Adrian Loveridge Column – 911 Response

While a handful of hotels on Barbados have been very proactive in reaching out to locals and residents for Staycation options at attractive rates, despite some recent discussion, there appears no national initiative driving this important tactic to help the path of tourism recovery.

Perhaps equally discouraging is that our banks and financial institutions seem to be unaware of the potential to grow credit and debit card usage by offering enhanced cash back incentives to promote local tourism, which in themselves are self-funding.

What is abundantly obvious is that many would-be overseas visitors are delaying future booking, until some sort of normality returns to definite flight possibilities, rather than again risk going through the prolonged refund process that thousands are still trying to extract for previously confirmed flights and holidays.

Obviously, it is largely out of our control to secure airlift in the current ever changing circumstances from traditional markets, until infection rates are significantly reduced or eliminated, and the general public has the confidence to travel again.

The LIAT debacle has virtually ruled out welcoming back any possible early return of significant numbers of intra Caribbean visitors, despite the relatively low risk of Covid-19 spread within the region.

Many also find it difficult to understand how Governments, over decades, have ploughed hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars into supporting the airline, only now to see it liquidated with all the consequences that brings to those involved.

Therefore simply put, perhaps the only meaningful source of business which presently remains, is the domestic market. It is not just about our accommodation providers, but across the entire sector.

From my feedback, people are questioning if Government sincerely wishes to avoid further closures of tourism partners and enable these businesses to re-open and protect employment, that the administration has to play their part in removing room levies and VAT (value added tax), at least in the short term.

The British Government obviously considered this policy was critical to aiding the hospitality industry recovery in the United Kingdom by announcing days ago the lowering of the VAT rate from 20 to 5 per cent until January 2021on restaurants, pubs and other leisure outlets and introduction of specially priced meals, rather like our 19 year old re-DISCOVER initiative.

Ultimately there are so many ways Government can wrest taxes and if those businesses remain closed and unable to meet their financial obligations, then clearly, they cannot contribute to national recovery.

While, thankfully, one closed restaurant was recently re-opened, under new ownership, no mention has been made of several others that have already been forced to close their doors ‘indefinitely’, resulting in the loss of dozens of jobs. This closure trend will inevitably continue unless some corrective measures are put into place urgently.

Over the last years ‘we’ have spent a fortune rightly boasting we are the culinary Capital of the Caribbean.  Let us now, not lose this hard earned reputation, simply by failing to respond to the immediate needs of those who have made it possible.

176 comments

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Adrian are you living in a time warp? How can you be writing about response to the economic crisis facing the tourism industry without mentioning PM Mottley’s brilliant Barbados Welcome Stamp initiative?

    The initiative has already gained tens of millions of dollars in free publicity because of the international interest and appetite for such a product, but you seem unable to see anything beyond the tip of your nose.

    It is patently impossible for staycations to have any meaningful impact on the industry because Barbadians simply do not possess the couple of billion dollars that the industry needs in order to survive. Please do the arithmetic.

    Neither will cutting taxes achieve anything beyond further damaging our public finances. Do you have no suggestions which are in the public interest rather than selfish, self serving whining for public bailout of rich hotel and restaurant owners like yourself?

    Like

  • @Peter

    You forgot to mention the currency of the spend required. We have to pay our significant bills with foreign currency; food, oil etc.

    Like

  • PTL

    Go drink a glass of ice water or cool aid lol.

    Like

  • More obsession with foreign currency. When are we going to learn?

    Like

  • Sitting at a waterfront bar in middle of town pumping same latin and soca music , it isnt the ocean but I like many more people during this crisis i have learned to take a step back .Why spend on travel when a staycation keeps money in the bank for an emergency because no-one knows when this is going to end. Even when it is over the product has to entice people to come crime low .. garbage gone…. the community will have to rely on connected partners to use their influence to bring people to come to the island. To that end Peter can you get some of your painter friends to come down and whitewash some of those houses on the way up to the gap.

    Like

  • Adrian Loveridge

    Peter, totally agree that the 12 Month Welcome Stamp initiative was a very creative idea to gain free destination coverage, but in the real world how many people do you think will take up the offer, pay the registration fee and buy overseas medical coverage? If it is to attract online workers then there will have to be vast improvements in internet access and a reliable power supply. As an example we were unable to access emails for three days last week and that is not exceptional. Time Warp or Reality?

    Like

  • Peter, totally agree that the 12 Month Welcome Stamp initiative was a very creative idea to gain free destination coverage, but in the real world how many people do you think will take up the offer, pay the registration fee and buy overseas medical coverage? If it is to attract online workers then there will have to be vast improvements in internet access and a reliable power supply. As an example we were unable to access emails for three days last week and that is not exceptional. Time Warp or Reality?

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    WASN’T GO SAY ANYTHING ABOUT THIS.

    LIKE A DROWNING MAN CATCHING AT STRAWS.

    THIS WILL NOT BRING THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE IN THE ISLAND FOR ONE YEAR TO WORK REMOTELY ONLINE.

