The Phartford Files: Case of the Bungling Banks – Epilogue

Submitted by Ironside

Today is Day 08 of the latest ATM skimming in Barbados (I am counting from Monday 08 July) and unless I have missed the news, there has been no formal public apology from the Bankers Association or from any individual bank so far. Pastor Dear’s rebuke seems to have fallen on deaf ears.

I am writing this epilogue primarily because of a question asked by a commentator on the original article in response to a further comment I had made. Here is an extract of my comment:

Ironside: July 13, 2019 6:56 AM

The problems we are facing in Barbados are not unique to this neck of the woods. If we take a global view of the matter, one can clearly see now why the time is fast approaching when everyone will have to be a walking point of contact with the financial system…the time when plastics are a thing of the past and subcutaneous implants are it. And I can now see why many will welcome it!

For those not familiar with the language, “subcutaneous” means “under the skin” a reference to implantation of microchips in human and animal bodies If your first reaction to this is “pure science fiction”, it means you have been off the planet too long and it’s time to re-enter Earth’s atmosphere. As we shall show, this is all W.I.P (Work-In-Progress).

At this point, let me open myself to the charge of being a conspiracy theorist, by saying that there are two good reasons why the banks didn’t/ still don’t feel pressured to apologize or, as I argued in the original article, to up their game with respect to providing better ATM security, considering that this is the third time this has happened in recent times.

#1: Reading between and beyond the lines, the bank’s position is that you (the victim) are the chief suspect! When they say they need to investigate, they mean that they need to investigate “you”. Of course, that is not what they actually said! Moreover, it would be too obvious for them to ask that every “victim-suspect” be interviewed by the police…give the bank some credit for a change (puns intended)! Of course, your front line bank employee is either unaware of or not necessarily a willing party to this. So don’t shoot the messenger.

But we cannot doubt that the victims have been investigated as potential culprits or co-conspirators. Clearly the banks don’t give a phart anymore about customer loyalty or their favourite promotional phrase “valuable customer”. The charade of delaying the return of funds is all window dressing, aided and abetted by the current fraud legislation and manipulated – as always- by the bigger banking powers/owners across the globe.

From our perspective as victims, it is either that you have been skimmed or not. If you have been skimmed, the police investigation – unless they are investigating you- is irrelevant because you still have to get back your money. What we are arguing – and still angry about – is the missing upfront apology and the length of time taken to restore the funds of the victims.

#2: The banking elite across the world very well know that in order to get people accept an unpalatable measure such as skin implants, they have to create a crisis that drives the masses to that inescapable solution. Foisting it upon people without an urgent rationale will simply bring resistance.

These “bigger banking powers” know, as any biologist knows, that people are like the cold-blooded (poikilothermic) frog, which you can boil to its death simply by raising the temperature of the water in which it sits, a few degrees at a time.

So-called conspiracy theorists (e.g. David Icke) call this psycho-social process, “problem-reaction-solution”. Here is how it works: (1) create a problem (let there be a series of ATM skimmings) (2) let the public react in outrage repeatedly (as we do each time this skimming occurs) and (3) then offer the “solution” (an under-the skin chip).

While I may take issue with some of Icke’s “conspiracy excesses” you have to agree with him that this “problem-reaction-solution” psycho-social engineering formula actually works. It takes time, but it works! We have seen it with the “justified” burgeoning electronic surveillance on citizens as practised in the US and other countries and with the acceptance of the LGBT (now LGBTQ) movement. It is now work-in-progress with the “degenderization of the child” movement; if you know someone who is pregnant, get ready to welcome an unsuspecting “theyby” or two the world!

If you still have any doubt that this subcutaneous chipping is W.I.P read these two articles:
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Chip Implants: The Next Big Privacy Debate: https://www.govtech.com/blogs/lohrmann-on-cybersecurity/chip-implants-the-next-big-privacy-debate.html

The Internet of Human Things: Implants for everybody and how we get there:https://www.zdnet.com/article/the-internet-of-human-things-implants-for-everybody-and-how-we-get-there/
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
“But how about those of us black people who are very prone to keloid scarring (growing flesh)?” asked a fellow blogger. Well, I am sure they will find a solution to that because technology is just marvellous isn’t it?”

