Reform or Die II

Submitted by Ziggy Greene

I was listening to Senator Caswell Franklyn yesterday on Starting Point an Antiguan talk program. The host asked Franklyn about the recent political goings-on in Barbados and in his inimitable style answered forthrightly. The topic turned to the prospects of the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) now that it was unrepresented in parliament. Franklyn replied inter alia that the DLP and its founder leader Barrow were one and the same. And since Barrow’s death the party has been dying- a very interesting and insightful comment. I must say I agree with that assessment.

Senator Caswell Franklyn’s interview with Starting Point Talk Show

Thanks Caswell
I wanted to write about the link between founders and the continuation of what they started, especially political parties. In the case of the DLP, this is very crucial as it is facing what I believe is an existential crisis. We have seen the old faces of the party led by their front man George Pilgrim battling with the two year installed Verla De Peiza for leadership of the party.

What does this portend
If the DLP retrogresses to the leadership that led to a 30-0 drubbing at the 2018 polls will its prospect be any different in 2023? I think not. Their ineptitude will be forever associated with the disastrous economic plunge of Barbados whether or not they are solely to blame, whether they inherited a stacked deck or world events did them no favours. That they see it fit to challenge the new leadership of De Peiza is either a failure on her part to stamp her authority on the party or they think the recent kinks in the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) armour presents an opportunity for their resurgence. It is not lost on me that when the BLP were pushing investigations into alleged fraudulent activities under their stewardship they were silent but when Chris Sinckler , one of them, was given a pick in a Mottley Committee, they crept slowly out of the woodwork.

How will it play out with DLP party voters
So the choice is between Verla De Peiza and the old guard. Between a break from the past- if you can call De Peiza that but I will in this instance- and a continuation of a failed regime. How forthcoming will the old guard be when they address DLP party voters? Will the warning of Ulrich Beck in his book Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity in 1992, that we make decisions according to information derived from politicians and experts who in most cases are self-serving, ring true?

Really, what it is that the old guard can offer that they didn’t before? That brings us back to Franklyn’s comment Barrow and the DLP are incontrovertibly linked. I am not for one moment postulating that the old guard represents Barrow’s philosophy, far from it. I am positing however that at some point for a party to carry beyond its founders, it must reform and reinvent itself. We cannot do so with the old guard. And just as our society is transforming into a new modernity from the vestiges of the past or as Beck puts it, ” freeing itself from the contours of the classical industrial society” the DLP must pry itself from the shadow of Barrow and the stench of the old regime and transition into a new modernity.

In our first piece on this subject I submitted that DePeiza must articulate these changes clearly and with some alacrity. And with pressure from the old guard and a bye election in St George north on the horizon more than ever these changes are needed now.

See Related blogReform or Die

115 comments

  • Jones, Lowe criticise DePeiza’s leadership
    rticle by
    Barbados Today Traffic Published on
    September 22, 2020

    by Marlon Madden

    With just days to go before the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) holds its 65th annual general conference, there appears to be a growing lack of confidence in its current president, with a suggestion that democracy within the political party is under siege.

    The concern was expressed on Sunday, during a branch meeting, by some DLP stalwarts who suggested that stumbling blocks were being created to keep George Pilgrim
    from contesting the party’s presidency and others from running for office.

    Former Minister of Education Ronald Jones, who said he supported Pilgrim to lead the DLP into the next general election, suggested that the current president, Verla DePeiza, was afraid of a contest.

    Warning that now is not the time for division, Jones insisted that anyone who wanted to run for office should be allowed to do so.

    And questioning why no conference material has been heavily circulated ahead of the September 25 to 27 conference date, Jones said he was still unaware “who is running
    for office and which office”.

    “Why is this? We should not fear contest in our party. Our internal contest should take on national characteristics, albeit at a lower scale. Nothing is wrong with that,” he said.

    “I want to say to the current leadership of the party . . . to respect the democratic ideals of the party, remove the restrictions and alterations which you have put in place to debar persons from being candidates or being successful at the polls.”

    In addition to the election of officers and members of the party’s general council at the conference, the DLP is expected to make amendments to its constitution and rules,
    as well as appoint auditors.

    Only financial members will be allowed to vote.

    Jones, who questioned the lack of executive meetings, though acknowledging the COVID-19 pandemic, said he was aware that thousands of Barbadians were still interested in joining the DLP, but suggested that some were being ignored.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/09/22/jones-lowe-criticise-depeizas-leadership/

    Like

  • I see the crabs in the barrel are at it.

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  • Pacha..if you remember we predicated shortly after election 2018 that the male crabs in the DLP barrel would just wait until Verla built up the political rhetoric to their acceptable lowest denomination standards and then they will all crawl in and critize her to grab the limelight once again. with a view to getting their dirty paws in the treasury again, continue the corruption with minorities…oh sorry…Comissiong’s “planter class” again..

    that’s what crabs do….it’s their nature.