    THOSE LIVING ON THE ISLAND ARE NOT SEEING THE REALITY IN THE BIGGER COUNTRIES.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Adrian
    In the real world I can guarantee that I can bring thousands as long as the utterly stupid fees are removed. The fees are bureaucratic sabotage by BTMI purely because they did not have the brains to come up with the idea themselves.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ PLT
    Go and promote ten percent savings if you eat at certain restaurants. Spend your precious time cussing Butch Stewart and demanding concessions. Continue to rip of tourists selling them a half of flying fish for $10USD . Try to squeeze all the poor Black people out of the tourism business. Ask the Talma ( beach culture)guy who destroyed or helped to destroy his efforts.
    Go and tell people working for less than $150USD how they can spend a week end at Sandy Lane and the Hilton.
    Don’t try anything new.
    That’s how you can save the industry.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @BAJE
    My elder brother Trevor is a senior engineer with VMware in Silicon Valley… a company with 25,000 employees and almost $10 billion in revenue. He mentioned this at his office and confirmed that there is deep and widespread interest among VMware staff in taking up this opportunity. And this is from California, a place with great weather themselves… the demand in Boston and NY and Toronto will be much greater.

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  • PLT is right.

    Staycation will not work. The top 1% already have their villa and swimming pool and will hardly move to Sandy Lane. The rest of the population is impoverished and can’t afford anything anyway.

    Nevertheless, his new initiative has one flaw. Our new citizens also need the right to vote. They will thank Mia Mottley and secure her reign for the next thousand years.

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  • @PLT.. Was planning to email you concerning your older brother Trevor, but don’t recall where I had recorded your email address for safekeeping.😞
    Have always wondered how Trevor is doing and where he was. Now I know. We came through school together, sometimes walked home together (Trevor to Belleville, and I continued to Brittons Hill). Glad to hear of him.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Antonio Pilgrim
    Trevor is the brain in the family. He has had a long and very successful career in software, having made fortunes and retired only to un-retire again because he got bored.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @PLT…..“Trevor is the brain in the family”…..Trevor was also considered to be among the brightest (some say the brightest) guy in my years at school. Was always expected to win a Bdos Scholarship. Have googled him and believe I have his contact info via LinkedIn. Thanks for the update.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Here is the reality from the perspective of a regular Canadian visitor and villa owner regarding Barbados. Our family has cancelled two future trips to the island. One later this month and one in the fall. Why? We just cant seem to find a place in Canada that can guarantee a 72 hour turnaround on a Covid test. Flights from Toronto leave about 9 am . So if you are leaving on next Saturdays Air Canada flight leaving at 9am you have to have a test time stamped at 9 am Wed or later to be within the 72 hours. Local web sites state it can take up to 7 days to get a result back.

    We considered taking the test in Barbados but nobody can tell us which hotel we would be booked into while we wait results and nobody could tell us if we would be charged for one night or two and what the cost per night would be. Where can we find this information?

    The Air Canada flight on July 12 had 132 passengers. All according to the Minister, except for 10 to 15 had valid COVID tests. Can someone tell us where these tests were obtained and time stamped within 72 hours of the flight departure?

    The Ministry needs to put our more detailed helpful information .Barbados Tourism have offices in Toronto as does the Consulate General. Cant find any information anywhere on these sites on how to safely visit Barbados at this time.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Traveller July 13, 2020 12:36 PM
    Have you checked all from the list below?

    Women’s College Hospital
    Hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada · +1 416-323-6400
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral required· Testing for all patients

    UHN Toronto Western COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Michael Garron Hospital
    General hospital · East York, ON, Canada · +1 416-461-8272
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Saint Michael’s COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada · Near Yonge-Dundas Square · +1 416-864-5800
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Mount Sinai Hospital
    Hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada · +1 416-586-4800
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    St. Joseph’s Health Centre, Toronto
    Hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada · +1 416-530-6000
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Centenary COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Scarborough, ON, Canada · +1 416-495-2601
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Testing for all patients

    Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
    University hospital · Toronto, ON, Canada · +1 416-480-6100
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Birchmount COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Scarborough, ON, Canada · +1 416-495-2601
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Testing for all patients

    Branson COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · North York, ON, Canada · +1 416-756-6000
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Humber River COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · North York, ON, Canada · +1 416-747-6740
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Markham Stouffville Hospital
    General hospital · Markham, ON, Canada · +1 905-472-7373
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Mississauga Hospital COVID Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Mississauga, ON, Canada · +1 905-799-7700
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Osler’s Peel Memorial COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Brampton, ON, Canada · +1 905-494-2120
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients

    Ajax-Pickering COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Ajax, ON, Canada · +1 905-683-2320
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Testing for all patients

    Valley COVID-19 Assessment Centre
    Hospital · Mississauga, ON, Canada · +1 905-799-7700
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients· Drive-through

    Oakville COVID-19 Assesment Centre
    Hospital · Oakville, ON, Canada · +1 905-203-7963
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Testing for all patients

    Lakeridge Health Oshawa
    General hospital · Oshawa, ON, Canada · +1 905-576-8711
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Referral required· Testing for all patients

    Georgetown Hospital
    Hospital · Georgetown, ON, Canada · +1 905-873-0111
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment required· Testing for all patients

    Southlake Regional Health Centre
    General hospital · Newmarket, ON, Canada · +1 905-895-4521
    COVID-19 testing center
    Appointment not required· Referral not required· Testing for all patients· Drive-through

    Like

  • @ Traveller July 13, 2020 12:36 PM

    Dear traveller,

    Thank you for your important advice.

    We should unite to an interest group of villa owners, so that finally the unfair land tax for property with a value of more than 1 million is removed. It is not the villa owners who owe Barbados anything, no, Barbados can be happy if people like you invest something in Barbados.

    p.s. If you want to improve the procedure, you should write to our leader Mia Mottley via BLP party headquarters. If you write to the Tourist Board or any other gov agency, your letter will only disappear in the bin with these lazy bones anyway.

