Tag Archives: Food

Import it First Attitude!

It is often bandied about the ministry of agriculture (MOA) has more employees with PhDs than most places. However, if you try to plot a correlation between national agriculture output and number of post grad certifications in the MOA, there is a negligible positive.  The late prime minister Owen Arthur warned Barbadians of storm clouds on the horizon and that

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Understanding Food and the Ecology

For those who love to read here is a book IN DEFENSE OF FOOD – Thank you Bentley. Here is another topic Barbadians delight in giving lip service. We have reached a point where we do not intend to attack the serious issue of food security. Equally important is that we do not use our intelligence and formal education to understand

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Minister Sutherland @Shopsmart Notsmart

The Editor Barbados Barbados Underground Bridgetown, Barbados West Indies Dear Sir/Madam, There was an article in the Daily Nation of the 20th.December 2018 captioned Sutherland calls for sanitary lab. The article alluded to the fact that “Shop Smart” seemed to be having problems over the amount of money it was losing when food products had the Best Before Date (BBD)

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Dr. Lucas Responds to Peter Webster’s Deleterious Effect of Seaweed on Soils Piece

Submitted by Robert D. Lucas, Ph.D. and CFS, Certified Food Scientist   [Barbados Underground] The Editor Barbados Underground Bridgetown, Barbados West Indies Dear Sir/Madam, There was an article in the Nation of 26th July entitled “How to handle sargassum” by Mr. Peter Webster. Webster in paragraph one seems to have a problem with “however, if large concentrations of sodium salts

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What to do with Sargassum

Submitted by Robert D. Lucas,Ph.D. and CFS, Certified Food Scientist The Editor Barbados Underground Bridgetown, Barbados West Indies Dear Sir/Madam, The following is an overview of the uses of seaweed in the food industry. Suggestions are also proposed for prospective uses of the product. Seaweeds belong to a group commonly called macro-algae or  hydrocolloids in the food industry. The  latter

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City of Bridgetown Upbraided!

A City of Bridgetown member expresses disgust! I’m informing you to the fact that I take offense to your ad on health and nutrition in Barbados Today page 4. This ad features photos of blueberries and strawberries. These fruits are extra-regional while we have local fruits such as Avocado, Soursop, Bajan Cherry etc which are just as if not more

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Alienating the Junk Food Industry

The Barbados Advocate editorial of yesterday addressed a controversial position taken by Dr. Trevor Hassell regarding the addiction of our people to junk food especially the youth. What are the whys and wherefores we need to debate to save the health our people? – Barbados Underground As much as we understand the authenticity of his call and, indeed, largely sympathise

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Aquaponic Farming is Growing

Submitted by Damian Hinkson With a decade of experience in Aquaponic(AP) farming I am very happy to see AP systems now being created all over the island. The benefit of producing vegetables using fish manure rather than land animal’s or chemical fertilizers are many but the most attractive is the fact that your irrigation and fertilization is done automatically. Raising

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Producing Local Food to Feed Tourists–Can We Do It?

Hardly a week seems to go by without one or two prominent figures calling for, or in some cases demanding, more use of local produce by our tourism industry and especially restaurants. First, I absolutely and totally support this objective but I wonder if the energy expended in trying to make this happen is entirely well placed or in fact truly balanced.

Some time ago the dairy farmers were complaining about being forced to accept lower prices and reduced quotas, the virtual monopoly milk processing entity unilaterally stopped making yogurts locally, pretty much a basic serving menu article in most hotels and alternative accommodation offerings. No-one can convince me that it is cheaper to bring in a foreign made refrigerated alternative across 6,000 or more miles by road and ship and for the wholesale distributors to always disperse them within the stated sell by date. There has to be waste and spoilage.

I also understand the economics of mass branded cheeses like Cheddar, but surely there are specialty items that can be made locally like double cream, feta and cottage cheese which are largely imported with a huge drain of foreign currency.

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Understanding Aquaponics and Growing Food

Submitted by Damien Hinkson My first true commercial farm upgrade to aquaponics (AP) is complete, the first of many more as the commercial farmers are rushing to exploit the labor saving qualities of AP. This type of farming comfortably puts you in the .3 to .7 worker per acre range, amazingly, with no additional labour skill sets required. This reduction

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Let Us Discuss Food Imports Minister YESTWICK!

“It has been reported that Barbados current food import bill is in the region of $800 million dollars annually.  The Minister of Agriculture has also stated that 65 percent of our food is produced locally. This means we import 35 percent of our food.  Our total food bill is therefore almost $2.3 billion dollars annually. This translates to over $20

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The First Steps to Food Security

The following extract about Aquaponics submitted by Ready done Aquaponic farming dates back to the Aztecs but due to the currently available combination of cheap plastics and Magnetic drive pumps it was recently re-discovered and improved upon as a viable organic farming method. The system is designed to hold fresh water fish in tanks, in conjunction with plants in large

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Aquaponics Versus the Pet Dog

Submitted by Ready done Aquaponics is the food production system the world is upgrading to from conventional industrial farming. The major problem it solves is that potassium fertilizer taken from mines and used to help crops produces 40% more fruit. It has worked well for the last 100 years but it is a finite resource and will be exhausted soon

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