Emancipation Day, a Good Reason to Give Pause

Barbadians join former colonies to celebrate Emancipation Day on August 1.

There can be no disagreement the Black race had to endure a form of slavery that to this day weighs heavy on the conscience of world citizens. Some will engage in a spurious rebuttal that the immoral act of chattel slavery practiced on Black people should be distilled using a logic that it was the legitimate activity of the day. What cannot be refuted is that until the Slavery Act 1833 Blacks resident in the Mother Country (England) and its colonies were regarded as chattel. Then there was the apprenticeship period where the former slave masters exploited Blacks because it was determined that it was cheaper to pay a rock bottom wage or provide room and board to the former slave in exchange for labour.  A capitalist thinking?

The benefit of slavery is that the White race was able to accrue great wealth to build an establishment that to this day supports how the so called developed world does business to the marginalizing of minority populations. More fundamentally the period of Black slavery practiced by the British empire created a White supremacy mindset the legacy of which is with us today.  Dismantling the legacy thinking to promote an equal global community continues to be a work in progress. The establishment will not yield to demands from former colonies for reparations. It is not in the nature of man to surrender riches even if ill gotten. The blogmaster’s perspective is that demand for reparation by Barbados and other former colonies is not just about compensation in the form of a money transfer – it represents the opportunity for the former colonist to record on history’s page the egregious business of slavery.

We fast forward to 1 August 2018 and so the struggle continues as we celebrate Emancipation Day. Many Black Barbadians – especially the young – will remember today as a day to recover from attending RISE. How many will participate on the Emancipation walk to Bussa statue?  How many Blacks are aware there is a walk?

To Barbadians every where, the struggle continues to nurture a just society for all. One that we can make proud for our children and future generations to cohabitate on the planet. We must never forget what our Black forefathers had to endure to support what we have been able to achieve to date.

The following is the Emancipation Day message from Sir Hilary Beckles, the Chair of the Caricom Reparations Committee:-

Emancipation Day message from Chair, CARICOM Reparations Committee

Press Release

(PRESS RELEASE VIA SNO) – We join annually with communities across the world in marking the moment in which the crime of chattel enslavement was confronted and uprooted from our existential realities. For us, the moment is August 1st; other dates are determined elsewhere and officially recognized.

Marking the moment in a celebratory fashion remains necessary despite the despicable nature of the gesture of Emancipation, legislated by Britain in 1838. It was an act in which black peoples were finally defined by Parliament as property, and their enslavers deemed entitled to compensation for property loss.

Today is an opportunity for descendants of the enslaved, and enslavers, to reflect upon the causes and consequences of these crimes against humanity, and in particular their significance on how we live today, and will in the future.

Rising up from the barbarity of bondage, we have dedicated our development energies to the advancement of democratizing social values, with a primary emphasis on building societies that are free and fair; upon platforms of multiracialism and multiculturalism.

As descendants, we celebrate the values of human decency left as an additional burden for our ancestors to carry. Every day they imagined would be an Emancipation day. They protected and projected the best tried and tested human values – joys of family life, fine spirit of community living, vitality of food security and material production, moral commitment to equity and justice, and critically the overarching, indispensable importance of freedom as the source of all happiness.

Effectively transcending and conquering the legacies of enchainment, impoverishment and racial denigration continue to elude us. Residual elements of the plantation-based past continue to shape our societies and determine their trajectories.

This year, we find it necessary to litigate the restoration of democratic rights and citizenship, illegally stripped away by the British government from thousands of Caribbean descendants rightfully living in that country since the immigration door was opened to passengers aboard Empire Windrush in 1948.

Last year, evidence of hostility against the Caribbean community by the British state erupted against the background of data, unearthed by historians, showing that the finance bond, by which the British government raised £20 million in 1834 to pay reparations to slave owners, remained active until 2015.

This fact powerfully shows that, for the British state, the slavery world persisted well into the 21st century, putting to rest its argument that “slavery was a long time ago”. These contemporary examples show how the effects of historic crimes still surround our societies. ‘Emancipation’ for us remains a work in progress and in no way can be considered a distant event that is settled and closed.

It is specifically for these reasons that we celebrate Emancipation day as a moment in which we demand reparatory justice. The Caribbean calls upon the enslaving governments of Europe, and their national institutions, all enriched and empowered by their crimes against humanity, to return to the region in order to participate in cleaning up their colonial mess. The advancement of economic growth is dependent upon it; social justice is dependent upon it; and a 21st century humanity is dependent upon it.

As we confront the future, let us be guided by Sir Arthur Lewis, who stated in 1939 that the 200 years of unpaid labour extracted by the British from the enslaved people of the Caribbean is a debt that must be repaid to their descendants. This is important, he asserted, if we are to have a fair shot at sustainable development. Pushing ahead with a self-emancipatory agenda is critical, but we must do so fully conscious of this broader context of our development efforts.

Blessings to all on Emancipation day.

298 comments

  • I was sold as a slave in Africa to an European oh yeah
    I was bound in chains and taken beyond to the Caribbean down here
    The new faces that I met
    Saying that they are my master
    They teach I to be like fool
    Just to cheat on the Bible rule
    Use I and I for a tool
    It’s a good thing I stick to Jah golden rule
    Never miss a day in school (true)
    Teacher she teach I to one analyse
    Invert my life situation
    Then I really get to realising
    A rastaman first bring civilisation on ya right here
    A rasta civilise ya

    Israel your history say
    From 1655 we have been working on the same plantation
    Chanting the same recitation sing
    Rasta is love and who don’t love
    Him never know Jah
    Oh no he never never know Jah
    Oh yeah I civilise ya

    Robbing cheating hatridge and war
    That is the culture that Babylon taught
    Saying that they teach us the so called civilisation

    Babylon you are a sly old fox (true)
    Lock you in a box and throw away the key
    For all those tricks you played when I was me
    Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah Jah got the master key
    And a Rastaman bring civilisation on ya
    Right here Rasta civilise ya

    Israel your history say
    From 1655 we have been working on the same plantation
    Chanting the same recitation sing

    History (Alternative Jamaican Mix), Carlton Jackson

    Like

  • Hal Austin
    August 2, 2018 12:03 PM

    @John,
    If only I had been to school I would have shared my knowledge with you. Sorry, I am a Bajan semi-literate.

