Post General Election Musings

Of concern to Barbadians everywhere is the ‘fatigue’ that has set in triggered by an economy stuck in the doldrums for  more than 10 years. Some Barbadians although tired of the persistent state of affairs seem to have expected Mia and the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) to flick a switch to quick fix the economic problems of the country.  Old news!

In the build to the 24 May 2018 there was chatter in the country about:

  • Austerity measures
  • Government printing 50 million dollars a month
  • Dwindling foreign reserves
  • A judiciary about to crash under its weight
  • Sewage spewing onto the street on the South Coast
  • Garbage pile up across Barbados and the under-resourced SSA
  • Poor public transportation and the under-resourced transport Board
  • Outstanding income tax rebates
  • Low domestic and international investment flows
  • Pothole ridden highways and byways
  • Poor maintenance (physical/environmental of buildings
  • Rapid fire borrowing from the NIS Fund by Central government and questionable lending to private entities
  • Unresolved CLICO mess
  • Twenty something credit rating downgrades
  • Public servants not having a wage hike since 2006
  • Poor financial state of SOEs (see Auditor General reports)
  • Dysfunctional working committees of parliament

The list is not meant to be exhaustive.

What the last decade should have taught us is that we have to find a way to build consensus to move the country to an improved footing. Persisting with the adversarial and fractious approach will not help. Unfortunately the last general election has left the Democratic Labour Party (DLP) a broken party and the so-called third parties have not stepped up to the task at hand (so far) as a credible alternative.

See blogmaster’s pulse chaeck notes in red to the above.

  • Austerity measures/no change
  • Government printing 50 million dollars a month/from all reports significantly reduced
  • Dwindling foreign reserves/stabilized as a result of default on loans and IMF and other injections
  • A judiciary about to crash under its weight/no change
  • Sewage spewing onto the street on the South Coast/immediate problem addressed until a permanent fix is implemented, so promised Abrahams
  • Garbage pile up across Barbados, landfills and the under-resourced SSA/moderate improvement
  • Poor public transportation and the under-resourced transport Board/no change
  • Outstanding income tax rebates/significant improvement
  • Low domestic and international investment flows/small improvement
  • Pothole ridden highways and byways/small improvement
  • Poor maintenance (physical/environmental of buildings)/no change
  • Rapid fire borrowing from the NIS Fund by Central government and questionable lending to private entities/significant improvement
  • Unresolved CLICO mess/no change
  • Twenty something credit rating downgrades/moderate improvement
  • Public servants not having a wage hike since 2006/small improvment
  • Poor financial state of SOEs (see Auditor General reports)/no change
  • Dysfunctional working committees of parliament/No change

The blogmaster shares his  musings based on rumshop talk and observation. The thing about debate in a rumshop is participants hold strong views and know they have the answers to everything. The libation does not help!

Postscript: we need to hear more about government’s plan to address concerns about the NIS. It is our lifeline.

 

 

158 comments

  • In what manner or way did you come to making a grade of significant performance without having the necessary facts to prove
    All most hear is word of mouth by one source that is govt however nothing of substantial evidence is shown to the public that can be proven that all these “significant ” improvements are happening with good reason and sound economic input
    The Sewer system problem by all accounts has been “resolved” ( if one chooses to say) but also has in long term created another problem for the enviroment
    No minister or scientific reports has been said or given as to how much damage has been done to the Natural habitat of the Graeme hall Sanctuary animal or plant life or for that matter how much of or underground water system has been affected
    In your mind sewage not backing up in the street is a solution /short term / while the bigger issue of what is happening to the environs surrounding the plant and the many bodies of water stares us in the face

    Like

  • To add to David’ s scorecard :

    Cabinet larger – terrible change
    Consultants increase – bad change
    Crime increase – sad change
    Water rates increase – terrible change
    Taxes & cost of living increase – horrible change
    Bus fares increase – savage change

    And a not finger can be pointed to the DLP for the above , by a BLP ( Blasted Lying Party) who promised……better……but delivered BITTERS !

    Like

  • David you have wasted your time on a report that has a refection of sugnificance in that it reflects a govt hell bent on smoke and mirrors
    Here we have a govt who has increased barbados debt in less than a month after elected and in turn has bushwhacked and even hoodwinked the public into a false sense of belief persuaded by the slogan to stay the course
    Boy what you have written in your article all the above should be punished with laughter
    As the old folks say don’t mek me laugh

    Like

  • Postscript: we need to hear more about government’s plan to address concerns about the NIS. It is our lifeline.

    @ Blogmaster
    Anyone depending on the NIS for a lifeline is screwed.

    The NIS is insolvent and the government has neither plan nor competence to address the many issues. In fact, the man who directly over saw much of the recent failure of the fund was promoted to Economic Czar. Go figure.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    No one expected a flipped switch to change the downward spiral ….but they expected when taxpayers money are helping Mia pay million dollar consultants….that there would be results…

    What everyone expected was for MIA TO DO THE RIGHT AND LAWFUL THING…..bring back all the billions of dollars and estates….STOLEN BY HER ILK…to help the economy recover…and ease the suffering of those who were robbed, those whom she laid off….and the most vulnerable in the society….but she dont want to do thatt…she prefers to run from pillow to post begging…but that will never fill the gap and replace what they ALL STOLE OVER THE DECADES

    What they stole….MUST BE RETURNED to whom it was stolen from.

