Carmeta Fraser Trumpeted ‘Food First’!

Image extracted from Facebook, BU apologizes if anyone finds it offensive

Successive Barbados governments in the last twenty have shown little appetite to develop a vibrant agriculture sector. There is now a resignation by all but a few that the way services go so too the economic fortune of Barbados. The Barbados Labour Party’s  (BLP) chief spokesman on economic matters Clyde Mascoll is on record dismissing any significant investment by his government in the sector, reason being the high cost of inputs.  The commonsense view that investing in a homegrown agriculture sector has more to do with addressing food security seems to be lost on policymakers. Of course there is the other reason which has to do with protecting our right to grow food which is not genetically modified and at the same time align with the positive message that healthy lifestyle is a worthwhile endeavor.

This government has uttered the correct messages regarding the need to etch  an agriculture policy. However after four years there is not much one can honestly agree has been accomplished. There is the news making the rounds that the government currently has  several acres of land under fruit cultivation. The project is expected to supply local demand. Up to the time of posting this blog BU was unable to identify the location. The reality is that members of government reflect the values of the society which produced them.

Barbadians have bought into the values of others where to cook a meal is today considered an irrelevant activity. We have become  slaves to the taste of food because it is fashionable to do so. The fact that ingesting the food is known to do irreparable harm to the body is of little consequence. It hardly matters to many Barbadians that eating and drinking food sourced at the many fast food outlets is doing our bodies irreparable harm. Stake out any Return Bottle Depot at a local supermarket and see the car trunk loads of pep-bottles which are returned by the minute. We have also become slaves to convenience. We have time to go to the movie theater and enjoy other forms of entertainment, gossip on the telephone – both mobile and landlines, text away all day on the ubiquitous Blackberry, iPhone, iPad etc but little time  for the important stuff. How many busy Barbadians would give-up ONE hour to visit a plantation to buy ground provisions and vegetables  saving themselves dollars and protecting their health in the process? How many would pack a daily lunch bag instead of forking out $15-$20 to KFC and Chefette? Has anyone noticed that Chefette Restaurant is one of few businesses flourishing in the current recession?

Rosemary Parkinson, Kammie Holder and others continue against the odds to educate Barbadians about the likely repercussion of eating genetically modified foods manufactured by Monsanto and others. The news that consumers elsewhere felt concerned enough to mobilize against Monsato did not even make it on  local media radar.

The saying that there much information circulating but little knowledge is as true as John 3:16. What will it take to address the everest like challenge of planning and executing a relevant agriculture policy in Barbados? What will it take to change the  attitudes and behaviours of Barbadians to improve the quality of what we eat? Why should Carmeta Fraser have lived her live in vain?

193 thoughts on “Carmeta Fraser Trumpeted ‘Food First’!


  1. Look again! The government has recently implemented strategy to reduce the national debt and the people are complaining about the undue burden that it is causing. Now brudda comes along with more implementations which would affect those who can least afford more hardship bajans not gonna “have it” not only that i wonder if the cost to produce the product would have a significant savings effect to the consumer .


    • In order for any serious policy shift to occur which will bring focus on how we move the agriculture sector there must be a consistency in public policy.Currently the BLP is getting a free pass because they feel no obligation to add to this debate.


  2. @ Brudda
    do you know where that 60million came from ! Do you really understand the politics of Barbados. You need to get a reality check! Wheel and come again!


  3. @ David
    You are way too hard on Onions…”politicizing things”….its election time David..everything is linked one way or the other….besides Ac asked where will the $$$ come from ..I just obliged ..with a most astute suggestion…And you read it to be political….poor onions.

    Again I, I tell you all am not the blp spokesperson…just “not a blindman”.


  4. @ AC
    IT IS MERELY PRIORITIZATION AT THIS POINT! YOU CANT ARGUE OTHERWISE BECAUSE THE MACRO-ECONOMIC EVIDENCE IS THERE!!! FACE IT, IT IS THE ULTIMATE SOLUTION FOR BARBADOS, AND WE CANNOT AFFORD TO DIBBLE-DABBLE ON THE SHORT COMINGS OF THE NEAR FUTURE, FOR THAT IS ALL THEY ARE; SHORT COMINGS THAT WILL LAST IN THE SHORT TERM!

    If Anyone here is unrealistic it is YOU! You must be crazy if you think that we should continue to perpetuate the further manipulation of tax adjustments to save our economy.

    As My South African-American friend Jordan would say; “ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR COTTON-PICKING MIND?!”


  5. @ David
    Currently the BLP is getting a free pass because they feel no obligation to add to this debate.

    See what I mean Dammed when I do Dammed when I don’t…ok our contribution….put the damm $60 million + IDB $ 160 million ..redirect to agriculture.>>>sure ROI…unlike FS.


  6. @ ac
    The government has recently implemented strategy to reduce the national debt and the people are complaining about the undue burden .

    Could tell me any other so called strategy..other than the T Word…that they have used..to reduce national debt ?…(.point exactly)….No No No .
    If I Want money to them>>> just means RAISE TAXES. “Economic inability.”


  7. look onions we are in a quadmire here, we need “REAL Money to fund hydrponics and organic agriculture. The people like yourself sa “No MORE TAXES. The people like yourself including me Do not Touch The NIS fund> At one point i suggest partner with CHINA as a means to an end . The People SAY NO. Brudda say cut social services and cut pay ! Now with all the NO! > THe question still on the Table how do we move forward with NO money!


  8. @ ac
    The people like yourself including me>>> Do not Touch The NIS fund
    Dear ac
    On the contrary…I said USE the money air marked for FS.
    Do you realize should we plant 1000 acres of ground provis. the amount of Forex we would be saying ? Now lets talk Exports…fish farm dolphinstalaphia…you know how much money in that.?.Hydroponics large scale are too expensive ..use what we got…there is so much in Agro..that over the years that has been neglected…..a very labor and not capital intensive means of production .Look my neighbor just sold 3000 lbs carrots which took 12 weeks to turn over on a farm in ST George..that was $9,000..1 man and his 2 teenage sons..Imago


  9. @ ac
    The analogy continues using 1000 acres above ( using prod .SP =$3 CP= $0.50)..sweet pepper,onions
    From the example above 12 acre bring nett (9000-1500 cost)=$7,500
    then 1 acre= $15,000…1000 acres (15000x 1000)= $15 million in 3mnths.
    I am told we could easily put 10,000 in immediate veggie production, continuing with our example , the would be $150 million .I know we are very hypothetical here but…there is money in this thing. The investment $60 million is chump change.We could also get a small cannery outta the $60M and freeze blast others and Can excess to take care of perish-abilty.
    Marketing obviously will have to be on the cutting edge and there will be the need have good export logistics. Consider Guyana…agriculture is the way forward as we have been told of World market increases forecast..corn etc and WE NEED TO ACT NOW..not when world scarcity start ..Barbados wake up..we are on a gold mine.