    +++++++++++++++++

    Hal

    I went to school but never was taught, learnt or was interested in learning the history or philosophy of Mathematics!!

    Had I chosen to do math I would probably know something about these topics.

    For me, math is a tool to be used …. like the speed square.

    That’s not to say I am uninterested in the history or philosophy of Math, it’s just that I am not sure how I would use them.

    Like

  • MoneyBrain
    August 2, 2018 12:56 PM

    Why dont we spend time coming up with solutions? So what should be conducted and why?
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Let’s say that two of the biggest problems facing Barbados are Water and Sewage.

    We have an army of university graduates and are spending a fortune producing more.

    How many people do we have available who we can apply to solve these two problems?

    The underlying problem is the lack of STEM capability.

    That’s apparently a really difficult problem to solve.

    Until you realise that really only a couple are needed who can direct us to a solution.

    But as we have seen from the recent contributions, the issue of egos of the powers that be are a stumbling block.

    I would rather have as a PM a civil engineer or a geologist or someone who does not feel threatened by people who know more than them than a non practicing lawyer with a no record of achievement who is steeped in the culture of politics of Barbados.

    Like

  • John the time wasting smart ass cunt and asshole
    You do the maths Boy

    Blacks in Barbados are slave descendants
    Blacks in Jamaica are slave descendants
    Blacks in USA are slave descendants
    100,000,000+ Slave Descendants today

    JOHNNY CLARKE ~ ROOTS NATTY CONGO / JAH STITCH ~ REAL BORN AFRICAN

    Like

  • John are you saying the local engineers working at the BWA and members of BAPE are STEM challenged?

    Like

  • John Please share your Videos on Cotton here it is certainly something to consider bringing back especially with that Cotton Harvester you showed…The Japanese would buy up what we can supply.

    https://barbadosunderground.net/2018/08/01/barbados-improvements-part-3-agriculture/

    Like

  • Remind us why cotton has not taken root in Barbados despite the long talk?

    Like

  • John, 1.08pm

    Funny old world. You cannot know everything.

    Like

  • David BU

    Hi Dave

    I couldn’t do it yesterday but I want to say something to you about the manner in which you upbraided Freedom Crier yesterday afternoon. I am well aware this is your blog and you can run it how you see fit but I feel I must tell you that the manner in which you did the upbraiding was uncalled for. I know you are capable of doing better, I don’t know what would have caused you to react in the manner in which you did, nevertheless it occurred. I know that Freedom C can be a bit off thread sometimes but hey, I think lots of us here have done it from time to time. I know that you warned her a couple of times to stay on topic and she ignored the warnings. However, Dave, this is exactly one of the reasons that I mentioned to you that if we are going to making any headway on race relations in Barbados then we have to be more understanding and patient with each other and each others perspective. Hope you are following me. I’m by no means trying to offend you in any way so I hope no offense is taken, just trying to do my usual bit at peacemaking. Also I am not trying to buff you in any way, just adding my 2-cents worth.

    I do happen to know Freedom personally and I can assure you she is one person that I know, together with her husband, who has gone out of her way to make sure that others less able than herself were taken care of in many instances. She even made it possible, with her husband’s help, that a poor dark guy, among others, was able to finish his university courses in the USA when he needed the help. She has not, nor is she now seeking any praise or recognition for her assistance to anyone who needed it and to whom she could give a helping hand even now in todays harsh economic circumstances.

    So if it were possible for me to apologise to her on your behalf I would so like to do. However, I am well aware you are quite old enough and man enough to do so on your own behalf. Peace and love Dave. That’s what’s needed in the world today.

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  • William Skinner gives us the benefit of his elder wisdom on August 1, 2018 at 10:56 PM

    Here we go: “It is obvious from this almost childish back and forth that some of us are not prepared to just say straight up to the white man: You built an empire on the backs of Black slaves that you murdered , raped, completely gutted of language culture, ripped apart families; raped children …”.

    This is probably the most stupid thing ever to be published on BU, against some serious competition.

    Just WTF from Barbados is going to approach a white child in Coimbra or Maastricht or Manchester “just say straight up” to her that she “raped children”?

    Who’s going to do that? You? Are you out of your mind?

    Like

  • No offense taken hoodie. Which comment are you referring again?

    As you know the BU crowd has a rum shop mentality sometimes and the blogmaster needs to show teeth sometimes albeit infrequently. As you know being a longtime family member, BU belongs to all that participate.

    There is not a malicious bone in the body of the blogmaster 🙂

    Like

  • David
    August 2, 2018 1:37 PM

    John are you saying the local engineers working at the BWA and members of BAPE are STEM challenged?
    ++++++++++++++++++++

    Not at all, not at all.

    But somehow a solution seems to evade everyone!!

    It may suggest that it is not even be a technical issue that needs to be addressed.

    Like

  • Hal Austin
    August 2, 2018 1:52 PM

    John, 1.08pm
    Funny old world. You cannot know everything.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I figured that out along time ago!!