    But Mia dont want to do right by her black people, she dont want to see her own people prosper and become wealthy and productive …and for that she will pay THE PRICE…

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Whatever the hell a czar is…the only czars are drug czars…but that is what happens when ya believe too much in ya own bullshit..

    Like

  • As you know BU has posted many blogs sharing concerns about the management of the NIS fund. Both political parties have used the fund as you would an ATM. The fact this government with a bevy of financial advisors has been reluctant to tackle the problem almost one year in does not bode well for the country.

    Like

  • There is a reality the blogmaster has come to accept. Barbados is in very deep dodoo and the slide did not start last year. We will be in austerity mode for a long time to come. Here is the thing about austerity measures, they hurt!

    Citizens need to be smart with the advocacy effort. Criticizing for the sake of it is easy.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Here we go again:
    BLP + DLP = Same Party

    Common sense shows that we simply change parties; we don’t change governments.
    We have a one party state!

    Like

  • As you know BU has posted many blogs sharing concerns about the management of the NIS fund.

    @David

    And you deserve great credit for it.

    I really don’t understand why no one is kicking up a fuss about the NIS. The state of the NIS is big, big deal.
    Where are the unions, the Cave Hill crew, NGOs, etc. ? It’s amazing.

    @ David
    Why do you think no one is saying anything about the state of the NIS?

    Like

  • @Dullard

    There is a leadership vacuum.

    We have a generation of Barbadian who does not know what it is like to sweat for a piece of stale bread.

    The two commingling is a receipy for lack of purpose and lethargy that has taken deep root.

    Like

  • @ William Skinner

    I believe you are correct. Personally, I don’t see any differences between the BLP and DLP. The way supporters of both parties behave on this blog, would give one the impression BEES and DEMS are different. They are not.

    I have read contributions by posters such as Mariposa, Greene and Fractured BLP in which they try to portray the BEES as being corrupt. Then there are people like Enuff, Lorenzo and Gabriel who would like us to believe the BEES’ hands are clean and the DEMS are dirty.

    When the BEES give an example about untoward activity of the DLP, you can be certain an example can be given where the BLP did something similar. Vice versa.

    For example, during election campaigns whoever is in opposition accuses the incumbent party of corruption, promising to investigate and lock up the perpetrators. We saw this scenario played out during the 2008 election campaign when David Thompson wanted to fulfil his childhood dream of becoming PM. He promised to be transparent and accountable, and other promises that were not kept. Then we witnessed it again when Mia Mottley wanted to fulfil her childhood dream of becoming PM. She also made promises of transparency, accountability and others that are yet to be fulfilled.

    When they, as we would say, get in, they ignore or forget the issues and do all types of things to protect their counterparts.

    Like

  • This is what concerns most ..govt having no growth plan but has unleashed a barrage of taxes on the most vulnerable
    A govt hellbent on bending the Constitution to seek resolve for social problems
    A govt who has unilaterally used pensioners money as a piggy bank to pay off debt
    A govt who uses the ocean as a seondary spetic tank to off load millions of pollutants which becomes a real source of contaminating the enviroment
    A govt who has yet to formulate a plan to secure our borders
    A govt which is of yet to attend to the ongoing problem of gangs in communities

    Like

  • Same philosophy. Why are we not seeing a credible voice to fill the space?

    Anyone?

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    And just to prove my point…the Mottley family have invested their illgotten gains heavily in the marijuana trade…very recently…..hooking up to sell out as usual without a thought for their own people……but black bajans are yet to see one permit or license to grow the plant….the same black bajans who are paying Mia and her gang of parasites….salaries.

    Ask Mia why Stewart her brother, iss investing so heavily in the marijuana trade and besides the 28 year old regime for medical marijuana in place…11 months later…still no legal framework in place so that the majority black population…can also invest in their birthright….but the Mottleys already invested.

    Like

  • So here we have the Minister of Distraction DAVID BU telling all and sundry by way of an insignificant score card what has worked in favour of govt measures
    What a belly laugh
    Pig sh.it would be the operative word for that article

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    This show is about to begin…ticktock

    Like

  • Minister of Distraction David how about telling us the significance of not being transparent by present govt in their extravagance of tax write offs to individuals and business
    A list please would suffice

    Like

  • For the ladies on BU.

    Like

  • Have one for me but I ent sharing. lol

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu

    What voice are you looking for? And to fill what space? I do not know about you, but I find the cacophony disorienting. Bare noise pollution.
    By the way who asked you for a score card?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    What was posted is not a score card. It is the opinion of a blogmaster. Is he allowed to share an opinion on the blog?

    Creativity and innovation comes out of diversity

    Like

  • A couple weeks ago there was a question about the number of uninsured houses in Barbados. Today minister Edmund Hinkson confirmed the majority of houses in Barbados are not insured. He did not share numbers.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    What Mia in her blind state needs to be told is…. that it is time for her fellow minority criminals and MASTERS……STOP FEEDING OFF BLACK PEOPLE…

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Dullard
    in reporting on the SOE’s, Minister Straughn referred frequently to changes in financial position as a result of “inter-governmental write-offs”. I haven’t seen the financial reports, but could these be NIS monies due, which the SOE’s had been instructed to withhold, and now the decision has been taken to write them off?