    Like

  • @ peterlawrencethompson July 13, 2020 12:52 PM

    I really wonder why PLT as a single person is able to do more here than our lazy tourist authorities.

    Like

  • @peter Larence

    Thank you for the list of places to get a test. Getting the test is not the issue. Getting the results within 72 hours is the issue. Please provide a list where tests results can be guaranteed within 72 hours of a Saturday or Sunday Departure from Toronto at 9 am. That would be very helpful

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Traveller
    You will need to sit down and call or email them one by one. I wish you luck. I’m confident that you will find a testing site that can accommodate your schedule because a hundred other people found a solution last week.

    Like

  • @tron

    Peter was able to supply a list. We can all get that list. What the questions was is where can we get a result from the test with 72 hours of a 9am toronto departure. These sites list up to 7 days from a test to get a result. We need a 72 hour guaranteed test result. So if the flight is leaving on a Sunday we need to have test stamped on a Thursday at 9 am or later.

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  • @Traveller

    Your feedback has contradicted what local health authorities are saying i.e. that the majority of Canadian travellers who arrived on the island yesterday met the 72 hour requirement.

    >

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  • I agree that the problem is not getting the test but having the results within 72 hours to present upon arrival. I live in a small town in Ontario and need to overnight in Toronto in order to be able to take the flight. If the Barbados government really wants to encourage tourists it should be researching on behalf of its potential customers or will lose a lot of business.

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  • When will I get my test result?
    You will receive your results as soon as they are ready. This could be
    between 2 to 4 days, or longer. The time it takes to get results is changing
    every day, as the testing labs get busier.
    If the test shows that you have COVID-19, we will call you. You can also get
    your results online through the myUHN Patient Portal or by calling the
    Toronto Public Health COVID-19 Hotline at 416 338 7600.

    Click to access Next_Steps_for_Patients_Tested_for_COVID19.pdf

    Like

  • @Tron
    “@ peterlawrencethompson July 13, 2020 12:52 PM

    I really wonder why PLT as a single person is able to do more here than our lazy tourist authorities.”

    Than God for google.

    Like

  • @ David, PLT, HANTS

    DAvid raised the same question as I did. Where did the about 110 people on AC966 who had a certificate get tested and why did the 20 that did not have certificates, in fact not have them. I quote Hants here who has the official Ont Govt response. “When will I get my test result?
    You will receive your results as soon as they are ready. This could be
    between 2 to 4 days, or longer. The time it takes to get results is changing
    every day, as the testing labs get busier” .

    Did the 110 people get lucky or am I missing something? While I appreciate Mr. PLT wishing me luck in finding a solution this is not about luck. The Government needs to come up with a better plan, offer more information on local testing and hotels , and /or expand the time of a test to that readily available from the country the visitor is travelling from. As seniors we simply cant take the chance of planning everything around “luck” and we wont.. Many of us will stay away until “luck” is taken out of the equation.

    Liked by 3 people

  • @Traveller

    A call to Air Canada should be able to assist?

    Like

  • @Traveller

    Being a frequent visitor to Barbados over the years you’ve not obviously been paying attention, a little US$ GREEN in your palm will get you approved as meeting the COVID test results, same old same old. As far as which hotels the government has arranged and the timeframe and costs are still under negotiations by government to see which hotels are going to give the best kick backs.

    Like

  • @ Wily Coyote July 13, 2020 3:43 PM

    LOL. The “special” fee always works.

    Like

  • Hi guys, interesting discussion. Please see further details and FAQs here https://www.visitbarbados.org/covid-19-travel-guidelines-2020

    Note the following.
    Q: What happens if I don’t have a negative COVID-19 PCR test result before my trip to Barbados?
    A: Travelers from medium and high-risk countries travelling without a negative COVID-19 PCR test result will be required to take a test on arrival.

    Q: Will tests taken more than 72 hours prior to travel be considered valid?
    A: You must have your test done no more than 72 hours before you travel to Barbados. Any test performed outside of the 72 hour window will not be valid.

    Q: Where do I await my test results in Barbados?
    A: Persons who are tested at the airport can await their test results at either a government accommodation at no charge, or should they choose, a designated holding hotel at their own expense.

    Q: What is the cost of a COVID-19 PCR test in Barbados?
    A: Tests will be available at the airport free of charge or for a fee of USD $150.00, at designated satellite hotel sites.

    Q: What are the designated hotels for awaiting test results?
    A: The Crane Resort – Book via 1 (246) 423-6220

    Like

  • On my travel through Atlanta AirPort the passenger Numbers are way down again

    Probably 90+ % from normal travel for domestic travel

    I saw more International flight on the but boards but cannot Get any info on that AS yet

    Like

  • @David

    Air Canada referred me to the Ont Govt Web site..that is the one that says results are variable up to 4 days or longer (the luck of the draw one).. The interesting thing is international arrivals into Canada don’t need a covid test to enter. There are some quarantine requirements but no mandated test.,,,,even the return flight from Barbados does not mandate a covid test.

    Would seem to make sense to me that the Minister should allow long stay persons to enter under the same conditions that they would receive on return to their home country. In other words quarantine for 14 days. I dont think any of us are opposed to taking a test. Our problem is sitting at the airport in Toronto where one could still be trying to get the results of a 72 hour test. The Minister could also extend the 72 hours requirement to something more reasonable like other Caribbean destinations have done. Still too much confusion to make plans to be in Barbados.