What should trouble us more, is the knowledge that an advanced form of this chipping was predicted in the Bible in the context of global commerce:
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
It [the beast or political directorate] also forced all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads, so that they could not buy or sell unless they had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of its name. (Rev 13:16-17)
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Perhaps we are some distance from the exact technological state predicted in the Bible; such a state would, however, be a natural progression from the chip as we know it today.

But as I said before, I am not expecting to be around when this new financial world order is unleashed. Praemonitus, praemunitus. [To be forewarned is to be forearmed!]

88 comments

  • Only the BLOGMASTER could turn a SKIMMING issue into a RACIAL issue. This is the EXACT MENTALITY that has/is resulting in the countries FAILURE.

    Like

  • @Wily

    Can you update the blog how the blogmaster has turned skimming into a racial issue?

    Liked by 1 person

  • You dont have to have a credit card, i have not had one in over 20 years and survive just fine, no debt… and you dont have to implant anything thing under your skin, not every scam they come up with black people have to jump in, you will only get robbed anyway…s as ya normally do.

    TAKE YOUR MONEY OUT OF THE THIEVING BANKS….use your brains, that is all you need.

    Like

  • @ Ironside

    Nor has the regulator said anything; no warnings, no instructions to the banks, no re-assurance to consumers, no investigation. Our banking regulator is asleep on the job. MASS INCOMPETENCE.

    Like

  • RE you dont have to implant anything thing under your skin,

    THIS SHOULD MORE ACCURATELY BE STATED AS……….you dont have to implant anything thing under your skin YET

    BUT THIS IS VERY IMMINENENT, ………….AND INEVITABLE!
    AND IFFEFUTABLE!

    Like

  • IT IS ALSO IMPENDING AND IRREVERSIBLE

    Like

  • GP…….skin implants/microchips has been happening in the Dakotas for years, it is not new…AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO DO IT..

    Like

  • https://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=AwrEzexevi1dDmcAVTpXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTExdmEwNmRjBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwM3BHZ0aWQDREZENl8xBHNlYwNzcg–/RV=2/RE=1563307743/RO=10/RU=https%3a%2f%2fsingularityhub.com%2f2009%2f07%2f02%2fwill-your-id-soon-be-a-microchip-under-your-skin%2f/RK=2/RS=Upx.hQEKSiKMkTVMrxDt659Wils-

    that article is from 2009, it was approved by FDA years ago, it is nothing new.

    some youngster in the Dakotas, think it was at a university, invented one and those who choose to have been using it.

    Like

  • @David

    “But how about those of us black people who are very prone to keloid scarring”

    Bringing up implants ok, however putting caveats in is just plain RACIAL.

    Like

  • Skimming is a world wide issue with ATM type machines, you’d think by the comments it’s solely a Barbados issue. Banks don’t owe anyone an apology, they do however have to respond to customers losses and respect whatever regulations are in place in the respect the jurisdiction with regards to refunds. Customers can expect to justify their refund requests with proof of the fraud and signed appropriate documentation. Its only a bank issue if it can be proven that the bank was somehow negligent in the placement and operation of a particular ATM MACHINE.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    Why put a chip under one’s skin,when one can put it in one’s brain ? Is this not what some contributors on this Blog attempt to do?

    @ Ironside

    The banks responded. On Sunday last the ATMs were accepting debit cards from their banks only. CARIFS appeared to have been temporarily suspended. Was it an audit ? Or fixing a patch?

    Like

  • GP…….skin implants/microchips has been happening in the Dakotas for years, it is not new…AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO DO IT..

    implants/microchips etc is apparently the way that the mark of the beast will be implemented in the soon coming seven year tribulation period of the one world government led by the antichrist

    whether you like it or not THIS IS VERY IMMINENENT, ………….AND INEVITABLE AND IRREFUTABLE! IT IS ALSO IMPENDING AND IRREVERSIBLE

    WHAT EVER HAS been happening in the Dakotas for years, JUST INFORMS ESCHATOLOGISTS HOW the mark of the beast will be implemented in the soon coming seven year tribulation period of the one world government led by the antichrist

    Like

  • GP…it’s been around for more than 10 years…what are you talking about, ya did not even know..lol

    they WILL sell you and you won’t know..

