Minister of Education Santia Bradshaw Makes Shocking Revelation

There has always been consensus by the BU family that at the root of our problems is an irrelevant and dysfunctional education system.  It was therefore important to listen  to Minister of Education Santia Bradshaw as she and her team appeared before the 2019 House Appropriation Debate – Standing Finance Committee OWN the problems with a promise to reform the education system.

It was interesting to note Bradshaw’s assessment of the current education system if compared to her predecessor Ronald Jones. He offered no similar critiques during his lengthy tenure as minister of education. What a difference a general election makes!

A poignant moment came in the presentation when Minister Bradshaw stated that problems identified by the criterion test at 9 years old were not remediated before the child had to do the 11+. It there translated to young children condemned as failures by society. Some may suggest another poignant moment occurred when the Prime Minister asked Chief Education Officer what recommendation would she make to improve the leadership in the schools. Her response will floor you!

Watch Santia Bradshaw, Minister of Education, Technological and Vocational Training share the challenges and opportunities  faced by her ministry.

A must listen for all Barbadians!

 

260 comments

  • Taken from BU FB timeline:

    This is my first post in a long while as something arose in the Parliament of Barbados today that is of great interest to me, and possibly to you as well.

    I was listening to today’s Parliamentary debate on educational reform and came away with the impression that the country’s preeminent secondary school (since 1733), Harrison College will be destroyed. Actually “destroyed” may be too strong a word. Perhaps I should say that the school will be purged of its perceived (or real) “cancer” of elitism and classism. This “problem” was mentioned several times by at least one speaker during that period of the debate (about 3:30 – 4:30 PM) and I did not detect any dissent by other Parliamentarians.

    I was therefore left to wonder exactly what “problem” is being/has been created by the school, its teachers and heaven forbid, its students? Against whom is this “problem” being directed? What are the negative impacts of this “problem”, if any? How have the impacted persons dealt with the “problem”? Have any remedies been effective? Have some Parliamentarians been victims of the “problem”? Finally, is the Parliament of Barbados infested with the same cancer?

    I do “confess” that I am a former student of Harrison College and the school did try to inoculate me from the cancerous infections of uneducation. For some strange and obscure reason, the school absolutely insisted that academic over achievement is to be preferred over under achievement. Yes, I am a “victim”.

    I also concede that it was the Government of Barbados that knowingly fiested this cancerous school upon me when I was at the tender age of ten years old (and thus unable to make decisions for myself). Am I now in a position to seek leave for redress from the said Government of Barbados, given that Parliamentarians have clearly made thier accusations against the school a matter of public record?

    Surely you would agree that my perverse interpretation of today’s Parliamentary debate is a reflection of the folly of the proposed action against the “problem” of Harrison College!

    Further, it seems to me that Harrison College and by extension what it “represents”, is merely a surrogate for, and a legacy of the colonial history of Barbados. It is obviously an easy target as the school and its students and teachers are not in a position to defend themselves against the “tyranny” of the Parliament of Barbados. Given this imbalance, the sentiments expressed today by Parliamentarians may ultimately be seen by history as “Parliamentary Bullying”!

    Even further, I detect that Parliamentarians in their heart of hearts, really want to take on a “true” colonial “problem” that persists until this very day (from since 1627). However, shall we ever see today’s passionate Parliamentary ire be directed against the true ongoing institutional legacy of the colonial past, namely the Monarchy of Barbados and the Westminster form of Government? Needless to say, doctor cure yourself first!

    Do our Parliamentary leaders have the fortitude, let alone the wisdom to tackle the real “problem” and not merely its perceived surrogate, a secondary school of innocents?

    Will the proposed surgery on Harrison College cure Barbados of the scourge of elitism and classism? Some how, I think not!

    I say to the Parliamentarians, leave the school alone and go and fight some real battles with all the intestinal and anatomical fortitude that you will require. Go pick on someone of your own size!

    In summary, I think that the current public educational system has worked well for some of the students. In fact, I would wager about fifty (50) percent of the students. That’s my guess. Rather than throwing the baby out with the bathwater, there should be a delicate and thoughtful approach to address the “academic” underachievement of the remaining fifty (50) percent. Therein lies part of the solution, simply target the under achieving 50 percent with non-academic education, and leave the achieving 50 percent alone. However, there seems to be much vested emotions in destroying, or at least curing Harrison College, which is but one of about about 21 public secondary schools, and nine (9) private schools that offer secondary education.

    In deo fides.

    Regards,

    Roland Clarke PhD UPenn (1995) HC (1978)

    Liked by 1 person

  • Root of the educational problems is the teaching theories of pedagogy. Teaching system is not effective in the learning transfer of classroom. We have to change change the prevailing school system for the effective knowledge transfer of students. Thanks for the writing

    Like

  • Imagine 30 nine year olds sit a criterion reference test. The test results come back sometime towards the end of the school year. 30 different educational profiles are thus determined. However a single teacher in the following academic year is to respond to the strengths/ weaknesses of 30 students while being required to complete a syllabus of “new” work in that year.

    Talk is cheap!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Should one find a Youtube posting of this item please let de ole man know causing I ent willing to use dese fellers facebook tings dem causing I frighten to get a Charles Me Love you long time Infection like de one wunna manufacture heah in *** when wunna ef up de ole man old gmail account heheheheheh

    Tank you very much for that act.

    @ Roland Clarke Phd

    The problem with these Public Relations show is that THEY HAVE TO DELIVER SOMETHING else it will be seen for just that a PR show.

    For the Mottley Regime to continue to fool people outside of the regime that something is going on IT MUST FIRST FOOL PEOPLE ON THE INSIDE THAT THEY ARE DOING SOMETHING!

    This is the strength of any dictatorship so that this seeming semiautonomy among the multiple party leaders/ministers is to create a false sense of power for a Minister, IN THIS CASE THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, to ensure that the regime’s pimps will not renege on pledging their power rather their loyalty to Mugabe.

    This formal CBC show seeks to leverage this PR stunt to the max while Mugabe effects a pretend “ceding of decision-making authority” to these pretend Ministers and Ministers in the Ministry of *** FOR 45 minutes

    By offering these 45 minutes in the spotlight Mugabe is able to have the poochlickers believe that they are part of the INNER RED CIRCLE.

    But that feeting power is cancelled AT THE END OF THE MONKEY PARADE

    Liked by 1 person

  • You seem entrenched with your conspiracy lense. If you read closely you will see that the video embedded in the blog is YouTube. Secondly have we had a minister in recent years speak to the issues as was done yesterday? Does talk precede action? How do we measure if this minister and government can implement change? The answer is obvious, civil society must continue to advocate and agitate to hold officials accountable.

    Like

  • Forgive the uneducated, what is a “criterion test”? And which society condemns 11 year olds as “failures”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David BU

    Come on boss!!

    Why do you remain so enthralled by talk? Why don’t you reserve the applause until after we see real change?

    I submit to you that this approach is part of the problem why Bim is where it is. We are too impressed by fluff and pretty talk and plans. If only we reserve the praise until we see progress.