    Like

  • Baffy de baf Jr

    The reparations movement faces an insoluable problem, which is why it is always going to be (i) utterly pointless and (ii) a rich source of junkets for its leaders.

    That problem, in short: there is no living taxpayer in the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, the UK, who has the tiniest, most microscopic shred of guilt for the Atlantic slave trade. Nor should they. This is obvious. Three-month-old Ana in Madrid is not responsible for it, and quite rightly she is going to grow up feeling zero guilt for it.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Blogmaster
    i will assume it was the comment at August 1, 2018 2:33 PM
    I have to skim through these long entries with multiple links. But after a quick scan I was not 100% sure to whom your comments were directed.

    Like

  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    “Remind us why cotton has not taken root in Barbados despite the long talk?”

    I am sure the irish descendants don’t mind planting and picking cotton and have their children and grandchildren do the same to get the cotton production and exports up and running….that would be a wonderful example to set for everyone else to follow.

    Like

  • David
    August 2, 2018 1:47 PM

    Remind us why cotton has not taken root in Barbados despite the long talk?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    It is like the evasive solutions to the sewage and water issues except that in the former two, it is difficult to hide the problems.

    Remember a guy called Nitin Amersey?

    I understand he was/is an Indian who marketed all of the Cotton Barbados could produce …. until the powers that be cast an envious eye!!

    I heard his family had been in the Cotton industry for ages and he had the contacts.

    Those who cast the envious eye did not realise there was a little more to getting results and selling wasn’t as easy as it seemed.

    But, maybe I got that wrong.

    I saw this year acres planted in cotton and watched as vines and cow itch overcame it.

    If there is no will or know how failure always follows.

    I had an uncle who claimed he held the record for cotton yields but he was also known to exaggerate!!

    Point is this was a crop that was certainly grown productively the generation before me.

    Cotton was grown in Barbados from the time it was settled.

    In fact, it was the currency in which bills were paid … tobacco as well!!

    Sugar then supplanted these crops and like both of them it was the currency of the day.

    Like

  • Unless Sea Island Cotton is like gold, we can never compete with operations like the ones I showed in the clips.

    Too tiny a land area.

    Like

  • … and if Se Island Cotton was so valuable, it is now two to three decades on and we would have seen its exploitation …. unless there are other agendas.

    Like

  • @ David BU

    Quote:-There is not a malicious bone in the body of the blogmaster.

    Very well aware of that Dave. We must get together sometime. You may be in for a shock! Lolllllllll.

    Like

  • John if you do not mind I did share your Videos on Cotton…Have you other great ideas to share?

    https://barbadosunderground.net/2018/08/01/barbados-improvements-part-3-agriculture/comment-page-2/#comment-1061665

    Like

  • @ David BU

    This is the exchange I referred to Dabve.

    Quote:- “Freedom Crier
    August 1, 2018 2:26 PM

    This is now about your fifth Article in Succession to emote Triggered comments while Successfully Dividing and Conquering…This Conversation was meant from the Start to Elicit Emotional Responses….
    Continually Stirring the Pot will not Calm the waters! Even under the Guise of Emancipation and Reparations!!
    Is this Trying to Quill the waters David? There is No Resolution Here only an Agenda.

    David
    August 1, 2018 2:33 PM

    It is Emancipation Day and a Black man, the Blogmaster of a Blog with focus on issues with a major Black population and you dare to have the cheek by asking why this Blog was posted?
    Are you a Rh?

    Freedom Crier
    August 1, 2018 2:56 PM

    No Sir the RH thing does not match my Intellect much to your Disliking…
    It is All Part and Parcel of the Pattern…Are you holding up a Mirror?
    What we should be Focusing on is Building our Nation Not Tearing it to Pieces!! That is my Strong Point to which some of your more open-minded audience on BU can Attest! You just think I am a Know it all as you so enviously stated.”
    Unquote.

    Like

  • There is something funny about cotton that does not justify the hype we have heard for the past 20 or 30 years!!!

    FC, the clips were just to show how tiny we are in comparison to the real world.

    I think I just googled youtube harvesting cotton.

    However, if someone can explain the apparent inexplicable where cotton is concerned I would say it does not seem to be a crop worth considering.

    Who knows though.

    If Sea Island Cotton is really as valuable as we hear, once it can be grown profitably, then it should be thrown into the pot.

    Like

  • … but there shouldn’t be such secrecy!!

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  • Thanks Hoodie, sometimes borrowing from the rum shop lexicon more accurately conveys a feeling that is present versus standard English🙂

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  • The Government spent money on a facility for cotton at Groves.

    Maybe Mr. Jong and if not him the GIS should inform the public what is happening with cotton.

    Like

  • David August 2, 2018 3:54 PM

    “Thanks Hoodie, sometimes borrowing from the rum shop lexicon more accurately conveys a feeling that is present versus standard English🙂”

    Some once share with me “Humility is Our Friend”… I suggest you acquire such a friend.

    Like

  • @ Freedom Crier

    I’m quite sure David is quite amenable in most circumstances but sometimes the heat of the moment gets most of us, like myself, in real hot water. Suffice it to say that I believe if you and David ever met in reality that you both may be quite amiable to each other so what I will say now is that he has noted statements from both Hal and myself and perhaps some others on the subject and you may be quite surprised at how affable David can be. He must have a heck of a time controlling the rumshop brawlers who sometimes frequent his blog. Sometimes it doesn’t matter who is right or who is wrong, we just have to forgive if we want to be forgiven. Capiche?

    Like

  • I rather like that quote above.

