straight answers, but hints that he knew something you did not.
    It is an old Bajan trick. We do not like debating; we prefer to shout, heckle, abuse, or just whisper advice. I remember earlier this year, posting from Barbados and being told I did not know what I was talking about.
    A few weeks ago I also mentioned squatters occupying land illegally and the Water Authority attaching a water supply to the squatters and someone came on and said it was nonsense.
    I have also had a situation in which a senior civil servant dealing with a certain projected told me about and when mentioned it on BU I was told I was wrong.

    Like

  • @ Miller who wrote ” not one of his associates aka co-conspirators in the same matter ”

    It is about making ” the deal ” with the DoJ and runinng back home to Canada.

    https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/file/1133316/download

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I have gone past that living where and on the ground nonsense. My Comrade try hard to ignore them. You are a born and bred Barbadian and that’s all that matters.
    Just write what you feel. All I suggest is that you try hard to don’t reply with names/ cussing even if others do and don’t instigate it either.
    We’ve been around too long to indulge in such. But you said your mother told you about being hard ears. At least she never said hard head. Lol
    The struggle continues.
    Peace.

    Like

  • @ David
    Unless I can’t read , even BLPs on BU have stated that the only industry that performed under the DLP was tourism. We had records in 2019. The two previous years were also considered great years. You should know there have been several bumper years since tourism took over the economy when it replaced sugar. Use your BB sources anc get the necessary statistics.
    It seems that you have bought into junk that : hoteliers, Abed , Haloute, COW, Bizzy and all those cry babies never made money or profit . Not surprising you always defend the business class.
    The struggle continues
    Peace

    Like

  • @ William

    Many thanks. I do not use obscenities and do not encourage it. I however like people to be accurate with the actualite. I am sure I am not the only one to notice the number of inaccuracies that have been normalised on BU.

    Like

  • @ William Skinner

    IT IS PRETTY OBVIOUS TO BLIND MEN THE LIKES OF STEVIE WONDER AND RAY CHARLES THAT YOU DETEST BOTH THE DLP AND BLP AND QUITE RIGHTLY SO BECAUSE OF NON PERFORMANCE IN LIFTING OF THEIR OWN BLACK MASSES ON THE 2 x 3 ISLAND WHILST ALWAYS BOGGED DOWN IN CORRUPTION AND NEPOTISM.

    KEEP SPEAKING THE TRUTH OTHERS WHO WANT TO ATTACK OR MALIGN HAVE THEIR OWN AGENDA IN MAKING EXCUSES FOR STATUS QUO REMAINING IN PLACE WHILST QUICK TO POINT TO DLP PAST TRANSGRESSIONS THAT BLP GOVERNMENT HAS NOT PROSECUTED ALMOST 3 YEARS LATER AFTER MISLEADING THE NAIVE VOTING PUBLIC.

    I HAVE NOTICED THAT OF ALL THE LOCAL PEOPLE WHO ARE STRIKING AND CRYING OUT FOR WAGES/SEVERANCE NOT ONE IS WHITE OR AN INDIAN.

    ALL THE POLITICIANS FROM BOTH DLP AND BLP WHO HAS BEEN ELECTED SHOULD BE ROUNDED UP AND SHOT FOR BETRAYING THEIR OWN PEOPLE CAUSING I SUSPECT MANY EARLY DEATHS DUE TO STRESS AND FINANCIAL HARDSHIP FOR MANY BLACK BAJANS.

    YOU HAVE SAID NOTHING THAT CAN BE REFUTED BUT MANY ON THE ISLAND DON’T LIKE TRUTH AND FACT, THEY ARE LIKE THEIR BLP PRIME MINISTER WHO DON’T WANT THE OUTSIDE WORLD TO KNOW WHAT IS GOING ON IN BIM. STARTING TO SOUND LIKE NORTH KOREA OR CUBA.