    I thought you left Hope Road earlier in the year…

    Liked by 3 people

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    You have two of the oldest schools on the island STILL named after 2 repulsive slave masters…who were vicious criminals and racists …Harrison and Combermere…that alone is insulting and disrespectful to every black student AND THEIR ANCESTORS….who enters those doors with innocent unaware minds….expecting to have a wholesome education…devoid of MISEDUCATION……

    None of them can give a clear explanation about why after hundreds of years you still have schools named after criminal slave masters…

    first….get rid of those two blighted and cursed slave master’s names…free the schools from the stigma of being slave owner’s schools..

    then upgrade the education system across the board.. particularly….. WHAT IS TAUGHT…

    get rid of the goddamn useless 11 plus…

    a good measuring stick for failure…is that most of the ministers, PMs, lawyers, public servants etc went to those pretend elitist, classist and downright racist schools…and they all turned out to be failures, unable to upgrade the island beyond the dependency level, neglecting the island and very population who pay their salaries… useless to the island and any expected progress and productivity so by extension you have failed students and a failed country..

    Happy to see some finally waking up from fantasy island…

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  • @Sargeant

    Here is a link which explain the criterion referenced test.

    https://gisbarbados.gov.bb/blog/assessing-primary-school-work/

    Like

  • @Dullard

    Where the blogmaster comes from we must give feedback, all the time. You prefer we shut up or be always condemning?

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    i hope this sinks right into those minds with the big egos and pretend elitism/classism

    …a good measuring stick for the island’s major failures…is that most of the ministers, PMs, lawyers, doctors public servants etc went to those pretend elitist, classist and downright racist schools…and they all turned out to be failures, unable to INTELLECTUALLY OR PHYSICALLY upgrade the island beyond the dependency level, neglecting the island and the very population who pay their salaries… useless to the island and any expected CURRENT OR FUTURE progress and productivity…. so by extension you have failed students and a failed country..

    When white people can complain about how racist Barbados is…a small country with a predominantly black majority…ya know the racism, classism, pretend elitism starts in the schools and extends outward to the parliament like a cancer and continued for decades to spread its destructive toxic poisons into the unaware population for the last 60 years…

    if you understand the symptoms…you can apply treatment and a cure..

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  • The blogmaster is willing to be corrected but is this the first time we have heard a minister of education voicing publicly we must dismantle the thing?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Leave the school system in place because a post-Harrisonian with PhD says that we must. It is of no concern to him that we have this stupid concept of bad schools, good schools, and the 11 + that perpetuates this stupid notion. The system has worked well for 50 percent of the students? The other 50 needs an assessment as to why they underachieve. They underachieve because of unfair practices of employment; struggles associated with the cost of living, and lack of time spent with their children because they are too busy worrying about the next set of bills. Barbados presents a good few reasons for the underachievers, but if you look at the achievers, their conditions are far better than the underachievers. Look at that too as part of the problem

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Everything has hit rock bottom..from the economy to the education system and everything else in between…..ah don’t think anyone who can see, hear or think would be so blind as to not understand that the only way left for the island to go is up..and the only option left .is to make the requisite and appropriate changes to the education system……to all the systems, but this is the only one i think those in parliament may have enough intelligence to start fixing….unless they want more of the same and even worse coming out of an already failed education system… in which case the electorate should throw all their failed asses, out of the parliament..

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “Barbados presents a good few reasons for the underachievers, but if you look at the achievers, their conditions are far better than the underachievers. Look at that too as part of the problem.”

    There are only 2 groups of achievers coming out of the education system…the ones who are forced to leave the island to access opportunities abroad because as long as they are not connected or wired into the corrupt system…they cannot progress…..or achieve.

    …AND…the ones who stay on the island…are wired into the corrupt system through friendships, familial connections or whatever…but most times those on island achievers are equally corrupt and like their masters in the parliament and bar association…known only as low level common class thieves, helping their companeros to rape the island…which in turn helped them to achieve…

    we have to call it what it is before it gets twisted and those pretend elites and classists in the parliament start assigning blame when they cannot fix what they broke…

    Like

  • @SSS

    It was interesting listening to the technocrats, forget the politicians.

    It serves a useful purpose if some commenters take the time to listen as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Does the criterion test account for problems that may not be immediately identifiable e.g. dyslexia, poor eyesight,poor hearing etc,? Some of these tests no matter how noble the intent descend into a one size fits all template.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Here is the problem with the education system in general

    Teacher johnny who wrote the declaration of independence

    I do know and I dont give a phuc

    teacher calls parents to come in, your son is rude, insolent. and frankly seems not to know anything

    father asks What do you mean

    I;ll show you johnny who wrote the declaration of independence

    I dont know and I dont give a phuc.

    father…..Look you little phucer if you wrote that thing you better own up to it.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Last year i remember throwing a fit when i found out there were teachers …black teachers…in the so called elite schools, teaching black children how to hate themselves…at least one of those teachers i knew of has been removed…retired…the problems in the education system runs very deep…and wide…

    If they start the healing from that perspective…maybe..just maybe…they will get somewhere….by instructing the teachers in every school that self love and self-respect are traits that vulnerable children need in their lives…not self-loathing..

    the 11 plus is toxic…has always been toxic, has always been a self-hating weapon, tool and vehicle…. and unless removed, nothing will ever change…the failures will never change…no matter how the ones who sat it and thinks it made them arrive and elitist…wants to keep it in place for the pretend elite effect and want to pass on that pretence of being elite to their children and grandchildren….it is the stupidest thing i ever heard..

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  • @Sargeant

    Would poor results in the criterion test not present the opportunity for early detection of some issues?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Here is the great observation of a former minister of education and current prime minister. We want action, not fluffy PR words.` The failure of leadership starts at the top, not with the classroom teachers.

    Prime minister Mia Mottley has blamed education management and school leadership for a deficit that allows teenaged boys and girls to fall through the cracks.
    Mottley said: “We cannot abandon these children by just putting them out there . . . . If we have a school that is not functioning or a leader that is not leading to keep them there for two years, three years, four years . . . . How many children’s lives have been sacrificed in the interim?
    “We will continue to spin top in mud if we do not recognise that it begins with leadership and it ends with leadership. Leadership at the level of schools, at the level of Ministry is what is needed.”
    Speaking in the House of Assembly during the Appropriation Bill and Estimates hearings today, Mottley revealed that plans to introduce a new leadership position within the teaching faculty has been shelved owing to budget constraints.
    “We continue to believe that a good teacher becomes a good principal,” she said. “My one regret is not being able at this stage fiscally to introduce the Master Teacher. Good teachers must be paid well without being promoted into leadership where they become managers.”
    The Prime Minister, a former Minister of Education, posed a direct question to Chief Education Officer Karen Best seeking recommendations on how best to weed out “bad” and non-functioning principals.
    In responding, Best reminded Mottley who spent seven years in the education ministry, that there is process in place that they are forced to follow.
    Best told the premier: “There are some schools where we have challenges with the leadership. We have been providing the assistance for them.”
    When pressed further, the Chief Education Officer said a “contractual arrangement” in hiring principals would allow the Ministry the power to act when a principal is not doing their job.
    Best declared: “The system that we have does not allow for principals, teachers or anybody for that matter on contracts. They are there, they are appointed. If we have principals who are placed on contract and they are not performing they would then have to move on. I believe we should move to a system where we have persons being placed on contract.”
    The Prime Minister said while the Edna Nicholls School was Government’s first point for deviant youth, she is mindful that another institution to handle chronic delinquents is needed.
    Mottley had made similar comments on Monday in the House when she made the link between deviant behaviour and the current surge in violence. At the time, the Attorney-General and his team were before the Standing Committee.
    She said then: “There has to be an institution that allows those children who literally are too difficult to be managed in the secondary school setting to be taken into another setting and to be able to be given the dedicated time, attention and discipline to stop them from literally falling off the edge and entering into a world of crime from which they may never return.” (QUOTE)