    Some people are so poor, all they have is MONEY!

    Like

  • RE David
    August 1, 2018 2:33 PM

    It is Emancipation Day and a Black man, the Blogmaster of a Blog with focus on issues with a major Black population and you dare to have the cheek by asking why this Blog was posted?
    Are you a Rh?

    IT IS WRITTEN
    PRIDE GOETH BEFORE A FALL!

    Like

  • What happened to the bales confiscated from Carcicot that was under lock and key by the BDF? Must have rotted by now. What a waste!

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  • GP..ya have really become ya own worse enemy.

    We must get past the intent of others with big ideas which will just end up as the normal capitalist greed…you have a majority black population and every idea they come up with is to exploit that population for free labor via low paying, back breaking, no progress, no future jobs…to enrich themselves ONLY…I am yet to see any ideas that enriches the same black population….and cannot take any of these fly by night scam artists and frauds seriously..unless I do.

    …the Mia government would do well to release the land to the black population to plant whatever is necessary to promote food production …AND…promote wealth generation in the majority population and stop the crap about putting other people’s welfare and futures in the hand of the minority few to continue be exploited and oppressed…

    This is the defining moment right here.

    Like

  • Well, Well August 2, 2018 5:54 PM

    GP..ya have really become ya own worse enemy.

    how ? i am here peacefully singing some hymns like
    MOMENT BY MOMENT
    IT IS GLORY JUST TO WALK WITH HIM

    Like

  • have fun GP..

    Like

  • “That problem, in short: there is no living taxpayer in the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, the UK, who has the tiniest, most microscopic shred of guilt for the Atlantic slave trade. Nor should they. This is obvious. Three-month-old Ana in Madrid is not responsible for it, and quite rightly she is going to grow up feeling zero guilt for it.”

    It is probably the opposite emotions of the state of play that you state

    The guilt feelings of past is what prevent countries from admitting liability.

    50 years ago when apartheid and racism was still institutionalised in culture, the general feeling was whites rule the world and that’s the way it is, Judges would have been racist enough to block black peoples justice and case would be dismissed.

    Nowadays whites will admit they were wrong, but will still use any excuse not to pay reparations.

    The biggest obstacle nowadays is fake news where whites try to bury their guilt with false stories (as per Johns MO).

    Any claims for reparations will in the first instance be a truth commission to establish facts and remove the lies.

    The time to file a case is now.

    Like

  • Negroman August 2, 2018 10:55 AM

    You are correct in your assessment of the Indian mentallity. Their attitude is racist. The Indian community believe that they will never work for any one. By the way these business people are building homes for black folks. They offer cement blocks, cement and wood. As usual blacks can credit. Black folks continue to live in denial. Simon Wiesanthal was a Jewish Austrian holocaust survivor. Through his Wiesanthal Centre he hunted down the Nazis who had fled to different parts of the world particulary Argentina. The Jews never forgot the inhumane and murderous behaviour of the Nazis. What is amazing as soon as black Bajans begin to discuss racism they are are always villified. Dont talk about it continue to think that hiding our heads in the sand it will go. There are blacks here in Barbados who will continue to act as though nothing happened.
    The mental slavery today is worse than the shackles our ancestors were shackled with.

    Bob Marley said it best in his Redemtion Song “Only we ourselves can free our minds.”

    Like

  • Have to disagree with Negroman and Anne about Indians
    Indians can mix with blacks and can mix with whites especially youths
    Divide and Rule mindset of racists assume blacks and browns cannot get along at individual level

    https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=2kQe6exuSN8

    Like

  • Ignore above link which is a dud / typo

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  • Anyhow what I wanted to say was..

    If UK blow out Reparations call it will expose them for what they are and will make them look bad in future when trying to make business trade relationships with any black or developing nations. They will lose credibility in Court of Time.

    Just like fallacy of white supremacy is revealed as fake.

    Like

  • This August 1 was another significant milestone, 30 years of Rush Limbaugh.

    President Trump called in to congratulate him!!

    Like

  • The numbers on GDP and employment seem to be having an effect on some sectors of American voters.

    https://www.kusi.com/reuters-poll-black-male-approval-president-trump-doubles-one-week/

    May not persist but my guess is the Democrats are dumbfounded.

    Just too dumb to understand why Trump, atleast for the moment, is so popular and gaining in popularity!!

    Things in life can always change!!

    Like

  • A Don Blackman sighting at Waldo’s funeral. He delivered the eulogy.

    don_blackman

    Like

  • The Slave Master of Trinidad

    William Hardin Burnley and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World

    Inline image

    William Hardin Burnley (1780–1850) was the largest slave owner in Trinidad during the nineteenth century. Born in the United States to English parents, he settled on the island in 1802 and became one of its most influential citizens and a prominent agent of the British Empire. A central figure among elite and moneyed transnational slave owners, Burnley moved easily through the Atlantic world of the Caribbean, the United States, Great Britain, and Europe, and counted among his friends Alexis de Tocqueville, British politician Joseph Hume, and prime minister William Gladstone.

    In this first full-length biography of Burnley, Selwyn R. Cudjoe chronicles the life of Trinidad’s “founding father” and sketches the social and cultural milieu in which he lived. Reexamining the decades of transition from slavery to freedom through the lens of Burnley’s life, The Slave Master of Trinidad demonstrates that the legacies of slavery persisted in the new post-emancipation society.