    Like

  • @ Traveller,

    Consulate-General of Barbados
    Foreign consulate in Toronto, Ontario
    Address: 110 Sheppard Ave E, North York, ON M2N 6Y8
    Hours:
    Opens 9 a.m. Tue.
    Phone: (416) 214-9805

    Hon. Sonia Marville-Carter, Consul General
    Mr. David Gibbs, Consul
    Mr. Peter Mayers, Director, Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. (Consul)
    Ms. Stacey Hutchinson, Senior Business Development Manager, Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. (Vice Consul)
    Mr. Jason Yearwood, Business Development Manager, Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. (Vice Consul)
    Mrs. Joy-Anne Cassandra Crichlow, Barbados Tourism Marketing Inc. (Vice Consul)

    Like

  • I thought there was twelve nipples on a sow

    Liked by 1 person

  • @peterlawrencethompson July 13, 2020 10:21 AM “In the real world I can guarantee that I can bring thousands as long as the utterly stupid fees are removed. The fees are bureaucratic sabotage by BTMI purely because they did not have the brains to come up with the idea themselves.”

    So we invite people to come for a year, to rent housing, to buy food, to pay for local transportation, purchase local telecommunications, entertainment etc.

    And ten hit them with an upfront fee?

    Why, o why?

    Like

  • Whats funny John is they cant even get their own people home to work .Look at Hants list that doesnt include the consulate services in edmonton, vancouver halifax montreal or the embassy in ottawa, which I bet they are paying housing education fees cars etc etc and asking people to come work there because they can do everything over the net really???? you cant make this up. On a side note how many consulates in US or UK ya know we only have 37 million people

    Like

  • Lawson just came up with a great idea.

    Repatriate all Embassy and Consulate staff to work at home.

    Unfortunately that would mean no more free food and drinks for Bajans in the Diaspora.lol

    Like

  • @Hants
    As far as I know there are no consular staff beyond Ottawa and Toronto, Barbados used to have an individual (honorary consul) in some cities who may perform some duties on behalf of the Gov’t but he/she wouldn’t maintain a consular office. Similarly, some Gov’ts have honorary consuls in Barbados and they may perform some minor duties for the Gov’t they represent.

    Like

  • @ Hants July 13, 2020 11:26 PM

    Thompson already repatriated and set an example! LOL.

    Like

  • Oh dear! Drake is not following the rules! No mask!

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  • Without wanting to get into a lengthy discussion, I believe that @Traveller has made the point that should have ended this discussion long ago and that is, The Barbados Government should take it upon itself to do the necessary research in major cities from whence people intending to visit Barbados can get the necessary tests and within the stipulated time frame. Heck, we want their business and our job is to make it as easy as possible for the client/visitor to get here with the least amount of hassle. Would it not be easier for our people in various locations to do the necessary research and have it published rather than every individual having to invent the proverbial wheel?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hants they can just leave the credit card at the bar. Peter has an idea which he has probably thought hard about but rather than find out how he would fine tune it and close some of the loop holes , they pass it off as their own and will screw it up with fees and mixed messaging.
    Sarge I was only going by what it said on computer. whats a vice consul make anyway there is quite a few of them
    I think you should be taking aim at Venezuela sell them citizenship for a price and on condition they keep a home on the island , they will have to pay ,property taxes or rent ,hydro,water,gas insurance etc . When the people finally get sick of the elites and they will they will be looking for a place to land, and having a brother commiesong on the inside barbados would be seen as a friendly place to come.

    Like

  • Last month, Estonia passed a law offering one-year visas to freelancers who spend part of that time working from the Baltic state. That is particularly tempting for those fond of romantic medieval cities, song festivals and smoked eel….(Quote)

    @PLT

    ???????