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  • Why don’t we stop humbugging the poor DLP and leave them to their rebuilding exercise. They have at least another 10-12 years in the wilderness. They have no chance of winning the next two elections, only gaining some seats.

    If the other third parties had any sense at all, they would all immediately come together to form a coalition or single party to gain some serious momentum within that time to be more than a laughing stock within two or three elections from now.

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  • Who did not know this was going to happen?

    Come on back and tek some more licks, ye masochists!

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  • there is a lot of noise on social media that a certain union senator is the nominee for the bye election in SGN. A bit unbelievable but these are strange times

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  • Donna, you should done know that DePeiza was just a temporary stop gap for the DLP, because the fellows were ashamed after the 30-0 defeat. Look, they even abandoned Stuart after the results. He was at George Street with not a boy around him. to answer questions from the media alone.

    Donna, you feel Greene and Mariposa should throw their hat in the ring?

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  • @Greene

    The BLP bringing Toni Moore would be a mistake by the BLP.

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  • @David,

    please explain why you say that

    Liked by 1 person

  • This is a period where labour needs to be strong. For the head of the largest union to be be enveloped by the BLP will be viewed with suspicion by a large segment of the electorate. This would create a noisy talking point for the opposition and dilute a BLP natratoywhichbsays it is about making fundamental change. How would Toni explain her vote on the integrity bill?

    The upside is that Senator Caswell Union would grow.

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  • Michael Campbell,

    I have no opinion on that matter. My beef is with those for whom I voted who allowed this country to descend to the depths of despair, all the while telling us that things were fine.

    I do recall that iconic photograph of Freundel on election night. The rats abandoned the ship as though they had no hand in its demise.

    Fools did not even realise how that made THEM look. Freundel at least took his licks and accepted the responsibility.

    NOT ONE OF THEM WHO LEFT HIM BY HIMSELF THAT NIGHT COULD EVER GET MY VOTE!

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  • @ David
    What’s the difference between Toni Moore and Leroy Trotman, Evelyn Greaves, Bobby Morris, Mary Redman, Obrian Trotman,
    All of these unionist were/ are Bees and Dees.
    Why pretend this is not business as usual? More damn hypocrisy from George and Roebuck Street Kool aid drinkers.

    Liked by 2 people

  • @William

    There is some merit in your intervention but COVID and the current economic and political situation makes for a unique case.

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  • @David

    from the time Moore and the other unions marched with MAM and the private sector and stuck out for an unbelievable pay increase they were compromised. and then within 5 minutes of meeting the BLP Govt accepted 5% increase, all their members would have or should have known where their stood with union leadership, such as it is.

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  • @W Skinner
    You forgot the most influential of them all better known as the Heavy Roller: Frank Walcott

    @Donna yours@7.49am

    Just a reminder that “Victory has a thousand fathers but defeat is an orphan”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Donna,

    agreed. unless Freundel told them he would do it alone which i doubt

    @William,

    agreed but i dont recall any of those persons marching with the opposition and the private sector against the standing Govt., refusing a reasonable pay increase from one govt and then accepting a pittance from another

    Like

  • In the Rebranding of Country’s Company Name project work Barbados could rename itself as Wakanda

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  • @ Greene
    What you and others are failing to realise is the simple truth, that in reality we have had a one party state since 1961. I , as a young trade unionist, back in mid seventies , learned my lesson very well.
    Errol Barrow legislated salaries and I actually moved or seconded the resolution to protest in the yard of parliament. Tom Adams was leading the opposition at that time. Adams made the most brilliant speech saying that Barrow should have never broken the collective bargaining process. At that time O’Brien Trotman , was leading the public servants union.
    Barrow was kicked out in 1976 and Adams became PM and he then also legislated salaries. By that time O’Brien Trotman , was in the senate and was Minister of Health in Adams’ cabinet.
    So Toni Moore if she wins the seat means no difference to me. I ain’t just come town.
    @ David
    I have no political regard for Grenville. However , he must be respected for throwing his hat in the ring. There are those who can only write crap on BU but they have never demonstrated any commitment to anything other than cussing people on behalf of the decadent BLPDLP.
    @ Sargeant
    You are right about Sir.Frank Walcott. Don’t forget that the joker at the NUPW said they had “ crunched” the numbers and the then government could afford 23% increase in salaries. Then just so they quickly accepted 5%.
    Peace.

    Liked by 2 people

  • “only financial members will be allowed to vote”
    Control? When will one need a BRA certificate to vote in a general election?