    Clearly, this version of the GoB is avoiding the issues at the NIS.

    Like

  • This is article is more worthy of a discussion as it clearly pinpoints govt pitfalls

    Home / Local News / Economy / Opposition urges Gov’t to slow down on BERT

    Opposition urges Gov’t to slow down on BERT
    Article by
    Katrina King Published on
    April 7, 2019
    Members of the Opposition are warning the Government to take its time in the execution of the IMF-sponsored Barbados Economy Recovering Transformation (BERT) programme.

    Responding to the ministerial statement delivered by Minister in the Ministry of Finance during the Estimates debate, Ryan Straughn, where he outlined the precarious state of Government’s state-owned enterprises, shadow Minister for the Ministry of Tourism and International Transport Scott Weatherhead said the Government’s austerity programme could not be realistically executed during the proposed seven years.

    “This is a 15 to 20 year thing that this administration is trying to force on the backs of Barbadians in one election term or seven years. The problem we find ourselves in wasn’t created in seven years, it was created in over 40 years. We cannot solve it in seven years.

    “You cannot turn around an economy that is $16.4 billion in debt, you cannot turn it around in seven years,” said Weatherhead.

    “We really believe that Government needs to slow down, pace itself and take this thing in strides and in pace. There is no rush. Rome was not built in a day and Barbados cannot be fixed in seven years.”

    Weatherhead was joined by Opposition members Crystal Drakes, Bruce Henniss, and Sylvan Greenidge at a press conference held at the Opposition Leader’s office in the Parliament Building.

    Weatherhead argued that the Mia Mottley administration was building the blocks for a debt-ridden Barbados, as the $580 million loan from the IMF, $100 million loan from Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and $230 million loan from Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) increased the public debt.

    “A billion dollars in loans cannot clear $16.4 billion in existing debt. This is additional debt that this Government has just placed the citizens of Barbados in, so I want us to be very aware as we go along into this programme.”

    The prominent businessman also expressed concerns about the growth strategy of Government. He believes that the suggested growth strategies could bring no immediate results.

    “Investing in education, investing in training is not going to directly impact economic growth this year, next year, or five years from now. That is a 30-year plan. What we need to see is growth in the productive sectors. We need to see growth in agriculture, growth in manufacturing, growth in exports, development of products and services for exports and I do not see any of those things contained in the BERT programme . . . We are talking about real measures to incentivize farmers, manufacturers, people who make products, people who export products outside of Barbados, that is what we really need to see

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    What i want to know is why Mia did not tell Caribbean people, particularly Bajans, that Africa is opening her doors to all her descendants so they can access the wealth to which every black person on earth is entitled….that is what i want to know…she has known for a while because Hunte-Cox was at that meeting with the ambassador so Mia knows…instead she was hot to have bajans who had to run from the island seeking opportunities…send their money to her so she and cow, bizzy etc all the usual parasites and thieves…could tief it…

    …cause if she thinks Cow and Bizzy and her fellow minority lowlifes will slither into Africa pretending to be slave masters and to tief….and leave with their two ugly dried up heads intact…she better think again…

    as long as she knows…the hardest thing is to know.

    Like

  • David April 8, 2019 12:39 PM

    A couple weeks ago there was a question about the number of uninsured houses in Barbados. Today minister Edmund Hinkson confirmed the majority of houses in Barbados are not insured. He did not share numbers

    Uh think he didnt know all this while in opposition
    Now coming in a pretentious manner as if he has News for the public steupse
    The question he should be asked is giving the harsh austerity measures how does govt expect households to carry more extended debt
    It is either a choice between govt debt via taxes or household commitments

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David at 12 :39 PM

    The minister shared an opinion which we all knew. It added nothing to our bank of knowledge. It is not compulsory to ensure one’s house. The decision not to ensure is a rational decision for most persons. We are insuring risk of loss by fire. The house owner might decide that the probability of his house being burnt is small and that portion of his income should be allocated to other more necessary and important goods and services. That is perfectly rational.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Northern Observer at 121:41 PM

    I am not too clear about your perception of the problems at the NIS. But clearly the backlog of audited Financial Reports will have to be delivered before an assessment can be made. From alternative sources, there are indications that the Fund may have been used, in the past, as an extension of the Consolidated Fund. The extent of this can only be confirmed by an independent audit of the accounts.
    I do not think write offs is the preferred and appropriate solution. But in the past ,and in other jurisdictions, is this not what was done?

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    An intelligent government would see what i can so clearly see…the opportunities…just handed to us by our ancestors…opportunities i never thought i would see manifest in my lifetime…i sent my grandchildren the info and they saw the opportunities right away….without me saying one word…that is why i did it, i wanted to see if they could see without me telling them.

    Mia should never have kept that information from the majority population..

    so why cant these uppity lawyers/ministers see..maybe if they would stop trying to run every scam…they would..

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC
    true. Yet, one cannot have a mortgage without home insurance [versus contents insurance]? Hence the extension is the ‘majority’ of Barbadian homes have no mortgage?