    Like

  • Barbados may not be a dream ticket after all
    July 12 2020, 6.00pm

    The prime minister of Barbados, Mia Amor Mottley, issued an invitation to the world, offering year-long visas to the many millions who have discovered that no one really needs them to be physically in the office. Last year 2.4 million visitors spent £872 million in Barbados, 40 per cent of the island’s GDP. She wants to turbocharge those numbers. Anyone who can work remotely, she said, is welcome to do so from the comfort of a beachside villa. And with just 98 Covid-19 cases and seven deaths, you can leave your mask in London or Los Angeles; the only second wave you need to worry about is the one that comes with a surfboard. Best of all, Mottley implied, the Barbados government will throw in 3,000 hours of sunshine annually — for free!
    By offering her “welcome visas”, Ms Mottley threatens to upend orthodox thinking about the most sensitive topic in the world — immigration. For almost a century, migrants have flooded from poor countries such as Italy and Ireland to North America; the poor and huddled masses have swept from the south across the Mediterranean and across the Balkans to western Europe. Immigration policy has been all about defending the borders of Europe and North America. Yet while this weekend the UK announced a £700 million plan to close the UK’s doors to immigration, Barbados is throwing the gates open. Ms Mottley clearly believes that Covid-19 and the digital revolution could both reverse the tide and transform the narrative.
    Before we get carried away, let me enter a note of scepticism about Barbadian claims. West Indians, like everyone else, have their own vanities and prejudices, mostly about each other. The Guyanese consider themselves the smartest, best educated people in the region; everyone else thinks of us as manipulative, devious and all too ready to resort to the dark arts of Obeah to get our way. Trinidadians present themselves as carnival charmers, full of ready wit and joie de vivre; others paint them as party-mad scammers who never know when to shut up. And I won’t even start on the Jamaicans, since I know what’s good for my health.
    But a special obloquy is reserved for the Bajans (of whom there are several on both sides of my family). Their self-regard is legendary. Anthony Trollope wrote of their plantocracy that “no people ever praised themselves so constantly”. The travel writer Patrick Leigh Fermor said that the island “reflects most faithfully the intellectual values and prejudices of a golf club in Outer London”. It won’t surprise anybody in the Caribbean that “Little England” thinks that its offer is irresistible.
    Yet there is definitely something in the sales talk. Barbados has been politically stable since 1625, and its per capita income is consistently higher than all its neighbours. Ms Mottley is the first leader anywhere to acknowledge that the Fourth Industrial Revolution could free us from the constraints of geography; lockdown may be the wormhole that pulls the workplace into a new future. Politically, her scheme could be an ingenious antidote to the national populism sweeping the globe. The Caribbean, where almost everyone’s ancestors hail from somewhere else, is the ideal laboratory to find a formula that neutralises the corrosive pull of tribe and nation. It is one of the few places on earth where no one needs to feel like or look like a stranger.
    There will, of course, be a price to pay. You can drive around the island in a third of the time it takes to fly from Gatwick; nearly 300,000 residents squeeze into a space roughly the size of the Isle of Wight, which claims less than half the population resident on “Bimshire”. It is already prohibitively expensive to live on its glamorous Caribbean-facing western shores. Another bunch of tech-savvy hipsters could turn the island into a high-tech San Francisco, where property prices averaged over £1 million last year, and beggars slept in the streets by the thousand.
    The woke generation would also be disappointed by the fact that across the Caribbean social attitudes are distinctly conservative. The God of the Old Testament is in evidence everywhere, and every English-speaking Caribbean nation outlaws homosexuality, with punishments up to life imprisonment still on several statute books.
    Of course, the place is stuffed with billionaires and rich entertainers, but it isn’t all rum and Coca-Cola for those who “come from foreign”. The “redlegs” of Barbados’s eastern coast are the descendants of some 50,000 or so Catholics shipped out by Oliver Cromwell to the West Indies as indentured servants — slaves, to all intents and purposes — during the conquest of Ireland. The sun is not kind to red-haired, pale-skinned Celts, hence the nickname. They are now an elderly, interbred, poverty-stricken community, largely looked down upon by their neighbours.
    So before you start packing the laptop and sarong, grooving along to “woah, we’re going to Barbados”, think long and hard. What today looks like a straightforward full toss could turn out to be a googly.

    https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/barbados-may-not-be-a-dream-ticket-after-all-z8x9ctt7m

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @David July 14, 2020 12:02 PM
    I saw that article in the Times. It is such atrociously incorrect malicious drivel that it sinks well below the standards established by the Nation or Barbados Today.
    @Hal is this the state of British journalism??

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    They had me at smoked eel…

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  • It is the kind of article social media loves to run with. Posted it here so that we know what we are up against. Did Phillips get it right?

    #bajancondition

    Like

  • @PLT

    There is a good and a bad reason why journalism is not a profession. Trevor Phillips is one of the bad ones. I will tell you a story. Years ago Trevor’s eldest brother, Ron, sadly died in the US. He had lived in Manchester in the UK for a number of years and had a reputation as a black radical. He was a decent man.
    I was approached by the middle brother, Mike, the novelist, and asked to write an obituary for the Independent newspaper, which I did. I was thanked by Mike, Ron’s widow and many of his friends, but not by Trevor. Trevor did not go to his brother’s funeral, giving as an excuse that he had to work.
    At the time he was a researcher with London Weekend Television and the commitment he had was to interview former Home Office minister David Mellor.
    Trevor has also been wronged. He was chairman of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, a position that normally carries a title – a knighthood or peerage – so far he has received neither. And, of the senior executives on LWT when it was bought by Granada, he was the only one who did not become a millionaire out of the deal.
    Trevor has made a career out of playing to the right, now even his mates in the Labour party do not want to know him. In the 1980s there was a highly intellectual social policy magazine called New Society, it is no longer in existence. Trevor once wrote an article for them that was the right side of libelling all Jamaicans.
    From memory, I think he called Guyanese the Jews of the Caribbean. He is a strange man. To answer your question, @PLT, the article looks like a cut and paste job.

    Like

  • @Hal AustinJuly 14, 2020 2:56 PM “…Trevor did not go to his brother’s funeral, giving as an excuse that he had to work.”

    Looks like our Hal is not the only one with the English Condition.

    Like

  • @ peterlawrencethompson July 14, 2020 2:21 PM
    @ Hal Austin July 14, 2020 2:56 PM

    Why are you two making such a fuss? The man has his roots in Guyana, that explains it. A typical Guyanese racist. Anyone who – like the Guyanese – cannot count to 65 (“majority of 65 is 34”) and changes the election result 5 times within 5 months (sic!) is insane or something else.

    The man is simply jealous because Barbados is so successful and peaceful, while he comes from a hellhole that his British countrymen despise. Of course, his British business partners don’t tell him this to his face because of political correctness. But it’s a fact that the British love the paradise Barbados and laugh about the hellhole Guyana.

