Walter Blackman – Findings from the 2021 Auditor General’s Report, and Educational Reform

The following submission from Walter Blackman, Actuary and VOB TalK Show Host is a summary of his June 14 ,2022 Brasstacks program – BU blogmaster


Walter Blackman – Actuary and VOB Brasstacks host

There are many national issues simmering on the front burner which are worthy of discussion. Just to identify some of these, we have gun violence, the strategy announced by the Attorney General to combat crime, a test carried out on a male to determine the presence or absence of Monkey pox in Barbados, the need to be on the lookout for counterfeit currency, some disturbing findings from the latest Auditor General’s report for the Fiscal Year ended March 31, 2021, and last, but not least, educational reform.

With respect to the Auditor General’s report, there are some issues raised by the Auditor General which I would like to highlight:

  1. There is a lack of timely response by Ministries and Departments to requests for information. When responses were provided, they were inadequate. To solve this problem, the Auditor General noted that section 13(5) of the Public Finance Management Act 2019-1 states: “If a person refuses to produce any records or information as requested by the Comptroller General, that person is liable on summary conviction to a fine of $10,000, or imprisonment for 12 months, or both.” He suggested that the legislation should be amended to include the Auditor General.
  2. There is no Leader of the Opposition, so the post of Chairman of the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) is vacant. There is some uncertainty on how the PAC can function. The Auditor General recommends that one of the “independent” senators be allowed to chair the PAC.
  3. In his 2019 report, the Auditor General referred to a Special Audit which was conducted on the Barbados Water Authority (BWA). Legal action has now been taken against the office of the Auditor General by a former Chairman of the Board of the BWA. Any discussion on this report must now be placed on hold pending the decision of the courts. The Auditor General recommends that legislation should provide that any document produced in good faith by, or on behalf of, the Auditor General should be privileged information and protected against lawsuits.
  4. The Treasury Department reported that its receivables increased by $1.238 billion during the year. A great difference exists between amounts reported by the Treasury and the Barbados Revenue Authority.
  5. A balance of $32.8 million was reported in respect of dishonoured cheques. The names of individuals or entities were not provided for audit inspection.
  6. $3.9 million in pensions were paid by the Treasury Department in the names of deceased persons. Sometimes, payments were made 10 years or more after death. 34 pensioners, former government workers, were affected. Over the years, the Treasury Department was unable to access the Death Register information.
  7. BRA recorded $12 million in wire transfers related to taxes paid by taxpayers. However, these wire transfers were not applied to the appropriate taxpayers’ accounts.
  8. With respect to the National Insurance Scheme (NIS), access to the SAP information technology system by former employees was not deactivated. Benefit transactions were processed and approved by the same individual.
  9. Old-age NIS pensions were generated for persons who were recorded as deceased within the national Death Register. 10 NIS pensioners were affected, and in some cases, payments were made for over 5 months after death.
  10. Persons no longer employed by BRA still had active credentials and access to the TAMIS application. Some taxpayers had multiple active TAMIS numbers. BRA was not informed of deceased taxpayers.
  11. Tax refunds payable to taxpayers were reported as $611.9 million. The audit of BRA was characterized by extremely long delays in the provision of information to the auditors and this would have impacted negatively on its timely completion. Cash and banking information was not properly reconciled. This matter has been ongoing for several years. It poses risk of errors, omissions, or acts of fraud being perpetrated and concealed.
  12. Clearwater Bay Ltd, a government company, made a loan guarantee of $120 million. This loan guarantee was connected to the construction of the proposed Four Seasons -managed Hotels and Villas. The $120 million were originally shown as a receivable but then written off in 2018. The Auditor General holds the view that this $120 million should not have been written off. The Government of Barbados paid $124.3 million to the bank after the loan was called. A check with The Land Registry Department indicates that the property has been conveyed to a private company. There is no evidence of money being paid by the private company.

Minister of Education Kay McConney

With respect to educational reform, we are not limiting our analysis and discussion to the 11+ exam. I have my own ideas and vision and you have yours, so let us discuss.

Sandy Kellman has eloquently and repeatedly shown us that our new system of education must expose all of our children to assessments and tests at an early age in order to detect learning challenges and disabilities. Those young children with learning challenges should receive adequate remedial treatment as early as possible. Funds from the education budget will be allocated for this purpose, and jobs will be created.

Primary school students will be encouraged to develop their talents in art, the performing arts, music, technology, sports, English, Mathematics, Spanish, Mandarin, and Cantonese. Metrics will be used in all of these areas, and teaching and coaching jobs will be created to prepare students for a vastly expanded 11+ exam.

Talents surfacing at the primary level will be further developed at the secondary school level with teachers, coaches, musicians, artists, singers, playwrights, poets, writers, and religious ministers all playing a critical and pivotal role. Many jobs are waiting to be created. We are going to need the experience and the wisdom of the John Goddards, the Ralph Jemmotts, and others to help guide us forward.

CXC, CAPE, and SAT exams will be taken by secondary school students. High SAT scores will enable our secondary school students to attend polytechnics and universities in the USA where their marketable skills and talents will undergo the last stage of development. After that, the brilliance and talents of a young Barbadian population will be unleashed upon the rest of the world.

The overall objective of this new education policy is to generate foreign exchange earnings for Barbados. At present, we are on the wrong course. We need to find a new direction. As a people, we need to pivot the Barbadian economy around a new axis.

138 comments

  • Get serious!
    Call for penalties on Auditor General’s report
    by SHAWN CUMBERBATCH
    shawncumberbatch@nationnews.com