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  • @William

    the Obrien Trotman / Tom / Barrow scenario is not exactly the same as Moore/ MAM / Stuart / Private Sector one but it is close enough. Point taken

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  • And nobody has written more crap on BU than Grenville Phillips the second in defence of a ghost party.

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  • Is Miss Moore even a member of the BLP? Obviously her position at the union pushed her more into the public spotlight.

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  • DavidSeptember 22, 2020 8:31 AM

    There is no doubt that the US economy is in deep trouble. Trump and the Republican Brat Pack have tried to stave off the obvious by cutting taxes to the wealthy and reducing social security costs, in an effort to throw money into the economy.

    Unfortunately, that measure to fuel an economy only works in a very short term. The middle and long-term impact of that can be disastrous, particularly from a socio-economic view. This can lead to severe social issues and therefore instability.

    The debt levels have been rising even before the pandemic, so people are using debt to fuel spending, a sure sign that their earnings are not keeping up with the cost of living and that the economy is not as rosy as some pretended.

    Then, add the pandemic and the situation gets even worse. Over time, more will likely turn to a Burnie Sanders type candidate, even if a new prototype of him. This is inevitable.

    The people who really run things behind the scenes are likely fully aware of this and are probably terrified (that their billions will be taxed).

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  • The sad thing about Barbados is that the great BLP will rebuild the country to new heights of prosperity. Then the masses will become frivolous again and fall back to their old tribal habits. Sometime around 2035 they will vote for a DLP-PM again because they still believe in the fairy tale of the deep welfare state.

    We should therefore differentiate voting rights according to wealth or income to ensure that the votes of smart voters count double or triple. This is the only way to prevent a relapse into the DLP Stone Age.

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  • I also remember before the 1986 elections when the DEMS joined the unions in asking Bree St. John to give them 5%, 10% and 15% from top to bottom of the civil service. Bree said government could not afford those increases at the time.

    When Barrow won the government, he said they could not afford those pay increases. The unions agreed and accepted the 0.5% Barrow offered them.

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  • the only distinction i will made in those scenarios is that none of the unions then marched or agitated with the Private Sector against whom they would at some point negotiate, against the standing govt. to me that is a game changer.

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  • Go Caswell, don’t let them deter ya with their little fowl slaves, they can’t do you a thing, we got ya back…

    i knew the fowls were lying, they have no shame.

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  • Who marched with who? Wasnt the march instigated by the unions and the private sector joined in?

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  • @john2
    The private sector were marching against the financial management of the country. The Unions were marching against? Wage freezes in the public sector?
    That little March has stuck in the craw of many to levels unimagined by the planners.

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  • The trade unions and private sector have announced joint action planned for next Monday as they continue to press Government for dialogue.

    At a press conference this afternoon, Barbados Workers’ Union General Secretary, Toni Moore, issued a call to Barbadians to come out and show their support for the unions’ and private sector body’s call for Government to meet with them to discuss rolling back the recently increased National Social Responsibility Levy (NSRL).

    “We’ve planned for a march on Monday July 24, where we’re calling on the wider public to demonstrate their support for the concerns which we have, namely, that we should have dialogue,” said Moore.

    “We understand that there has been disruption a number of areas and we think that the message of sensitising the public is one that we want to focus a lot more on and from the feedback we have been getting from our various publics we think there is now an understanding that urgency in dialogue is paramount.”

    She was joined by President of the National Union of Public Workers (NUPW), Akanni McDowall, President of the Barbados Secondary Teachers Union (BSTU), Mary Redman and President of the Barbados Private Sector Association (BPSA), Charles Herbert.

    Herbert indicated the private sector’s involvement, noting, “The private sector will be asking its members where possible to close their businesses and to make their employees available to participate should they wish to do so.”

    https://www.loopnewsbarbados.com/content/march-monday-trade-unions-private-sector-team

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  • Why are these unionists demonstrating with the private sector? Are they just stupid or mad, or both?

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  • @Hal
    this is my issue too, Hal. where in the world does that makes sense?

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  • Why DID the unions demonstrate with the private sector.

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  • @Greene

    It was a desperation move to send a strong message to a government that persisted to twiddle on the deck of a sinking ship.

    Liked by 1 person

  • The National Union of Public Workers (NUPW) will not be swayed from its quest to get public sector workers a salary increase.

    In a media release thanking members who supported two days of industrial action last week, the union vowed to stay the course despite caution from economists Marla Dukharan and Jeremy Stephen that a salary increase could do more damage to Barbados’ fragile economy and value of the dollar.

    The NUPW is asking for a 23 per cent wage increase for Government workers, who have not had an increase in almost ten years, while Government, through the Ministry of the Civil Service, remains stuck at no increase.