    Like

  • @Wily Coyote
    July 16, 2019 6:28 AM
    ++Only the BLOGMASTER could turn a SKIMMING issue into a RACIAL issue. This is the EXACT MENTALITY that has/is resulting in the countries FAILURE.+++

    @ David:
    July 16, 2019 6:33 AM

    I got this one David.

    FYI Coyote, this is the comment/ blogger I was referring to:
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife (On The Phartford Files: Case of the Bungling Banks)
    July 14, 2019 1:08 AM
    @Ironside July 13, 2019 6:56 AM “when plastics are a thing of the past and subcutaneous implants are it. And I can now see why many will welcome it!”

    But how about those of us black people who are very prone to keloid scarring?
    how will the subcutaneous implant thingies work for us without causing damage to our sensitive skins?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    So Coyote, I am guessing that SimpleSimon is a racist then?

    The article was posted just as I sent it- no amendments by David – so as man or woman (you can accuse me of being sexist), you owe David an apology!

    Are you an apologist for the other-coloured? Are you hiding your own racial biases? (We can get unjustifiably racist, too!)

    (I really don’t want to go here but..) the accusation-cum-hypothesis you have concocted is methodologically unprovable because it is epistemologically invalid….Perhaps you are NOT so “wily” after all?!?

    Application: Stop pharting on free speech!

    Like

  • WARU YA DUMMY!

    RE GP…it’s been around for more than 10 years…AND IT IS COMMON KNOWLEDGE TO ALL ESCHATOLOGISTS LIKE ME

    WE WERE ALL HAPPY TO LEARN OFF IT BECAUSE IT HELPED US TO SEE HOW ANTICHRIST COULD IMPLEMENT AND MONITOR THE MARK OF THE BEAST DURING THE IMMINENT TRIBULATION PERIOD FORETOLD BY ALL THE PROPHETS INCLUDING JESUS IN THE OLIVET DISCOURSE

    NO ONE IS GOING TO SELL ME THANK GOD

    I WAS BORN AFTER THE SLAVE TRADE

    AND I RESIGN AND LEAVE FROM ANY UNTENABLE SITUATION I FIND MYSELF UNDER THE LEADING OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Wily Coyote July 16, 2019 8:48 AM @David “But how about those of us black people who are very prone to keloid scarring”

    @Wily Coyote July 16, 2019 8:48 AM “Bringing up implants ok, however putting caveats in is just plain RACIAL.”

    No it is not. It was not David, it was me who mentioned the FACT of keloid scarring. And mentioning this FACT is not racial or racist. It is simply a scientific fact which should be taken into consideration when people start talking about implants.

    Have you ever seen a keloid as big as a grapefruit? Well I have. And to have them removed is both painful and expensive.

    This is not racism.

    This is science.

    If I said that white people are more prone to skin cancer that black people that is not racial either. it is just a scientific fact.

    Noticing racial differences is not racism. Treating people badly because of their skin colour is racism.

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE how about those of us black people who are very prone to keloid scarring?
    how will the subcutaneous implant thingies work for us without causing damage to our sensitive skins?
    IT WILL NOT MATTER TO ANTICHRIST
    YOU EITHER TAKE THE MARK OR YOU CAN NEITHER BUY OR SELL

    Like

  • RE Have you ever seen a keloid as big as a grapefruit? Well I have. And to have them removed is both painful and expensive.
    ACTUALLY REMOVAL OF KELOIDS IS NEITHER PAINFUL OR EXPENSIVE
    REMOVAL OF KELOIDS IS A RATHER SIMPLE PROCEDURE

    PLEASE ALSO NOTE THAT CAUCASIANS CAN GET KELOIDS ALSO

    Like

  • Money in the bank? YOU don’t own it!

    When you deposit $1,000 in your bank account you are in effect making an unsecured loan of $1,000 to the bank.

    If the bank should fail for whatever reason, or if it is determined that the depositors (i.e. unsecured creditors) will have to give up some or all of their funds on deposit (on loan to the bank) to bring the bank back to some form of stability you are basically without recourse. The process these days seems to be that funds confiscated from depostors’ accounts to save a failing bank are capitalized meaning that depositors are given shares in the bank in proportion to their confiscated funds, becoming part owners of a financially shaky bank – the process usualy referred to as a bail-in.