    The Slave Master of Trinidad is an unbelievably bold book that retells the story of slavery, emancipation, and indentured labor through an account of Burnley’s life and work.”—Nicholas Draper, author of The Price of Emancipation: Slave-Ownership, Compensation, and British Society at the End of Slavery

    “An original work that will appeal to academics, university students, and general readers studying Trinidad and Caribbean history in the late slavery and emancipation periods.”—Bridget Brereton, author of A History of Modern Trinidad, 1783–1962

    William Hardin Burnley and Caribbean slavery

    William Hardin Burnley, the biggest slave owner in Trinidad, did everything in his power to prevent the emancipation of Africans in the colony. When slavery ended, he was convinced that only Africans who had tyrannical masters would benefit from emancipation. The rest, he opined, ‘Were too ignorant to understand the real position in which they were placed.’ This lecture examines Burnley’s participation in slavery, his attempts to prevent Africans from being emancipated, his subterfuge to keep them enslaved under another guise called apprenticeship and his energetic efforts to recruit workers from outside of Trinidad to undercut the gains that former slaves had made in the post-apprenticeship period.

    is Professor of Africana Studies, Margaret E. Deffenbaugh and LeRoy T Carlson Professor in Comparative Literature at Wellesley College, Wellesley, Massachusetts, USA. He has researched the life of William Burnley at The National Archives.

    William Hardin Burnley and Caribbean slavery | The National Archives

    Selwyn R Cudjoe

    Like

  • From TT Chat group:-
    “Just to add a few comments:
    VS Naipaul was born in Trinidad and went to school here but the rest of this life, more than 75%, was spent in his new homeland, UK, and on traveling. He is 85 years old, left Trinidad on a Govt scholarship (he never rejected T&T, he went to study and then settled there) at a young age, maybe 18 or younger, and then never came back to live here. He visited but he was never a Trinidad inhabitant after that escape to London. Most people who spend more than 75% of their lives in another country other than their land of birth may consider the place where they spend 75% of their life as their homeland. Of course, Naipaul is forever linked to T&T but why the fixation on why he does not like or praise T&T?
    Most likely, Naipaul deliberately snubbed T&T in his initial response to the Nobel Lit prize award but that is typical Naipaul, whether you like it or not. The fact is Naipaul, like many from T&T who migrated and permanently settled abroad, has very few, if any, kind words or feeling about the land of this birth, and never minced words about how he felt about T&T and the 3rd World. Don’t feel like a sole target since he left a trail of bitterness and intense dislike in India, Africa, Islamic countries, and many other places, and had legendary feuds with fellow writers, agents, wives, lovers, friends, etc.
    His father, Seepersad, was from the village, but soon became a “tong” Indian in the St James area, well-read, educated, worked for decades at the Guardian, a fairly good writer, even wrote a book (or two? ), so one would not be surprised if Seepersad did not have the mannerism, speech, lifestyle etc of the country Indians. Seepersad appeared to be one who never suffered fools gladly and his son, VS, even more so. Remember Seepersad was not a brahmin and had contempt and hatred of the Brahmins and their clique, their lifestyle, and did not have a good relationship with the in-laws (read House of Biswas).
    As for the letters, they were real, all were not destroyed, his sister who was on scholarship in India was part of the letter network and kept some or all of the letters. VS even begged his sister for money, he got caught up in the London upper-class university lifestyle that could not be maintained on scholarship money …. his constant whining for money, like a child begging for sweets, reminds one of baby penguins constantly demanding food from their parents.
    Humans are different (duh! what a revelation), we see that every day, we acknowledge that, we behave and respond based on our interpretations and analysis of every one we meet or interface — not deep or intense analysis, and for those who are famous and for whom we feel an attachment, there is really intense analysis, love, hate, derision, contempt, praise, etc. For writers, poets, sculptors, musicians, others in the Arts & culture field, famous people, we dissect and analyse almost everything, but it is best to ignore the personal issues and focus on what they offer.
    NAIPAUL, WALCOTT, ARTHUR LEWIS et al are great Caribbean achievers, for all their faults etc. To win a NOBEL PRIZE in Literature or Economics is a really great achievement, and for one from the Caribbean to do so in these Literature or Economics is an incredible feat.
    Still, these people are humans, have weaknesses, even Walcott had his issues….”

    Caribbean Nobel Laureates

    V.S.(Vidiadhar Surajprasad) NaipaulTrinidad and Tobago,Literature,2001

    Sir Arthur LewisSt. Lucia, Economics, 1979

    Derek WalcotSt. Lucia, Literature, 1992

    Read their books, the reviews, and enjoy!

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    Sir Arthur Lewis – Biographical – Nobelprize.org

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    Books by W. Arthur Lewis (Author of The Evolution of the International …

    W. Arthur Lewis has 11 books on Goodreads with 134 ratings. W. Arthur Lewis’s most popular bookis The Evolution of the International Economic Order.

    Books by Arthur Lewis (Author of Judges & Ruth- Everyman’s Bible …

    Arthur Lewis has 24 books on Goodreads with 19 ratings. Arthur Lewis’s most popular book is The Church of the Living God, the Pillar and Ground of the Tr…

    Like

  • And if ya think they are done being lowlife..think again.

    Like

  • Well, Well August 4, 2018 7:43 PM

    “And if ya think they are done being lowlife..think again” Lol.

    Well Well be careful some will say you are playing the race card. They dont want to call a spade a spade.
    There are none so blind as those who cannot see.

    Like

  • Anne…then they got a real serious problem……particularly since those complaining the most live in a majority BLACK Country…I hope they see and can appreciate the irony.

    Like

  • @akenatenI

    Has such as approach worked in Zimbabwe for example or a case of poor implementation. Are you hitting of such an approach for Barbados?

    Like

  • Here is another explanation of what is going on in South Africa!!

    Like

  • Freedom crier pay attention.
    The Albino Enslavers
    from Realhstoryww.
     