    Like

  • @ Vincent,
    A home is the biggest expenditure for most families and, it follows, should be protected. That much is given. The big question is whether government should allow insurance companies to rip off home owners? Good regulation should sort this out.
    The other issue is that to put a vehicle on the road it must be insured. That is the law. if someone has a mortgage, the lenders insist on insuring the home to protect their investment. Government can easily make home insurance compulsory.
    By the way, do our fire investigators carry out investigations in to the cause of household fires? If so, do they publish the results? I believe most domestic fires are caused by electrical faults. Another area for good regulation.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    That should have been 12:41 PM

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC @ 1.16pm
    when this current administration took over, one of the early statements [memory says it came from an IMF report] was that SOE’s and the Central GoB had been withholding premium payments, due to the NIS.
    Hence my query was whether these large inter-governmental write-offs referenced by Minister Straughn, referred to the outstanding NIS premiums due.
    Clearly formal financial reporting from the NIS itself, will hopefully shed light on a wide range on topics.

    Like

  • Agree every home owner should do the sensible thing
    However what we have (here) is a minister tooting vhis political horn absent of the fact of barbadians experiencing unbearable hardship under this govt

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Northern Observer at 1:17 PM

    The majority of Barbadian houses are built out of personal savings and short term credit from building suppliers . One needs a steady job and a certain level of income to access mortgages. The credit unions also provide short term loans without a formal mortgage. The culture is not North American. Not only are we risk averse ; we are also loan averse. Culture is very important. That is why I always inquire whether decisions are fit for purpose.

    @ Hal

    One cannot expect GoB to do everything. It comes with a charge. ..high taxes and the potential for corruption. You also know the track record for regulation in Barbados within recent times. Should we keep flogging a dead horse?

    Like

  • One should not hold breath as to who and to whom these tax write offs were given
    Needles to say the “make up for loss revenue would be dumped in the lap of the tax payer

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC
    I suspect you are 100% correct. One may also add the ‘inter-personal loan’ as another source of financing.
    Yet, in recent times we have been told of large write-offs by financial companies and been led to believe they are mortgage and loan related. The two opposing concepts do not mix well?

    Like

  • No comment from me. Done casting my pearls before Salemites and pick-a-noisettes.🤣🤣

    Like

  • One cannot expect GoB to do everything. It comes with a charge. ..high taxes and the potential for corruption. You also know the track record for regulation in Barbados within recent times. Should we keep flogging a dead horse?(Quote)

    What comes at a cost? Make the industry pay for its own regulation, only that it should not regulate itself.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Northern at 1 :50 PM

    You inquired about the majority of uninsured houses and not the majority of default mortgages. The latter is made up of a section of upper middle income cohorts that on some criteria do not really qualify for that level of mortgage . When there is a dip in household income they are unable to meet monthly commitments. I do not think that they are significantly large; but the ratio changes in tandem with the national economy.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    If there is a disaster and the majority of houses are not insured who takes the hit of last resort?

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Looks like Mia had a good turnout? What is the on the ground feedback?

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Robert Green

    You are way behind in that discovery. Why you think it is easy for all politicians in Barbados to say that they are not corrupt. Thompson accused the BLP and Owen Arthur. The idiots holla hard, by into his smoke screen, and kick the crooked BLP out. Mia Mottley accused the DLP, turn around after she got what she always wanted and said where the evidence is overwhelming she will execute an investigation. The bottom line of all of this, tell the idiots what they want to hear and they will give us the government to do whatever the shite we want. So Mottley won the government, elevated Dada and momma, wipe dada’s interest on unpaid taxes with tax exemption, but to ensure that it does not look like favouritism, granted all others owing, the same tax exemption. All the other stuff about it was recommended, the money cannot be recouped yadayada, is a bunch of hogwash. All the shite about many hands make like work is another smoke screen. The BLP cannot do as much as thieving as they did when they had the government for 14 years. It would be too obvious and too early. They will do it very tricksy indeed. Just wait and see.

    Like

  • @David

    That was the Montreal meeting, today is Toronto’s and I expect a large crowd but the message will probably be the same.

    Liked by 1 person

  • KINDNESS INSURANCE for the poor.

    ” She said they were expecting to move into temporary housing this week, but until then, were staying with other relatives at various locations.

    “People have reached out. They brought clothes, toiletries, towels, and even my workplace said they would take up a donation to help out.”

    Like

  • @ Sargeant,

    we await your report.

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Thanks.

    The news items here were ignited by questions from the floor. As you expect concerns about the legal system took center.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “No comment from me”

    course not..yall tried to tief 11 billion dollars of the people’s savings…and had the nerve to try that scam …BEFORE..they found out about the African diasporan credit union/ bank and the open door policy to African descendants later this year..that ya were so desperately trying to hide…….but ya got caught…and now because ya kept the information from ya own people…it blew up in ya face and is now viral…

    Canadians might smile in ya face…but they are not at all gullible.

    Like

  • @ David,

    12 months of ” We gatherin fetes in Barbados “.Nuff nuff BLP supporters in the Diaspora will be coming home.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Hants
    you can watch the video feed live from your fishing hut.

    @VC
    I am not questioning you, rather some of the reports from international financial firms, which lump all the Caribbean areas together. The cultural aspects of which you speak are historical, but not necessarily shared by every nation within Caricom, and it is unclear to me today in Bim, if a certain amount of people movement in the past 20 years, along with the traits of the middle class (in BT’s lingo ‘whatever the hell that is’), have not impacted the overall profile.
    One example is as our insurers expanded, events in those expanded areas will affect rates in Bim?