    IT IS TIME FOR ministries and departments to be penalised in light of the Auditor General’s persistent evidence that Government is “bleeding” millions of dollars.
    That is the recommendation of former president of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Barbados David Simpson, who said there was a risk that the effectiveness of the report “is being dwindled down because no real action is being taken to create the result that we need”.
    Chairman of Integrity Group Barbados (IGB) Andy Armstrong was also worried that the Auditor General’s concerns were not being taken seriously enough.
    He urged Government to fulfill its promise to give the office the staff it needed and for state agencies that did not file their financials on time as required by law to be penalised.
    “I feel as though the Auditor General is speaking every year and there are no apparent serious steps or improvements being made.
    “So while I know there is a big outcry over what people are seeing from where I sit it is a common thread running through the issues that are being raised that needs to be addressed in a meaningful way once and for all.
    “And I think a lot of the resources are there, but we just need to be able to enforce better, and sensitise, continue the training and add that sanction, or that disciplinary component, to hold people accountable more for these breaches and for them to understand the serious nature of it.”
    The chartered accountant said the issues raised by the Auditor General were serious enough to affect Government revenue and expenditure policy, and its funding strategy.
    He added that a major downside of poor financial management in the public sector was that Barbadian tax payers were the ones carrying the burden.
    “So when a system has so much bleeding out of it, it begs the question if we had better and more sound financial management, would we be in a position where we need the level of loans that we have, or the level of increases in taxation,” he stated.
    Armstrong said while the IGB was “impressed by what the Auditor General is able to continue to do, even though he doesn’t have a full complement of staff”, his office needed to be better resourced.
    “I would imagine the first thing Government would say as well is ‘we don’t have the funds’. But surely you want to make sure that you spend your funds wisely, and therefore having a properly resourced Auditor General department is really critical,” he said.
    The former president of the Barbados Chamber of Commerce and Industry also said that in the same way that companies could be penalised by regulators for their failure to produce audited financial reports on time, Government needed to lead by example in ensuring its own entities were similarly expected to comply.
    “What I would suggest is that the Auditor General have the power to penalise in some way agencies who refuse to file on time. Right now, there don’t appear to be any consequences apart from ministers or the Auditor General saying, ‘come on, come on, please get up to date’. But after a while they realise that ‘they are not going to do us anything if we don’t’,” he said.
    “So there should be the ability to put some form of penalties or censure in place. I think if you if you do it to one or two, and you publicise that, you will very soon find that all of them start to fall in line.”
    Simpson was confident that “if we can achieve full compliance of all agencies, and departments, in government with the Public Financial Management Act, continue the training and sensitisation of offices at all levels, set benchmarks and so on, then we will start to see a reduction in incidents of what the Auditor General reports”.
    “But we also have to be able to take clear steps where there are breaches and clear steps in terms of sanction and penalties, to make sure that full compliance can be achieved,” he added.

    Source: Nation

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  • The Eleven Plus: A Red Herring

    Article by Barbados Today Traffic Published on
    July 13, 2022
    Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed by the author(s) do not represent the official position of Barbados TODAY.

    by Ralph Jemmott

    On the Friday, July 8, 2022 edition of Brass Tacks, moderator Ms. Sade Jemmott made a number of very sensible and highly observant statements on the current preoccupation with the Barbados Secondary School Entrance Examination (BSSEE), commonly known as the Eleven Plus.

    Ms. Jemmott is not a relative and I have never had the pleasure of her acquaintance. Before making the statements, she noted that she would probably get into trouble for what she was about to say. She continued to make the valid observation that the Eleven Plus debate within the context of the total reform of the Barbadian educational sector, constituted in her words, ‘a red herring.’

    The moderator is right in the sense that many of the factors that limit the quantitative and qualitative learning outcomes of Barbadian children, both cognitively and affectively have little or nothing to do with the BSSEE.

    In fact, if you study world educational trends you might perceive that formal schooling is doing best in countries with high material and psycho-social cultures. These include Japan, South Korea, Finland and most of the Scandinavian states. Across the board school systems are doing poorly in many countries. There are great schools in England, but white working class boys from the Council Estates, submerged in the ‘yob’ culture, are not doing well. In the U.S parents are concerned that they send their children to school with fear that there might be a fatal shooting on any given day.

    Far too often formal schooling is discussed out of context, the context of family breakdown, social decay, material and cultural impoverishment. It took COVID to tell us that many children not only did not have any access to technology, but their homes did not have electricity.

    The reality is that some children wake up with little to eat. But don’t tell that to the bourgeois ‘educators’ who have clamoured to the top of the educational establishment.

    Abolish the Eleven Plus, zone all the schools, make the Harrison and Queen’s Colleges into all ability comprehensive schools and ‘just so’ everybody will learn and presumably become high profile doctors and lawyers, architects,
    actuaries and political scientists or whatever status
    positions we obsess about.

    Some amazing claims have been made against the Eleven Plus Examination many of which have absolutely nothing to with the test itself. They are more about the mechanism of transfer from the primary to the secondary cycle within a hierarchically structured school system that reflect the class stratification of a capitalist democratic society.

    There is no society operating within the capitalist mode of production where all schools are considered equal even where total zoning exists. Parity of esteem does not exist in most schools system, besides with schools as with other things in life, reputations are won and lost.

    One of the most outrageous indictments of the Eleven Plus is that it promotes classism. One moderator on Brass Tacks blames classism on the Eleven Plus. Another moderator whose understanding of education is highly questionable, when told that a gas attendant was working for a mere BDS$300 a week said that was why he would abolish the Eleven Plus.

    Admittedly that is a pitiful wage, but what has it got to do with the Eleven Plus? That low wage is a function of the wage market conditions and of the interaction between labour and capital.

    Presumably if there was no Eleven Plus, there would be no class variations as low income earners would disappear. The truth is that social stratification is a product of an economic system called ‘Capitalism’ which distributes its surplus unevenly. Thus the bank manager draws $150,000 a year while the security guard at the same bank gets $10,000.

    The manager lives in a mansion in a gated community at Royal Westmoreland, the guard in a chattel house in Eagle Hall. What formal schooling can do and does, is to allow the child of the security guard to go to the same school as the manager’s and if he has the ability and applies himself, to become a bank manager one day. Thus formal schooling can help to mollify or soften class rigidities by affording some degree of upward social mobility.

    I am not a Marxist, but the Marxist critique of education in a capitalist society is absolutely valid. Schooling in capitalist society, while it might offer upward mobility, tends to replicate the social relations of the capitalist mode of production. However class distinction is not so much a product of schooling as it is of the mode of production.

    In the 1970s the British Labour Party, for lack of a better word ‘comprehensivised’ many of the old grammar schools in Britain. The expressed claim by many on the left-wing of the Party was to create a more egalitarian society. This of course has not happened.

    British society today is as class ridden and class driven as it ever was. Of course, the British with typical social hypocrisy never touched the elite public schools like Eton, Harrow, Charterhouse, Rugby and Winchester to which the aristocracy and the upper classes still send their children. These children still emerge at the top of UK society
    in almost every field of endeavour.

    The Daily Mail on November 21, 2012, produced a headline ‘How Britain is still being ruled by public school elites.’ Almost a third of those persons holding senior positions in business, politics, law and the diplomatic service attended public schools and were Oxbridge educated.