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    The Minister has said nothing new. The Barbados Union of Teachers (BUT)under the leadership of Comrade John Cumberbatch highlighted the failures of the system in the 70s.
    Quite frankly, unless the eleven plus is scrapped and a system of continuos assessment instituted , what we got yesterday remains nothing but hot air.
    I have warned repeatedly that we cannot produce a 2019 model on a 1919 production line. Yesterday was nothing more than tinkering with a system that is hugely responsible for the myriad socio economic problems that have now enveloped the country,
    We need to stop looking at presentations and seek substance.

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  • @ William,

    Much as I appreciated your continuing invaluable contributions to BU, 11+ versus continuous assessments is not that simple. We have just had both n the UK and the results scan be surprising.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    So the education system in Barbados is not fit for purpose. Who knew? Ms Bradshaw is just stating the obvious.

    What she could do to show that the Gov’t is serious, is to publish the performance of all schools for the public to look at and form their own opinions. Why is this a state secret?

    This is the Dullards prediction. In 10 years we will still be having this conversation. Why? Because it is easier to talk about doing than to do.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Another political speech without sound reasoning and rationality
    As usual Barbados is leaping forward with backward movement

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  • “we have this stupid concept of bad schools, good schools”

    Why is this a stupid concept?

    Aren’t some schools better than others? It was and will always be like this. Where would the world be without centres of excellence?

    The issue is not Harrison College or Queens, etc. But not making the ”other schools” fit for purpose.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Would poor results in the criterion test not present the opportunity for early detection of some issues?”

    @David. For starters the results are not shared with parents. Our system repeatedly undermines the parent s role. Further 9 is too late in the context of the 11+

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  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    This is nothing new ,they always blame the teachers. Ms. Mottley knows fully well of the role played by politics in the ministry and it was no different when she was minister of education. She cannot now pretend that she does not know that many outstanding teachers never sought to be principals because of the politics.
    A real debate about the politics in that ministry over the last forty years will open a can of worms that will brutally shock the country.
    In terms of being a political football; the ministry of education is just as infected as any of the SOEs.

    Liked by 1 person

  • What makes a bad school or a good school? Mr Kirk Humphrey asked an insightful question which was not directly addressed by Ms Bradshaw. He asked what accounts for two groups of students having almost identical CE marks but after going to different secondary schools, having very different academic outcomes?

    How does introducing continuous assessment change that scenario?

    Liked by 1 person

  • What is continuous assessment? continuous stress vs stress on one day?

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    Your point is well taken. However there must be an exercise that can carefully husband our Human Resources and it must start at the primary level. I remain a proponent of continuous assessment because it can be tailored rather quickly to fit the needs of our society.
    No system is perfect but the eleven plus has outlived its usefulness at all levels.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    The first thing we should accept is that the schools are not bad – it’s the system.

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  • @smarty

    Agree with you. Minister Bradshaw has moved the conversation along. We have the opportunity to measure her performance this time next year. Did you listen to the technocrats?

    @Dullard

    The blogmaster will drive in the positive lane.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Honourable Blogmaster

    You said and I quote

    ” ..@Sargeant Here is a link which explain the criterion referenced test.

    https://gisbarbados.gov.bb/blog/assessing-primary-school-work/ …”

    So in the one breath you point out that the Facebook movie will not call the fbsbx com website and thereafter harvest the user’s Facebook name that they are logged in on without their knowledge

    And yes my CONSPIRACY lens is ot to point out that the site to see the rules and regulations, is in fact a Charles Me Love You Long Time Jong website with embedded pixels

    STEUPSEEE!

    Liked by 1 person

  • You claim to have state of the art security policies VPN proxy servers and the like yet unable to click a public link?

    Steuspe indeed!

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  • Jefferson Cumberbatch

    What makes a bad school or a good school? Mr Kirk Humphrey asked an insightful question which was not directly addressed by Ms Bradshaw. He asked what accounts for two groups of students having almost identical CE marks but after going to different secondary schools, having very different academic outcomes?

    Is this a problem? Different outcomes must also factor in the home environment. Do/can the parents read? Do they encourage conversation/reading or is it just social media and television every day after school. GIGO!

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    “William Skinner March 6, 2019 7:25 AM

    The first thing we should accept is that the schools are not bad – it’s the system.”

    On point..there are no bad schools.

    And without backing and forthing …if we help those who live in their comfort zones on Cuckoo Land to see the reality of how and why the island FAILED….starting with the FACT…that after UK cut and ran leaving their VICTIMS behind in the Caribbean…with an education system DESIGNED by UK….a system which was merely an EXPERIMENT….ehich was never upgraded by the pretend leaders cause they were all brainwashed by the same system….and obviously still dont understand why they themselves are like that mentally……..still dont understand that all they are is an EXPERIMENT…

    those of us who understand KNOW…that 99.9999% of all experiments…ALWAYS FAIL….ergo Barbados is a failed experiment…made even worse by dumb, visionless leaders.

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  • @ Mr Cumberbatch

    two points: First note the two groups are said to have near identical CE marks and second, my query as to whether continuous assessment will change the scenario as given.

    I don’t have the problem.

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  • I very strongly believe that the relative ranking of children re: allocation to secondary schools will be the same under continuous assessment as now obtains under the present CE exam.

    Try again if the objective is to ensure that the children of Fort George Heights attend Parkinson.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    Was slavery abolished in 1834 because there were protest in 1834?

    Was institutionalized apartheid in South Africa abolished because protests started when Mandela made the long walk to freedom?

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  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    And just to reinforce how toxic the education system is…cause am sure most have already forgotten..just recently a very bright boy child at Grantley Adams school, a natural born leader, stood up for his and his fellow students human rights when the government changed and placed their toxic yardfowls in the school canteen to serve the children bad food….and the kids protested and refused to buy food that could poison them and which cost more than their parents could afford…..

    ….this child was sentenced to 2 months at home for standing up for his rights and those of his fellow students and then the same ministry of miseducation…after punishing the child for 2 months…withholding his education.. tried to torment and punish him even further by attempting to drag him off to a distant school for troubled kids……clear across the other side of the island…effectively sending a message to black kids that you have no right to stand up for your rights…as black children…

    Maybe Santia can tell us how that investigation into the clear violation of that child’s human rights is coming along.

    Then there is the even worse violation of black people’s rights by the ministry of jackasses.