    The statement said public workers were disregarded and disrespected when the January 15 deadline passed with no response from the Ministry of the Civil Service.

    https://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/122038/nupw-sticking-guns-raise

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  • @David,

    i have no issues with the unions demonstrating with the opposition to some extent but not with the private sector agaisnt whom they will have to negotiate at some point. as it turned out the private sector got all the tax breaks and financial incentives from Govt (with whom they marched) and the unions got a paltry 5% and are still carrying the load.

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  • @ Greene

    Do they believe that they and the business class are on the same side in any debate about the economy and jobs? Can this be real? My enemies enemy is my friend?
    What a waste of public money on educating a younger generation. The objective should be to get rid of the parasitic Social Partnership.

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  • Greene,

    According to your logic there is some natural right to higher salaries in public service. But many businessmen and their employees have to cope with the same turnover as 10 years ago and work 60 hours per week.

    The fact is that productivity in the public service is on the decline. Therefore it would be very fair to the taxpayer to halve the civil servants’ salaries and to reduce their pensions to a maximum of 1,000 BBD per month.

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  • All gloves are off! This is the word coming from the President of National Union of Public Workers (NUPW), Akanni McDowall, warning the Freundel Stuart-administration of possible industrial action due to stalled salary negotiations.

    Shop stewards of the NUPW met at their Dalkeith Headquarters yesterday, Monday evening to discuss a plan of action to address government’s lack of intent to settle salary negotiations.

    In December 2017, government had made an offer of $49 Million lump sum payment to public servants, to which the NUPW countered with a $60 Million offer, allowing for a $2,500 payment across the board for all public servants. Government did not respond to the increased offer put forward by the NUPW. Neither has the NUPW been able to make any headway with the 23 percent proposed salary increase.

    https://www.loopnewsbarbados.com/content/nupw-threatening-strike-action#:~:text=In%20December%202017%2C%20government%20had,board%20for%20all%20public%20servants.

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  • The Ministry of the Civil Service is awaiting the final mandate from the Minister who holds that portfolio, Prime Minister Freundel Stuart, on how to proceed with the salary and wage negotiations with the trade unions.

    That’s the word from Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of the Civil Service, Alyson Forte. His comments came as he spoke to the media on the sidelines of the Caribbean Leadership Project’s Opening Ceremony for the Technical Working Group Meeting at the Accra Beach Hotel and Spa, as he noted the Barbados Workers’ Union (BWU), National Union of Public Workers (NUPW) and the Congress of Trade Unions and Staff Associations of Barbados (CTUSAB) had long ago submitted their proposals which addressed both salary and non-salary matters.

    “Once I get that mandate I would then either invite the unions to give them that update, or I otherwise might send out a letter telling them what that particular mandate is. But we have had ongoing talks with the NUPW [National Union of Public Workers] in relation to those non-salary issues and they were quite a few, but in time you would hear more,” the Permanent Secretary said.

    With that in mind, he said they are awaiting final approval on the non-salary proposals. Referring to the meeting with the NUPW in December last year, PS Forte said a financial proposal was put on the table by the Government and he gave them two scenarios for a one-off payment to public servants.

    “I gave them two scenarios for them to mull over so that they and I could kind of form a proposal that we would submit to my principals. They went ahead and met with their group and came up with what they considered to be a counter to what I had offered. I submitted that to my principals and in due course I will get back to them on what my principals have said,” he said.

    Government’s suggestions, he said, was two per cent across the board which would have given people at the top a one-off payment of $3000 and the people at the bottom in the region of $400; or two percent at the top, and five percent at the bottom, where public servants at the bottom would receive a one-off payment of $1000. Government’s proposal would result in a $49 million lump sum payment, but following the meeting with their members, the NUPW countered with a $60 million lump sum, for all public servants to receive $2500 each.

    https://www.barbadosadvocate.com/news/awaiting-wage-instructions

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  • Legalise It,
    Don’t Criticise It,
    I’ll Advertise It

    ▶ Jah Jah Skanking, Wood Roots

    There’s somethin’ happenin’ here
    But what it is ain’t exactly clear
    There’s a man with a gun over there
    Tellin’ me I got to beware
    I think it’s time we stop
    Children, what’s that sound?
    Everybody look what’s going down
    There’s battle lines being drawn
    And nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong
    Young people speakin’ their minds
    Gettin’ so much resistance from behind

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  • @Green What is your end game with prosecuting this matter? The labour movement is not what it was back in the day.

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  • @Hal,

    that is exactly what bothered me at the time. i dont know what they were thinking? perhaps the enemy of my enemy is my friend? that only works until proper order is restored or until your present friend gets what they want. natural order has been restored and the unions got shafted

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  • @David

    the end result—-

    Opposition senator and trade unionist Caswell Franklyn has suggested public servants were “sold out” in trade union negotiations that won them a settlement of a five per cent pay increase.