    In Canada, we have a PM who loves to use the term ‘middle class’, which he finally defined as NOT being the top 1% of income earners !!!

    Like

  • @Hants

    It is being promoted as more than a fete.

    Red carpet for we people!

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC
    re my 1.28pm….what is your opinion on the nature/source of the SOE’s ‘inter-governmental write offs’. Are these accrued NIS premiums or something else? Certainly large sums of money.

    Like

  • @ David,

    I hope ” We Gatherin ” will help laid off workers and poor people in Barbados.

    Hopefully we will see a surge in roadside vendors and food trucks.

    Years ago I found vendors in swan street selling dunks,ackees, sea grapes, fat pork and cashews. I was able to buy nostalgia.

    Lets hope 2020 is a good year for poor hard working Bajans.

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver,

    I am Southern Ontarian right by Lake Ontario. We don’t fish in huts.

    Like

  • Professor Mascoll!

    Like

  • Phil Phillips is with Arturo Edward and 77 others.
    5 hrs ·

    Headline – “The Minister of Creative Economy, Culture and Sports has established ties with the motherland that is sure to stimulate economic growth and development across many key industries of Barbados’ economy.”

    Minister of the Creative Economy, Culture and Sports, John King is pleased to report on the success of a recent delegation to Ghana (the motherland). This initiative was spearheaded by the Creative Economy and has immediately borne fruit for our creative entrepreneurs with pending MoUs with key Ghanaian entertainment houses. Barbados has developed artists and repertoire agreements with entertainment and media houses for the Vodafone Ghana Music Awards on May 17th & 18th, which has a targeted television audience of 60 million people, along with strategic partnerships with Empire Entrainment for the highly popular Ghana Meets Naija on June 8th as well as the producers of the largest street festival in West Africa, The Chale Wote Street Festival.
    As a result Barbadian artists are being encouraged to strategically develop new markets across Ghana and West Africa which will expose them to a 400 million audience.
    Other industries are expected to benefit from these unique bilateral trade agreements and cultural exchanges these include but are not limited to solar energy, manufacturing (in particular CPGS), construction, Agro-processing and technology.
    Ghanian Professor Alex Dodoo enthusiastically themed the process as a reversal of the biblical passage the “Prodigal Son” to the “Prodigal Father” as the two delegations reflected on the 400 years of a broken family union.

    Like

  • Barbados Underground Whistleblower

    I love um😁

    Like

  • “sted their illgotten gains heavily in the marijuana trade…very recently…..hooking up to sell out as usual without a thought for their own people……but black bajans are yet to see one permit or license to grow the plant”

    In some states regulations were in place so that minorities could participate in legal marijuana. Many cities became creative and invented policies that essentially push the minorities aside.

    Do you realize that many of the policies of the BDLP are the same as if blacks were a minority in a town or state.

    How do we explain that..

    Like

  • It is now 7:30PM and the CBC TV8 has paraded Ministers John King, Marsha Caddle and Colin Jordan. Then Caddle was featured some more sharing info about a collab with an NGO. One must ask if there was an opportunity to squeeze in an opposition voice? Who to blame? More of the same?

    Like

  • @ David,

    The video posted above is by a Ghanian singer and dancers.

    I went looking to see if the The Minister of Creative Economy made a worthwhile trip.lol

    Like

  • @Hants

    He seems to be fairly gunho about the possibilities.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Northern Observer

    Please forgive my apparent bad manners . I attended a funeral of a relative this afternoon and only recently resumed my trolling.
    I have not heard or read the minister’s statement about the write offs of SOES’ indebtedness. In any case I prefer to analyse the audited Financial Statements of these corporations for my self. Until I see the financials I will notl/cannot comment.

    Like

  • @ David BU

    CBC 7:00 P.M 2008-1018 deja vu

    Like

  • CBC 7:00 PM 2008-2018 deja -vu

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 2;16 PM

    If you can recall any such past disaster history recorded who paid for the restoration of the housing stock. Insurance companies are not in the social welfare business . They operate to make a profit. The costs of restoration (usually partial) always come collectively from the insured pocket, either paid forward or backward. There are no free lunches in this life.
    You must step out of your constraining boxes some times and see things from other persons perspectives. One does not have to earn a Phd in Actuarial Science to decide what risks one is willing to pay for.

    Like

  • This is not a right or wrong issue. It is more commonsense Vincent.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @David BU at 8:40 PM

    Precisely.The man living in a house,with a market value below $ 200K, has to decide, using his common sense whether to pay house insurance premia or feed and clothe his family.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    Right now the Peter and Paul banquet hall in Toronto is “rammed” with Bajans and friends of Barbados listening to Auntie Mia, discuss “We Gatherin’ 20/20”

    Big, big, big crowd.

    Like

  • @David
    “more of the same”

    Actually it’s worse. At least this group is good at propaganda, lying, hiding and making garbage smell like perfume.