    ….the only people on the island not allowed to home school their children…under threats of arrest….is the majority black population….everyone else is given an immediate greenlight to homeschool their children…..without any questions……some never even send their children to the school system….and no one checks on them…they wont dare..but always have handcuffs ready for their own people.

    The problem is the school system..,the toxic leaders, the toxic ministry of miseducation…which have all PROVEN themselves to be useless.

    Clean that up …first…,then find ways to assist the traumatized parents into paying more attention…parental classes cannot hurt..,the money the leaders steal by the hundreds of millions..,it needs only a small fraction to set up parental classes.

    Like

  • Seems like there is a concerted effort to link crime to some schools to 11 plus to failures in the education system to a breakdown of management in the Education Dept.as well as the schools to assessment of primary school students to everything one could think of, however the Minister said that the “deficits” go back decades now that covers both Parties that Governed Barbados and includes the present PM.

    With all that in a few weeks we will see the celebration of 11 plus students and later the celebration of scholarship winners.

    I give up

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Sargeant

    Classism has always been alive and well in Barbados. You are correct to be suspicious there is a biase how data is collected.

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  • @ William,

    Classroom teaching is continuous assessment. Good teachers should be able to assess the understanding of every pupil after every lesson; that is also the purpose of marked work – in the classroom and homework. There is also a role for mock exams, to give teachers an idea of how pupils perform under exam conditions.
    All pupils are not academic, so testing them under academic conditions at age 9 or 11 says more about the system than it says about the pupils; there must also be provisions for late developers; the model I like is the Staten Island college model, which provides a weekend (fulltime) standard.
    There must also be room for technical education ( ie Germany) and not just using education as a production line for lawyers and economists. We must also look at the different impact of continuous assessment and sudden death exams on boys and girls (ie the UK experience).
    In a speech a few years ago to a Commonwealth Secretariat conference in Barbados I made this same point. Women all over the world are out-performing men, even in Saudi Arabia. There is a reason for that.
    In Barbados we have unique problems, including the social conservatism that cripples the country. Before any of us on BU was born the old First Grade schools have been out-performing the others. They still are. Why? Is it the quality of the teaching? The quality of the pupil intake? What? Can we bring the other schools up to grade, or do we as parents just want our children to go to the old First Grade schools, get national scholarships, and bugger the rest?
    The question of the home environment is irrelevant. My generation of young people enjoyed private lessons (in my case Mr Greenidge) paid for by parents who in many instances could not read or write, or not very advanced. But they understood the value of education. It is also the immigrant experience, with the exception of Caribbeans in the UK, but that is another story.
    Part of the home environment in Barbados was what we called playing ‘school’, when the older kids will teach the younger ones. On reflection, that was an incredible experience, especially during the long summer break when it acted to keep young brains alert.
    Finally, and this is important, the post-war generations who enjoyed a high quality of secondary education failed to make any contribution to their old communities. I have said here before that J.O. Morris, of St Giles, was the best educator I have ever encountered (in my limited experience) and the school itself was the Eton of Barbados (@ William, you know this from experience). Where did those values go?
    One inspiration I had while at St Giles was looking up at the plaques on the wall and reading off the names of those who had gone on and up; Grantley Herbert Adams stood out.
    Our failure is not one of households, as BU believes, but of our collective national leadership – poor and rich, black and white. We can keep finding excuses, or face reality. Barbados is a failed state.

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  • About violence in schools isn’t this a case of the chickens coming home to roost? We have never been attuned to conflict resolution it was always “if someone hits you hit e/she back”.

    An eye for an eye leaves both blind

    Liked by 1 person

  • WARU, Crazy & Unstable, Hogging the Blog

    Pretty ironic that all the pretend elites who attended the pretend elitist, classist, racist schools and headed with breakneck speed to the parliament, bar association etc….turned out to be thieves, just like the british who designed their racist education system…lol

    Karma lives.

    Like

  • @ Sargeant,

    An eye for an eye is Biblical justice.

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  • A lot of hot hair nothing would change
    In any case Barbados is so far behind and does nit have the financial resources to keep it education system in pace with the global economy
    All this hot air will amount to nothingness
    Meanwhile govt continues to blow smoke in the face of the people while using Parliament as a reflecting mirror

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ David
    Anybody(you included) who believes what was said in parliament yesterday was “poignant” and earth shattering, has not been following the on going debate about the educational system .
    I don’t understand your questions.

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  • @ Mariposa,

    You are right. We like it as it is. The first thing Ms Bradshaw should do is publish in full the CXC exam results for each school.

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  • MS BRADHAW IS TALKING AS MUCH SHITE AS HER FATHER DID WHEN IN 1994 HE SAID AT THE TIME OF AN IMPORTANT VOTE IN PARLIAMENT THAT HE WENT TO ANTIGUA TO HAVE HIS PILES TREATED

    Liked by 1 person

  • Instead of ‘pulling down’ Harrison College & other so-called “good schools”…. investigate & find out why you deem them the ‘good” schools and apply your findings to those you consider the ‘bad’ schools.

    Do not lower your standards…. raise them!!! Or as Hal says…..you will be a “failed state”!!!

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    That society that you speak of o longer exists. The whole approach was relevant to those times.
    Outside of the limited number that went on to the prestigious grammar schools, many others went straight into the trades. The ones who were bright but got none of the scarce scholarships found careers in the public service and were the builders of what we now call the middle class.
    Teachers today are not seen as the fountains of all knowledge;they have no monopoly on information .There is google!
    Countries cannot be built on nostalgia.
    As outstanding as that era was, we must realize that it has gone forever.
    To restructure an economy such as ours ,there must be a radical reform of the educational system.
    Our problems are a direct result of an economic system that keeps real wealth in the hands of a few and an educational system that condemns citizens at the ripe old age of eleven.
    If we are a failed state that is how we failed.

    Like

  • Our failure is not one of households, as BU believes, but of our collective national leadership (HAL AUSTIN THE SAGE ..SORRY I SHOULD HAVE SAID THE SHIT!)

    IF HIS BRAIN WAS THE SIZE OF A PEA IT WOULD BE ABLE TO COMPUTE THAT NATIONAL FAILURE IS A FUNCTION OF COLLECTIVE HOUSEHOLDS……SINCE NATIONS ARE COMPOSED OF HOUSEHOLDS!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jeff

    I have never understood why after paying teachers loads of money to educate our children …then we turn around and expect parents who are trying to make a living to take of the same children to educate then at home as well?

    Liked by 1 person

  • As much as the Minister was complaining about the “deficits” and lack of resources the Gov’t decided to allow the children of CARICOM nationals free entry into all of our educational institutions,now I don’t know how the numbers impact any thing but yesterday I caught the end of a response to a call in query by Wickham and he said something to the effect that any Barbadian student could enter any school in the CARICOM area and receive a free education which made me go Hmmmmmmnnnn.

    Liked by 1 person

  • ks March 6, 2019 9:08 AM

    Instead of ‘pulling down’ Harrison College & other so-called “good schools”…. investigate & find out why you deem them the ‘good” schools and apply your findings to those you consider the ‘bad’ schools.