    Guess who are doing worst in the British education system, white working class males coming out of a council house environment affected by a materially and culturally impoverished socio-economic environment. Anyone who thinks that abolishing an exam will change the Barbadian social structure must be living in la-la land.

    If you want to abolish class distinctions, then you may have to advocate a completely different mode of production, maybe a centrally driven, command style communistic type of governance that will supposedly guarantee equality. But as Gladstone Holder used to point out, that is the type of equality that can only be enforced by a tyranny, which
    it often does.

    Sade Jemmott made bold to express the concern that the conversation on education reform would not be in her words “highjacked” by persons with “chips on their shoulders” about what school they went to or didn’t go to.

    A serious reform movement should avoid the ‘leh we pull um down mentality.’

    It must try to rise above the compounded silliness that characterises so much of contemporary discourse.

    One aspect of that compounded nonsense is the notion that if the child does not obtain a certain mark in the Eleven Plus, he or she is “condemned” to failure. Utter garbage! What, pray tell, is the “condemnation” mark? Children are born with or develop certain abilities, not all of which are scholastic or academic but which are all needed in contemporary society.

    Regrettably or fortunately, we are not all alike and are born into different circumstances. Besides, people will always discriminate based on whether one is short or tall, fat or thin, black, brown or white, beautiful or not so beautiful, athletic or clumsy. These are distinctions we all have to live with.

    Get over it.

    Ralph Jemmott is a retired educator and regular contributor on social issues.

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  • Why has the 2019 Financial Management Act not worked in the way Minister Ryan Straughn touted in the House of Assembly?

    Why has there been no rush to proclaim and operationalize the FOI and Integrity legislation? IF the government is serious about bring change to how public affairs is managed?

    Why the haste to rollout the NEW ID system and those in the know are aware the production setup is not yet operational? Why has the media not pursued this matter? This is simply dishonesty in government with compliant public servants.

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  • The New ID system is getting a bushwhacking across social.media platforms
    People are of the opinion that they are being set up.for govt to spy on them
    Govt intrusion in the lives of people have become incessantly morbid

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  • Some thing to chew on

    It is amazing that what goes around could so easily come around. Given the significant level of deceit and hypocrisy that is firmly planted in the bosom of the current Barbados Labour administration, Barbadians should not be surprised that the administration is turning its attention to the domestic capital market for funds.

    Barbadians will recall that the BLP in opposition lambasted the previous administration for the accumulation of domestic (and foreign) debt and promised to reprofile (not repudiate) the debt if elected to office in May 2018.

    Barbadians will also recall the pain and suffering some families had to and continue to endure through the unilateral action taken by the BLP administration in late 2018 to repudiate (refused to pay) about $4.5 billion in debt inherited from the previous administration. That action led to great mistrust of the BLP administration by domestic and foreign investors.

    Notwithstanding and in a few short years this same BLP administration is seeking to tap into the domestic market for more funds through a scaling-up and extension of the BOSS programme. This is on the heels of the administration borrowing excessively from the IMF and other external sources. With little attention being paid to stimulate the productive sectors and to achieve higher levels of growth on a sustained basis, the administration’s obvious intention to escalate both the domestic and foreign components of the national debt will plunge the country in a debt trap in a few years.

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  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Keep waiting for a DEGRADED colonial system to effectively and competently educate your children and there will ALWAYS BE FAILURE….these fools are still trying to pretend they created a 11 plus SLAVE TEST…and decadent, backward education system that not even enslaver countries use anymore…steupppss..

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  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Chairman of Integrity Group Barbados (IGB) Andy Armstrong was also worried that the Auditor General’s concerns were not being taken seriously enough.”

    took them 30 YEARS OR MORE to realize this, seriously…..

    regressing in a reverse motion….

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  • David

    I would say the 2019 Financial Management Act HASN’T WORKED, for the simple reason Auditors from AGO were able to conduct audits of several Ministries and state owned entities that were able to submit their financialstatementsto the Accountant General by the stipulated July 31st deadline, the results of which the Auditor General outlined in his annual report.

    This clearly indicates there wasn’t any widespread issues of noncompliance.

    However, Mr. Trotman provided a list of tge few Ministries and SOEs that FAILED to COMPLY with or ADHERE to the provisions of the Act.

    Another issue we seemed to have overlooked is the tardiness of the Accountant General Office, which is responsible for preparing financial statements of the various Ministries.

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  • page ten of Barbados Today friday online.

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  • Thanks Artax, this is the kind of feedback the blogmaster is looking for. Why make implement legislation to be able to huff and puff that this is why we need a big cabinet? We want to see improvement.

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  • The $6.7 million cheque was at Oistins not Bridge street.

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  • Thanks David,

    that link works.

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  • Should be:

    I WOULDN’T say the 2019 Financial Management Act HASN’T WORKED,******

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  • @Artax

    One of the objectives of the Act is to hold SOEs accountable is this not so? Especially as it pertains to timely submission of financials? Have you read the suggest coming from David Simpson that the time has come to penalize public servants?

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  • @ WALTER

    WHAT YOU HAVE DESCRIBED IS PARADISE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    THEY LIVE IN A WARPED SENSE OF REALITY.

    CORRUPTION AND BACKWARD BEHAVIOR IS PAR FOR THE COURSE.

    NOTHING WILL NEVER CHANGE TOO MANY UNDER HANDED PEOPLE OUT THERE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND TO BE FED.

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  • David

    I agree with Simpson “that the time has come to penalize public servants.”

    Because SOEs have not been held accountable, so far, for noncompliance with the provisions of the Act, relative to submitting financial statements by the stipulated deadline, does not necessarily mean it hasn’t been working.

    The question is, WHO is responsible for penalising those SOEs and why have not performed the duties as stipulated by the Act.

    Shouldn’t they be held accountable as well?

    Do you believe it would be FAIR and REASONABLE if corresponding legislation EXISTED to hold politicians accountable during or after their tenures as well?

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  • @Artax

    Is it because the Act has no ‘teeth’?

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  • David

    Or, perhaps it’s what happens as a result of when civil servants are required to ‘police’ other civil servants?

    We all know the Chairman and other Board members of a SOE, are usually political operatives who either campaigned for the Minister, lives in Minister’s constituency…. or, is associated with the incumbent political party.

    What would happen if the officers guilty of noncompliance of the Act, are closely associated to the Minister?

    Under those circumstances, what would be EXPECTED of the Minister?

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  • @Artax

    Isn’t this what the same Act was intended to address?