    European Albinos who chose to settle in areas of the Earth between 40 degrees North and 40 degrees South; knew fully well that they would NOT be able to do the FARMWORK necessary to support themselves with FOOD in those areas due to the Damaging/Killing strength of the Sun’s UV radiation at those latitudes. So they resolved to use the Slave Labor of pigmented people as a means to supply themselves with enough Food to live in those Latitudes. 
    • Slave labor was also used to generate huge profits/ wealth for the albino enslavers.
    Barbados is 13 degrees from the equator. The Suns Ultra Violet (UV) intensity is the maximum of 11 or 12 almost year round. In contrast, London reaches it’s maximum of (UV-6) in the months of June and July. Europeans who lack the protection of Melanin are usually advised to avoid prolonged exposure to the Sun while in Barbados.
    The SAME” people, who are advised to seek shade from the Barbados Sun today – after only a few minutes of exposure: are incredibly said to have worked from “Dawn to Dusk” in t
    Phat SAME Sun, only a few hundred years ago?

    NO! THE SUN HAS NOT CHANGED – THAT IS SIMPLY IMPOSSIBLE – THERE IS SIMPLY “NO” WAY THAT A WHITE BRITAIN, USED TO NO MORE THAN (UV-6) FOR ALL OF HIS LIFE, COULD HAVE POSSIBLY SURVIVED WORKING IN THE COTTON, TOBACCO, AND SUGAR FIELDS OF BARBADOS, WHERE IT IS (UV-11/12): THAT IS PURE FANTASY AND FICTION, A “PALE” EUROPEAN WOULD SURVIVE ONLY A SHORT TIME IN THAT ENVIRONMENT.

    The latest data from Ireland shows:
    Skin cancer deaths in Ireland: One in four are construction workers or farmers

    THE IRISH CANCER Society has said that almost one in four (23%) deaths from skin cancer in Ireland are from those in the construction, outdoor and farming industries.

    Irish Cancer Society warns Ireland is facing a skin cancer ‘epidemic
    Spokesman Donal Buggy said: “Ireland is facing a skin cancer epidemic in the next few decades, with cases to rise by almost two-thirds by 2040 to nearly 19,000 cases a year.”

    In 2015, there was 11,785 confirmed cases of skin cancer in Ireland.

    A recent international skin cancer index has found the death rate from skin cancer in Ireland is higher than in Australia .

    Like

  • Skin cancer risk for freckly red-heads equivalent to 21 years in sun

    Kate Kelland
    (Reuters) – Having genes that give you red hair, pale skin and freckles increases your risk of developing skin cancer as much as an extra 21 years’ exposure to the sun, researchers said on Tuesday.

    Their study found gene variants that produce red hair and freckly, fair skin were linked to a higher number of mutations that lead to skin cancers. The researchers said even people with one copy of the crucial MC1R gene – who may be fair-skinned but not have red hair – have a higher risk.

    Millions of Britons are unwittingly carrying the ‘ginger gene’ which puts them at greater risk from skin cancer, even if they do not have red hair.

    Redheads carry two copies of the ‘ginger gene’ MC1R, but now scientists have discovered that around one quarter of the population carry one copy, which also raises their risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

    The people who are most likely to carry one copy of the gene have freckles, pale skin and tend to BURN in the sun.

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  • THE IRISH CANCER Society has said that almost one in four (23%) deaths from skin cancer in Ireland are from those in the construction, outdoor and farming industries.
    Irish Cancer Society warns Ireland is facing a skin cancer ‘epidemic
    Spokesman Donal Buggy said: “Ireland is facing a skin cancer epidemic in the next few decades, with cases to rise by almost two-thirds by 2040 to nearly 19,000 cases a year.”
    In 2015, there was 11,785 confirmed cases of skin cancer in Ireland.
    A recent international skin cancer index has found the death rate from skin cancer in Ireland is higher than in Australia .
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    If you look at a map of the world you will see Ireland is in the Northern Hemisphere and Australia is in the Southern Hemisphere.

    If you look at the latitudes you will see that the whole of Ireland is at a higher northern latitude than are parts of Australia in the south.

    That’s why I would expect the skin cancer rate to be higher in Ireland than in Australia.

    It is due to the earth’s tilt and how close the higher latitudes get to the sun during its orbit around the sun.

    The earth’s tilt is why there are seasons in the higher northern and southern latitudes.

    If you are worried about skin cancer, the worst time to be in Ireland outdoors is, in the summer when the days are much longer and the sun is much closer!!

    For Australia, the same applies!!

    … except that for Australia winter is shifted by six months and Australia is a little bigger (it is a continent after all) than Ireland with a sizeable portion of its land mass below the Tropic of Capricorn !!

    In the Tropics, day length is pretty constant and the sun further away all of the time.

    Even though Andrew Symonds is from the Caribbean, and is “black” he still has to take precautions on the field of play.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=andrew+symonds+cricketer+australian&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=LvxW1qNADzHVWM%253A%252CjJCRyoXTkdIIWM%252C_&usg=AFrqEzemW5W1LLaXGQjm7_dis3p8-sIqyA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi15LfspdjcAhWkxFkKHXN-BEQQ_h0wF3oECAoQEQ#imgrc=LvxW1qNADzHVWM:

    In the Tropics, day length is pretty constant and the sun further away all of the time.

    Skin cancer rates in the Tropics are thus much lower than in the higher latitudes.

    Like

  • John,

    Andrew Symonds is not from the Caribbean. He was born in the UK and adopted and taken to Australia.