  10. @Brudah-Bim | February 7, 2012 at 10:47 PM |
    “@millertheanunnaki: Which is why I stated fot the millionth frigging time that there must be mobilization on part of the barbadian people to by drafting a petition with a clear declaration in which the bajan people wish for the appropriate prioritization of government expenditures to our much needed sectors!!!”

    Excellent idea, Brudah-Bim! When do you start? People like “ac” and myself would be keen to affix our signatures on the first page.
    The question to you, though, is this: How would your proposal about re-directing funds to the food production sector fit in with the Government’s medium-term fiscal strategy (MTFS) as supervised by the IMF?

    Do you, pie-in-the-sky dreamer, believe that the “average” Bajan is interested in having locally grown vegetables and root crops as a major part of their diet as opposed to processed foods and animal meat products? Are you forgetting that white rice, macaroni pie, sweet drinks KFC and Chefette fare make up the average Bajan diet. Now I am against this type of diet and am aware of its harmful effects on health. But can you recommend ways of weaning Bajans on to a more healthy diet based on the food you would like to see produced locally

    Do you really think that the Trinidad owned importers and distributors of food into Bim along with their retail outlets (supermarkets) would allow such a transformation of food production and distribution to take place when they are in control of the economy of Bim?

    Do you know that imported processed food make a significant source of revenue for the Treasury (VAT, etc).
    Who owns the idle plantations and overgrown with bush arable lands? Don’t you realize that your proposals and recommendations for agricultural reform are all set out in the parties’ manifestoes and innumerable Estimates speeches and budgetary proposals? Your proposal about fish farming is not new. The Oistins bay was earmarked for such a venture. This was recommended to government and proposed in the 2009 budgetary proposals. NO Action to date.
    But like the much promised FOI and Integrity legislation just words, mate, just words?
    There is no real big money in agriculture, no award of big contracts, no massive kickbacks associated with multi-million dollars contracts. Very little for the politicians, bureaucrats and parasitic local businessmen to benefit from.

    I support your enthusiasm and your heart is in the right place. But take your head out of the SKY. Agricultural reform will not take place until the forex gets real low and we have to take matters into our own hands away from the politicians and do what other countries Like Cuba have to do to feed their populations.

    Please, Brudah, I beg you, don’t attack me personally, (ad hominens) just refute what I have just written with sound argument.


  11. onions if all that you said is feasible why didn,t the BLP after 14 years in power and with access to suvbstantial foreign exchange did not implement plans to forged forward in that direction.


  12. THE PRICE of Corn ac ..the price of corn….skyrocketing..haven’t you heard.
    Predictions say that in 3 yrs there will be a shortage WORLD WIDE..
    We will also need FOOD…..as the scenario has turned from emphasis on Oil to more on FOOD


  13. @miller

    There is no real big money in agriculture, no award of big contracts, no massive kickbacks associated with multi-million dollars contracts. Very little for the politicians, bureaucrats and parasitic local businessmen to benefit from.

    After so many blogs, at least one person has got it right!


  14. Oh smarty pants……Me thinks you should now change the name to just pants..soiled ones at best.Times have changed.Read up on corn even our sugar needs revamping.Blame the UK EU who had a plan to drop our sugar producing FOR NOT GOOD reasons for us…good for them… for their benefits.Guyana just here reported a massive taking on sugar.
    But who really are you ?Probably some UK or European here again to infiltrate our ideas again to suit you all purpose..Ba ck Off


  15. @Miller

    The gap in your last comment is the social cost of allowing a country to become addicted to a fast food culture. For example, Barbadians are living longer but are they healthier, is it costing the country more i.e non communicable diseases etc.


  16. @ David | February 8, 2012 at 11:21 AM |

    Totally agree that there is a massive social cost associated with the widespread and endemic consumption of fat and salt-laced “fast food” and sugary drinks by young people that represent the ‘productive’ sector of our population.

    What we have on our hands is a ticking time bomb. Most of the people who are living longer than previous generations are those that were raised on “cooked” food with little preservatives or growth hormones. They also did a fair amount of manual work either as a job or domestically which burnt up many calories. But most of all they benefited from improved public health strategies that were introduced in the 1920’s, 30′ and 40’s; even up to the 1950’s with general vaccination schemes.
    The current generation has access to a generally good health system but their diet and sedentary lifestyle are countervailing factors that contribute to the rise of NCD’s.


  17. @millertheanunnaki
    you are mistaken my friend. Agriculture has been projected as becoming one of the most valuable industries in the planet. Barbados has the means of doing it. You forgot that I mentioned that the government even has the option of allocating those funds out of our national reserves (ie OUR HARD ASSETS). Not to mention that indeed it would be highly expensive to commercialize Barbados’ hydroponic capabilities, however it is definitely POSSIBLE because of Barbados small population size. Our country’s limited space in size necessitates such a move.

    And when you were talking of the E.U., U.S., the IMF, and Trinidad & Tobago in relevance to our economy. YOU FORGET THAT BARBADOS IS STILL ITS OWN SOVEREIGNTY AND HAS THE OPTION TO MAKE DECISIONS FOR ITSELF! In other words, to answer your question, should the mentioned countries/organizations oppose such a move of the government. And if they oppose, Barbados SHOULD move on to more strategic business partners that would otherwise be willing to establish mutually beneficial unions and accommodations. That means that Barbados should also be gearing up to employ Spanish and Portuguese in the nation’s educational curriculum.