    Like

  • @ Baje

    In your note to @William, you have spoken a truth you do not hear in Barbados, or even on BU, and that is the impact of long unemployment on health and longevity.
    We avoid these uncomfortable truths, dance around them, keep silent, look the other way. We have a country with 40 per cent unemployment, 40 per cent, and not a single word by politicians or trade unionists. In any other country that would have led to riots.
    But in Barbados it is so normal that people shoot each other, instead of confronting the system. Things are so corrupt that we have wealthy hoteliers asking for more taxpayers’ money to shore up their failing businesses, but, even more, that the low-paid and unemployed should get less.
    Yet people demonstrating such savage, brutal behaviour can still be described as, and behave as if they really were pillars of society.
    These are people who should be isolated by all decent people, the worst of whom are the silent church and their hypocrites in dog collars. Not a word from these hounds. We have lost our moral anchor. We are a failed society. When those hungry people rise up, it will end in tears.

    Like

  • In the second quarter of 2020, white households—who account for 60 percent of the U.S. population—held 84 percent ($94 trillion) of total household wealth in the U.S.
    Comparatively, Black households—who account for 13.4 percent of the U.S. population—held just 4 percent ($4.6 trillion) of total household wealth….(Quote)

    Like

  • @William

    The blogmaster did not ask you to cite what the politicians have stated.

    When we say the sector did well in the years you mentioned what do you mean? Does it mean all tourist related businesses in the sector did well? How was the revenue/PROFITS distributed in the sector? Do you know? The businesses mentioned in the media of recent do you know their financial status or have you assumed?

    When we say Barbados has a per capita income north of 15K does it mean we have no poor people in the country, again a mean average? Do you get the point dear William?

    Peace.

    Like

  • @ BAJE:
    “KEEP SPEAKING THE TRUTH OTHERS WHO WANT TO ATTACK OR MALIGN HAVE THEIR OWN AGENDA IN MAKING EXCUSES FOR STATUS QUO REMAINING IN PLACE WHILST QUICK TO POINT TO DLP PAST TRANSGRESSIONS THAT BLP GOVERNMENT HAS NOT PROSECUTED ALMOST 3 YEARS LATER AFTER MISLEADING THE NAIVE VOTING PUBLIC.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    That’s one piece of TRUTH which neither your detractors nor naysayers can refute.

    The evidence to support your position is there all concealed in a little BIG red bag just requiring the fixing of its broken zip marked: “Forever DBLP” made solely for Tweedle BEE and Tweedle DEM.

    But you must give Thanks to the American Justice System for letting the incestuous cat out of the red blue and yellow strip(p)ed bag.

    Like

  • @Hants
    I know Innes is a Canadian via Georgetown, is Tasker a Canadian too?

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver ,

    I don;t know if Tasker is a Canadian.

    Like

  • Those who accept bribes and those who pay bribes should be treated equally.

    Like

  • @ Baje
    Thanks. Sometimes I am actually shocked that we seem oblivious to what is tearing up the social fabric of the society. Either we like it so or just don’t care. The funny thing is that as a very young man, I listened to some progressive Black thinkers say almost exactly what I and others are saying today. We just keep sweeping serious matters under the carpet.
    Errol Barrow once said we would wake up one day and discover that we no longer have/own the country. Amazingly , some of us seem determined to fulfill his prophesy.
    It’s just mind boggling that in 2020, nearly sixty years after independence, some are afraid to call a spade a spade.
    We owe future generations of our children a lot more than we apparently want to leave as a legacy.
    Keep up the good work.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • After Tom Adams “came to power” in 1976, one of the first things he did was to set up a commission of enquiry headed by Sir Herbert Duffus.
    Duffus’ verdict was “all roads led to Barrow”. He stressed that, for a small island, that was not necessarily a bad thing.

    If a commission of enquiry were set up to investigate how the laws of Barbados were so easily broken by the Donville Inniss Affair, where and who to would the roads lead?

    Like

  • @Hants
    Agreed.
    However, the case against Innes and Tasker by the DOJ is WEAK. In reading the indictment, Part III, their criminal actions lie within Barbadian laws, “Barbados Prevention of Corruption Act”, the bribing of a public official. Once the DOJ got whom they deemed laundered, DI, and whom they deemed supplied the funds, ICBL’s Bermuda parent; from their end, the case is done. Barbadian authorities have never charged any of the 4. (the fourth is the ICBL employee, the former CFO, who was not charged in return for her testimony)
    You need to be asking local authorities why nobody was ever charged. The evidence is laid before them by the DoJ.

    Like

  • To answer Walter then, all roads lead to the COP.