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  • Sometime Bushie has to wonder if David and Artax are being facetious, or are REALLY as clueless as they try to make us think they are…

    Quote..I agree with Simpson “that the time has come to penalize public servants.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    LOL ha ha ha Murdah!!
    …so what was the appropriate response to criminality PREVIOUSLY?
    Now that the horse has BOLTED, ‘the time has come’ to do the SENSIBLE (RIGHT) thing…?

    Boss … the time that has come, is the time for REAPING….the jobby that we sowed.

    …and from David…
    “Isn’t this what the same Act was intended to address?”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Oh Shiite!!!
    …Mean like the Integrity Legislation?
    or the new Town Planning Act?

    Steupsss
    These are all just BUL SHIT legal GIMMICKS to give the impression of action, while protecting their duopoly status.
    The laws are essentially COPIES from other jurisdictions, (for which LAWYERS are paid MILLIONS to copy) and they end up unintelligible, flawed and useless.
    …but this is OK, cause they then get to pay their friends to do it ALL OVER again…. and again.

    ‘Only in brassbados….. ‘
    Well not really ONLY in BBdos, …but shiite we do it so well…..

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  • Walter Blackman

    BAJE July 17, 2022 2:00 PM

    “@ WALTER

    WHAT YOU HAVE DESCRIBED IS PARADISE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND.

    THEY LIVE IN A WARPED SENSE OF REALITY.

    CORRUPTION AND BACKWARD BEHAVIOR IS PAR FOR THE COURSE.

    NOTHING WILL NEVER CHANGE………………”

    Baje,
    I understand and appreciate your cynicism.
    In many respects, we as a people, are responsible for what is happening to our country. Therefore, we are responsible for rectifying the situation.
    \
    A lot of malfeasance has been committed and some of it has been revealed.
    How best should we handle these revelations? Keep silent? Or try to educate each other so that we are better positioned to take collective remedial action, as a next step?

    You have convinced yourself that “nothing will never (sic) change”. Those of us who are interested in making this country operate and function in the interest of all Barbadians must oppose your stance.
    We have to believe that we can change things in this country for the better.

    There is a danger in Barbadians at home and abroad believing that nothing will ever change. I am not saying that it will happen to you, but whenever the day of reckoning comes, such persons, rather than standing up and being counted, typically offer no meaningful support to any action seeking change. “Nothing will ever change” invariably becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy for these cynics.

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  • Walter Blackman

    BustTea July 17, 2022 3:37 PM

    “Sometime Bushie has to wonder if David and Artax are being facetious, or are REALLY as clueless as they try to make us think they are…”

    We had a situation in which investors decided to borrow $120 million from a bank to construct a proposed Four Seasons – Managed project of hotels and villas. To start the ball rolling, these investors assumed the financial risk associated with this project.

    Very conveniently, a government company, Clearwater Bay Ltd, steps forward and guarantees this loan. Senior civil servants are associated with this company. Very conveniently, the original investors decided not to pay the loan. Very conveniently, the government of Barbados could easily find $124.3 million of taxpayers’ money to pay the bank that offered the loan. Very conveniently, the loan is written off, and $124.3 million of taxpayers’ money end up in the pockets of persons who we must now investigate. Very conveniently, whatever valuable property remained ends up in the hands of “somebody” we need to investigate. There is no evidence that this “somebody” paid a cent for the property.

    Here is a case involving politicians, “smokescreen” investors, senior civil servants, and a “somebody” who ends up with a valuable property free of charge. After this group had collaborated and colluded to its heart’s content, taxpayers’ had to fork out $124.3 million and had absolutely nothing to show for it.

    We can easily identify every person involved in these unsavoury transactions.
    If you, the BU reader, had the power, who out of this group of “hoodwinkers” would you punish? What would be their punishment?

    Please note that the politician and the senior civil servant play a central, co-operative role in all situations that involve the mishandling of public funds.

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  • You have convinced yourself that “nothing will never (sic) change”. Those of us who are interested in making this country operate and function in the interest of all Barbadians must oppose your stance.
    We have to believe that we can change things in this country for the better.

    There is a danger in Barbadians at home and abroad believing that nothing will ever change. I am not saying that it will happen to you, but whenever the day of reckoning comes, such persons, rather than standing up and being counted, typically offer no meaningful support to any action seeking change. “Nothing will ever change” invariably becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy for these cynics.

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    BOSS I DON’T CONVINCE MYSELF OF ZERO.

    FOR OVER 20 YEARS THE AUDITOR GENERAL IN ALL HIS REPORTS YEAR AFTER YEAR AFTER YEAR HAS HIGHLIGHTED MILLIONS BEING STOLEN OR UNACCOUNTED FOR ANNUALLY.

    NOT ONE CIVIL SERVANT OR POLITICIAN ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND HAS BEEN JAILED COSTING THE TAX PAYERS BILLIONS OF MISSING DOLLARS OVER THAT PERIOD AND THAT IS ONLY WHAT HAS BEEN HIGHLIGHTED IN THE REPORTS.

    THE ONLY LOCAL POLITICIAN OR LOCAL CIVIL SERVANT CONVICTED AND JAILED FOR BRIBERY AND THEFT ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND WAS DONE BY THE USA IN THE USA.

    I HAVE NEVER VOTED AND HENCE NOT A PART OF THE BACKWARD THINKING.

    THE cynicism IS LOOKING AT THE REALITY WHICH YOU DON’T WANT TO ACKNOWLEDGE.

    THEY DESERVE TO BE LOCKED UP FOR STEALING AND ROBBING THEIR OWN BLACK PAYING TAX PAYERS MANY WHO LIVE IN POVERTY OR STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE.

    EVERYONE PAYS VAT.

    THESE PEOPLE HAVE NO SHAME AND I AGREE WITH EXPOSING THEM AND THE NEFARIOUS UNDERTAKINGS HOWEVER YOU NEED TO DEAL WITH THE IDIOT VOTERS WHO ALLOW THE LEADERS TO GIVE THEM SCRAPS AND PITTANCES WHILST ENRICHING THEMSELVES.

    MIA MOTTLEY WAS INVOLVED IN THE PARADISE/CLEAR WATER PROJECT MAKING OVER $1 MILLION FROM,IT CROOKED AVANISH PERSAUD HER CONSULTANT AND ANOTHER BAG MAN WAS HEAD OF THE PROJECT MAKING “$MILLIONS, BIZZY WILLIAMS AND MARK MALONEY MADE $ MILLIONS ALL ON THE SAME FAILED PROJECT.