    In short, THE ELEMENT OF COMPLACENCY EVER-SO PRESENT WITHIN BARBADOS’ POLITICAL SCHEME IN REGARDS TO ITS RELATIONS TO INTERNATIONAL PLAYERS (IE. OTHER COUNTRIES) IS PERVASIVE TO THE POINT THAT OUR POLITICIANS HAVE BECOME SHORT SIGHTED AND ARE ILL-EQUIPPED TO SUFFICIENTLY PRIORITIZE THE NATION’S EXPENDITURES. WHICH IS A CERTAIN DETRIMENT TO THE BAJAN PEOPLE AND THEIR FUTURE AS A SOVEREIGNTY!


  18. Here we are going around the mulberry bush beating our brains out trying to find money to start these projects and brudda has added one more idea for barbados to hire portugese and spanish And potuguese and partner with those countries.btw brudda brazil has an excellant agriculture business go read about how they were able to do so without taxpayers help.


  19. And speaking of Onions ,the real ones . When are we going to learn how to properly process reaped onions to last us more that a few days. Although we produce a considerable quantity of onions, we are still left stranded when there is a shortage of onions from overseas,and our local supply have long rotted. Why? And from all accounts it looks like the local restaurants,and many housewives, have no trust in locally produced onions.
    Onions are produced in many countries world wide, and are properly processed thus providing a constant all- year round supply


  20. @ AC
    I’m seriously beginning to think that you do not know how to read….AT ALL!!!
    I said CLEARLY IT WOULD BE IN THE BEST INTEREST OF BARBADOS TO EMPLOY SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE LANGUAGES IN OUR SCHOOL SYSTEM AND YOU GO ON TALKING ABOUT ACCUSING ME OF NONSENSE. I NEVER SAID THAT WE SHOULD HIRE PORTUGUESE AND SPANISH PEOPLE!!!! I SAID THAT THE GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO FORM MORE ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP TIES WITH THE ECONOMIES OF SOUTH AMERICA AND THE REST OF THE CARIBBEAN AS WELL AS AFRICA IN ORDER TO BE PREEMPTIVE AND STRATEGIC!

    YOU’RE TAKING THIS ARGUMENT ON A MERRY-GO-ROUND NOW!
    FACE IT! THE ANSWERS ARE RIGHT IN YOUR FACE BUT YOU’RE JUST TO DAMNED LAZY TO ACCEPT THEM!! YOU DON’T WANT TO MAKE SACRIFICES IN THE SHORT TERM TO BENEFIT LATER ON IN THE LONG TERM.

    AND BY THE WAY, BRAZIL’S AGRICULTURAL SECTOR IS IN FACT FUELED BY TAXPAYER’S DOLLARS BECAUSE OF ALL THE BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT’S SUBSIDIZATION. LOOK AT ARGENTINA AND CHILE AS WELL!


  21. @ Brudah-Bim | February 8, 2012 at 1:40 PM |
    “The element of complacency ever-so present within barbados’ political scheme in regards to its relations to international players (ie. Other countries) is pervasive to the point that our politicians have become short sighted and are ill-equipped to sufficiently prioritize the nation’s expenditures. Which is a certain detriment to the bajan people and their future as a sovereignty!”

    Brudah-Bim, I could not agree with you more! Now you see what you are up against. Then why petition them? Just a waste of time as in the case of the restoration of the Empire Theatre. Sweet words and empty promises are comforts to fools and you go home ‘de-stressed’ after having had an audience with some bullshit talking Minister.

    Two circumstances could trigger the realization or fruition of your proposals.
    One, the soon coming squeeze on Bim’s forex reserves where rationing (prioritizing) will have to be implemented. The high import food bill will be the first to come under the spot light.

    The second is the astronomically rising food prices on the international commodities trading markets. The prices for basic staples such as wheat, corn, rice and sugar are daily skyrocketing. The “ole onions bag” (kite string) alluded to this grave situation. The gamblers have migrated from the financial markets to the commodities stock exchange and are playing high stake poker with the livelihood of nations like Bim that rely heavily on food imports to feed their populations. Any prolonged spike in food prices on the international markets would force local consumers to do their own thing as far as food security is concerned. Don’t forget, “Food comes first”, as the late (a great woman before her time) Carmeta Fraser would say.

    But don’t you think that it is a crying same that a country like Bim which was once a leader in sugar production, research and development cannot even produce 50,000 tonnes of sugar to meet its export requirements and satisfy local needs? I am willing to bet that this year’s harvest will be less than 30,000 tonnes. Have you travelled recently around Bim and see the ecological disaster that is playing out right before our very eyes? Fields and fields of bush and non-fruit bearing trees replacing once productive landscapes. Imagine having to import sugar from Guyana to meet local requirements and where the crystals are not too appealing to the eye or taste!


  22. @ millertheanunnaki

    Which is why the petition must be back by aggressive rallies and demonstrations. That is how the governments of France and Switzerland are so responsive to the people and the people’s demands. There needs to be and outward public pressure that demonstrates the outrage of the people.

    We need to educate normal Bajans about the situation of our economy; whether they’d be from the working class onwards to the upper class. We need to be aggressive in educating our unemployed, the working demographic, the manufacturers, members in the financial sector, our teachers, our Priests and Churches; ALL THE KEY PEOPLES WHO BEAR ESSENTIAL STAFF TO THE BARBADIAN SOCIETY ABOUT THIS SO THEY CAN EDUCATE THE MASS OF BAJANS!

    WE MUST BE ACTIVE NOW. WE MUST ALSO HOLD WORKSHOPS IN CHURCHES, WORKPLACES, AND SCHOOLS ABOUT THE PROSPECTS OF AGRICULTURE! Make phone calls, email people, friends, and co-workers. Pitch up canvassers on the streets and send them to people’s houses and go door to door to educate people about our current predicament and our viable options. WE MUST ALSO TEACH SOLIDARITY, RESILIENCE, AND SELF-RELIANCE TO BE WOVEN WITHIN OUR NATIONAL FABRIC!

    ***GET THE MESSAGE OUT THERE BROTHERS AND SISTERS!! FOR I FEAR THAT WE DO NOT HAVE MUCH TIME!***


  23. ^^^
    AND WHEN I SAY “AGGRESSIVE RALLYING AND DEMONSTRATIONS”;
    PLEASE KEEP IN MIND THAT I STRESS THAT THEY ARE TO BE PEACEFUL ONES!! WE BARBADIANS ARE TOO CIVIL AND LEARNED TO DEGRADE OURSELVES TO SUCH LOWS!! WE MUST SET THE STANDARD, AS IS TRINIDAD & TOBAGO!! OUR BIGGEST IMMEDIATE THREAT YET!!!!