    Like

  • The case of Trevor Phillips clearly shows that there are also migrant haters who agitate against peaceful peoples such as Barbados because they do not cultivate the same racial hatred as the Indian and black Guyanese, but are concerned about harmony and peace.

    Time for the British to indict Trevor Phillips for racial hatred and discrimination against Barbadians.

    Barbadians live matters!

    Like

  • More to be done, says lecturer

    Government is being warned that the success of its widely publicised 12-month remote visa programme could be placed in jeopardy if steps are not taken to improve the country’s telecommunications infrastructure, “island backwardness” and overall standard of living in time for an influx of remote workers from Western countries.

    Director of the Sir Arthur Lewis Institute of Social and Economic Studies (SALISES), Dr Don Marshall was responding to the open invitation being extended by Prime Minister Mia Mottley for persons from across the world to live and work remotely in Barbados for a year.

    While commending the PM for grabbing hold of “low hanging fruit”, Marshall is worried that the demographic to which the Government is appealing will not be satisfied with the “poor” internet facilities and inefficient services which Barbadians have grown accustomed to over the years.

    “We have had a number of discussions via webinars within the intellectual community about immediate solutions to the tourism challenges and the need to have people who work remotely in these North American countries and Western spaces come to the Caribbean, and do so,” Dr Marshall told Barbados TODAY.

    “But this business of calls dropping out and static when you go on the web is ‘dinosaurial’. That is backward, and while we in Barbados have grown accustomed to it, Barbadians who have travelled and see how their handheld phones operate marvel at the speed, the ease of communication and so on. Then they come back home to see that the only thing that greets them are dropouts and buffering,” the academic lamented.

    Last week, Cabinet approved the Barbados 12-month Welcome Stamp in an effort to enhance the country’s tourism product, and according to recent reports, the initiative has gone viral among members of the international community, who have been learning about it on CNN, Business Insider, BBC and the Telegraph among others.

    Efforts to reach Minister of Innovation, Science and Smart Technology Senator Kay McConney for further details on the initiative have been unsuccessful.

    In the meantime, Dr Marshall suggests that the Government should start by demanding improved standards from local telecommunications companies as well to compete with the 4G and soon-to-be 5G networks that exist in the developed world.

    “So improving our telecommunications environment is going to be absolutely critical, and the service providers here will have to shape up and the state will have to use its influence to ensure that visitors are getting value for money and that the service is very reliable. But I applaud the Government on that initiative. It’s one of those low hanging fruits and we should seize the opportunity,” Dr Marshall stressed.

    In addition to upgraded telecommunications, the SALISES Director believes remote workers will demand an overall first-world experience from transportation services to recreational activities.

    “People don’t want to work remotely from home and then step out into decrepit spaces. A digital native does not want to experience a certain kind of island backwardness. It doesn’t make sense. We must first conceive what a first-world island looks like,” he declared, before adding that the administration ought to be doing more to develop ‘smart’ cities.

    “You will get to experience greater levels of foreign exchange accumulation and international business if you have your smart city that also features efficiencies in your transport systems, telecommunications provisioning and access to services that are reliable,” Dr Marshall suggested.

    He admitted that financing for such “regeneration” was unlikely to come from organisations like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund who have so far supported Government’s digitization drive, and suggests that Government pursue more progressive lenders.

    “We need to have a plan. We can’t be simply creating rhetoric around initiatives that the [International Monetary] Fund and the World Bank are sponsoring.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/07/15/more-to-be-done-says-lecturer/

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ PLT
    I find it very interesting that your idea has gained such currency and you have not , as far as I am aware, made any fuss about it publicly. Why are you so silent?This entire idea , in the international press, is being thought of as Prime Minister Mottley’s “ brilliant” idea.
    Why are you so silent?

    Like

  • @PLT
    @William

    What is the surprise? The president has no ideas of her own, she does not like details so likes readymade packages and is a lawyer in more ways than just her professional training. It is her mindset: you take a brief, then go out and speak to it as if you were an eye witness.
    This is the modus operandi of the Barbadian decision makers. Yet, for some unknown reason, it is thought to be normal. In the UK (I know we do not like these overseas countries) the first question that would have been asked of @PLT would have been “what is in it for you? What do you want?”
    This is barbarism.

    Like

  • PLT, Hal!

    Why spending thousand of dollars for such poor permission?

    The globalists have their villas in Barbados anyway or can rent from other globalists. Just book a return ticket for three months and rebook it later to 12 months or buy a new ticket.

    The authorities issue visitors’ driving licences for 12 months anyway.

    The saving is 2000 USD – price for rebooking return flight.

    So why register officially? For what?

    Like

  • The officials do not check how long you stayed in Barbados anymore when you LEAVE. Right?

    Like

  • @Tron

    It looks as if @PLT has allowed his nationalism to crowd out his normal common sense. The basic principle is do not trust the buggers.

    Like

  • @ Hal Austin July 15, 2020 12:41 PM

    If you want to really piss off your “colleague” Phillips, send him a postcard with the number 65! You know why … LOL.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    William SkinnerJuly 15, 2020 11:56 AM
    “Why are you so silent? This entire idea , in the international press, is being thought of as Prime Minister Mottley’s “ brilliant” idea.”
    +++++++++++++++
    I simply want the idea to be implemented… because if there is no short term replacement of tourism FX earnings the poverty rate in Barbados will spike from 17% to over 40%. I am fortunate to be comfortable enough that I do not have to be wondering where my own next meal is coming from.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @TronJuly 15, 2020 12:34 PM
    “Why spending thousand of dollars for such poor permission?”
    +++++++++++++++++
    You are entirely correct. The idea of charging up front fees is pure folly. I have sent memos through reliable channels explaining this in relatively polite language and I will publish a column in next Monday’s Barbados Business Authority to the same effect.