    Just imagine:

    Imagine a Minister of Energy show up at a press conference for a SPORTS launch.
    Imagine a Minister of Blue Economy taking the lead on a major environmental / business policy.
    Imagine a Minister of Information threatening to shut down social media accounts and computers, supported by a leading trade unionist
    Imagine another leading trade unionist saying she is pleased with the retrenchment process

    But looka look:

    Look at how much “Ministers in the Ministry of…” we got
    Look at the 85,000 per month to White Oak to shaft ResLife policy holders even more, AFTER, shafting GoB paper holders
    Look how much businesses saving in corporation tax while passing on ALL of their water, light and transport overheads to the consumer
    Look how they gave a whole 5% pay increase, then, take it back in a tax. Give back some by lowering the tax but take it back in bus fare and petroleum costs.

    The kettle ain’t so black after all since:

    Cuss Mark Maloney, now in bed with him for Ross and Hyatt
    Cuss the past AG, now got two inept Ministers that can’t handle crime and violence
    Cuss Chris for racking up debt, but still borrowing, borrowing
    Cuss Bobby Morris, but now want to offer all social services to any eligible CSME citizens
    Cuss Freundel for not saying nutten, now everybody saying everything which amounting to much of nothing
    Cuss the municipal waste tax, then tax me for a once every other week garbage collection
    Cuss all of DEM and call DEM thieves and whores but not one of DEM even under local investigation

    But, there’s magic!

    presto. Forex gone up cause we haven’t paid external debt and borrowed instead to shore it up
    presto. Current expenses gone down cause we send home nearly 2000 people
    presto. Grants to SOEs gone down, cause we paying for garbage, bus fares and MORE
    presto. NSRL removed, but not one sh*#% get reduce in price
    presto. Constitutional changes overnight left, right and center with a 29-1 majority
    presto. Gimme d vote and watch muh pull the largest cabinet, largest collection of czars, biggest group of consultants and the complicit corporation of the trade unions all out of a hat in the blink of an eye. Poof!

    6 is half dozen with a few addle ones in between.

    Just observing

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthernObserver

    @VC
    no bad manners….while I agree I too would like to see audited financials, as far as the NIS is concerned I am not ‘holding my breath’.
    This is the article I saw on the SOE financials….https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/04/03/soes-report-on-financials/

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Hants
    “We don’t fish in huts”….all the fun you are missing. The bigger ones are like a rum shop pun ice.

    Like

  • @David

    It was SRO crowd and the PM was well received, I saw people that I hadn’t seen in sometime and they were all eager to hear the PM. The early highlight or lowlight was a power failure during Farley’s introduction of Humphrey (rumour has it that a man in blue and gold attire was seen running from the building) but the gods smiled upon us and the hydro was restored within 5 mins.

    There was a heavy turnout of the Caricom Diplomatic Corp. (including Cuba) and even a Consular Rep from South Africa. As you know the proceedings were livestreamed to the faithful in Bim and elsewhere and I’m sure you are up to date on the details of proceedings.

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “Do you realize that many of the policies of the BDLP are the same as if blacks were a minority in a town or state.

    How do we explain that..”

    Theo…that is what these wicked, small time leaders do in Barbados, if stink cow or bizzy say black people are minorities in Barbados, their nasty little bribed leaders run with that and insists that it is so and do everything in their power to push that false narrative down the people’s throat.

    Mia is attempting to hold over 200,000 African descendants hostage because of the money their existence generates …i spent some time pondering why Mia would want to keep Bajan Africans away from the wealth that they are all entitled to in Africa, if they so choose to access their birthrights…why would she so maliciously and deliberately try to prevent Bajans from knowing they have an option….access to Africa’s wealth….for whom is Mia trying to hold her own people hostage and steal their wealth….

    For a long time i have heard of Mia’s and by extension her family’s greed…did not believe black people could be so vile as to deny generations of children their rightful place in their ancestor’s homeland…but it’s as clear as day that is what she planned to do.

    Don’t know which part of despite europeans raping Africa for centuries they only still managed to extract 10% of Africa’s wealth these miseducated, ignorant leaders do not understand….she thinks the Mottley’s can steal everything out of Africa for themselves and deny their own people their right to wealth…somehow she and her ilk believes they have some right to perpetrate more crimes against generations of their people….well they are welcome to try.

    Ancestors are watching though…and so are we.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    If I did not know better I would be inclined to believe ManyPussy when she calmly the Honourable Blogmaster

    The Minister of Disinformation for the Barbados Labour Party

    Behold his enthusiasm

    “…David April 8, 2019 7:51 PM

    @Hants

    He seems to be fairly gunho about the possibilities….”

    Yet when responding to the dissent by Mr Vincent Codrington he was rather lacklustre bordering on an admonishment

    And he days and I quote

    “…David April 8, 2019 8:40 PM

    This is not a right or wrong issue. It is more commonsense Vincent…”

    But let us not forget that the Honourable Blogmaster is impartial in this matter and is driven by the Barbados Underground motto

    “…For the cause that lacks assistance, the wrong that needs resistance, for the future in the distance, and the good that [BU] can do – George Linnaeus Banks…”

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @Brother Hants

    Your link on that woman living in my Lords Hill in that plight, is very timely

    Especially with the most Inept Minister of Elderly Affairs the cuntry has ever had Cynthia Forde

    While you are at the Gathering today, maybe you can share this link to let people know that, while Mugabe trying to fleece them there in the Diapora, ANOTHER SET OF BULLING IS GOING ON IN BARBADOS under the guise of 30 Ministers and $21 million in austerity.