    Do not lower your standards…. raise them!!! Or as Hal says…..you will be a “failed state”!!!

    YOU ARE VERY CORRECT SIR
    BUT IT IS THE NATIONAL PLOY IN GOVERNMENT TO DESTROY THE BEST IT PRODUCES

    TWO EXAMPLES FROM MY EXPERIENCE
    1- I WORKED AT A POLYCLINIC WHERE THE RECEPTIONISTS GOT OT THE NOTES FOR THE NEXT DAYS PATIENTS BEFORE CLOSING TIME EACH DAY. THE CLINIC WORKED LIKE CLOCKWORK THE NEXT DAY.
    YOU WOULD THINK THAT THIS EXCELLENCE WOULD HAVE BEEN TAUGHT AND IMPLEMENTED THROUGHOUT THE SYSTEM………IT WAS NOT. IT CRUMBLED FOR SILLY REASONS I WONT DISCLOSE
    2 I WORKED WITH AN EXCELLENT DR WHO PATIENTLY SORTED OUT ALL THE INTRICATE DETAILS OF OUR ELDERLY PATIENTS AT ONE END………WHILE I CLEARED THE CLINIC OF THE TRIVIAL CASES
    THEY SEPARATED US! AND TURNED THE OPPERATIONS OF THAT CLINIC INTO CHAOS

    I WENT TO BFS AND THEN HC AFTER THE FIRST COMMON ENTRANCE EXAM
    I AM A DUMMY SO I MISSED THE ELITISM!
    I WENT, PITCHED MARBLES, PLAYED TIP AND RUN FIRMS, MARBLE CRICKET AND BECAME AN EXCELLENT PHOTOGRAPHER, SUCH THAT I WAS PHOTOGRAPHIONG WEDDINGS AT AGE 17—–SHOULD HAVE STUCK TO THAT!

    LET US DESTROY HC AND QC IN ORDER TO FIX OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM! HILARIOUS!
    WAS NOT EDUCTECH UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF MIA MAO MUGABE MUTTLEY, NOW PRIMEWICKER AND DICTATOR, TO FIX OUR EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM TOO?

    Liked by 1 person

  • The next question which should have been asked of Wickham( the poochlicker) how does he proposed the govt pay for this extended Caricom family
    As of now Mia made plenty promises of tax cuts to the poor which she has not kept
    Furthermore has taken a position of depleting govt revenue in her giving tax waivers to rich

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE Lexicon March 6, 2019 9:19 AM

    Jeff I have never understood why after paying teachers loads of money to educate our children …then we turn around and expect parents who are trying to make a living to take of the same children to educate then at home as well?

    THAT IS EASILY ANSWERED! IT IS BECAUSE YOU ARE AN ASS!
    THE CHILDREN WHO DO WELL IN SCHOOL AND GET SCHOLARSHIPS AND DO BEST IN SCHOOL WELL IN BARBADOS TODAY ARE THE CHILDREN WHOSE PARENTS WHILE trying to make a living ALSO TAKE THE TIME TO PARTICIPATE IN THEIR CHILDREN’S EDUCATION.

    NOW LEXICON PLEASE SHUT UP AND SIT DOWN!

    Liked by 1 person

  • RE The first thing Ms Bradshaw should do is publish in full the CXC exam results for each school.
    THIS IS ANOTHER “BRAIN WAVE” FROM HAL AUSTIN THE BULL SHITTER
    WHEN WE publish in full the CXC exam results for each school THIS WILL CAUSE THE PERFORMANCE OF THE STUDENTS AND TEACHERS OF ALL SCHOOLS TO IMPROVE.IN LEAPS AND BOUNDS

    WE HAVE NOW HAD LEXIMORON AND HALMORON! NEXT TO COME TO SCHOOL WILL BE THE PEDANTIC BULLSHITTING BRIMBLER, none of whom attended HC OR QC!

    WE ALSO NEED THE OLD GARDENER SAGE TO COME TELL US HOW SHE WOULD IMPLEMENT AGRICULTURE IN THE SCHOOL SYSTEM

    Like

  • William Skinner is generally right. About the 11+ foolishness. We find it hard to understand why an independent country would want to continue seeing this instrument for social stratification as so pivotal. In jest of course! We well know the answer/s.

    And we can’t pretend to want to change or RADICALLY transform the miseducation system unless we also intend to overturn all the adjoining structures. It can’t be empty talk. It has to go to the root – economy!

    What Skinner lacks badly it a frontal, alternative, paradigmatic or radical discourse as to what is to replace it. We suggest that the answer is well located in the ancestral DNA of those same children now being imbued with submission to the thinking of other people’s foremothers.

    This writer is always pleased to hear the name of a Great ancestor John Cumberbatch. For there has been no other person, born in Barbados, and known in our lifetime, with a real serious determination on such matters.

    That it has taken this motley bunch fifty years to rekindle his thinking is deeply regrettable and demonstrates our underdevelopment.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    She said then: “There has to be an institution that allows those children who literally are too difficult to be managed in the secondary school setting to be taken into another setting and to be able to be given the dedicated time, attention and discipline to stop them from literally falling off the edge and entering into a world of crime from which they may never return.” (QUOTE

    We always have to reach crisis level to start talking sensible alternatives nuh. I want hard to believe you, Rogue-Works, I really do, so I am going to say here right now for the record that you saying the right thing but doing something remains to be seen. The same way how you laid haste at the feet of the constitution to effect changes beneficial to you, move with the same haste in designating one or two of the secondary schools or build a school Reprogramming Centre equipped with the right type of learning aids towards these problem children. While you are at it, provide legislation that mandates that the parents of these problem children be assessed and where falling short, attend guidance and parental counselling classes for a period of time. Makes no sense picking up the apples and leaving the tree grounded in its bad roots. This change needs a suitable environment, nicely designed building (or retrofit and renovate an old one), appropriate props, technology and good teachers. No talk shops but more practical learning with plenty of assimilations and visual aids. Then when progress is shown and a system that assesses them with data that can easily identify their strengths and weaknesses, have a section of the school construction for them to graduate to the next level for more stringent academic learning. Both parent and child must past all tests set because it does not make sense dealing with the child and leaving out the parent to return to an environment that will open wounds again. The curriculum will be designed according to their needs and strengths but with a focus on teaching deportment, discipline, self control and de-escalating conflict. And, for what it is worth, we really need to do away with the 11+. This thing about Harrison College, Queens College and Combermere versus all the other schools is a big part of the reason why you have this shitety good schools-bad schools concept.

    Like

  • WOOL BEING PULLED OVER ONE’S EYES

    BLOGMASTER has once again fallen prey to the one thing BARBADOS POLITICIANS ARE EXPERT AT, GUMFLAPPING.

    The problem has always been with these grandious proclamations is the lack of follow through, ie WALK THE TALK. Same old same old to quote the BLOGMASTER.

    Wily maybe in agreement with the context however is cynical about any positive results.

    Like

  • @Dullard
    The blogmaster will drive in the positive lane.

    Good or you! But you should first ensure that this lane leads somewhere and is not just a roundabout.