    If they persist with the outrageous fees they will have killed the goose before she laid a single golden egg.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin July 15, 2020 12:41 PM
    “It looks as if @PLT has allowed his nationalism to crowd out his normal common sense.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++
    I’m not often accused of being in possession of normal common sense 😉

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ PLT
    Thanks for your response.

    Like

  • There is money to be made assisting ” Peter”s People ” in their journey from their “home” to their ” New Barbados home “.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hants July 15, 2020 6:14 PM
    “There is money to be made assisting ” Peter”s People ” in their journey from their “home” to their ” New Barbados home “.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++
    Yes there is… as long as the misguided policy and stultifying bureaucracy don’t screw it up.

    Like

  • After all the face time on the various TV networks promoting the “Work from home in Barbados” the proof of the pudding is in the eating and the fine print may put paid to the idea. No Gov’t wishing to attract an initial slew of clients would attach a fee to the application, fees if appropriate should be applied in successive years depending on the popularity of the enterprise. Fees could also be applied if the target numbers have been attained and there remains a surge of applications but no one wants to be bombarded with layers of red tape and additional costs before they set foot on the island because in this competitive environment someone is probably building a better mousetrap.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    http://nationnews.brb.newsmemory.com/?publink=112a82ce4
    Hmmm, no mention of any up front fee… perhaps I’m making progress.

    Like

  • @PLT
    Question: Since passing your idea on toe Santia Bradshaw’s partner and seeing it worked its way through to the president, have you been called in for any consultations or asked for an elaborations? Or have they just taken the idea and ran with it?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    They just took the idea and ran with it for the most part. I have been talking to Invest Barbados because that agency stands a smaller chance of screwing it up that the BYMI, but those discussions do not seem to be leading anywhere quickly enough. I even have shown them how they can probably get the development funded by the IDB to the tune of US$500k, but they are still stuck in first gear.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    BTMI^

    Like

  • @PLT

    I asked because I did not want to jump to conclusions. But I expected that was what they did. By the way, I have had dealings with Invest Barbados. They tried to cut me out of the loop, the only problem was that the English bank director I invited to participate in one of their conferences kept me informed. He was not impressed.
    It is a cultural thing. Part of the Barbadian Condition.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    Yes, I understand the Barbadian condition. It is a direct outcome of the Plantation. I do not have enough time left in a normal life span to change that condition except by very modest increments, so I dream up strategies which will work despite the condition. That is why I am so blasé about their psychological need to claim authorship over my idea.

    Like

  • @ David July 14, 2020 2:29 PM

    But Blogmaster the man Phillips (of strong Bajan ancestry) does have a point.

    There are many laws on the BAJAN statute books which are ‘anathema’ to the lifestyles of many of those to whom this programme is targeted.

    Wouldn’t it make sense to take these observations on board and remove those ‘offending’ Victorian era pieces of legislation in order to attract a more inclusive and open-minded clientele?

    The same way the legislative framework was upgraded and modernized to impress the offshore financial services (international) market, what’s so hard about removing those backward laws which clearly are in violation of people’s human rights if Barbados is going to justify it ratification of the many UN conventions?

    Let the Bajan government put its legislative hand where its forex-needing mouth is.
    Just get rid of those barbaric and inhumane laws the same way the country wants to rid itself of relics which represent their ‘dark’ past of chattel slavery.

    PS: We notice that Trevor P might be a follower of your BU blog since he also alludes to that special “Bajan Condition” with which your man Hal Austin appears to be in consonance.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Adrian Loveridge July 13, 2020 9:18 AM
    (Quote):
    Peter, totally agree that the 12 Month Welcome Stamp initiative was a very creative idea to gain free destination coverage, but in the real world how many people do you think will take up the offer, pay the registration fee and buy overseas medical coverage? If it is to attract online workers then there will have to be vast improvements in internet access and a reliable power supply. As an example we were unable to access emails for three days last week and that is not exceptional. Time Warp or Reality? (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    We remember that you were right at the centre of the tourism business playing your part when this proposal was first mooted.

    It was under the previous administration back in 2013/2014 when this “Initiative” was first announced.

    We can agree that the previous Minister of Finance was not the sharpest tool in the macro financial management box but he and his ‘advisory’ technocrats ought to be given credit for putting this ‘invitation to work from Beautiful Barbados’ proposal on the agenda.

    It’s called giving Chris and advisors their ‘initiative’ jackets; even if there is no honour among political thieves.

    The real challenges will come when it comes to its implementation which has been in the Initiatives & Project proposals pipeline since 2014 awaiting execution by the relevant agencies like Invest Barbados, BTMI and Immigration.

    But thanks to Covid-19 it might become a red project in 2021.
    How about fixing the problem with the Internet speed and reliability which has been known for years to be a major drawback to attracting “Internet nomads” to the oasis called Covid-under-control Barbados?

    Necessity is always the mother of invention even if it involves reinventing the wheel of forex-generating ideas.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Miller
    Amazing. Here we have complaints about the internet connection when for donkey years the hoteliers could not even maintain a basic , proper website.
    Be wary of these so called experts and self appointed gurus of the industry.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Miller
    Can you direct me to press coverage or any documentation about the 2013/14 initiative. I was not yet back in the Caribbean at that time.