    WHICH ONE OF YOU ALONG WITH YOUR CROOKED POLICE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND GOING TO LOCK THEM UP.

    EASIER TO CHARGE THE BOY AND GIRL ON THE BLOCK.

    OR YOU ARE WAITING FOR THE USA TO ARREST AND PROSECUTE EVERYONE.

    DO A CITIZEN ARREST ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND BECUASE YOU LIKE A LOT OF HOT AIR THEN I WILL TAKE NOTE.

    SO THAT YOU KNOW MY VIEWS ALL NEED TO BE SITTING IN DOODS WHERE THEY BELONG BOTH POLITICIANS AND CIVIL SERVANT..

    I AM NOT IMPRESS BY WORDS ONLY ACTIONS.

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  • NorthernObserver

    NTSH?
    Btw…that isn’t exactly how CBL played. The monies guaranteed were to restart…they were a bunch of existing AP, incl a foreign bank loan.
    We ‘heard’ about down payments by buyers, but no legal action. Guessing they got their money back?
    There is a danger…..?
    That was true 20 years ago. All the chatter about rules, regulations and accountability could form the basis of Ralph Jemmots history syllabus were he still teaching.

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  • @ Walter

    I BELIEVE YOU ARE A BRIGHT INDIVIDUAL.

    PONDER ON THIS. IF DONVILE INNISS HAD NEVER BEEN TO THE USA WHEN THEY PICKED HIM UP HE WOULD BE ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND FREE AS A BIRD IN 2022 AND NOT CURRENTLY SITTING IN A USA PRISON.

    HE PROBABLY WOULD HAVE RAN IN THE LAST ELECTION FOR THE DLP AND CHALLENGED FOR LEADERSHIP OF THE PARTY SIMILIAR TO BENT DR DAVID ESTWICK WHO HAD MANY UNDERHANDED DEALS WITH THE CAUCAISANS AT INNOTECH.

    HE ALSO WOULD HAVE BEEN CALLING THE BLP A BUNCH OF CROOKS AS THE MUSICAL CHAIRS CONTINUED

    I WOULD ADVISE YOU TO DO LIKE THE STORY IN THE BIBLE WHEN JESUS WENT INTO THE TEMPLE AND OVERTURN THE TABLES WHERE GAMBLING WAS TAKING PLACE.

    GET THE MEDIA AND THE NEXT SITTING OF CABINET ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND GO INTO PARLIMENT AND OVERTURN THEIR TABLES AND THEN MAKE A CITIZEN ARREST OF THE HEAD FOR CORRUPTION AND MALFEASANCE.

    MAKE SURE COVERED BY ALL MEDIA.

    YOU SEE EASIER TO TALK FOR DECADES OF YEARS CONTINUALLY ABOUT CORRUPTION AND NEVER NO ACTION.

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  • Walter Blackman

    BAJE July 17, 2022 5:44 PM

    “THEY DESERVE TO BE LOCKED UP FOR STEALING AND ROBBING THEIR OWN BLACK PAYING TAX PAYERS MANY WHO LIVE IN POVERTY OR STRUGGLING TO SURVIVE.

    SO THAT YOU KNOW MY VIEWS ALL NEED TO BE SITTING IN DOODS WHERE THEY BELONG BOTH POLITICIANS AND CIVIL SERVANT..”

    BAJE,
    You have expressed your outrage. That’s all we can do on BU.
    I confidently believe that most Barbadians agree with you.

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  • “At present, we are on the wrong course. We need to find a new direction”
    Truth.

    “the politician and the senior civil servant play a central, co-operative role in all situations that involve the mishandling of public funds.
    More Truth

    “CORRUPTION AND BACKWARD BEHAVIOR IS PAR FOR THE COURSE. NOTHING WILL NEVER CHANGE”
    An nothing but the Truth

    Just observing

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ Walter; @ Baje@ Bushie
    It’s not what they say or what they write ; it’s really what they do not say and what they do not write.
    We often underestimate the skills of those who effectively defend the status quo every single day.
    Peace.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…wham, bam, thank you mam…let’s see what the parasites and their ENABLERS do now that they are fcuked..

    “THE ONLY LOCAL POLITICIAN OR LOCAL CIVIL SERVANT CONVICTED AND JAILED FOR BRIBERY AND THEFT ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND WAS DONE BY THE USA IN THE USA.”

    using BARBADOS’S 1929 LAWS. …that were NEVER used in Barbados before to lock up these political THIEVES, minority criminals and their yardfowls…..a stinking DISGRACE…

    “THESE PEOPLE HAVE NO SHAME AND I AGREE WITH EXPOSING THEM AND THE NEFARIOUS UNDERTAKINGS HOWEVER YOU NEED TO DEAL WITH THE IDIOT VOTERS WHO ALLOW THE LEADERS TO GIVE THEM SCRAPS AND PITTANCES WHILST ENRICHING THEMSELVES.”

    the dirty little fowls and groupies head those gangs…..eliminate them….one way or the next…

    “GET THE MEDIA AND THE NEXT SITTING OF CABINET ON THE 2 X 3 ISLAND GO INTO PARLIMENT AND OVERTURN THEIR TABLES AND THEN MAKE A CITIZEN ARREST OF THE HEAD FOR CORRUPTION AND MALFEASANCE.

    MAKE SURE COVERED BY ALL MEDIA.”

    time to arrest these THIEVING CRIMINALS AND THEIR MINORITY CRIMUNITY PARTNERS…

    Like

  • “……using BARBADOS’S 1929 LAWS. …that were NEVER used in Barbados before to lock up these political THIEVES……”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    That is not true.

    Please explain how the USA Justice Department could use “Barbados 1929 laws,” to arrest and charge Inniss for laundering money into the USA.

    According to the evidence presented at his trial, Donville Inniss allegedly took part in a scheme to launder money INTO the United States.

    On January 16, 2020, he was convicted of two counts of money laundering and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

    If these facts are indeed correct, the you may to explain how the USA Justice Department used “Barbados 1929 laws,” to arrest and charge Inniss for laundering money into the USA.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Please explain how the USA Justice Department could use “Barbados 1929 laws,” to arrest and charge Inniss for laundering money into the USA.”

    and yet they did, it was in the media,,,now go do the research…

    Like

  • NO, they did NOT!

    NO, I DON’T have to do any “research,” And, “it was NEVER in the media.”

    To ‘say’ Donville Inniss was convicted for laundering money INTO the USA, “using Barbados 1929 laws,” is a blatant misrepresentation of the truth.