    Here is the link here

    https://www.change.org/p/the-barbados-government-keep-bus-fare-at-2-00?recruiter=948007268&utm_source=share_petition&utm_campaign=psf_combo_share_abi&utm_medium=whatsapp&utm_content=washarecopy_14755969_en-GB%3Av7&recruited_by_id=95d83cc0-5a54-11e9-8c20-81ce3110669d

    ManyPussy i know that you and the demonic lying party will love this one and that assuredly it is going to be a link you going share.

    Let me see how Goering and his Poochlickers team going tek dat one down!!!

    Are you seeing the discontent that is spontaneously arising all over Barbados?

    I want wunna to comprehend that The Third Party Movement IS BIGGER THAT DE OLE MAN AND CONSPIRACIST AND TIN FOIL WEARER.

    Mugabe is a one term government

    ALL HAIL MUGABE !!!

    Like

  • Another economist speaks out
    There are dark clouds of more economic storms heading our way

    Home / Business / Government ‘on two-year countdown’

    Government ‘on two-year countdown’
    Article by
    Colville Mounsey Published on
    April 9, 2019
    There are ominous signs that key measures in the International Monetary Fund-approved economic restructuring programme are behind schedule, likely jeopardising any gains the Government has made so far, a leading economist has warned.

    Jeremy Stephen has argued that Government’s failure thus far to fix its foreign debt problems and fully implement its strategy for sustained fiscal breathing room could spell trouble for the country.

    And the clock is ticking to a deadline to find the money to pay huge debt bills in two years time.

    Stephen said the Mottley administration’s apparent reluctance to make deeper cuts in public sector jobs made it necessary to ensure that the other revenue-saving measures are fully online sooner rather than later.

    “Government has at best two years to really get things moving, to create that digital government, so that they could cut cost. It is clear that they don’t want to send home as many people as they really should. They are looking at other ways and means to cut cost.

    “However, if they are not able to create that fiscal space and that same digitization programme, which should have been implemented last year stretches into 2020, then we are going to have a serious problem,” He told Barbados TODAY.

    The University of the West Indies lecturer argued that in addition to the austerity measures, Government needed to put the pedal to the metal on a short-term growth plan.

    The growth is needed to bolster foreign exchange reserves, which stand at just over a billion dollars after being propped up by a near $600 million drawdown from the IMF, but are in danger of running out, he added.

    Stephen explained: “Government has two very big debts to fulfil. In 2021, there is near $500 million that Government needs to find to close out some debt and then the following year they need to find an additional amount.

    “So, all of the reserves that we have now, which is over a billion, Government needs to find a way to grow exports in the near term so that we could have enough reserves left behind to pay off those debts comfortably in about two years.

    “The onus is on Government to act quickly because it is not something that you can play around with.”

    Another area of concern to the economist was the Government’s handling of its sovereign debt to international creditors.

    He told Barbados TODAY that with almost a year having elapsed since Barbados defaulted on its foreign debt and a settlement yet to be announced, Government was essentially on borrowed time. He contended that anything less than a quick amicable debt restructuring could prove problematic for the country’s ability to borrow as well as investor confidence.

    “If the global private sector sees that while we have good tax rates, but Government is taking a bit longer to properly restructure the debt of foreign investors, then they are not going to want to invest in the Government debt. This will also impact on those who want to invest in private interest in Barbados because they look at things like sovereign risk.

    “If they [Government] don’t get that done and settle with these foreign investors in the near term then that has far-reaching consequences. You need to remember what happened to Argentina in the early 2000s, where those investors took that country to court and to this day Argentina has trouble borrowing.”

    However, the economist did have high praise for other aspects of Government’s roll out of BERT, noting that Government has “been pretty good in keeping up with what the IMF expects.”

    “They have been a little slow with certain things such as the retrenchment process but that is possibly politically motivated, as sending home too many people too quickly is never a good look from a public perception. So, Government has done other things such as local debt refinancing which has helpful for the Government. It is left to be seen still if they will get the desired result at the end of the day,” he stressed.
    colvillemounsey@barbadostoday

    Like

  • Is this the same Jeremy Stephens you made the following comment:

    boy i tell u when Jeremy stephens had finished his two cents worth of chapter and verses of the barbados economy i was heading out the door , this guy is a work of art, the dullest gloomiest creature that i have ever encountered in word all my life, phew sweat was falling off my brow my heart was racing faster than a kentucky mule running at brek neck speed and all i could think of ,, where in the world is this place this dude this dude is speaking ,it sounded like hell on earth, this guy should be banished from ever talking again about any thing cause he knows how to direct a person attention to all things Negative, what a dracula! Scary

    https://barbadosunderground.net/2015/01/05/time-for-donville-to-usurp/comment-page-1/#comment-438426

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    I do remember Stephens on radio trying to help Rawdone and Dukharan promote their mMoney scam against the peolr. They could talk all the shite on earth but they better not one of them try to steal that 11 billion dollars in savings belonging the majority population.

    Like

  • So what is your point
    I do remember when making those comments Stephens was a strong advocate of IMF intervention
    Hence my comments were in such context as to his preference of IMF intervention which would have included draconian policies

    Like

  • Marippsa

    Ignore David BU

    He is a misguided BLP apologist !