    Like

  • @ Walter
    What results have we ever gotten from within the corrupt BLPDLP. I don’t recall any high flyer outside of Leroy Parris being shackled before the law courts. I don’t think we honestly want to admit that there is a sustained corrupt cesspool in our country.
    Practically all the state enterprises have been tainted. As of this moment we cannot account for buses and in some cases houses. Poor people are daily robbed by professionals and they have no where to go. Yet somehow, we feel that we can clean up this mess by wishing on a star.
    To clean up this mess goes way beyond winning a seat in parliament. Quite frankly that’s the worst place to be right now if one is serious. Sometimes , I feel I actually escaped being in that place with people who sit and watch their own people being exploited and they dare not say a word.
    Man, this whole thing becoming a very sick joke- this pretense that it will be alright in the morning while poor black people getting slaughtered.
    Just look at how G4S can treat our own brothers and sisters in 2020. Just glance at how dishonest employers are robbing our own brothers and sisters out of NIS contributions and severance . Just read the comments of ordinary , honest hardworking people being pinned against the wall. Our poor children being denied education because they can’t afford a tablet to study online and their schools sick from lack of maintenance. People in rural areas can’t get water. Are we really serious about addressing such issues. Are we chasing butterflies and looking for daffodils?
    I am not pessimistic but nothing we say here is new . Let us St least admit that there is a fear of the mighty and that it looks as if you either join them or get “starve out”socially, economically and politically.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • I feel I actually escaped being in that place with people who sit and watch their own people being exploited and they dare not say a word.
    Man, this whole thing becoming a very sick joke- this pretense that it will be alright in the morning while poor black people getting slaughtered.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    I KNOW HOW YOU FEEL.

    I THANK GOD EVERY DAY :LITERALLY I DON’T LIVE IN THE CESSPOOL OF BROKEN MINDS.

    Like

  • @ Baje
    Just want to set the record straight. When I say escape from that place, I am referring to my failed attempt to win a seat (Parliament) when I contested the elections of 1991 as a NDP candidate. I really mean escaped from being in parliament.
    However, I actually remember being told by a friend that he was happy to “ escape” Barbados. So, you have expressed the feeling of many , who left the island.
    Quite frankly, I personally don’t think I would ever reach that stage but at least you are not being a hypocrite because there are some who pretend this great love for country in public but in private , they really don’t care much about it.
    Some indulge in sweet nothings to avoid the great injustices that are being meted out to the poor every single day.
    I have not seen so many people look at an empty glass and try to convince me that it is half full until I came to BU.
    They try to display optimism but in fact they hand pick a few successes and then expect intelligent persons to see that as the norm.
    Believe me, I was involved in more than one Black/small business group and for every one of us that succeeded about fifty or sixty failed. It’s the same thing they do to people in the USA , when blacks complain, they say to them: Look at Michael Jordan, he made it why can’t you!
    The simple and unvarnished truth is that if we don’t start to address widespread poverty, I can guarantee you that 80% of our young black entrepreneurs will not make it to any substantial level within ten years. There is already a new brain drain because many can’t even find work with a degree.
    We have a very high failure rate of Black business because there is no inherited wealth to start with in the first place. I have attended trade shows in countries, that only white Barbadian business people knew about or were invited to. I got to go because of affiliation with some professional bodies outside of Bim.
    I ask those who come here with no facts but daily pontificating , to tell me where all the black manufacturers from the 80s are today. Tell me the percentage of their businesses that lasted twenty years. Tell me how many can find ten thousand dollars today after struggling for a quarter century .
    I know where the bodies are buried and I know who destroyed them and why they were destroyed .
    Keep up the good work. The struggle continues.
    Peace.

    Like

  • Why do Indians and minorities succeed again?

    Like

  • All on the blog have noticed you sidestepped the issue of hoe profits are distributed in the tourism sector. Cherrypicking the issues again. Barbados like any other country has its issues, the end.

    Like

  • Why do Indians and minorities succeed again?….(Quote)

    Don’t know why. Plse tell us.

    Like

  • Steupse! William Skinner arguing against himself and dropping stupid remarks, as is his wont these days.

    Here’s what I say to those who escaped – good riddance!

    Again, nobody is disputing that the odds are stacked against us. All I am saying is that we have what it takes to overcome. There’s just too many of us to be powerless – if we move together.