    “Now YOU go do the research…”

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I don’t need to argue with you Artax…..

    you can have all the last words….i have the facts..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    TLSN…don’t blink…

    Like

  • Results of research search
    Missing: 1929 | Must include:1929
    The crime that underpins the money laundering charges, a violation of a 1929 Barbados anticorruption law, is in place but is a red herring as he was not prosecuted under Barbados Law
    The Devil is in the details of the mind

    Like

  • I’m NOT going to argue with you EITHER.

    Simply because if you ACTUALLY had the
    FACTS you would have ‘said’ the US Justice Department charged Inniss using Barbados 1929 laws.

    Your problem is, you never ADMIT when you’re wrong.

    Send out the ‘Bat signal.’

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “The crime that underpins the money laundering charges, a violation of a 1929 Barbados anticorruption law, is in place but”

    but active and USABLE…

    hope that helps the nonlegal minds..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    had they deactivated that law during the 20th century into the 21st century instead of using it to hide behind, no one could use it….but ah want them to keep it…but then again, they spread themselves so THINLY ACROSS the jurisdictional landscape….they may not need it…

    different to Inniss who is a US resident…

    they can surely get these based entirely on cross border violations of international law..

    Like

  • “The crime that underpins the money laundering charges, a violation of a 1929 Barbados anticorruption law, is in place but is a red herring as he was not prosecuted under Barbados Law.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    It’s clear you either read the indictment or understood the intricacies of the case.

    According to another blogger, “all bluffers will be caught.”

    Like

  • “but active and USABLE…hope that helps the nonlegal minds..”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    You PURPOSELY REFUSED to INCLUDE:

    “……as HE WAS NOT PROSECUTED UNDER BARBADOS LAW.”

    Like

  • Why must we go on and on about situations that can be checked? The laundering charge was linked to Donville wiring the funds via a dental company in the USA to mask the source of funds. Hope this brings clarity.

    Like

  • Innis should be arrested under Barbados Law when he comes back.
    These politicians are slippery motherfuckers who should be nailed down to the ground so they cannot move, and banned from running in politics again.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Less those with very short memories forget:

    Anthony Davis May 16, 2016 1:35 PM

    “If they do form the next Government they will be measured by what is in their Covenant! The same way that there are no holds barred with this Government with regard to its forgotten promises, there will be none barred for the BLP if they do the same. I intend to give them a certain grace period if they get in – after that the gloves will be off! ” (Quote)

    This what the kool-aid drinkers; shameless apologists and defenders forget. And all they do is come here picking fights and trying to entrap people with their peculiar brand of argument which to all intents and purposes is to ensure that Mottley is not touched. It will not work because at the end of the day, they cannot hide their collective embarrassment of how this administration has botched a ever increasing number of initiatives.
    Those who truly love our country will continue to offer praise and criticism of the administration, as is necessary, and refuse to be silenced by those who want to establish themselves as the arbiters of what is offered on BU.

    Like

  • @ David,

    I listening to Brasstacks,

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…as far as am concerned they are so very welcome to tag along behind the slave master of the day who make their little slave hearts go giddyup…

    am so far out of their reach, they can apologize to the wind…,,but can’t change reality…

    imagine, things are BURNING TO THE GROUND ALL AROUND THEM at an escalated rate, and they can only see me……wrong person…

    Like

  • “This what the kool-aid drinkers; shameless apologists and defenders forget.”

    corny soundbites repeated over aside politics is a lottery and you have to be in it to win it
    Irie feelings
    skanga
    skanga skanga skanga
    everyday you are wondering wondering what you will do your couldn’t even try reach the top then you’ll be free
    I’m feeling high so high in my head
    do you believe in love
    you wouldn’t worry
    got to know my rights
    irie I

    Like

  • David

    I’m not “going on and on about situations that can be checked.”

    I READ the INDICTMENT and my comments were based on the information contained therein.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Artax
    To launder money, the money first has to be dirty?
    If you take after tax dollars you earned, converted them to $US and took them to the USA, you may run afoul of exchange control laws, but otherwise the money isn’t dirty.
    The DOJ first had to establish, the money in question was a bribe, AND that bribery was illegal in Barbados. Hence the money was dirty.
    This is why defenders of the Don, were at pains to say the money was NOT a bribe. If they were consulting fees, or many other reasons for remuneration, the money was ‘clean’. Hence it was not subject to laundering laws.

    Like

  • @NO

    The point though is that he was charged for masking I’ll gotten gains.

    Like

  • @NO

    Bear in mind as a minister there was room for Inniss to argue that it was not a bribe. It was the action by BF&M that out of an abundance of concern triggered the disgorgement process to probably escape prosecution down the line.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    They were FORCED to upgrade their anti-money laundering laws too, nearly a hundred years later, and they had to be forced…..these they MUST observe though.

    they have no intention of observing any laws they ratify or to those which they are signatory…

    Like

  • NorthernObserver July 18, 2022 10:26 AM #: “The DOJ first had to establish, the money in question was a bribe, AND that bribery was illegal in Barbados. Hence the money was dirty.”

    NorthernObserver

    Obviously.

    But, it’s being argued that Inniss was convicted for breaking Barbados’ laws, which is a completely different issue.

    Dun wid wunnuh and dat.

    Like

  • There is a gang of people on Bu who will always chat rubbish and love to call out each others name for validation.
    The funniest take on this is they like to label themselves as radical thinkers when they do not have good brains.

    Like

  • “The DOJ first had to establish, the money in question was a bribe, AND that bribery was illegal in Barbados. Hence the money was dirty.”

    US Court evidence would make it a slam dunk case in a Little Island prosecution
    He should be used as an example that politicians are not Above the Law

    Like

  • Donville ” took one for the team “.

    Like

  • One minor comment.
    The ‘A guy’ is boringly solid. He does not make a move unless he is certain of the point he is making.

    When it comes to hard facts/data, I would not engage ‘the A guy’ (unless I had hard/strong/irrefutable evidence that he was wrong).

    All, have a great day.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Donville ” took one for the team “.”

    that’s all it was….and more than likely INVOLUNTARILY..,,by the time he realized he got pushed to the front…too late…

    .the FALL GUY…lol..

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Artax
    On that you are correct, DI was not convicted for breaking Barbadian laws.
    Yet, it had to be established they were broken, in order for the money laundering charge to apply.