  24. @millertheanunnaki

    AND LET’S NOT STOP THERE EITHER. LETS MAKE THIS RELEVANT TO OUR NATION MILITARY SERVICES AND POLICE DEPARTMENT AS WELL!!

    LET US BRING THEM ON BOARD BY AVIDLY EDUCATING THEM ON HOW THE GOVERNMENT HAS FAILED IN ESTABLISHING THE SUFFICIENT PROVISIONS TO CREATE A HEALTHY MARKET FOR HIGHLY MECHANIZED AND SKILLED SECURITY AND PARA-MILITARY UNITS THAT COULD HAVE BEEN SERVICING TOP NOTCH AS WELL AS COMMERCIAL BANKS!

    WE NEED TO GET EVERY BODY ON BOARD. AND THE LAW ENFORCEMENT’S SUPPORT WOULD BE OUR MOST BEST AND STRATEGIC ASSETS YET!!


  25. @Old Onion Bags

    Listen OOB, I didn’t insult you, so back off yourself! I was merely agreeing with millertheanunnki as to the real reason why neither party is interested in agriculture. Incidentally, how is it possible to “infiltrate” ideas that don’t exist?


  26. @smarty pants
    Listen..who u takkin ta
    So we don’t have any ideas huh….? Well chayaa….
    chk this link>>>pants..no insults tradin pants
    Onionsdungotttobeahwukkintaswellyarasul


  27. Let it be resolved that we need some major investing in agriculture in light of the oncoming SUPER INCREASES in prices of food commodities( corn and wheat etc.).Mr.Minister.
    To do otherwise will be costly…..Agriculture will be our savior if we act NOW..Get the lands back in production once more Mr.Minister>>>we can start small but please please start.Our lives will depend on it..please ACT ON OUR IDEAS, sirs.


  28. old onion bags | February 8, 2012 at 4:33 PM |
    “Get the lands back in production once more Mr.Minister>>>we can start small but please please start.Our lives will depend on it..please ACT ON OUR IDEAS, sirs.”

    We hear your plea, OOB. But you really think the Minister would be interested in any of the suggestions or proposals outlined by you or Brudah-Bim? Haven’t you seen the proposal to build a brand new building to house bureaucrats at the BWA? There are many existing buildings that can be refurbished to provide reasonable accommodation for BWA employees. But there is no money involved in agriculture or refurbishment.
    Contracts for building new structures is where the money is, my friend. Money that could be used to renovate an existing structure or be re-directed to invest in Brudah-Bim’s technologically focused agriculture would find its way in some people’s pockets.


  29. @Brudah-Bim: “AND LET’S NOT STOP THERE EITHER. LETS MAKE THIS RELEVANT TO OUR NATION MILITARY SERVICES AND POLICE DEPARTMENT AS WELL!!

    WHILE I HATE THE FACT THAT YOU YELL IN EVERY POST, you make a valid point.

    “Petty larceny” is the reason many of our farmers have gotten out of the business, and why we are now so dependent upon other countries for our food supplies. Hmmmm…

    It is well known that one or two days before harvest, a farmer will often wake up to find his entire crop “harvested” by thieves.

    Perhaps there should be an alliance between the indigenous food producers and the law enforcement agencies.


  30. @ millertheanunnaki
    That is why we build massive public awareness. Public awareness will transform into public outrage, and will translate into pressures from the citizenry to hold the government highly accountable in order for our STUPID-ASS politicians to prioritize our expenditures. I already Told you how it can be achieved.

    You just need to stop being lazy and think big, be strategic, BE PREEMPTIVE!


  31. millertheanunnaki | February 8, 2012 at 4:55 PM |

    Cchaaaaaaaaaaaaa brother.s YOU RIGHT..so we gine dun shite creek from D start.? Look we gotta Do something bout that…Any advice?


  32. @ old onion bags
    i pray that you’re being sarcastic, because I just provided you ways in which we can achieve the forgiven suggestions.


  33. “old onion bags | February 8, 2012 at 5:15 PM |
    Look we gotta Do something bout that…Any advice?”

    Yes! Answer this riddle:
    How come government can find private sector financing to build a new building for the BWA but can’t find it for the 4 Seasons project?

    Why not use NIS funds to invest in a utility that is vital to the economic and social development and survival of Bim; and which is a sure return on long-term investment to the NIS. Answer that and you have the reason why Bim is in the state she is in. Too many educated asses running the place who think they can get rich by being in politics.


  34. to stay inform one must be informed just because one screams and shouts doesn;t make them more intellectual than the other person who is clamly making a point.

    The FACT Brudda if you read the Economist on Brazil Agriculture and development you would get an insight on how the farmers took most of the arable land and redeveloped it . OECD states that state support accounted for 5,7% of total farm income when Brazil is one of the leading exporters . BTW maybe if you stop screaming and hollering people would get more of an understanding of what your are saying, Most of the time i quickly gloss over your comments. You Need to learn BLOGGINg etiquette.


  35. @ AC
    That completely discounts the fact that the Brazilian government gave much accommodation to their agricultural industry through a SERIES of subsidization plans. And almost immediately they saw profit returns which helped to remedy their national deficits relatively quickly.

    As soon as Brazil’s agricultural sector become highly productive, the government subsidies (a.k.a. tax funding) fell down to the rate of 5,7%

    You didn’t even look at Brazil’s agricultural industry from a historical macroeconomic standpoint at all. You are only paying attention to the trends of the Brazilian economy’s agricultural sector.

    Get it through you head. ABSOLUTELY NO SUCCESSFUL AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRY IN THE WORLD BECOME HIGHLY PRODUCTIVE WITHOUT ANY INITIAL SUBSTANTIAL GOVERNMENT INTERVENTION THROUGH PROVISION OF ACCOMMODATIONS FOR DOMESTIC AGRICULTURAL BUSINESSES.

    ***I must Yell because you still refuse to accept any LOGIC whatsoever!***


  36. @Brudah-Bim: “I must Yell because you still refuse to accept any LOGIC whatsoever!

    You don’t have to yell; you choose to. And rather than getting your message across better, more people tune out.

    Be responsible for the listening into which you are speaking.