    If there are other claims on the bank’s assets due to perhaps a more dire situation, like an outright bankruptcy, you and your fellow depositors have to line up behind the secured creditors to collect from whatever crumbs might be left over after the secured creditors have been taken care of first. Only if your funds in the bank are equal to or less than the government guaranteed deposit insurance will you get your money back (providing the government can honour its guarantee).

    See the following video at 6:26:

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Greenmonkey

    That is why we have deposit insurance. In the UK you have compensation up to £85000 payable within five working days. That is proper regulation..

    Like

  • Quite appropriate actually…

    Like

  • BU family member Fearplay forwarded this link on the weekend to share which makes this submission timely.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7244877/How-going-cashless-allows-Big-Brother-spy-Sweden-faces-backlash.html

    Like

  • In Barbados the amount covered by deposit insurance is $25,000. Which is better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick, but not a hell of a lot for some people. Although you could help reduce the risk somewhat (depending on how much money you have laying around) by having multiple accounts each at different banking/financial institutions.

    The Barbados Deposit Insurance Corporation (BDIC) is a statutory corporation which was established under the Deposit Insurance Act (2006). The BDIC commenced operations on June 8, 2007, and provides insurance coverage of up to BDS$25,000 for depositors of commercial banks, as well as deposit-taking trust and finance companies.

    http://bdic.org.bb/

    Like

  • @Green Monkey

    If the credit union is to be seen as a viable alternative they will need to implement deposit insurance as well.

    Like

  • David

    Given the history of banking and financial serves failures in Barbados – Trade Confirmers to Clico and considering the new and emerging status quo, a la Greece, it is comfort to a fool to think that what is coming down the pike could be mollified by the pretense about deposit insurance, and not only in Barbados.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    It is very scary when you think about the tenuous position we find ourselves as a small open economy.

    Like

  • Reported on page 3 of todays Nation CIBC started to refund customers from Friday last week. Interesting they are quoted as defending the need for customers to report the theft of the money to police because it occurred from accounts in their names.

    #hmmmmm

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    The reason, is so the BPF cannot say “they were never aware of $&@&$”. Reporting ensures they are aware,.

    Like

  • And that makes perfect sense to the unprofessional idiots in the bank..

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    What about:

    Stolen from ATMs ownned by them
    ….and deposits in their safekeeping
    … and loaned to them

    Like

  • Trying to understand the banks position. What I have come up with is that confidentiality restriction prevents them from submitting a group report detailing account info. What is your counter?

    Like

  • The banks have lost a lot of money due to the debt cut and the defaults on mortgages. It is clear that they now distrust the local masses. That’s logical.

    It’s only a matter of time before the Canadians dump their business.

    Like

  • The $25000 deposit insurance in Bim is underwritten by whom? I keep hearing about this insurance but have never heard who the underwriter or guarantor is. Is it the central bank? Is it central government via the consolidated fund? Who exactly is the insurer?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Remember in the last blog on this topic we were trying to decide at what point does the money cease being the responsibility of the bank and become the account holders? Is it when the funds leave the dispenser chute? If as I read the account holder is now responsible to take the matter up with the police wouldn’t that imply thus?

    So many questions and not a squeak from the regulators on this issue. You feel they know something happen yet?Lol

    Maybe David could send them a WhatsApp and let them know the public is awaiting a statement on the issue! After all if an old man like me get Rob at one of these machines over kadooment I want to know what to do, other than hollow hard and run!

    Like

  • @@John A

    The fraud occurred at the ATM. It wasn’t the customers fault.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Northern O

    You are always taking the side of the capitalists.

    Do the financial institutions not have a fiduciary responsibility.

    And is it not included in such a duty the expectation to examine accounts held to make sure no ‘unusual activities’ took place?

    Efforts to transfer that responsibility to depositors is merely an attempt to avoid, even evade, their customary duty

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Pacha

    I am asking questions as like you I am guessing at who is responsible for what.