    And what I will say again is – it ain’t no better where you have escaped to! But you are welcome to stay there and I will stay here – ON THE GROUND.

    Now I can’t help it if you cannot see the butterflies and the daffodils. I don’t see daffodils either but I have hibiscus. And a beautiful humming bird to go with it, I hear though I have not seen it in months.

    But I go out in the morning and live in hope.

    By the way, the grand-daughter of this successful businessman studied Hotel Management at the UWI. During her job attachment, she became aware of the poor treatment meted out to hotel workers, usually by black overseer types. When asked what she hoped to accomplish in her chosen field she replied that she wanted to own her own hotel. You should have heard the laughter from the black overseer!

    Well, COVID put paid to all that hotel stuff and she has started a different business. Do you wish to know how it’s going so far?

    Young people!

    P.S. Had a serious boyfriend thirty years ago who rose from poverty to run a very successful business. He used to tell me about all the obstacles placed in his way by the white men. Then he would let out one big steupse and say, “Anyhow!”

    Do you know why we aren’t married? The man lived and breathed the business and had no time to play. He worked hard, spent wisely and was determined to succeed. Always calm, big clown in downtime (that was his charm) and confidant he would succeed.

    Took him to age thirty-four to declare his business successful enough to ease off.

    Like

  • @ William

    A big question: why is government intervening in the industrial relations negotiations of G4S and the hotel sector? And, not t ministerial level, but at the very top of the tree? Plse explain.

    Like

  • Oh dear! I forgot to mention – the businessman boyfriend treated his staff well and gave good service to customers.

    Like

  • @ Donna
    I hate to do this but I did explain my statement to @Baje regarding “ escape “ I did do because I did not want to be misunderstood. At December 10, 2020 2:44 AM this is what William Skinner wrote:
    “@ Baje
    Just want to set the record straight. When I say escape from that place, I am referring to my failed attempt to win a seat (Parliament) when I contested the elections of 1991 as a NDP candidate. I really mean escaped from being in parliament.
    However, I actually remember being told by a friend that he was happy to “ escape” Barbados. So, you have expressed the feeling of many , who left the island.
    Quite frankly, I personally don’t think I would ever reach that stage….“(QUOTE)

    In other words, I was looking back , at my failure to enter Parliament and philosophically , seeing the failure as a blessing in disguise. It had nothing to do with arguing against myself. I then made it clear to @Baje that whereas I understand why some people express that they “ escaped” Barbados , I declared , that I don’t think I will reach that stage. Quite frankly , those who know me well, will confirm that I see the entire Caribbean as one nation.
    I am often called a dreamer because I have remained a die hard unrepentant regionalist. I maintain that with all its problems, the quality of life in the Caribbean , is better for our people but that’s a position that may not be shared by many.

    The struggle continues
    Peace

    Like

  • For those who have followed IR in Barbados the Labour Department does not have a good track record of arbitrating serious disputes. The matter is then escalated to government when the Minister who has responsibility for labour deems it can add value in the national interest. You would prefer the BWU call out the GAIA workers at this times wouldn’t you, then you start to cry the president, the president.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    Thls is a question with which I have engaged myself over the last few years. A lot of bad leadership practices have now become the norm.
    It seems that the BLPDLP, has embarked on a Supreme leader philosophy. All roads must now lead to whomever is Prime Minister. I have noted that , for the past two years , Mottley has hogged the show , whenever there is good news. She has been elevated , in very short time , to a type of Messiah. This seems to be consistent with how we want our PMs to be.
    It will grow and then lead to “ elected” or parliamentary dictatorships. It was a similar thing with Barrow and then Arthur took it to greater heights.
    Look at what happened to Comrade Prescod. She fired him, he wailed and then took a fancy title to rub shame from his face. All the progressives have now lined up behind her . It’s absolute legitimate power. Let’s see how it works out. Although I suspect you and I already know the possible result.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • @William

    How do you the whole thing was not orchestrated with Prescod to save face?

    Evidence please!

    Like

  • That particular part of the comment was directed at those who feel they have escaped.

    P.S. This morning the runt of my okra plants, the very one WHOM I told I would take care of even though she looked poor rakey, produced the biggest okra I ever saw – six inches long not counting the bend. I swear it grew inches overnight because I did not see any okra yesterday ready to be reaped.