  37. I would rather appreciate the findings of the Economist and what they say as remarkable in who Brazil was able to accomplish and become one of the leading exporters of in to the world with little or no government subsidies than listen to a screaming maniac whose ideas would eventually bankrupt Barbados .


  38. @ AC
    “I would rather appreciate the findings of the Economist and what they say as remarkable in who Brazil was able to accomplish and become one of the leading exporters of in to the world with little or no government subsidies than listen to a screaming maniac whose ideas would eventually bankrupt Barbados” **********************************************************************************
    I as well as other individuals on this post have stated repeatedly where the government can allocate the sufficient funds to complete such a strategy without severely affecting the economy.
    Any cuts would prove to be only temporary and the domestic economy will increase due to the high output of Barbados’ local free markets booming thus contributing to increased productivity.

    The answers have all been put forth before you and yet YOU still choose to ignore that. Admit it, You accuse of me of endangering Barbados’ economy by having it go, and I quote, “bankrupt” because you haven’t the slightest clue what I am talking about due to you being incapable of looking at Barbados’ macroeconomic history, present state, and future prospects that would otherwise be viable for Barbados to exploit.

    You would rather read for the ‘Economist’ because you are merely a tool. You have been taught, from young, to only think about development from a contorted standpoint. In which case, Barbados’ education system that employs professors to teach mainstream ideas about trading in the nation’s productive capabilities in order to accommodate the foreign policy of “free-trade market theory” propagated by the U.S.’ “Washington Protocol”.

    Those same free trade policies have brought in SAP’s (Structural Adjustment Programs, a.k.a. loans) imposed by foreign entities (ahem! The IMF) as well nations (ie. The U.S., U.K., Canada). These “conditioned” loans delegated to the recipient-government (Barbados in this case) where the borrowed funds SHOULD be allocated to much of the detriment of the Bajan economy. Instead of prioritizing our expenditures to key industries that could enable Barbados to progress into a productive economy as opposed to a service economy.

    You are completely ignorant to the fact that Barbados is in the current predicament that she is in because of her dependence on other countries. Her inability to diversify and complete revamping of Key sectors such as manufacturing and agriculture has CRIPPLED Barbados’ ability to be self sufficient as well as her ability to compete in the international market (whether regional or global).

    It has been proven time and time again that prudent measures implemented by governments that are now key regional/global players took measures that indeed equated to short-falls in the temporary, but most certainly ensured gains to their benefit in the not-so-distant long run.

    Let’s be reaal here AC, you’re acronym now reflects who you are. Don’t compel me to use it in a derogatory manner.


  39. Brudda i have no thought or concern for any nof your ideas as a matter of fact i really don’t care to engage in them. your bambastic attitude tell what kind of a person you are .However i would prefer to rely on the the farmers of Brazil who have proven that they can make something out of nothing and now governments worlwide are looking at the Brazilian model as way to implement ways to make their agricultural industry be productive and not you Brudda!


  40. @AC
    You have failed to think in a logical sense. You portray yourself as being comprehensive in your arguments but you cease to offer any sufficient nor real remedies to Barbados’ current problem. What you are Preach is Slavery and Permanent indenture of the Barbadian Society as a whole.

    As I Stated before sir/Madam “AC”, you are a tool.
    A dangerously hopeless one at that…


  41. @ David (B.U.)
    Please offer your voice on this matter B.U.
    I need your help. I have offered more than just a simple few of viable options Barbados has in order to secure her economic future and yet they still choose to reject it. Please provide your opinion on the arguments posed and at least try to rationalize who offers the best solutions to Barbados’ situation.

    A third party is needed urgently to help deliberate this matter, and i am trying to establish ties not create unnecessary divisions….


  42. Brudda maybe sometimes your sense of logic is only logical to you and when others like myself dont agree you resort to name calling which in effects voids out any of your point of views as meaningless. i really don’t care how much you scream and shout and straddled your high horse . for me the main focus being how to finance the barbados agriculture industry without breaking the backs of the taxpayer who also becomes a consumer and buys the product. i am well pleased with the Brazilian model and after reviewing your input i am of the opinion that the many options you stated like cut of pay and gods knows how many others would be of a substantial burden to the people shout all you want because i am not going to change my mind.


  43. This is madness. I can’t help but feel as if all if his is a farce. I cant help but feel that the voices of people with a REAL sense of how to strategically secure Barbados’ priorities. I can’t help but feel as if my voice is being wasted here.

    I so far haven’t seen any other competent arguments, and I’m afraid that at this point that should these suggested Plans be ignored, then Barbados does indeed DESERVES to be set up for failure.

    Though I admit they are stubbornly strong, I will conclude that the opposition is also reflective of how GROSSLY inept the mainstream “education” system has trained them to be. Therefore, should the Bajan people continue to turn a blind a to these solution, the Bajans of the future who will live in absolute servitude will look upon this generation of Bajans as imbecilic and incompetent degenerates who were no better than slaves in terms of their thought-processes.

    I can only weep for my beloved Bim, for it has literally been sucked dry of all potential. Her landscape lays ravaged, her resource count are permanently scarce, and her children are nothing more than blind pitiful cattle who foolishly rely on the corrupted propaganda purported by the mainstream economists, bankers, and professors of the U.S., U.K., and Canada.

    As her lamb-like children willingly choose to lay in bed with the likings of the deceitful colonialist mongrels, then it is indeed FITTING for Barbados to become nothing more than a mega-sized plantation in which her sons and daughter will forever be subjugated to the hegemonic powers, BECAUSE HER CHILDREN CHOSE FOR IT TO BE THAT WAY.

    Bajans will have no one else to blame other than Bajans THEMSELVES when Barbados’ economy falters in the light of the global economic collapse.

    ***O, WHAT PITIFUL SHADOWS THAT LURK AMONG THE LIME-ROCK OF OUR BELOVED BIM, FOR THEY WISH TO ONLY CONSUME THE VERY ESSENCE OF OUR NATION AND TO SERVE AS PROXY TO THE DARK FORCES***

    SUCH IGNORANT CHILDREN INDEED….