    Of course my questions and yours could be answered if the regulators would come and make a public statement. Until then all you and I can do is ” run mouth” and guess. What “should be” and “might be” is all personal opinion. Surely after 10 days this should of been cleared up with a statement from the regulators?

    Till then we can all get here and pontificate on what “should” be the rights of the consumer and the banks.

    Like

  • @ David.

    I want to know who is responsible for underwriting the $25000 in deposit insurance. Don’t come back and tell me government neither! Tell me central bank, consolidated fund or even the fairy godmother but not no broad statement like government!

    Like

  • In Canada

    “Your liability if your debit card is used fraudulently.

    If you are a confirmed victim of fraud and you have met your obligations under CIBC’s Convenience Banking Service Agreement, you will not be held liable for the associated losses. Review your Convenience Banking Service Agreement for additional details.”

    https://www.cibc.com/en/privacy-security/debit-and-credit-card-fraud.html

    Like

  • @hants

    Yes Canada has a clearly defined system in place that is well regulated.

    My problem is that I can get no answer on what are our guidelines as outlined by our regulators with regard to the clients rights locally. What in other words is the maximum time the bank can delay settlement? What must be in place for a settlement to occur here?

    All I am hearing from the powers that be is a deafening silence on this issue.

    Like

  • Will not get anywhere. Unfortunately, with each transaction, Hal Austin and DR.GP’s words keep coming back.

    Getting things done here is like pulling teeth, although, a dentist at least can get teeth pulled.

    Whether the government or financial system, things move like molasses and files are lost, moved from person to person, correspondence not sent etc. Yes, the financial system here is as bad as the government transactions.

    But I suspect that is mainly because the banks simply do not want to be here.

    Very sad.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A

    Bank deposits are the liabilities of the banks. They therefore finance the insurance. It is a very small percentage of the deposits.
    In any case that is not relevant to the present issue. The FDIC relates to a general run on the banks where customers have lost confidence in a bank and they all want to withdraw their deposits.
    Each depositor regardless of the size of his deposit is limited to $25 K.

    The current issue is theft of bank funds. Digital robbery. Why should it differ from a hold up at gun point?

    Like

  • @Vincent.

    My question is who is the underwriter of the deposit insurance locally that’s what I want to know. To say it is guaranteed is well and good my question is by whom? I want to know the entity responsible for underwriting settlement. To say its guaranteed by government is a broad statement and does not point to a entity of final responsibility.

    In the USA it’s the FDIC up to $100,000 USD a deposit. I am very familiar with their system. What I want to know is the details on our system and why in light of all of this the regulators are saying nothing.

    We could argue till tomorrow about liability but in the absence of a clearly defined statement from the regulators we are only guessing.

    That sir is my point.

    Like

  • @ Ironside July 16, 2019 10:15 AM

    Who POSTED the original comments,
    David the blogmaster, therefore he’s a racist, a true blogmaster would not post such garbage. Time for you Bajan RH to get your head from under the mounds of sand and stop pretending to be ostrich’s. Barbados is a free for all education state, however its intellect is TURD World.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A

    The USA FDIC and the Barbados FIDC operates the same way. The only difference is the upper limits of the deposits guaranteed. They guarantee deposits that is a consequence of a general run on the deposits of a bank.
    It has nothing to do with bank theft. That is a criminal or civil matter.
    It was established that liability for restoration of funds stolen from the bank via ATMS was the bank’s. Nobody needs a statement from the regulators on this. Theft is a regular occurrence in Barbados.

    Like

  • @David

    Yes I say and read the “statement ” but What does this link really say? The words that concern me I will capitalise.

    ” BDIC currently only invest in SAFE AND LIQUID INVESTMENTS SUCH as Bds denominated securities ISSUED OR GUARANTEED BY BDOS GOVERNMENT .

    So tell me what are these liquid investments? Also are these securities ISSUED OR GUARANTEED BY THE BARBADOS GOVERNMENT similar to the worthless paper forced on the NIS?

    The above may bring you comfort but in the absence of specific holdings being shared I must question what these securities are and what portion of them have a ready cash surrender value should a bail out be required.

    Or will the BDIC issue me a ” bond” for my $25000 to be redeemed in 2040 at 1% interest?