    Like

  • Even above 40° latitude Caucasian are not safe from the Sun.
    Skin Cancer Skyrockets in Norway
    August 30, 2013

    Number of Norwegians who were diagnosed with skin cancer has increased by 27 percent in the period of 2007-2011 compared with 2002-2006, according to the new figures from Kreftregisteret.

    Sweden hit by sharp rise in skin cancer deaths

    More Swedes than ever are dying from skin cancer, with a 39-percent increase in people losing their battle with the disease today compared to how many lives it claimed ten years ago.

    The number of diagnosed cases of skin cancer has increased in Sweden, reported the Swedish Cancer Society (Cancerfonden) in its annual report. 

    In 2002, 380 Swedes died as a result of malignant melanomas. Ten years on in 2012, that number had gone up to 528. The jump was not due to the disease becoming more deadly, the TT news agency noted in its review, rather it came down to more people falling ill – malignant melanomas were the fastest-growing cancer form in Sweden.

    Skin Cancer: The Most Common Cancer in Canada
    Rex Austin, Great Lakes Ledger.

    1 IN 5 CANADIANS WILL GET SKIN CANCER.

    BY MEDISYS ON NOVEMBER 25 2017 | NEWS.

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in Canada affecting one in five people today. 

    Researchers indexed the 62 countries with the highest rates of skin cancer ,New Zealand and Australia had the most new cases per population, followed by Switzerland, Sweden and Norway. 

    Skin cancer rates in Switzerland very high

    National News // Nov. 20, 2017.

    Switzerland has one of the highest number of cases of skin cancer in the world, according to the Federal Health Office.

    The country has more cases of melanoma than 40 other European countries, and is even only third globally after Australia and New Zealand.

    *Switzerland lies 47° North of the equator.

    Like

  • Why does Australia have so much skin cancer?
    1)Much of the population has fair skin

    While it’s true that anyone can get skin cancer, it’s undeniable that fair-haired, fair-skinned people are the most susceptible. Fair-skinned people have less melanin than their darker skinned peers. Since melanin is a protective pigment, it leaves them at greater risk of skin cancer and other sun-related skin damage, such as sunburn.

    2)Tanning

    3) Australia is 25° south of the EQUATOR.

    5) high UV:
    Australia experiences some of the highest levels of UV radiation in the world because we are close to the EQUATOR and have many clear, blue-sky days. The Earth’s orbit also brings countries in the southern hemisphere (Australia included) closer to the sun in summertime than countries in the northern hemisphere during summer.

    UV radiation levels vary throughout the year and throughout the country according to:

    The height of the sun (the higher the sun is in the sky, the higher the UV radiation level)

    Distance from the equator (the closer to the equator, the higher the UV radiation level)

    They amount of cloud cover (on average, clouds reduce clear sky UV by 30%)

    Altitude (UV increases by about 4% per every 300 m)

    UV-reflective surfaces (such as snow and water).

    Like

  • Although Symonds was originally qualified to play for England due to it being the country of his birth, and West Indies due to his ancestry,[20] in 1995 he decided that he wished to pursue an international career for Australia instead.[14]

    Like

  • Altitude (UV increases by about 4% per every 300 m)
    UV-reflective surfaces (such as snow and water).

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Eskimos in Alaska and Sherpas in the Himalayas should have an extremely high incidence of skin cancer.

    But while the risk is great the incidence is not!!

    Here is a picture of an Eskimo!!

    https://idig.me/eskimo-images/eskimo-images-4/

    Can you think of a reason why skin cancer might not be a big deal for them?

    And what about this old picture of Jamaicans?

    https://www.google.com/search?q=barbados+images+vintage&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=wZYiGzdtFwLC4M%253A%252CeLS1wypkfWGbcM%252C_&usg=AFrqEzd_89D0NFIGRurQOecyYDGOIXiYpQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj795KW0tjcAhXBrFMKHUegCSAQ9QEwAXoECAYQBg#imgdii=6UL_gkIf8wSm2M:&imgrc=uRPhkRSlrSngDM:

    I suspect all that is happening is that people wear less clothes today than before and rely on sunscreen to protect them from the sun whereas their ancestors would have used clothes and animal skins.

    Some say it is the chemicals in sunscreen that may be to blame.

    Also, the older you get the more likely you will develop cancer.

    As life expectancy rises in the developed world so too does the incidence of cancer, just a hazard of living.

    Eskimos live 10 years less than Canadians overall.

    Our ancestors may have run around partially clothed or naked in Africa, but they did not live very long so skin cancer was probably not an issue for them either.

    https://www.skincancer.org/prevention/skin-cancer-and-skin-of-color

    Eventually, everything wears out!!

    Like

  • Difficult to believe but here is a case in Ireland from June of this year.

    https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/man-dies-of-suspected-heatstroke-in-cork-848075.html

    Summer there now.

    If you look the case in Australia was in November 2017, 7 months earlier … summer there then.

    Like

  • In response to David Aug 2
    Why hasn’t Jordans super market chain failed but rather has undergone significant expansion over the years
    Or Carlton supermarket
    Or Terrific tiles
    Or Kentucky Fried chicken or
    Solar dynamics
    And last but not least CHERISH
    Owned and operated by the sole employee when Mr Rowe first started on St Michael’s row
    Yes white people do have an advantage but the fault dear David does not always lie with them

    Like

  • Anne gives us all a little history lesson on August 3, 2018 at 8:24 AM as her ability allows.

    That lesson in part:

    “Simon Wiesanthal was a Jewish Austrian holocaust survivor. Through his Wiesanthal Centre he hunted down the Nazis who had fled to different parts of the world particulary Argentina. The Jews never forgot the inhumane and murderous behaviour of the Nazis.”