  44. @ AC
    “for me the main focus being how to finance the barbados agriculture industry without breaking the backs of the taxpayer who also becomes a consumer and buys the product. i am well pleased with the Brazilian model and after reviewing your input i am of the opinion that the many options you stated like cut of pay and gods knows how many others would be of a substantial burden to the people shout all you want because i am not going to change my mind”
    _____________________________________________

    A classic example of the old saying of one “ignoring the Gorilla in the room”.
    You’re the good old right hand man of Uncle Sam. Just know that In my eyes, I am very suspicious of you because You could very well be a member of the American secret intelligence agency.

    You have PURPOSEFULLY IGNORED the fact that all of the cuts proposed are only in the short term. Not to mention, you were extremely adamant in advocating for Barbados to not be preemptive by not being strategic and invest her expenditures from the numerous aforementioned sources (ie. national reserves, etc.). Not to mention that you’ve been stubbornly positing that Barbados do anything but invest into her productive sectors at all.

    You have been persistent in doing so and have not addressed nor offered any real nor LEGITIMATE rebuttals that would sufficiently prove otherwise that Barbados shouldn’t invest in her productive sectors and why implementing such a strategy to revamp our sectors would be unwise. You have CONVENIENTLY yet PERSISTENTLY continued to maintain such a position.

    Not only I, but numerous others have pointed out to solutions that could make the limiting measures to be less impacting for Barbados and can ensure almost immediate progress for the long term.

    You have repeatedly ignored the answers so obvious that at this point it is virtually impossible for me to accept you a legitimate Barbadian. No Bajan would be so persistent as to vote for sacrificing their homeland’s self-sufficiency and productivity for the sake of avoiding cuts that would negatively affect her in the short term. If such measures were to be that impacting, then it would certainly be of benefit to Barbados’ local manufacturers for Bajan citizens would realize that their costs of living would be cheaper because they are buying domestically instead of buying imports.

    To continue to rely on imports equates to Barbados being crippled and hindering her ability to be self sufficient in producing domestic products. Barbados would forever be at the mercy of other countries should it were to rely on other countries’ land for agricultural production. Hydroponics and Aeroponics is the answer to our problem, and can be solved by also allocating funds for renewable energy products on local levels as opposed to a centralized system for the nation.

    How convenient indeed it is for YOU, a self proclaimed so-called “logical Bajan” would miss all of that.


  45. @brudda
    all of what you prposed should have been done 14yrs ago when their was plenty of grain in the storehouse. Now the storehouse is empty and there is nothing left. The government is depending on the people to bail the country and their investments out the people are saying “NO MORE” it is not the fault of the people but a bunch of hypocrites who gave the people a false sense of having “arrived” within a 14year period ,now the bills have become due and like you stated we have a crisis of food security arriving on our doorstep and no money to foot the bill. Can you blame the people for saying NO!


  46. Quoting miller etc. “Answer this riddle:
    How come government can find private sector financing to build a new building for the BWA but can’t find it for the 4 Seasons project?”

    Because the Barbados and foreign private sector knows that Bajns pay their utility bills mostly in full and mostly on time so the private sector investors are certain that they will get their money back.

    Local and foreign private investors don’t have the same cnfidence in the Four Seasons folks

    Same reason Emera bought Light and Power. Emera bought Light and Power because Emera knows that ordinary Bajans pay their utility bills, mostly in full and mostly on time.

    Bajan utilities are cash cows which give millions of dollars of sweet cash at the end of every blessed month


  47. @AC
    “The government is depending on the people to bail the country and their investments out the people are saying “NO MORE” it is not the fault of the people but a bunch of hypocrites who gave the people a false sense of having “arrived” within a 14year period”
    ___________________________________________________
    I get what you’re saying AC, and I can understand your frustrations. But do you really think that the Barbadian people could afford to think that ” it is not the fault of the people” when our economy starts crumbling before our eyes?

    It would serve us no good, and we as the people must realize that we have a VERY real stake in this and it must be made clear to them that our very future as a key regional and global economic player is under threat of being lost by the incompetent elitists who claim to be educated and want to play ‘politician’.

    If I, a 21 year old male can figure out what is the best , logical, and viable ways in order for Barbados to keep afloat in the oncoming turbulent waters of global economic collapse, then what does that say about our so-called “well-seasoned and maturely groomed” politicians?

    It say that they are a BUNCH OF WRETCHED RATS, THAT’S WHAT!

    And the Bajan people do not have to be complacent towards the government and accept that. Look back at my previous comments on me suggesting on strategic ways in which the Bajan people can mobilize under this single proposition and assert the appropriate political pressures needed in order to COMPEL our rotten politicians to enact measures based on such a doctrine.

    The tools are there, the resources are there, the means of going about this are there. All we need now is for there to be a strategic unit of individuals who would be willing to submit time in order to establish awareness amongst the Bajan people in order for them to become concerned enough to demand action from our government in the necessary areas.

    Please brother AC, hear me out…..


  48. brudda i applaud your efforts despite the fact we disagree on how we can move forward in making the agriculture industry an economic plus for barbados and bajans as well continue pressing on as a 21year old you have what most politicians lack “vision” and that is one of the reasons we have arrived at this crucial point.


  49. noticed in yesterday’s nation vendors crying out about the slow sales of their produce; not so with the expensive supermarkets. ever stop to think why the space allocated for the display of agricultural produce in supermarkets is so small; because even with a purchasing market of 270.000 persons, sale of agricultural produce is not really profitable and is sold as a means to an end. lambaste me as much as you like ,but that is the reality. we have been taught since independence that conspicuous consumption is part and parcel of upward mobility.remember as the facade of progress after the sixties became more evident how we were educated that it was infradig to take to school or work mauby, bayleaf tea or soursop tea or drink pap and graduate to milo and ovaltine.the horse is long out of the stable. this healthy food eating exercise fostered on us in recent times is a powerful international marketing tool to push their new expensive products. going back to the land is not included in their plan.


  50. @AC
    I just sent an email to the ministry of Agriculture about the suggested strategy and possible sources for funding it. I also commented heavily on their website’s comment section.

    I tried signing up for “Nation News”, and I attempted to register over 18 times!! And the system still wouldn’t allow me to register. If I didn’t know any better, I’d say Uncle Sam and his slaves in parliament definitely don’t want me to get the word out there and are doing the best they can to silence me.

    Mark my words brother AC, I am going to be as vocal as possible and try to gain as much support through networking as much as possible. I just simply won’t allow for Barbados to just simply be left to curdle by our VERY OWN politicians in the light of a massive global economic onslaught of non-productive economies.