    You fellows like to take comfort on broad statements void of detail, wunna ain’t learn nothing from the slaughter of bond holders recently?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A

    Trust me. There is no guessing in my intervention.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    I disagree with you on the ATM issue and can’t release the regulators from their stand being shared with the public on this issue. They need to tell the customers what their rights are and what guidelines for settlement they will demand for the card holders.

    My reference on the $25000 insurance has nothing to do with the credit card issue. I am questioning the deposit insurance with regard to funds we hold on our savings account.

    2 completely separate issues for discussion. My aplogies if i didn’t make myself clear so let me now confirm that I am looking at 2 separate banking issues not related to each other. The common denominator being only us the poor consumer.

    Hope that clarifies my position.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    John A

    Do you expect a run on any of the commercial banks in Barbados? What is your evidence?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    John A

    In all business transactions Emptor caveat. Customer beware. That is your responsibility.

    Like

  • Check page 38 John, the maturity of the investments will interest you.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Should i wait till my old house blow down to find out if my insurance company sound?

    I am saying that after Clico and the massacre on bond holders recently, we need to be made overly comfortable that the last bastion of safety for our older depositors who may have lost money in both of these issues, is not only safe but bullet proof!

    Like

  • @david.

    Well here we go.

    Of the 71M in securities $14.3M maturing in 10-15 years and $31.5M maturing in 15-25 yrs. With no provision in place for a cash surrender value on these securities the BDIC will not have matured deposits yielding cash surrender for the next 5 years and those will represent a small portion of their total security value. Probably no more than 10% of listed assets say in the first 8 years based on their financials.

    So let us hope in the short term we have no issues with depositors money as the BDIC based on its financials will not have the cash on hand required to bail out claims in excess of $10M in the short term.

    As I said Vincent it’s not about a run on a bank being likely, but more about if one did occur would we be in a position to deal with it. I dont want ever to see another Clico or bond slaughter in my life time.

    I hereby step down from my soapbox.

    Like

  • @John A

    One imagine the members of the BIDC have to be funders of last resort?

    You have taken note that financials terminate at 2017?

    Like

  • @ Vincent.

    Yes I agree with you it boils down to customer beware. It’s not you or me I worry for but the older person who can’t take another hit. I know it’s their job to look out for their investments, but so few can on their own.

    I mean if you told a 70 year old bond holder 5 years ago what would happen in the debt restructuring he would of laughed at you and said ” no way that is government guaranteed”.

    I don’t know maybe as i age I feel we must help those understand the risks out there. After all it’s harder to make up losses at 70 than at 40.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    Yes the 2018 should soon be published. Not sure if their year ends December or March 31st to line up with the government financial year. But yes we need to keep an eye out.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A at 6:41 PM

    You will never find, in this side of Eternity, any man made contrivance operated by man safe and bullet proof. It is a matter of trust and integrity. If you do not have these , financial institutions will fail.

    I understand your concerns because recently institutions we have put our trust in have failed us.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A

    In the likely event that liquidity becomes an issue we can always revert to the printing press. That is what the USA does. Of course you can only print BBD.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John A
    The Financial Reports will not answer your concerns. In fact you know the answers already. It will be worse in ,2018,and 2019.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    I agree with you as I have no doubt they too were holding government paper and their return will suffer too as a result.

    Did sinkler you think ever stop to think the far reaching damage his Xerox spree would of done to this island?

    That is why I have so little faith when i hear the phrase ” guaranteed by the Barbados Government”

    They must really hate us for the issues we raise here! It’s all David’s fault blame him. Lol

    Like

  • @ Vincent.

    We can’t print no more the IMF lock way the Xerox machine. Lol

    Like

  • “Do the financial institutions not have a fiduciary responsibility.”

    You don’t get a straight answer for anything, no one wants to take responsibility for anything, they all just want to take your money.

    The banks should leave, too many thieves.

    Like

  • @ Tron July 16, 2019 4:31 PM
    “It’s only a matter of time before the Canadians dump their business.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    So can we expect BNS and CIBC to do what Barclays did and jettison the East Caribbean from their portfolios leaving the Trinidad-owned banks to fleece the populace?