    @David
    Yes, BF&M’s admissions were the key. They were not going to report and pay all the legal fees, plus lose the profits (disgorgement) if the payments were ‘easily explainable within legal boundaries’.
    Yet, it was rookie moves by II and AT that led to the exposure.
    My guess is also the whole scheme extended beyond what ‘we know’. While II ‘resigned’ early, AT was there (ICBL) ‘for a while’. BF&M was afraid of what else may ‘come out’.
    So they dump ICBL and the profit quadruples? Even after what they did to the Don.

    Like

  • BAJE,
    You have expressed your outrage. That’s all we can do on BU.
    I confidently believe that most Barbadians agree with you.

    Xxxxxx

    PLEASE DON’T SPEAK FOR ME OR PUT WORDS IN MY MOUTH.

    WHY WOULD I BE OUTRAGED, I DON’T LIVE IN THE CESSPOOL.

    I AM INCREDULOUS THAT IN 2022 BLACK PEOPLE CAN BE SO GULLIBLE FALLING FOR THE SAME BAIT OVER AND OVER ON THE 2X3 ISLAND.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I was going to show what is online regarding the progress of the AK extradition, but then this was the top news..

    “Collin Spencer’s song, If Yuh do These Things, which is critical of Barbados’ Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley, apparently cannot be played on radio stations in Barbados, which amounts to censorship in what is supposed to be a democracy, but in truth and in fact is a country under one-party rule. Readers are urged to listen to the song, which contains no profanity or objectionable content, if you can find it.

    It details much of what is wrong with Barbados, and is a plea to the PM to right the wrongs, and serve the needs of Bajans. If Mottley cannot stand someone to speak Truth to Power in Barbados, then perhaps she should resign and leave the governing of Barbados to one who will have the welfare of the people in mind, first and foremost, not in repeated international trips to conference and events. Bajans first, Miss PM.”

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    I AM FULLY AWARE “it had to be established that Barbados laws were broken, in order for the money laundering charge to apply.”

    But, please be reminded the issue you raised was NOT the GIST of the original argument.
    Hence, there was a reason why I did not make any reference to it.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    They don’t want to PAY REPARATIONS to the taxpayers and descents of the enslaved robbed mercilessly for the last 100 years…

    so i just listened to the song on this link….; and my take on this unimpressive move, flexing the dictator wannabe muscles much..

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @Hants
    Nice sound bite, but you would have to tell us ‘which team’.
    Reminds me of the four University students who travelled one weekend to party. That had such a good time their missed their exam on Monday. Upon returning, they contacted their professor, explaining they had a flat tire which took a long time te repair. The prof acquiesced and said they could take it next a.m. When they arrived, they were each seated alone in a adjacent rooms. When the moderator said ‘Begin’, they opened the exam. It had one question…’ which tire?’

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    de groupies/fowls got their own special mention…

    Like

  • David
    “Bear in mind as a minister there was room for Inniss to argue that it was not a bribe. “
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Please enlighten a lost bushman about this ‘room’ that allows ministers to accept handouts from organisations with which government is transacting business.
    Are you also guilty of the NATIONAL RESIGNATION to the FACT that our government officials are in fact bribe takers and that it has become so endemic that we may as well give them the ‘room’ to proceed?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Bushman….we gotta congratulate the fowl graduates…

    so this is what i went looking for knowing i had seen it some days ago….and butt up on the rendition of TRUTH and REALITY now banned from local radio stations..

    “The Court of Appeal Court in Barbados, almost a year after Alex Tasker, charged in the Donville Inniss money laundering and Foreign Corrupt Practises Act (FCPA) case in the United States, took up a lower court decision requiring his extradition to face the music in America, sits on the case without handing down a ruling. Given that the requirements for extradition are purely procedural, and not on the merits of the case, there is no proper reason for the delay. there is something rotten in Barbados, and it wears judicial robes.”

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William, Pacha, TLSN….your thoughts???

    don’t think these people are seeing themselves and HOW they are perceived in therreal world, apparently they still believe this is some game that they can’t lose because of the winning streak since the 1920s…

    Like

  • @NO

    It makes you wonder if AT did similarly at DIGICEL?

    Like

  • @Bush Tea

    Do you live in Barbados? This is how business is done in Barbados most of the time.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Just remember Piece warned yall over and over.., remember the dude yall love to make fun of and the PhD level graduate fowls called him tinfoil and all types of derogatory terms…well he did warn yall bout the dictator wannabe…

    .and that is what you DUMMIES partly reelected in the buy election….

    Like

  • @Bush Tea

    Didn’t the Allan Kinch blog not give you an insight if you didn’t know?

    Like

  • .
    Are you also guilty of the NATIONAL RESIGNATION to the FACT that our government officials are in fact bribe takers and that it has become so endemic that we may as well give them the ‘room’ to proceed?

    Xxxxxx

    THAT IS WHY THE 2 X 3 ISLAND IS A PARADISE

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Bushman…the good news is….THEY ARE THE ONES BROUGHT THIS ON THEMSELVES…..they are responsible for the hijacking of the parliament for dictator purposes, now they are the ones RESPONSIBLE and SHOULD BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE for FORCING OUT wannabe dictators out of every taxpayer entity STARTING in the parliament…..

    they have lots of foolish, useless petty talk for us on BU, so let’s see what they are made of now…..all the reckless nonsense about 30-0 and 60-0 is right up IN THEIR FACES…

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @David
    I cannot comment on AT, I don’t know the person.
    What can be observed is the senior management at ICBL did not appreciate the finer points of what they were doing.
    What none of know is the inner workings. Did BF&M have other issues with IRS/DOJ? What was the relationship between the CEO-CFO at BF&M, and that CFO/others and ICBL personnel. I mean, even after discovery, it did not have to be disclosed. Who actually found it? It was two relatively small amounts…somebody could have created paperwork after the fact. Yet, somebody also decided that wasn’t going to happen.
    Imagine somebody at BF&M was upset they didn’t get the ICBL CEO job. Let’s face it, II wasn’t particularly well qualified, and an outsider at BF&M. The decision to disclose may have been to sink her. In the myopic Bajan view it was to get DI. But the intent may have been to get II fired, and it ends there. Maybe they were after AT. Sometimes when you don’t appreciate the ‘big picture’ a decision is made, which has ramifications one didn’t foresee.

    Like

  • “There is a gang of people on Bu who will always chat rubbish and love to call out each others name for validation.
    The funniest take on this is they like to label themselves as radical thinkers when they do not have good brains.”

    And sadly it is celebrated and supported.