    Franklyn, whose Unity Workers’ Union was not part of those negotiations with Government, yesterday claimed the National Union of Public Workers (NUPW) had moved from its original demand of a 23 per cent wage hike for the public servants, to four and a half per cent, eventually reaching the final settlement of five per cent, with Government’s addition of the half of a per cent to the Unions’ proposed figure.

    “That is to their eternal shame, but they rushed and they did it and every public servant in Barbados knows that they were sold out,” Franklyn told the Senate yesterday during debate on a Resolution to approve the Public Service (General) Order 2018 which approves the payment to public servants across the board, effective from April 1, 2018.

    https://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/186535/public-servants-sold-unions

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  • The old guard under Pilgrim will take the DLP to 25 years in the political wilderness. Can you imagine two year on and they have not recognize why they were defeated 30-0.The old guard sent Pilgrim against the St.John branch wishes in the safest DLP seat and he won two boxes.Denis Lowe has so much baggage that he should not be allowed to run again by any sane executive. The DLP still has support because it is an established party that has done some very good things for Barbados but he old guard will not get them to vote for them again.
    Let Verla stay in place and rebuild the party because you are not going to win the the government in the next ten years. You can imagine the old guard picking Jepter Ince to run in SGN again

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  • @Greene

    Go to Robert Morris Facebook page, he has pretty much acknowledged the labour movement lacks leadership. It starts with the membership who largely have usurped their role in the governing of the union. Count the number of members who vote. The same players recycled.

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  • @Lest we forget

    The assault by these rejects on Verla even if commonsense suggests they will lose has already done untold harm.

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  • so what al of that has to do with Moore runing for SGN? that is if she is a member of the BLP

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  • the unions have been a sell out for a long time now. they simply dont agitate for workers’ welfare in my view. they are all about what the leadership can get. the workers be damned. unions are not only there to get pay increases but to advise workers how to best utilise their skills for the benefit of the nation and in turn their own benefit. that means going to work on time and doing a fair day’s work for a fair day’s pay. in addition unions especially in the public sector should be constantly reinforcing to public sectors workers that they are there to serve the public and not the other way around. unions should be holding classes for workers to hone their public interface skills so that the bad attitude displayed by civil servants towards the public would be minimise if not eliminated.

    moreover and i cant emphasise this enough instead of always demanding pay increases unions should be agitating for an ownership share in the business in negotiating with the private sector and in the case of government demanding that they be the first to be offered government departments if they are to be privatised. that is how they can serve their members in this modernity. that is how you build and maintain wealth- business ownership, collective or otherwise.

    and to prepare for that they should teaching business ownership and attendant responsibilties to members

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  • Didn’t the BWU (under then General Secretary, Leroy Trotman) and the other trade unions, private sector, public sector employees and the then opposition marched against the Sandiford administration sometime before the 1994 general elections were announced?

    What I believe was a “game changer” was the fact 5 members of Sandiford’s Cabinet, including Trotman, became so disillusioned with his leadership that they voted in favour of the no confidence motion the BLP brought against ‘Sandy.’

    It is important to note Trotman contested the 1986 general elections as the DLP’s candidate for St. Michael Central and won the ‘seat.’
    Former BWU General Secretary Sir Frank Walcott was also a member of the DLP. And, so too were NUPW General Secretaries Joseph Goddard and Dennis Clarke.

    Caswell Franklyn, who has his own trade union and is a member of the Opposition PdP, is regarded as a ‘hero’ by several BU contributors.

    But, now they have a problem because Toni Moore is rumoured to be the BLP’s candidate for St. George North?

    Or is it a problem because it’s the BLP?

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  • David
    The DLP placed a person to be High Commissioner to London. The party was wipe out 30-0.The person showed an interest in leadership .That same old guard, seems from the mouthing’s at that time that no newbies cannot lead the party and supported Verla over the person. It made perfect sense to go with a new person because a rebuilding effort was required without any baggage. The old guard now feel that people forget but they are wrong. There is still a need for reform and they cannot do it. Too much baggage
    I am not a political strategist but the High Commissioner would have done better than Pilgrim in St.John.

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  • Agree Guy would have been a good choice even in a transitional role. It would have immediately gone a long way to identify with a different modus operandi. Added to the fact he is intelligent and respected across segments.

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  • Artax,

    i dont remember the unions and opposition and private sector in a staged coordinated march around that time. i remember the unions and the opposition but i may be wrong. could you please provide a link or a source?