    The U.S. being the largest service economy in the world this it would be the hardest hit. Barbados wouldn’t stand a chance without any real measures to enable productivity.

    I beg you to at least do your part in getting the message out there. there needs to be an immediate form of public awareness, and it starts with you.

    Unfortunately I cannot do much for I reside up here in the United States. God knows how I wish to pack up immediately and start a new career path in Bim right now. I’m sickeningly very much so tempted to doing that should this not get out to the Bajan People!


  51. Brudda bim it is obvious you love your country wish they were more like you in leaership who has/had the vision and determination to put this cointry on the right path.hopefully your lone voice crying in the wilderness would make a difference on the critical need and immediat attentionto our food reserves . Nevertheless our differing methods in achieving such a goal should not overide the object of tackling the problem.brudda you have started the awareness now we have to find a real and feasible solution


  52. @ Brudah-Bim

    If you are serious and completely knowledgeable about that which you speak, I would suggest you seek out other fora in order to get your propositions out to as wide an audience as possible. Politicians in Barbados are just “photo-ops” specialists. They seem to be only concerned most of the time with how often they can be pictured in the press and how ever many women they may draw into their sexual nets (bear in mind most politicians here are men) and how many shopping sprees they can fly to overseas. So, if you really wish to get your ideas investigated as widely as possible then you must try lots of other avenues in addition to the blogs. Capiche?


  53. [ @ AC & De Hood ]
    Thank you for your words of encouragement. But it can’t just start with me, remember? I am all the way up north in the States and I haven’t the sufficient funds to make frequent travels to Bim in order to organize the campaign.

    No my friends, this one must be home-grown, not imported. It can only gain serious momentum if the citizens turn their awareness into action on the ground in Barbados. I can make vocalizations from here, but I fear that my voice would only be stifled due to the geographical “barrier” if you will.
    I sent three e-mails to the Ministry of Agriculture and up to now and I still haven’t heard from them. Not to mention that I submitted comments on their website, and apparently They are still “screening the comments by an ‘administrator'”. What utter nonsense.

    The government has proven that they aren’t in the slightest bit interested in adequately securing our agricultural capabilities. With so many needles obstacles in our bureaucracy, I have pure faith that the strong political mobilization of the people, that is both unified and organized as well as diligent, would be the perfect remedy to scare our politicians into shifting gears. With the Bajan people’s demands for IMMEDIATE ACTION from the government in accordance with the citizens’ doctrine.

    Nothing less. No propositions. No proposals. but a CLEAR, ORGANIZED, UNIFIED, and SOLID doctrine that DEMANDS that this strategy be immediately initiated. I can try and see if I can establish some awareness within the Bajan diaspora here in New York City through the Bajan Churches and community organizations as well as through Bajan owned businesses.

    Its all about being strategic. However, I am also knowledgeable of the fact that planning is easier to formulate, yet how how it is applied is a completely different matter. In other words, it can be easier said than done…

    But we MUST show diligence!
    Our very future depends on it!!


  54. @old onion bags | February 9, 2012 at 12:16 PM

    So, just what are you trying to tell me? That what I commented was FACT or that I was “stretching” the truth? Or rather that I need to put a lock on my keyboard when it comes to making comments about our ever “so efficient” and “caring” politicians. Show me just one of them who gives a damn about anyone other than themselves and what they can get out of being elected and I will let you paint “LIAR” on the front and back of my shirt and walk down Broad Street.


  55. @ Brudah-Bim | February 9, 2012 at 4:23 PM |
    “I sent three e-mails to the Ministry of Agriculture and up to now and I still haven’t heard from them. Not to mention that I submitted comments on their website, and apparently They are still “screening the comments by an ‘administrator’”. What utter nonsense. ”

    So Brudah-Bim, you see what you are up against? A bunch of incompetent bureaucrats who don’t like to entertain ideas or proposals from people like you; especially those who are not white and in any way connected to Bim. If a man from FAO or Monsanto was sent to “advise” them by way of expensive consultancy services, then you will see the red carpet treatment on display.
    In any event, the politician in charge does not want to hear from you unless there is large money involved.


  56. @old onion bags | February 9, 2012 at 4:51 PM
    So, in other words just keep my so and so shut when it come to commenting about politicians? Is that it? Well I got news fuh you & DEM. . . . . .de man (or woman) ain’t born yet and DEM mudder DED who figure DEM cud keep me quiet! Put dah in yuh pipe and smoke it like de crapaud (or de rasta)!


  57. @millertheanunnaki

    But I am closely tied to Bim. My Parents are both Bajan and were born there and the vast majority of my extended family still resides there.
    I was just simply birthed in America, but my blood is as Bajan as Mount Gay.

    Would that still make them suspicious of me?


  58. @Brudah-Bim | February 9, 2012 at 5:14 PM
    As far as de local Bajan is considered you are what is known as a “bajan-yankee”, with the emphasis on “yankee”! That should be an eye opener for you.


  59. @Brudah-Bim

    Maybe if you had connections to a member of “guvment” or one to the technocrats in the Min. of Agric. or if you had a “friend” who was close to one of them maybe you might stand a chance on being heard and getting your ideas looked at and perhaps adopted. Good luck to you, you will surely need it.


  60. @Bruddah Bim – yes I have been reading all the comments. I have a book to get to the designers before I lose my chance of getting that completed….that I do not comment at every posting does not mean that I am not aware. If I do not take time to work, I can earn no money and I will not be able to eat, and then issues of food and electricity might not be pushed like how I push them…’cause I cannot encourage blogs from 6′ under….so gee me a break!! There is so much I can do.

    Food in Barbados and the Caribbean has my top priority….then comes Barbados Light & Power (who I waiting for this month ’cause I been living in darkness and wannah see what dem coming up with now!).

    But to be honest, I tired of all the talk…I still say bottom line is – a petition to stop the importation of Monsanto’s products and all GMO foods…this is the most important start to getting our island clean…our health bill down. Educate our children (and the older ones) about same and how to eat clean. @BU and David….why not start this petition…I think it would be amazing if it started here. I will personally deliver such a petition, with anyone else who wants to join, to the government of Barbados.