    Commercial banks, especially the Canadian banks have made billions in profits over the halcyon years of commerce and consumerism from these poor island territories; and in the case of Barbados, stretching back to the Atlantic trade in rum and molasses in exchange for salted fish and meats and lumber.

    Is this the ‘pretty’ ugly face of the ‘banking’ whore of capitalism?

    Who next is going to pillage and run? British Airways and AA?

    Like

  • Racist Argentina need to keep their thieves in Argentina, this wicked criminal wiped out over 80,000 dollars of innocent people’s money and the idot banks are still talking shite and still unprofessional…take your money out..

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/07/17/argentinian-national-charged-with-theft-from-bank-and-credit-union/

    Like

  • We wait to see if the government will release these criminals when all are caught instead of allowing the courts to give them a good 20 years in Barbados’ prison….to act as a DETERRENT to the other thieves from Argentina and other places WHO ARE ALL WATCHING THIS…

    Yall ignorant, hand to mouth negros like to release white criminals…keep doing it.

    Like

  • @Miller July 16, 2019 8:29 PM

    You obviously not very sharp at the supposed pointed end and do not keep abreast of international news. The BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA is presently underway with a program to devest itself of its Caribbean operations, ie Republic Bank and Sagicor acquiring a number of thier business’s. CIBC last year tried to offload its entire operations into a seperate identity on the stock exchange, price expected was too high and takers were fwe. This is just an example of what Tron is saying, DUMP AND RUN.

    Like

  • @ Wily Coyote July 17, 2019 8:15 AM

    Given your more incisive knowledge and understanding of these Canadian banks’ business plans to ditch the Caribbean, shouldn’t Bajans be preparing for this eventuality?

    With the fast spread of online banking why would there be a need for so many bricks and mortar branches dotting the Bajan landscape?

    Is this ‘esoteric’ knowledge the reason behind Dr. Worrell’s call for the ‘dollarization’ of the Bajan economy and eventual digitization of its monetary system?

    Like

  • @Miller

    You pose good questions, however Bajan mentality says “line up and wait for service” which is unavailable with ONLINE BANKING, Wily’s got feeling is not likely to be attampted by Bajans. Dr Worrell has a point in that it would force Bajans to adapt to new technologies and with it bring FINANCIAL DISCIPLINE to the country.

    It’s like trying to drag a mule to the trough to drink.

    Like

  • Some very serious points about our financial future are being made here. The discussion makes the time and effort spent in researching and writing worth it.

    @Pachamama: July 16, 2019 4:57 PM
    You have raised a question that has been bothering me and which now needs to be addressed urgently in some depth: do banks have a “fiduciary responsibility” customers? Members of the public are going to be surprised at the answer to this!

    Like

  • Won’t be surprised if the banks in Barbados engineered it so they have no fiduciary responsibility to the people whose money they USE ….won’t be one bit surprised…but in forward thinking, progressive jurisdictions…banks MUST EXERCISE FIDUCIARY RESPONSIBILITY TO THEIR CUSTOMERS…or pay a price..from regulators…

    Like

  • @ Wily

    You cannot have the banks marking their own homework with a nonsense called a voluntary banking code. The banking code should be a regulatory condition.

    Like

  • I read that an Argentinian national, Joaquin Alberto Lobo, 33, of Caseros, Buenos Aires, Argentina was arrested and charges with two counts of stealing $3,040 from BPWCCUL and $79,770 from FCIB…..

    ….. and is scheduled to appear in Court tomorrow.

    Kudos to the police.

    All they have to do now is arrest and charge the bank employees who “aided and abetted in COLLUSION with this Argentinian and some ‘fraud squad police,’ current and former,” “to steal hundreds of thousands of customers’ money,” as indicated by those individuals who, by having “first-hand practical knowledge and experience, can tell you that this activity happens.”

    Then again, all reports indicate that Lobo would be hustled out of Barbados without facing any jail time, because he is white.

    Like

  • @Hal Austin July 17, 2019 12:10 PM

    Wily agrees SELF REGULATION NEVER WORKS.