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  • @ Hal
    @ Greene
    Occasionally, the BLPDLP set up such scenarios and we fall for the trickery. It’s just games for them and they know how to feed their followers red meat so that they can come on BU and embarrass themselves.
    Imagine a union calls for 23% and then accepts 5% and that is considered a great achievement by the government if you are a Bee. Now if you are a Dee you pretend that they should have gotten more. In the meantime while you were in office you offered them 2.5 %. That’s how the stupidness works. Shortly after you give them 5% you send home some other workers because there simply is no money to pay them. But hold on for a minute; you have no money but you increase the size of the previous cabinet by nearly 100%. And on and on it goes: BLPDLP trickery .
    The only thing I thank the BLPDLP for , is that I know they will never poison the kool aid. It’s a mercy for which I thank them daily.
    Peace

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  • @David,

    from what i heard Hewitt didnt seek to canvass support from party delegates or began too late. you know how these things go. you have to have some connection in the party. from what i heard he was / is a supporter of the party but not well known inside the party so to speak. i agree he would have been an interesting choice but with little inside support it was virtually impossible

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  • @Greene

    In a nutshell he was a rookie and the party machinery huffed him.

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  • DavidSeptember 22, 2020 2:20 PM Stupse. Bunch of jokers. No one is going to vote the same old crew back in. A bye election come and they suddenly appear like vultures.

    Best thing that Hewitt can do is join Grenville and try to strengthen that party.

    Remember, there is effectively NO OPPOSITION now. So DLP is at the same base level as any other!!!

    Grab the horns and run with it Hewitt / Grenville.

    Have to give Grenville kudos, he has consistently put out thoughts and been a regular opposition, clearly also pushing for Barbados.

    Give jack his jacket.

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  • I say again, if the DLP lose this seat, they can close those doors.

    If Grenville is smart, he will be up front and center from now until the day after the bye election. When they lose, be up front and confirm that they are finished and that his is now the only legitimate opposition.

    Never mind if he does not win it, he has to play the publicity game.

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  • @Crusoe

    The DLP has a residual loyalty/base that makes it easier to rebuild. The challenge for executive positions by the old guard as an affront to Verla only serves to deplete the support.

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  • Still cant figure out what all the marchibg business got to do with moore running for sgn. If she is a members of the b and is noninated and selected

    To me it seems that since the unions turned against the dem that They became a problem to the dlpites so They pick at anything

    If the story was reversed than all would have been Ok

    Liked by 1 person

  • No member of the old DLP guard will run for the by-elections. Why should they do this to themselves, campaigning in front of the black masses and stuffing their hungry mouths with food packages for bribery? I suspect that many are now multimillionaires after their ministerial years and no longer need to deal with the black masses. The new home of the DLP grandees is with the whites in Canada, Florida or London.

    For DLP grandees, the black population of Barbados is nothing more than a doormat and a ladder step to ascend to the whites of the North.

    Like

  • DavidSeptember 22, 2020 2:28 PM

    I actually wonder about that. That support was largely built on Barrow. Even the election in 1986, when he was 66 and clearly looked aged, when he should have been enjoying his later years, they needed him desperately and would not have won without him, which they knew.

    Far as I am concerned, that killed him. Those top jobs are tough and demanding jobs. While people can run a business or regular job into the late 70’s, those head jobs take a much greater toll.

    Much of his older supporters have passed on and the younger people, those in their thirties and younger, would not have that allegiance to the party.

    The same awe is not there for any of his successors. Therefore, the DLP is a shell of its former self, much because the last lot also disparaged its legacy.

    This is the prime moment for a third party to be the main opposition.

    Grenville needs to sit with Hewitt and come to an understanding. Pull in Hennis also as part of the leadership core. The three of them, if they work together, can lead a strong force into the next election, with significantly more capability than the present or recent past DLP.

    Now is their time.

    Like

  • Why is Hewitt being talked about as a future leader of the DLP and, by assumption, a future prime minister? What are his distinguishing features?

    Liked by 2 people

  • Crusoe
    You are so wrong matching Grenville with DLP support. There are hard core DLP supporters just like the BLP. Case in point, a constituency branch meeting voted for Denis Lowe to be a candidate. Maybe eight persons but still an organized group. Grenville party does not have any constituency branches

    Like

  • Take DLP for Trinidad ….

    Like

  • Ask the same question of Pilgrim.

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  • Lest we forgetSeptember 22, 2020 2:53 PM Crusoe a constituency branch meeting voted for Denis Lowe to be a candidate. Maybe eight persons but still an organized group.
    +++++++++++

    Eight people? Eight is a number to take seriously? That is seriously sad.

    Like

  • Crusoe
    I do not know I was just joking about eight persons but outside of election time in opposition politics the constituency branch meetings for Bs and Ds are small. Only when in government the people come out because they want a pick or favour done.