    He only knows how to pooch lick for the Bees !

    Like

  • @ Mariposa,

    When the facts change you have a right to change your mind – John Maynard Keynes. More important, BERT is not an economic policy, it is humbug. What are the theoretical underpinnings of BERT? Where is the economic recovery in a programme of austerity? For the academics, are they saying the qualitative easings mechanism used by the G-20 after 2008 were wrong? Under the BERT austerity programme, how will growth return to the economy? What about the proposals to encourage household savers to ‘invest’ their life savings in peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding?
    The problem with BERT is that there s no serious economic debate.

    Like

  • And the policies of the DLP were not draconian? Sewage, garbage, decimation the NIS fund, 50 million printing of money, MICHAEL CARRINGTON etc etc

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    BERT …SMERT….Mia is a fraud..

    Mia knew about the conference re Africa opening it’s doors to its African descended children worldwide SINCE 2018…but Mia does not want her fellow black bajans to access THEIR African wealth to which they are entitled…she is nasty and envious and want to see black people wallowing in poverty while she and her dirty ilk steal everything that cannot be nailed down…a demon criminal…so just like her ….BERT IS SHITE..

    Like

  • quantitative easings….

    Like

  • Here is another reminder of your volte face: you are entitled to change your mind.

    Every now and then when nothing seems to be working in favour of the Blp. party and there leadership…there are those who would seek refuge and comfort by digging up the dried bones of David Thompson .For all that is worth and the captivating story surrounding the check.there is an lngoing legal process being put in place which would sort and dissolve all issued involved to the Clico problems..however after more than umpteenth years the now famous 75 thousand campaign check which was deposited into. Owen Arthur account still remains unresolved mired in a cesspool of suspicion as to.who.what..and where.

    https://barbadosunderground.net/2014/07/01/open-letter-to-the-director-of-public-prosecutions-dpp-about-the-clico-barbados-scandal/comment-page-1/#comment-340190

    #owenarthur

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Have not had a chance to listen. The early feedback is that diasporeans are very concerned about the fall of the jewel in the crown and are willing to assist as patriotic Bajans will want to?

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Hal Austin

    Wow. DId not know you had so much sense outside the sometimes nonsense you tend to write. I must give you credit on this. I know we have not always seen eye to eye,but when a man right he right. BERT is a mere stop gap measure in the interim phase to ensure that the problem related to our deficits can be addressed with cut backs. Then there is the growth factor for which BERT is not intended to address. Indeed, we need to attend to the problem of our fiscal nightmare, and the hiring of White Oaks at nearly 90, 000.00 BDS a month better darn well consolidate towards some sort of fix. However, that again is another stop gap measure for which growth strategies are not comtemplated. Therefore, what is going to fuel growth at the same time that the deficits are under remedial works? If we do not grow the economy, and come up with growth strategies outside of our number one friend tourism, the efforts will be wasted, and square one is looking very much like a return to the beginning of all the shite that got Barbados in this position in the first place-Myopic vision.

    Like

  • Dealing with bread and butter issues.
    (Not B or D… Just the mentality)
    a——————————————-a
    I found it surprising that there were a few who immediately supported an increase in bus fare. I believe it is un-natural to support an increase in bus fare, water rates, electricity rates, income taxes, land taxes .. …. Of course, there will always be increases but the first reaction should be study the impact of these increases and then speak out. (Yea or Nay)

    But for some to embrace increases as soon as they are announced is folly. (to put it kindly). The real bite comes when they have to put their hands in their pockets and pay the difference. No matter which part of the yard you are in, you will feel the pain.

    #JustTo1Guy: Scour Facebook and you will see the lovers of a fare increase.

    Like

  • I believe it is unnatural to support an increase in bus fare, water rates, electricity rates, income taxes, land taxes ….. at the moment they are announced. One can understand why BWA or the electric company would jump with glee,but not the average consumer.

    Like

  • Minister of distraction sorry to burst yuh bubble .i have not had an about face since i am still not in favour of the IMF draconian measures( which most likely Jeremy remains steadfast and in favour on account of the falling reserves)
    However his deep analysis and one of concern should not be disregarded as he pinpoints a gross area where negligence or the inability of govt to come to a formidable conclusion on repayment of foreign debt is a problem
    A problem which can cause huge economic problems for barbados

    Like

  • Leaving…
    Hal is a very bright guy…. one of the best here.
    However, he usually performs below his weight class

    Like

  • Actually it’s worse. At least this group is good at propaganda, lying, hiding and making garbage smell like perfume.

    Finally , someone says it.

    Like

  • The Minister and all the insurance crooks can beg Bajans to insure their homes until pigs fly…. but with bus fare, water rates, electricity rates, income taxes, land taxes, travel & transportation taxes, Credit card fees, etc, etc, etc .. all dumped on us to help our country…. who got money to pay for insurance???? I know its wise to have the insurance on your home but I don’t work for a Minister’s salary and food for me & family come first!

    Like

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Thst is what happens when ya were so desperate to become a small island, tinpot dictator .. that you do not care how much poverty your people experience or how much poverty your wicked, covetous, envious actions bring into the lives of vulnerable black people ..just as long as ya achieve ya smallminded objective.

    ,…..,but the saying, “be careful what you wish for”…….still rings very true…today aand every day.

    Like

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