    In the real world of people who read actual books sometimes …

    Simon Wiesathal never “hunted down” anyone in his life. He identified the living guilty, the living who were guilty of piling the corpses of children into ovens. Thereafter, in some instances, the serious, serious hardcases among the Sayeret Maktal went to visit the living guilty and brought their story to an end.

    What? The battle-tested, combat-hardened members of the BDF are somehow going to spread out over continental Europe, wiping out people who died two centuries ago? Or wiping out white children in the slums of Glasgow?

    Like

  • @Charles

    Jordan has had its fair share of internal family squabble that has prevented that business from going to the next level. We pray they are able to keep it going.

    Didn’t Davis lose KFC to a Dominica concern?

    Carlton/A1?Emerald City is a creature of David Seale and the establishment. The connections will ensure he survives.

    Solar Dynamics is a shadow of its old self.

    Good luck to Cherish and Terrific Tiles, doing well so far. Not to forget Popular.

    On Mon, Aug 6, 2018 at 5:40 PM, Barbados Underground wrote:

    >

    Like

  • John 7.38am

    Even though Andrew Symonds is from the Caribbean, and is “black” he still has to take precautions on the field of play.(Quote)

    John 9.50

    Symonds was originally qualified to play for England due to it being the country of his birth, and West Indies due to his ancestry,[20] in 1995 he decided that he wished to pursue an international career for Australia instead.14

    Which is it? Was he from the Caribbean and black (he is of mixed race), or of Caribbean heritage (what about his white heritage?)
    Your arguments are very Bajan, may be it is something in the food. Or Harrison College does not teach people to reason. Heritage is not the same as from? The children in my home will tell you they are British – until the Notting Hill carnival when they become Bajan. You must get it right.

    Like

  • John
    August 6, 2018 11:39 AM

    Difficult to believe but here is a case in Ireland from June of this year.
    https://www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/ireland/man-dies-of-suspected-heatstroke-in-cork-848075.html
    Summer there now.
    If you look the case in Australia was in November 2017, 7 months earlier … summer there then.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    But heat comes from the red/infra end of the spectrum, not the violet/Ultraviolet one.

    In India, most of which is in the tropics, heat stroke is common.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2015_Indian_heat_wave

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jun/02/india-heat-wave-deaths-public-health-measures

    But that is not associated with being closer to the sun and UV radiation, rather lack of moisture, drought and Infra Red radiation.

    I suspect the two cases in Ireland and Australia are more the result of dryness than of UV radiation.

    UV radiation can affect you without you knowing and I don’t think it will cause heat stroke.

    Could be wrong.

    Like

  • I think I am right.

    UV is higher frequency radiation than infra red.

    My recollection from years past is that higher the frequency of the radiation the more likely it is to affect atomic structure and cause cancer.

    ie, infra red radiation won’t cause cancer, but it will burn

    Like

  • Coming back to me now, the energy of a photon in an electromagnetic wave is proportional to the frequency of the wave.

    So I suspect you can get go outdoors and get sunburnt in India without getting cancer as easily as if you chose to go outdoors in higher northern or southern latitudes during the summer.

    Like

  • Which is it? Was he from the Caribbean and black (he is of mixed race), or of Caribbean heritage (what about his white heritage?)
    Your arguments are very Bajan, may be it is something in the food.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I chose my language to be deliberately imprecise to give you some food for thought.

    An African American is not from Africa but try referring to some as American and all hell will break loose!!

    The answer is he is of mixed ancestry as are African Americans!!

    Try referring to an African American as being of mixed ancestry.

    We could call him an African Caribbean Englishman.

    That way he gets to be “black”, “coloured” and “white” all at the same time!!.

    My nephews and nieces can benefit from affirmative action in the US by claiming to be either Hispanic or Black because like Andrew Symonds they are of mixed ancestry.

    …. and genuinely so … unlike Elizabeth Warren who claimed to be Native American Indian to benefit from affirmative action and earned the nickname Pocohantas or Fauxcohantas!!

    Look what happened when Trump called her Pocohantas!!

    She may run for president in 2020.

    Like

  • John will talk about anything and everything irrelevant under sun and moon when it comes to discussion about demands for Reparatory Justices for slave descendants as though there was never any brutality prejudice and racism against black skin.

    White people are S.O.B. snakes in the grass. 500+ years of pure selfish greed and wickedness from pirates.

    Like

  • Charles Skeete has a wearingly boring question whose answer is obvious even to a fool. Here’s the question on August 6, 2018 at 1:40 PM:

    “Why hasn’t Jordans super market chain failed … Or Kentucky Fried chicken? …”

    Seriously? Have you ever sat in Oistins Bay Gardens one evening, demolishing fresh marlin and a decent beer, while watching the cars line up across the street full of people desperate for their bucket of sugar and fat?

    What, seriously? This is whitey’s fault?

    Like

  • Farmers are in skin cancer’s deadly bullseye. Period. Full-stop.
    Skin cancer is the single most common cancer in the United States and the rising number of incidents is staggering, according to The Skin Cancer Foundation. 

    Minnesota has highest incidence rate of melanoma in Midwest
    Why is Minnesota experiencing such a high incidence rate with this cancer? It has to do with demographics — specifically, with Minnesota’s large white population (85 percent of the state’s residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau), who are at greatest risk of developing the disease. White men over the age of 60 are particularly at risk, and Minnesota has a large number of people in that demographic.
    Many of those men were involved in farming or other outdoor activities that exposed them repeatedly to the sun…

    @ John, Eskimos are brown skin Mongols.

    Like

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