    Like

  • Lest We Forget;

    What you just wrote reaffirmed what David write a couple of days ago.

    People support political groups NOT because of principles and policy, but because of what they can individually get.

    Yet we ask for the best behaviour from the same politicians and the systems.

    It does not work like that. We all know that you cannot sow potato and reap carrots.

    I really wonder sometimes. Are we spitting in the wind?

    The sad thing is that we would be hard put to find it much different in any country across the globe and the idiot up north has taken it to a whole new level.

    Like

  • Maybe the fowls from either side of the colonial divide can answer this, so what the hell does Mia have to trade with two Arab SLAVE COUNTRIES that i would not step foot in even if they were the very last countries on earth, both with evil reputations for kidnapping and enslaving African,s castrating them and raping them for thousands of years.. while bearing in mind that Barbados is 95% African…..the answer should be very interesting…

    “The proposed new missions are High Commissions in Kenya and Ghana, an Embassy in the United Arab Emirates and a Consulate at Casablanca, Morocco.”

    Like

  • The arguments on this blog continue to baffle. Toni Moore is rumoured to be the candidate for the BLP according to Greene (only last week he said it was well-known that Lisa Cummins will be the candidate). But isn’t Toni Moore currently an independent Senator and can influence bills that make or break her union members as occurred with IL bill? Likewise, isn’t Caswell an opposition senator and head of the Unity union? Somebody help muh.

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  • Grenville is a Trump supporter. That alone should disqualify him. I don’t believe you guys are even taking that clownish schoolboy seriously.

    I cannot see Guy Hewitt putting up with his idiocy. One should not join up with someone just for expediency. Grenville would spoil Guy’s reputation as a serious man.

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  • Enuff, Quite simply, the Senate is irrelevant in its present form.

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  • this seat has been in BLP control since 1996. there has to be a large swing against the BLP in the worst of times to change fortunes. we are not there yet. so it is nonsense to say if the DLP doesnt win this they are done

    Like

  • Should the DLP consider not fielding a candidate in the by election? What is the downside? It seems like a lose lose situation.

    The blogmaster has been hearing Kaye McConney is the one. She is no comyuh and she has some achievements to shout about.

    Like

  • Kaye McConney? MAM must be real confident cos i cant remember when last people in St George elected an outsider? does she live in St George?

    Like

  • @ Hal Austin September 22, 2020 2:49 PM

    Guy Hewitt was ambassador in London and is therefore used to white luxury. He is therefore the ideal tool for the puppeteers in Barbados (so-called white shadows) to continue to enslave and oppress the black masses. If I were the Williams brothers or Baron of Kyffin, I would sponsor Hewitt. He is the rational choice for our business class.

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  • John 2 do not take Greene, Skinner or Audtin seriously.Their agenda on here is to rabble rouse and to try to create strife.Greene who do not live about here earlier stated that he heard Ms Cummins is the candidate for SGN and i live here and have not heard this. I asked him who is running for the Dems his party and he cannot tell us.His aim is to stir up trouble but he will not succeed.Some time back he wanted to explain the lost decade to people who actually live through it where he blamed Mr Arthur and Mr Stuart but left out the star boy Mr Thompson.The same Tho.pson whose first budget sucked the life out of the economy as he had not a clue what he was doing only wanting to become PM.Greene now wishes to rehash history talking about marches but as someone reminded him the biggest march of my lifetime came against Mr Sandiford where all kinds of people marched against him bringing him down in the processTherefore Ms Moore as a bajan has the right like Sir Roy Troan, Mr Greaves Mr Morris and others to run for political office.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Yes in a democracy any one has such a right
    Hopefully those govt workers who were tossed under the bus by Moore used their democratic right to return her the same favour

    Like

  • Mari
    There u go
    They had that right all the time and in two years far they have not rebelled

    Greene failing to understand that the reAl power in the union are the workers not the leaders

    The leader have to fall inline with what the workers want or hit the road

    The workers did want the ds out
    Both gov and private sector workers
    Everyone want that group of dems out

    The worker wanted miA
    They got miA. Therefore they quiet (for) now

    Lorenzo

    I not as dump/bright as some may think

    Like

  • Crusoe
    You missed the whole point.🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • @ Tron September 22, 2020 5:22 PM “Guy Hewitt was ambassador in London and is therefore used to white luxury. ”

    He is kinda chubby int he?

    Maybe this white luxury thingy int so good?

    Like

  • @Tron September 22, 2020 10:03 AM “We should therefore differentiate voting rights according to wealth or income.”

    This won’t work because Barbados practiced this from 1627 to 1951.

    Didn’t work too well.

    By 1937 Barbados was the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere.