    There is no doubt the miseducation system in Bim is painfully out of date and a needs a serious overhaul.

    But this narrow -almost childish- focus on the 11+ is laughable.

    Let’s say we remove the 11+ tomorrow. What next? Will we then have a 1st class education system?

    These narrow talking points without due regard to the broader issues at play and how they all fit together suggests that no real appetite to tackle the underlying issues.

    Bare talk.

    Parliament is just another rum shop.

    Like

  • RE Mariposa March 6, 2019 8:52 AM
    A lot of hot hair nothing would change
    In any case Barbados is so far behind and does nit have the financial resources to keep it education system in pace with the global economy

    WHEREAS IT IS TRUE THAT MUCH HEAT AND HOT AIR EMANATES FROM PARLIAMENT ACCOMPANIED BY VERY LITTLE LIGHT IT IS NOT TRUE TO SAY In any case Barbados is so far behind and does nit have the financial resources to keep it education system in pace with the global economy

    WHERE DO YOU THINK THAT THE DYSLEXIC AND ONCE SLOW LEARNER LEXICON LEARNED TO READ SO THAT ON GOING ABROAD HE CAN CONTRIBUTE HERE IN SOME MEASURE?

    HE HAD HIS FOUNDATION IN THE FAILED BARBADOS EDUCATION SYSTEM!
    I TEACH AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS INCLUDING SOME WITH DEGREES ALREADY………..AND THEY ARE NOT EVEN UP TO LEXICON’S STANDARD! AND THE USA IS SUPPOSED TO BE THE GREATEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLDEVER!
    SO YOU SHOULD SHUT UP AND SIT DOWN TOO!

    Like

  • RE Jefferson Cumberbatch March 6, 2019 7:47 AM

    What makes a bad school or a good school? Mr Kirk Humphrey asked an insightful question which was not directly addressed by Ms Bradshaw. He asked what accounts for two groups of students having almost identical CE marks but after going to different secondary schools, having very different academic outcomes?

    Is this a problem? Different outcomes must also factor in the home environment. Do/can the parents read? Do they encourage conversation/reading or is it just social media and television every day after school. GIGO!

    JEFF IS OF COURSE CORRECT HERE
    HIS RESPONSE WAS WITH RESPECT TO THE SOME Humphrey askING ed an insightful question which was not directly addressed by Ms Bradshaw.

    what accounts for two groups of students having almost identical CE marks but after going to different secondary schools, having very different academic outcomes

    BUT NOTE THAT STUDENTS HAVING having almost identical CE marks but after going to THE SAME secondary schools, ALSO HAVE very different academic outcomes

    I EXPECT THAT HIS ANSWER MUST/WOULD BE THE SAME AS FOR students having almost identical CE marks but after going to DIRRENT different secondary schools, BECAUSE THE SAME FACTORS HE CITES ARE IN VOGUE IN BOTH CASES!

    SO FIXING THE FACTORS SEEM TO BE THE PRIMARY TASK!

    Like

  • RE Ping Pong March 6, 2019 7:53 AM

    I very strongly believe that the relative ranking of children re: allocation to secondary schools will be the same under continuous assessment as now obtains under the present CE exam.

    I very strongly believe that YOU ARE 1OO% CORRECT! THE CREAM ALWAYS RISES TO THE TOP!

    Liked by 1 person

  • She said then: “There has to be an institution that allows those children who literally are too difficult to be managed in the secondary school setting to be taken into another setting and to be able to be given the dedicated time, attention and discipline to stop them from literally falling off the edge and entering into a world of crime from which they may never return.” (QUOTE

    What would we the ground rules for identifying these children
    How would a teacher who is not trained in physchological problems tell the difference between a child who is mentality challenged and one who has ADS
    -”’—”””’-”””’-”””””
    Again alot of hot air but no reference given as to what plans would be put in place to adress a problem that is complex and complicated

    Like

  • @ Sargeant March 6, 2019 8:29 AM
    “With all that in a few weeks we will see the celebration of 11 plus students and later the celebration of scholarship winners.
    I give up ”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++=

    Sarge, you stole my thunder.
    Just another round of expulsion of heated gases from the empty brains of politicians.

    How else would the nouveau riche johnny-come-lately black middle class living in the heights and terraces differentiate themselves from those living in the former villages now known as the Bajan ghettoes?

    What we would like to know is the gender ratio (females to males) in the current educational system in Barbados even at the managerial and ministerial levels.

    Then we would be better placed to appreciate the thesis constantly prosecuted on BU by the “Lady SimpleSimonPresidentFuhLife” that the social and economic problems in Barbados are entirely due to naughty boys and violently vicious men with the only solution being proposed is castration of those falling into the age category of 2 to 82.

    Poor males, your days of wild raging testosterone are numbered. Soon you will be relegated to the social status of being bulls on dairy farms.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @GP

    You are probably correct, the challenge is to have a more equitable education system i.e addressing those who the system is presently failing.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss!!
    Same old! Same Old!
    Thirty years from now we will be having this same debate. The problem is that we do not know what education is;and what role it plays in delivering the good life . And that is a good thing. Too many Brimblers in town .

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ GP at 10 :20 AM

    You wrote : “The cream always rises to the top”. That is true whether you store it in a tot or a Royal Doulton milk jug.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    The system is not failing a soul. We are failing the system. We all have talent. We need to encourage their development.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Why are children from Tweedside Road, CARRINGTON Village going to Alleyne School? They prefer to ignore Parkinson’s for example in their zone? The system has to change.

    The technocrats pointed out that the education system we use to say is the same handed to us as a colony. The irony is that the mother country has made changes to the original system.

    Like

  • WE CAN START BY OBSERVING OUR BEST AND COPYING THEM BECAUSE IN ALL SPHERES OF ENDEAVOR, OUR BEST TEND TO ADAPT AND IMPROVE IN VIVO!

    THE ADVISORS IN THE MOE ARE LIKELY AS MUCH FAILURES AND STAGNANT AS OUR POOREST TEACHERS

    DONT ALL PRIMARY TEACHERS GO TO ERDISTON?

    MY SON SAID THAT ONE OF HIS TEACHERS TOLD THE STUDENTS THAT HE GOT TO ACTUALLY TEACH AT HC, ALTHOUGH HE DID NOT NEED TO DO SO MUCH TEACHING SINCE THE STUDENTS WERE GENERALLY EAGER AND WERE INVOLVED IN SELF LEARNING

    HE SAID THAT AT OTHER SCHOOLS AT WHICH HE WAS EMPLOYED HE DID NOT GET TO TEACH MUCH BECAUSE MOST OF THE TIME HE WAS CAUGHT UP WITH DISCIPLINE!

    Like

  • Q Why are children from Tweedside Road, CARRINGTON Village going to Alleyne School? They prefer to ignore Parkinson’s for example in their zone?

    A. SIMPLE BECAUSE THEY ARE ALLOWED TO! THE TAIL IS WAGGING THE DOG AT THE MOE!

    IF YOU WANT TO ZONE…….ZONE! BUT PICK OUT THE OUTSTANDING STUDENTS AND SEND THEM TO THE SCHOOLS WHERE THEY WOULD NOT BE SLOWED DOWN AND CAN GO AT A QUICKER PACE!