    Like

  • @ Miller who wrote ” It was under the previous administration back in 2013/2014 when this “Initiative” was first announced.”

    Years ago I used to describe the fish I caught and may have added an inch or three to the length. Nowadays you have to show a photo or video to establish credibility.lol

    Like

  • Miller is right I remember that minister of finance was ahead on this initiative. actually , I heard more than one person say he will make everyone sick .

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    https://www.terracaribbean.com/_themes/TerraCaribbean/Blocks/printcontent.php?contentid=663&Lang=0

    @plt
    Sorry I do not navigate well on my phone. But go to the bottom of above and it directs you to the piece on HNWI.

    Like

  • Super Saleswoman.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @MTA 7.54am
    Excellent points, many of which fly over the head, of Bajans’ who share widely many of these biases.
    The last time I saw this much free media local coverage for Barbados was when two young ladies ‘fled’ the island compliments of the ‘Rainbow Railroad’.

    Like

  • @ PLT

    “Favourable changes were also made to non-dom immigration requirements for High Net Worth Individuals (HNWI’s) creating a more welcoming environment for persons wishing to invest, retire or reside in Barbados. Chief among these is the revised policy on Special Entry Permits for non-nationals. Prerequisites for acquiring these permits include security checks, proof of adequate health insurance coverage and submission of police certificates of character.”

    Like

  • Super Saleswoman.(Quote)

    We do not need snake oil salespeople. We need dynamic leaders to take us out of this social and economic mess. PR is for showbiz. Few journalists take PR people seriously. It is called the dark side for a reason. Politics is for real policies.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Miller
    @NorthernObserver
    “But go to the bottom of above and it directs you to the piece on HNWI.”
    ++++++++++++++++++
    Yes I know about this residency for millionaire investor program. Invest Barbados runs it and it has been in place for years. The current work from Barbados initiative is quite different… although you can see them as part of the same spectrum. The market for the High Net Worth Individual (HNWI) program is quite limited, although it may expand now that COVID is here. The market of employed tech professionals who work from home is orders of magnitude larger than the HNWI market.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hants
    You will also note that the fee for a Special Entry Permit for High Net Worth Individuals is only US$150 as far as I am aware.

    Like

  • @PLT

    How do you define a HNWI?

    Like

  • @PLT

    How do you (Barbados) define a high net worth individual?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    I believe that Invest Barbados defines a HNWI as an individual who has a provable net worth of at least US$5m and invests at least US$2m in Barbados (either by acquiring a residential property or other investments in Barbados purchased with funds sourced outside the Island).

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @plt
    I didn’t say the two concepts were the same. Rather what I ‘believed’ was the ChrisS proposal being mentioned.
    Very different, and obviously the one you proposed has wider reach.
    My lone disappointment thus far, is that in 20+ communications, people do NOT READ beyond a headline. People asking me “what jobs are being offered”. Steupse.
    As expected ‘health care’ is the most common query.

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    Little “birdies” all over N.America have been whispering one term “wealth tax”. Details are sketchy. But we know Governments everywhere need revenue badly. Wonder who will be the first to create a virtual country?

    Like

  • Antigua just announce a 2 year residency program?

    Image may contain: 1 person, text

    Like

  • I expect that smart Bajans who own small hotels and villas are already preparing for the ” working tourists “.

    They should be getting high speed internet, ups,Varidesks etc and the car rental companies should be preparing special long term leases. ok there are people who can plan this sort a thing betta than me.

    I just adding some rice to depot.

    Like

  • We need to get rid off the land tax for our beloved expats (see above).

    No taxation without representation! Expats are not second-class islanders.

    Alternatively, we should grant our expats the right to name at least 10 cabinet ministers, 10 senators and 10 judges, since they contribute sooo much to our FX inflow.

    Like

  • @Hants
    Long term leases? They won’t be driving to Warrens daily, all they want is a room with a (beachfront) view.

    Like

  • @ PLT

    Again, not surprising, Invest Barbados has a concept of super high net worth. Check out the definition of high net worth in the US, UK and other developed economies and the level of disposable incomes that come within the bracket.
    What has formed the mindset that makes policymakers in Barbados think that we are top of the tree in whatever we engage in? It is boring. These are collectively what I call the Barbadian Condition. Reality seems to pass us by.
    Let common sense rule. How many people with a disposable (that is the measure and not net worth) income of US$5m, will be prepared to invest $2m in Barbados? In what? Property? That west coast market is already dominated by the super rich money-launderers.
    Where are the businesses for rich, investors to invest in? People do not get rich because they are stupid, unless they inherited their wealth.
    @PLT I have a number of workable and simple suggestions I can put forward, but I won’t because there are dishonest people in control and I am not a Bajan nationalist. We are not all in this together. Some of us are, and some just sit back and reap the benefits.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Crusoe
    Sadly this has become ‘standard’ behaviour. The Board, who are supposed to be representing the owners (shareholders) are frequently bonused too. And this is for compensation in firms which are on the edge of total failure. A failure bonus?
    Don’t politicians do likewise? As they know they are exiting soon, the appointments, contract extensions, contracts, honours and clemencies flow freely.
    All the “ME” generation. They are all looking out for #1, strong supporters and confidants next, all others can find their own lifeboat.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Sargeant who wrote “all they want is a room with a (beachfront) view.”

    I disagree,

    Like

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