    240 of every 1,000 children born died before the age of 5.

    One of the ones who nearly died was my brother. My uncle built the coffin and had it ready for him.

    It was hard on the toddler and real-real hard on my beloved parents.

    We won’t go there again.

    If pushed in that direction we will have to finish the job began in 1937.

    Except that this time around a lot more people have guns, and the gun owners are not all rich, white men.

    A word to the wise.

    Like

  • @NorthernObserver September 22, 2020 8:32 AM ““only financial members will be allowed to vote”
    Control? When will one need a BRA certificate to vote in a general election?

    Are you mad Northern?

    How about a BRA certificate from those who currently hold elected office, and from those who have ever help elected office, and from those who aspire to hold elected office.

    Like

  • @Donna September 22, 2020 9:26 AM “And nobody has written more crap on BU than Grenville Phillips the second in defence of a ghost party.”

    CORRECTION: duppy party.

    Like

  • @Lorenzo September 22, 2020 5:30 PM “.Greene who do not live about here earlier stated that he heard Ms Cummins is the candidate for SGN and i live here and have not heard this.”

    I live here, and I heard this, and I am no DLP or other political partisan rabble rouser.

    You really need to get out more. Take an example from auntie and rub shoulders.

    Like

  • If the BLP runs a bullfrog, the bullfrog will win. End of story.

    And Lisa is no bullfrog, but is a smart, good looking, hard working, young woman.

    I wish her well.

    Like

  • Well, well, well! First only Barbadian born people should vote in a referendum and now only rich people or taxpapers (and I say “or ” because many rich people get off without paying taxes) should vote in an election?

    I ask again, “Wuh vibes wuhnuh pon?????

    Like

  • so now the Cave Hill Campus is to be renamed Owen Arthur Campus at Cave Hill? what bollocks? what does Arthur have to do with the campus besides attending, coming up with crap about one graduate per household and gifting some land for expansion. name the economic depart after him if anything but the campus no way.

    in case MAM doesnt know its history- Cave Hill was established by the DLP in 1963 as part of its free education expansion for Barbadians. It started with 118 students at a temporary site near the Deep Water Harbour. It later moved to its present Cave Hill location and was designed for 500 student on its 47 acre site. It has since been expanded and now houses 7-9000 students on 98 acres.

    apart from what i mentioned above what does Arthur have to do with Cave Hill? “gimme de vote and watch muh?” what next …XMAS? on second that would be better or how about naming April 1st Owen Arthur day

    Like

  • Bitter?

    Like

  • She will name apr 1 after the sleeping giant

    Like

  • Everybody n here knows that I LOVED the little short guy.

    I understand the wish to “honor” him, since he was not the sort to lust after Sir and such like titles.

    But I think that auntie and UWI should leave Cave Hill alone.

    If we wish to commemorate him, how about the most prestigious scholarship, Open to all Caricom people, because Owen was a hard core Caricom man. which every year funds a few young people from undergraduate to doctoral level. Pay for tuition, pay for books, pay for housing, pay for airfare, pay for busfare, pay for some recreational and cultural activities, pay for the youngsters to attend and participate in related conferences. The youngster would have to have very high grades in order to be eligible, the youngster would have to maintain very high grades, the youngster would have to commit to giving five years of hard intellectual labour to any Caricom state. The Owen Arthur scholarship. I like that name.

    And not having to worry about finances would be of great help to any young boy or girl from Rose Hill, ofrBush Hall, or Silver Hill. or Kingston or Port of Spain or St. John’s etc.

    Like

  • I like living, ongoing memorials such as scholarships.

    Dead buildings, not so much.

    Like

  • So how did they manage to SCREW UP both the CXC and CAPE results in 2020…..what were they doing, the only difference this year is that everyone is wearing masks…don’t tell parents SHITE ABOUT CALM DOWN…people are having hell feeding themselves and their children, you incompetent, arrogant assholes..

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ss
    I know you does read nuff and post nuff. The first comment by David in this thread, was a newspaper article, which stated that at the upcoming DLP ‘convention’ only “financial members would be allowed to vote”. I took this to mean members of the DLP who had paid their dues? Hence my comments.

    Like

  • @David
    The blogmaster has been hearing Kaye McConney is the one. She is no comyuh and she has some achievements to shout about.
    ++++++++++++++++

    Whaddya yuh mean? Didn’t the PM amend the Constitution for her because she was over and away?
    SGN about as good as winning a lottery…….

    Like

  • Enuff. No I did not. What I said was part and parcel of your point.

    Which I think you would posit as being all a dem de same?

    Or Waru would call The Big Lie?

    Like

  • Should overseas Barbadian citizens have a vote in the forthcoming referendum?

    Like

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