    SEND THE BRIGTEST AND THE SLOWEST OR SPECIAL NEED STUDENTS IN WHAT EVER WAY TO APPROPRIATE SPECIAL SCHOOLS!

    The system has to change.YES THE MOE MUST CHANGE!

    Like

  • There are some behaviors which follow students from different socioeconomic segments. Our system does not continually assess teachers. Our system does not make it easy to move poor teachers and principals from the system.

    Our system of education must change.

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    I asked this question before. After the change in Estimates Format or PR Daytime Soap Opera compliments GoB/HoA. when these senior Govt. officials return to their respective offices and/or cubicles. What effectively changes? Will the specific ministry/ministries be run better; will they be more efficient or effective? Wil what is spoke on camera in the HOA actually come to fruition or frustration? Talk is cheap and plentiful. Activity is not always productivity. therefore is ask. “where is the souse”?

    The PR and change of format is fine. But where is the “new pudding” in the “new pudding and souse”.

    Just asking?

    Liked by 1 person

  • THINK OF THE DAYS OF THE AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE, THE MORRIS OXFORD, WOSLEY………….ALL BASICALLY THE SAME ON THE SAME CHASSIS…………BUT COMPLETELY DIFFERENT BECAUSE OF SEVERAL MODIFICATIONS.

    ONE COULD MAKE MORE CARS THAT WAY PER UNIT TIME AND UNIT COST.
    THE NECESSARY MODIFICATIONS PROVIDED THE REQUIRED DIFFERENCES.

    DOES BU GET A STIPEND FOR EDUCATION SERVICES PROVIDED TO THE MORONS IN GOVERNMENT(S)?

    IN 2008 I POSTED DETAILS OF THE POLYCLINIC PLAN I SUBMITTED IN 1985 PLUS THE UPGRADES THAT WERE NOT IMPLEMENTED.

    IN 2011 I ATTENDED A POLYCLINIC IN ST LUCIA AND SAW ALL MY IDEAS THERE MANIFESTED

    Liked by 1 person

  • We will know what changed next year when promises made in 2019 can me reviewed.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    That society that you speak of o longer exists. The whole approach was relevant to those times.
    Outside of the limited number that went on to the prestigious grammar schools, many others went straight into the trades. The ones who were bright but got none of the scarce scholarships found careers in the public service and were the builders of what we now call the middle class.
    Teachers today are not seen as the fountains of all knowledge;they have no monopoly on information .There is google!
    Countries cannot be built on nostalgia.
    As outstanding as that era was, we must realize that it has gone forever.
    To restructure an economy such as ours ,there must be a radical reform of the educational system.
    Our problems are a direct result of an economic system that keeps real wealth in the hands of a few and an educational system that condemns citizens at the ripe old age of eleven.
    If we are a failed state that is how we failed.(Quote)

    @William,

    We desperately need an educational system that teaches young people HOW to think, and not WHAT to think. A good, compassionate, knowledge-based society is not long gone. This is not wallowing in nostalgia. I thought better of you. This is about why a once good system, a system envied by other Caribbean islands, has been allowed to deteriorate.
    Young people looked up to the generation ahead of them as examples; I can go through the generation just ahead of me and the impact they had on the boys on the block, as conventional criminologists will now say. Our currency, however, was not drugs, but books. I am still addicted to them.
    And teachers were not regarded as fountains of all knowledge, but as sympathetic, understanding, encouraging. They taught us HOW to think, not WHAT to think.
    Only recently I met a former teacher of mine, who taught me at the age of nine, and our conversation continued as if it was just yesterday. They same mutual respect. I know he reads BU and knows who he is.
    There are more teachers in my family (and in-laws) than any other occupancy group or professionals, and they talk about their professions. So, @William, this is not just the view of an old man harking back to the old days. Why not call n overseas Barbadians (I know of one professor at Columbia, talk to him).
    We need to improve the status of teachers by re-training all those aged 45 and under, make teaching a desired profession. One problem is that we allow some of our best and most ambitious teachers to jump ship to be cheap lawyers. That is not nostalgia, but realty. Part of the problem, a big part, is that we reject what was good about the old system, but have not been able to replace it with anything.
    Do a quick check of the number of lawyers who were once teachers. We need to know how individual schools perform in public exams so parents and teachers could sort out any problems.
    Our problems are not just economic, although that plays a key part, it is a deep cultural malaise, the decay of a system. Education is but one symptom of this decay; have a look at all our major institutions, including the church. That is why I say Barbados is a failed state.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Hal
    I never said to throw out the baby with the bath water. I am merely saying that the entire sociological structure was different at that time.
    As a proud product of Bay Primary, I can boast of an excellent primary school education that was fitting for that time.
    The Neighbour hoods are not even the same.

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    The GoB and its ministries etc and the taxpayer must adopt the “W Edwards Deming” approach to the Estimates Soap Opera.

    “Simply put.” We cannot Manage what you cannot Measure”

    We must at a personal/ ministry level/ and a government level / national level set this in progress. Set attainable positive objective

    We need milestone/yardstick(not yard fowls)/points of reference in each ministry/department/division/school/ classroom etc where we put down a marker. At the point of review whenever that is we need to be clinically; determine if we have advanced regressed or stood-still.

    Are we prepared as a society to deal with the results of such a policy towards under preforming ministries ; schools, institutions, ministers, departments etc?

    Just asking.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    “it is wrong to suppose that if u cannot measure it u cannot manage it; a costty myth”

    “Change is no mandatory ; neither is survival”

    “There is no substitute for knowledge”

    “It is not enough to do you best; you must know what to do; and then do your best” – W Edwards Deming.

    The CCE(11+) may or may not be a bad thing. Many here on this blog will look back on your personal experiences after that faithful day many months/years ago and conclude that the CCE(11+) was ……….

    However, one thing i think u will all agree with me with is that there is life after the CCE. What do we with these young minds after the CCE? Each one is different, coming from different socio and economic and family and environmental backgrounds.

    We all know this because we all know where we have come from? We all know that some among us are late developers. Some among us experienced trauma(s), but some among us also know of those that overcame these setbacks; and we know of those that the setbacks overcame etc.

    To be BLUNT we also know that some will not survive and some will fall into the spaces/crack in any system that is created/implemented. Our 1st job is to make the MoE represent US. and not the fancies of a political leader(minister) that may not have anyone’s best interested at heart. We must see the MoE and what it does as OUR expressions of our own desires for the education of the children etc.

    Then products of the MoE like the CCE and their syllabuses; and classroom and teaching standards for conduct actual teaching parent interaction will be brought into balance. Zoning of primary and secondary schools; will be a part of us. Our epression of will in a ministry.

    In other words we need to reclaim the MoE away from the political hacks and make it the peoples MoE. That is the change that we must first try to accomplish before decisions to abandon the CCE can be truly made.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Our system does not continually assess teachers. Our system does not make it easy to move poor teachers and principals from the system.

    Our system of education must change.”