    Like

  • @ William

    It is the cult of personality. It leads to the Supreme Leader believing s/he is always right, then to anyone who says s/he is not right being imprisoned, then executed.
    Look at Africa, China, Hungary, Brazil. All you get are people shouting, barking, heckling, or putting forward irrelevant details about policy, while leaving the flawed policy untouched.
    The question remains why, in this case, is our Supreme Leader getting involved in an industrial dispute over wages between workers, their union and employers?
    Not only are the ministers superfluous, but the arbitrational body put in place by the law is ignored. The woman is an obsessive, power mad, a compulsive interventionist.
    I hope pressure groups, think-tanks, opposition parties, the media and academics, even BU, are keeping a careful audit of this government’s announced, and implemented policies.
    By the way, do you remember the row between doctors at the hospital? Was there ministerial intervention?

    Like

  • “@ David @William

    How do you the whole thing was not orchestrated with Prescod to save face?”

    Evidence please!“(QUOTE)

    What “ evidence” you want or expect from me ? Do you have comic juice for breakfast? Has Trevor Eastmond retired? Are you his replacement?
    In my view Comrade Prescod took the “envoy “ thing and then had the nerve to say that is why he went to Parliament I the first place. Last thing I heard , he was responsible , for moving a piece of old iron from somewhere in Bridgetown to the Garrison. I always thought he would have preferred to throw it in the Careenage.
    I stand by what I write because I know how he defended the public embarrassment that was meted out to him. You want evidence: call the CID.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • @ Donna
    Thanks for the clarification.
    Peace

    Like

  • The woman lives in your head. The bargaining and dispute process failed and the BWU is reported to be about to callout units to support a strike. Why should the prime minister not get involved which has been the custom in Barbados from time back.

    Like

  • In other words you do not know if there was a back room deal by your comrade Trevor Prescod to ensure is 15k month a salary is continued. You guys fare the biggest Rh hypocrites.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    When the DLP could not get an economic policy to succeed , the private sector told employees to march against the NSRL because they had no intention of paying taxes up front. They claimed the cost of living would rise.
    Now the workers want severance pay, NIS benefits , the same private sector saying they should not strike.
    In the meantime, the BWU is waiting on the PM. That’s the state of the game. I honestly don’t recall the Doctors issue.
    Things get curiouser and curiouser.
    The struggle continues.
    Peace

    Like

  • People marched because Stuart and the DLP were a butch of incompetents and civil society used every means necessary to show dissent. It is that simple.

    Like

  • @David
    December 10, 2020 8:05 AM

    “In other words you do not know if there was a back room deal by your comrade Trevor Prescod to ensure is 15k month a salary is continued. You guys fare the biggest Rh hypocrites.“(Quote)
    I did not even know that Comrade Prescod’s “ Special Envoy” salary was 15 thousand per month. You seem to be a better detective than given credit.
    Man, you carry on . I’ve been called worst for having an opinion even victimized by the BLPDLP.
    Carry on smartly my Dear David. If you have the salaries of others , please let the much loved BU family know.
    Peace and love, Bro’

    Like

  • Yes folks….the chickens have come to roost!…and the results are in. You basically have a system that is broke. One would ask…but how is this possible? So let’s look at the underlying factors. Firstly encouraging a population to work for cash with no contributions is plain stupid! …How do these people plan to retire? The answer is…they won’t…they will end up on the street begging. Secondly many employers have not contributed to the NIS…and continue to do so under the watchful eye of the government. Labour laws need a major overhaul ….sad enough it may already be too late . The third nail in the coffin is BERT. An ill timed recovery program…that has done nothing but indebted hard working Bajans…..with no end in site. Fourth point is the inability of the working class to stand up for them selves..and holding people accountable! A general strike to shed light on the situation may not be a bad thing. The only positive out of all of this is that COVID19 has actually uncovered many things….if not for COVID19…..they would still be telling you lies that everything is ok. Well folks …everything is not ok…its time to call your MPs…and hold these people accountable…. The future is yours! Speak up and fight for your future!

    Like

  • @ Homeboy

    Brilliant. The other feature is that Barbadians do not realise their power as consumers. Why can’t they organise?

    Like

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