    Re farming: There is enough land. There are enough farmers. We could do with more of both of course, and there are lands with which to do it. Bring in the Guyanese if the Bajans do not want to toil same. Right now that is about as much as I can fight for.

    We have thousands of others who can take action….many just like to sit and read these blogs, and write nonsense and insult each other just because they have nothing better to do. Those who write about good planning and what should be done are noted with interest….but…..do you go out there and implement what you preach? In fact is it not you Sir Brudda with all the ideas that lives in the US….if you can solve our problems, please come back and join forces of action. Or keep on writing to the government, keep on writing in the media, keep up the fight through words…I have been doing this for twenty odd years….because we do not get an answer does not mean we have to stop. Our islands are known for using the telephone for idle chat, the blogs for cussing, the mail for receiving same and putting into a draw for posterity. Action is not one of our pluses….but the time will come….so just keep on doing what you are doing from afar if you cannot come home and do it.

    I believe in what I preach. And take as much action as I can. My action right now is to shop at the local markets for my produce and my beef, talk to farmers and encourage them to stop using Monsanto, I do not eat GMO foods (even stopped using flour, use cassava flour instead – does the exact same work as normal flour and is bettah for ya and it is home-grown and made here), I do not purchase anything to do with food from the US, encourage others to do the same, even stop people in the supermarket when I do go there and ask them to read the labels of foreign and put it back on the shelves (one day I might get thrown out of these!). I try to eat as much clean local as I can, encourage restaurants to grow their own herbs and to shop in the local markets – in fact tomorrow I have one restaurant owner and her chef going with me for the first time to Cheapside market..(I have done this over and over again…sad when I take the time to actually take Chefs and introduce them to the market vendors…they shop there once and then because of pure laziness, soon go back to calling the expensive importers and return to their bad habits (much easier). In fact I am shocked at how many Bajan Chefs have never been to a market!! In the US and in in Europe Chefs go to the market themselves, choosing their produce with care….so since we follow everything foreign does how come we don’t follow this littl exercise??? LAZINESS. DRINKING TOO MUCH RUM AND PARTYING AFTER A NIGHT OF SERVING PEOPLE, CANNOT GET UP IN DE MAWNING AND DO DE RIGHT TING?????? or what????

    … but me…I do not give up…I still continue to encourage and try my best to show the way. In fact this particular restaurant owner I am taking to Cheapside, she is a foreigner, and has made up her mind to increase her food section (used to be more of a bar type operation) but do it conscientiously as she has seen the light about clean, good food…. will be also doing a little growing in her yard at home and more at the restaurant too….so my work is on the ground…my work is every time I leave my house. I get my satisfaction from hearing a friend telling others not to buy this or that and encouraging them to buy local. I get satisfaction from action.

    I will not get involved in politricks. I will not get involved in calling people names. Or wasting my precious time. I am doing the work through my writing and photography also, through my presentations (did not one Abaco screaming about Monsanto and our lack of respect for farmers – a child of 10 asked me for all the photographs and the presentation so she could speak to her entire school the same way and I gladly gave same – showed me children do want to know and are concerned). If I cannot get the attention of those who can make a difference, I continue to try, but mostly I go out there and do as much as I can by educating those who are not aware of the simplest of things – like throwing a plastic bottle into a bush (got cussed for telling a 30-something year old who did this in front of me the other day but perhaps nexx time she might think about it a little more…as I warned her she was killing her children…..man!).

    So if I do not get involved with every comment made it is because I am in fact out there doing in the immortal words of Bajan Brian Talma – “Action, man!”

    What are all of you who have placed your ideas and comments on this blog doing today to make a difference?


  61. @Rosemary

    Your idea is a good one conceptually about the petition. However the issue which is a potential blocker is the reality that only 1 out of 5000 Bajans has ever heard about Monsanto.


  62. @David…..I think that you are wrong…..but…who knows….I knew nothing about the development at Chancery Lane until I saw it on Facebook and signed the petition…that got stopped (well for now!)….I think you could try it…if you only get me signing it will be a show for me to nevah bother again…live my life the way I want….help those who want to be helped…and let cancer reign, and death continue….but I have a feeling we will get quite a few people….from all over the Caribbean too….Perhaps when I am finished with this Barbados book, I can do this myself but right now my brain cannot take too much…it is already addled with these pages…!!! 10,000 photographs, 600 stories – this major league work and I am inundated and fighting a virus at the same time…


  63. google “pink slime” or chicken nuggets ingredients.

    Wunna Bajans doan know how fortunate you are to be able to grow food all year.


  64. balance | February 9, 2012 at 6:40 AM |

    You truly understand Bajans.

    Brudah-Bim you need a white Canadian front man to present your proposal.


  65. I just sent a letter to the People’s Empowerment Party (a lesser known Political party) via Facebook and posted comments on their page (also via Facebook), which at the topic of the topics was the nation’s current state of agriculture and need for self sufficiency. It is an appeal to them in order to help spread awareness amongst the Bajan people. Hopefully it will encourage them to gear up and become the leading hedges of the mobilization of the people.

    I wouldn’t blink though, because it is still not enough to make even the slightest dent.


  66. you probably do not read my comments miller but we seem to be singing the same tune. reinventing the agricultural sector as aviable alternative to the other food competitors would take a lifetime because those who have authority over the purse strings like fast foods too. miller the agricultural sector in cuba has never recovered since the demise of the soviet bloc because 40% of cuba’s food and 805 of its fertilizers and pesticides were imported from thesoviet bloc and the collapse of that trade 1991 caused real problems.. in 1993, the first BASIC UNITS OF COOPERATIVE PRODUCTION were created to grow more food for the population but 705 of these COOPERATIVES have been unprofitable and unsuccesful due to interference in their operations by the CENTRAL GOVERNMENT.


  67. Random Thoughts | February 6, 2012 at 9:41 PM |
    David maybe betwen you are Rosemary could start a recipes thread using all local foods. Simple dishes which take less than an hour to prepare. I think that people like to eat local fresh food, but they imagine that it is difficult or expensive to prepare.

    Maybe you can show them that it is neither time consuming
    *********************************************************************************
    Or perhaps CBC Radio & TV could sacrifice some of the time it airs Days of Our Lives, et al ,and Stupid Cupid to teach our folk what you have suggested,instead of teaching them the crap that emanates from these shows

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