    Those are HR and management issues. They have nothing to do with the actual system

    The current approach to education is prescriptive. One goal is academic excellence, the other goal is a quality education. Academic excellence is well defined and easy to measure.

    What constitutes a quality education. Ask this question to the stakeholders (a Principal, a parent, a student, a teacher and a citizen) and we will get a wide range of answers and no consensus. Therein lies the problem. Worse yet is relying on institutions like the World Bank and Unicef for direction. All we get is Edutech and a bunch of overpaid consultants.

    The goal of academic excellence must remain (as sensitive as he is we still need scholars like GP), the prescriptive approach works well for this.

    The idea of a quality education however is poppycock. Instead the goal should be to identify, appreciate and hone all types on intelligence (this would actually encompass academic excellence)

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David
    The MoE put the Alleyne School in the students’ zone. Neither the children or their parents did. Please review the video and tell me which technocrat took responsibility for zoning of schools.

    Even in colonial times the Education system was home grown . The Colonial Secretary was not responsible for the system. The Anglican , Moravian and Methodist Churches were pioneers in setting up the Education system.

    Hal is on the right track when he states Education is about developing thinking skills. It is not a body of knowledge to be acquired. The shelf life of the latter is very short. If the system is delivering the tools of equipping the citizen to cope with living in the 21st century, the mission is accomplished. All else is puffery.

    The trouble with most of us is we want control over people and things. This is the seed of a failing society. So David you and others can continue to dismantle perceived institutions of excellence. I have educated my children for the world. They do not have to live or work here.

    Like

  • Allow me to introduce a somewhat discordant note to the discussion. The Minister has just returned after being treated for Breast Cancer ( and we wish her a speedy recovery and the best of health as she navigates through life). Breast Cancer is a scourge to women (and men) throughout the world and scores of women in Barbados have been treated for this illness so we should have some knowledgeable Docotors around who can treat this disease so why does the Minister have to decamp to the US for treatment? Is this a commentary on the medical personnel that we have in Barbados? Does she not have confidence in the treatment available locally?

    A more important question is why do politicians have to go overseas for treatment of illnesses when the therapy is not cutting edge? The answers are a reflection of our much vaunted education system that politicians have been exhalting over the years.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Many issues are being thrown up for review. No system can remain the same when all around you is changing.

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    @ Sargeant March 6, 2019 12:43 PM

    It a simple matter of being able to pay for the service u desire. There are wants and needs. Most of us if falling ill had the capacity to get “superior” medical care “overseas” will in a blinking of the eye take it.

    Why we cannot in a blinking of the same eye access it may be a dollars and sense question. Poor folks although having rich man dreams are often floored by the reality that dreams dont pay overseas medical bills.

    Just saying.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William,

    Of course you appreciate quality. About Bay Street, sorry about that. Somebody had to go there. Joking.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Sargeant at 12:43. PM

    As you surmised,you are discordant. Barbados is a democracy. We still have freedom of choice as to where we want to seek medical attention.

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    @ Redguard March 6, 2019 12:38 PM

    “The idea of a quality education however is poppycock. Instead the goal should be to identify, appreciate and hone all types on intelligence (this would actually encompass academic excellence).”

    There is quality. A better term maybe “an eduction of quality ( eg tuition, theory etc ….” as opposed to “a quality education”

    However, someone going to a military academy may actually get “a quality eduction”; as the stuff taught is fit for the purpose at hand; that is warfare etc.

    We in Barbados need a practical education that is fit for the purpose; whatever that purpose may be. But its components must be of high quality.

    Just saying

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    The education system in Barbados has never been stationary . It has evolved overtime to be fit for purpose and in response to the needs of the society. I have no fears that our tradition of pragmatism and common sense have died. The peripheral noises are distracting There is too much long talk and very little meaningful action.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    What you have stated does not accord with what the technocrats shared yesterday.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ The Honourable Blogmaster

    I am speaking to David of BU now

    Not the other two of the BU BORG

    When you said and I quote

    “…You claim to have state of the art security policies VPN proxy servers and the like yet unable to click a public link?

    Steuspe indeed!…”

    You two as usual miss the point that I am making.

    This IS NOT ADVICE FOR ME! though I am still watchful of Zero Day flaws and other constant hacking processes that attend the most hardened of OSes, I want unsuspecting people to guard their machines

    Many sites DENY ME ENTRY David of BU because my IPs are blacklisted

    So in order to be able to access a site, IF I WANT ITS RESOURCE, I have go us a common browser.

    I am surprised at your response Honourable Blogmaster

    Because you specifically know that I wrote to Barbados Underground several moons ago and suggested that BU actually promoted a 3rd party service FOR THE BENEFIT OF ITS USERS!

    Isughested it as a money generating project to (1) offset the expenses of Barbados Underground and (2) GO PROTECT THE UNSUSPECTING SHEEPLE AND PEOPLE WHO USE BARBADOS UNDERGROUND.

    My rationale was simple.

    People who use their computer at home or at work need to be safe from the ISP monitoring their use of Barbados Underground s website or my use of Mandingo Daying Services as a consort for unfulfilled white women or Down-Lowe and WeJonesing looking at crotchless panties on Victoria Secrets for themselves.

    This is NOT A EFFING GAME DAVID this is people’s lives

    Yet, IN ONE BREATH YOU SCREAM OUT and encourage the establishment of new Websites to promote the consciousness of Bajans AND IN THE OTHER YOU MAKE SNIDE REMARKS WHEN I WARN PEOPLE ABOUT MIA’S Charles Jong.

    It is like if you are paying lip service to this matter of citizenry keeping vigilant AT ALL TIMES.

    OR, MORE FEARFULLY, that you are promoting the use of links to Charles Jong’s tracking media and files to the public viewers on BU under the guise of concerned Citizen of State

    Nk man can have two masters for either he love the one and hate the other, or hate the one and love the other

    As a serious question though I would appreciate if you could publicly state to the BU WRITING OR VIEWING FAMILY

    WHAT IS YOUR POSITION ON USING aVPNs and them clicking on government sites?

    Are you definitively stating that you assure the public that the links you periodically provide on BU and vovernment sites ARE SAFE?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    What did the technocrats share yesterday? Nothing that an interested citizen did not know. David what most of us saw was a pappy show. Full of sound and fury signifying nothing.It was not even entertaining.

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    “every system is perfectly designed to getthe results it gets” W Deming.

    Can this be said of the CEE?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    As a matter of fact 90% looked as if they preferred to be elsewhere. They looked uncomfortable.

    Like

  • Piece Uh De Rock Yeah Right

    @ the Honourable Blogmaster your assistance please with an item here

    And “not accord with” is not a verb construct

    By this alone I know that this IS NOT daddy

    Like

  • @SirFuzzy

    Define quality? That’s the problem. Quality is defined by your stakeholder requirements. Try and define it in the context of Barbados. It doesn’t matter if you call it education of quality or quality education, all semantics.

    The military is ideal for a prescriptive approach to quality because there are tight controls and no outside influence. And the different stakeholder needs are very closely aligned.

    Fit for purpose. Fit for who the student, the teacher, the society. Fit for purpose is more poppycock.

    Like

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