    Like

  • so the PhD fowl don’t know it’s also included in that…..gosh…

    anyhoo….i await those who want the majority population to hold accountable a wannabe dictator regime…..doing the RIGHT THING and use cyberspace influence to GET THEM OUT and away from the vulnerable population..

    they are AND ALWAYS HAVE BEEN a clear and present danger to Afrikan descended people…..

    Like

  • @ NorthernObserver wrote ” which team ? ”

    Team Barbados

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ WARU
    We would be quite foolish if we don’t realise the accumulative effect of this nonsense. I think the only strategy they presently have is to create distractions and diversions , while hoping that something will happen to halt what is now exposed as rapidly declining socio economic conditions.
    I really don’t think banning calypsos is the answer right now.
    BTW, I suspect Donville will be released sooner rather than later, with good behavior, and will resume , what was quite a comfortable existence in Bim.
    I honestly think we are way past Donville now and we are just waiting to see what happens with Tasker.
    But in the bigger scheme of things we have to try and look out for those who are now desperately in an economic neck tie.
    Whether the world is watching or not , we have some very serious issues that require the type of leadership that is seriously lacking in Bim and the wider region.
    Quite frankly , I don’t think we can refocus; I don’t think we actually know how, at this point in time.

    Peace.

    Like

  • “There is a gang of people on Bu who will always chat rubbish and love to call out each others name for validation.

    ‘Xxxxxxxx

    I DON’T HEAR YOU TALKING THIS SHIT WHEN YOUR FELLOW BLP YARDFOWL @LORENZO BE CALLING OUT YOUR NAME.

    YOU WILL ALWAYS BE SCUM AND A HOUSE NIGGER. NO WONDER BLACK PEOPLE ON THE 2X3 STILL IN MENTAL SLAVERY BECAUSE OF DISHONEST SELLOUT POOCH LICKER LIKE YOU.

    Like

  • @William Skinner

    THERE WAS NEVER GOING TO BE RECOVERY WHEN LANDING A SEAT MEANS BRIBE AND KICKBACKS ALONG WITH CORRUPT CIVIL SERVANTS HAPPY TO LINE THEIR POCKETS OF A CONTINUING CORRUPTION RACKET.

    TELL ME IN WHICH YEAR OR DECADE ONE CAN BUILD AND GROW FROM SUCH A FOUNDATION TO TRULY BENEFIT THE WIDER POPULATION.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Disrespect to a mature calypsonian and a well known …for DECADES…social commentator is DISRESPECT TO THE ENTIRE AFRIKAN POPULATION…

    from an employee elected by the people…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “I really don’t think banning calypsos is the answer right now.”

    it was a STUPID and JUVENILE MOVE and the only thing it will do is remind people of the 100 YEARS of HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES, THEFTS and other SERIOUS CRIMES against Afrikan descents on the island….

    what am trying to do is engage blogmaster in taking up the baton to end these crime sprees against his people…he did not think that the population was engaged at a level to hold the corrupt accountable…but now he sees for himself FIRST HAND…..that they have no intentions of stopping the corruption or RESPECTING AFRIKAN RIGHTS…so on that backdrop, even he can see that something has to be done, and he is in the perfect position to do so with his website……others are doing their part…it’s his turn..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    How the hell do you ban a song calling for REPARATIONS for Afrikan people…..5 acres of plantation land from EVERY PLANTATION for the descendants of the ENSLAVED WHO BUILT THE ISLAND…and were IMPRISONED on those criminal sugar plantations…..with the FOLLOW UP DISENFRANCHISEMENT of their descents….for over 100 YEARS…which has accumulated into EXTREME POVERTY and social reduction…

    …..but you can take your funky ass at every opportunity to TERRORIZE and HARASS UK and Europe for reparations for you and ya corrupt friends to blow on yaselves…

    Like

  • Here we go……again.🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @enuff
    It’s the perfect song …lol
    No mention of the people’s names who get called…. Politicians, SOE persons, even other Calypsonians. Just focus on your target and repeat many times daily.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I think their heads have swollen to the size of HELIUM BALLOONS like the Goodyear blimp……goddamn lot of vote begging FRAUDS and WANNABES…

    Like

  • NO
    Who banned the song and from where? If the song was banned by the “employee elected by the people”, how is it in the finals of the NCF Pic-O-De-Crop Competition?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    man…that must have been the quickest reversal in HISTORY…

    people are not as dumb as the “EMPLOYEES OF THE PEOPLE” THINK.

    yall still gotta go though….cause that is not the only SHITE yall been cooking up lately against Afrikan people….stay there and think i don’t know….

    and got the goddamn nerve to STILL think yall can TIEF reparations ya trying to scam in our murdered, raped and oppressed ancestor’s names.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @enuff
    I have not a clue.
    Your friend the Salemite is the newsbreaker.
    Though I’m sure if it were banned @ac would have been all over it.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    I have not seen AC today yet, she probably is busy and/or heard nothing…

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    @ac was on another thread at 2pm. Not much which is anti B or Anti MAM misses her attention 😸

    Like

  • Colin Spenser may have more supporters in some places if the identity of the individual who sent it to me a couple of weeks was ever made public.

    I am not surprised that the song was banned, Bajan politicians are bullies and are thin-skinned bunch of cowards but banning a song from local radio will only mean that more people will seek it out from other avenues.

    I watched a little bit of the junior competition and was astonished to see a video which among other things lavished praise on the PM in the lead up to one of the participant’s songs. Some years ago people in the newspaper business expressed fears about being harassed if they wrote anything critical of the Gov’t, it looks like those days are here again though we shouldn’t be surprised.

    It was only a few weeks ago that I read the attached article in Barbados Today with the headline “Cowardice, money and fear affecting social commentary” seems it was right on the ball.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/07/02/cowardice-money-and-fear-affecting-social-commentary/

    Like

  • A song banned by the radio station is different to the NCF banning a song. Usually if there are contentious lyrics the NCF will ask the singer to rewrite the offending words. Colin Spencer is known for his punchy lyrics and must be use to it by now.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Well..if yall don’t nip this in the bud the SHITE POLITICIANS will SOON only want calypsonians including the young children singing praises to them and their CORRUPTION…

    Like

  • @David
    The radio stations must be afraid of their own shadow, ah wonder what they would do with a song like this Chalkdust Classic.

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    Often times the program manager errs on the side of caution because they don’t make money and try to avoid litigation or even out of court settlements.

    Like

  • Also Sargeant note the Trinidad environment is a polar opposite to Barbados.

    Like

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