    Lets talk Boeing 737 Max, General Motors, Ford Motors, etc etc. Banks and other financial service providers(ie CLICO) just following the NORM. Some jurisdictions however try to provide a semblance of regulations and security to provide customers with a minimal level of protection. However rules, regulations and ENFORCEMENT is very lax in THIRD(TURD) world jurisdictions.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @John A July 16, 2019 7:08 PM “I mean if you told a 70 year old bond holder 5 years ago what would happen in the debt restructuring he would of laughed at you and said ” no way that is government guaranteed”.

    Not all 70 year olds are foolish.

    Like

  • Stop putting your money in any scam government devises…you already know anything they touch is blighted by a scam against U.

    Like

  • The Nation newspaper editorial captures all the points made in this submission.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 9 :44 AM

    And I wonder why you are surprised. Time to collect subscription fees?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    You read the front page today?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 1:11 PM

    No . I have not collected my news papers yet. Will comment when I return.

    Like

  • The fact that a bank can have client funds money stolen from it’s property and some on this blog question the client’s right to be made whole immediately is disconcerting.

    In fact, as case can be made that the banks have poor operational risk controls. In more enlightened jurisdictions the regulators would jump at the opportunity to defend the consumers and the banks would grab the chance to portray themselves as good corporate citizens.

    But not in Bim, where everything in upside down.

    Why do we have free education?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ sir simple

    Not being critical of 70 year olds just making the point that our government paper had always been seen by many as one of the safest investments out there.

    The problem came in Sinkler s Xerox era when the paper became unsustainable. I recall having a conversation when his printery was first fired up with a retired person and told them this was going to be unsustainable, only to be told nonesence this is government guaranteed!

    Like

  • You all realise it has been 2 weeks since this incident first raised its head and still not a word to date from the regulators.

    Like

  • Moving onto commercial banks, Mottley accused the entities of not offering decent rates on savings accounts as well as not allowing ordinary Barbadians to access capital with low interest rates.

    “What we cannot have is the choking off of opportunities in Barbados for ordinary people, we believe, especially those who will be on the front line of any adjustment … government needs to have a policy of affirmative action to show that those who bear the brunt of the adjustment must be on the frontline of contracts and and supply of goods and services in this country.”

    http://www.loopnewsbarbados.com/content/mottley-lashes-government-awarding-contracts-0

    Like

  • @David
    A refreshing post.

    We like to put people in a box and stamp a label on it. I see that the blogmaster continues to operate outside of the assigned box and label.
    A great post and reminder
    ******************=================xxx======================***

    A happy and pleasant morning to all of Barbados.
    Make certain that you enjoy the sea and sand.
    Take a long dip and think of us who can play back distant memories of sea bathing
    Take along a small snack and a bottle of water and enjoy yourself
    Have a great day Barbados

    Like

  • This article counters some of the BS spouted here.

    HAMILTON, Bermuda – A High Court judge has sentenced two Puerto Rican nationals to 16 months in jail each after they were caught attempting to leave Bermuda with cash and equipment to make fake credit cards.
    Juan De La Cruz Carvajal, 21, and Avik Kavil Abreu Rivera, 24, admitted to charges of conspiracy to steal and attempted money laundering when they were appeared in the Supreme Court on Tuesday.
    Puisne Judge Craig Attridge said the men were caught with more than US$4 000 in cash as they tried to leave the island, but it was likely they had attempted to steal more.
    “The intent and expectation of the defendants must have been to make a significant gain. The court agrees that the increasing prevalence of offences of this nature in recent times undermines the financial integrity of the island by increasing the cost of legitimate financial activity, making victims of us all,” Justice Attridge said.
    The High Court heard that Carvajal and Rivera were stopped by US Customs as they attempted to leave the island on January 19.
    Officers searched their bags and discovered more than $4 000 in mixed currency, along with a machine designed to print fake credit and debit cards. Customs officials also searched a laptop in their possession and found a programme set up to use the card machine.
    The prosecutor, Allan Richards, said that evidence suggested the pair had attempted several unsuccessful transactions and they had tried to steal more money than they had obtained.
    Richards added that this type of theft was on the rise in Bermuda, with multiple cases before the courts this year alone. But he said both defendants admitted their culpability at the earliest reasonable opportunity and were entitled to a discount on their sentence. (CMC)
    >>>

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s