CXC- Time to Get it Right!


Tennyson Joseph, UWI lecturer and political scientist shared a personal experience in his recent weekly column. While it is a personal experience, it scrutinises and exposes decision making at the highest level by education planners in the region. We must do better if we are to compete on the world stage, especially being able to cover-off rudimentary decisions.

See article reproduced from Nationnews.com.


Another CXC mis-step 

I WRITE IN MY capacity as a concerned and frustrated parent, in response to an incident which occurred during the conduct of the CSEC English B (English Literature) multiple choice exam on Friday May 27, 2022.

Originally intended to be a two-hour exam (from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m), my daughter exited the exam room at 5:30 p.m., with other students having streamed out a few minutes before, this is on a day when they had already had a morning paper from 9 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Essentially, therefore, the affected students were kept under examinations conditions for seven hours.

What was the issue? It appears that a decision was taken to conduct all CXC multiple-choice examinations online without ensuring that the necessary IT infrastructure to support such examinations was in place. Given that English B is compulsory for all students at my daughter’s school, the demand overload proved overwhelming, and many students had to sit for hours waiting, without success, for the exam App to open. Some were successful at various periods after the start, while others’ systems crashed mid-exam.

My daughter was one of the unfortunate ones whose apps failed to open, and she reported to me that after two hours of waiting, and going through a range of negative emotions, a decision was taken to allow the examination to be done in the old fashioned, but reliable way.

My aim is not to question the judgement of the onsite invigilators and decision-makers. What is concerning is the poor judgment of CXC decision makers, who, by insisting on online multiplechoice examinations, appear to be operating on the assumption that “man is made for technology rather than technology made for man”.

Two issues are of concern here. The first is that, after the loud public outcry and loss of goodwill experienced by CXC over the conduct of examinations during the 2019 COVID period, that CXC did not consider it prudent to put a pause on all “experimentation” to allow for a period of cooling off period and a return to normalcy.

Secondly, given the importance of assessments as measurements of student quality and as a determinant of life chances, great care should be taken to ensure that there is nothing intrinsic to an examination environment that can negatively affect student performance. CXC ought to have assured itself of near 100 per cent success prior to utilising new technology in examinations.

CXC is too important to allow these constant hints of weakness. It should be airtight and the least problematic of our institutions. My recommendation to CXC is that it should perfect the basic aspects of its mandate, before venturing off into new territory, especially at a time when the stench of recent failures still pollute the atmosphere. For the sake of our children and the educational “ecosystem”, let us get it right.

Tennyson Joseph is a political scientist at The University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus, specialising in regional affairs. Email tjoe2008@live.com

128 comments

  • How much of the 2×3 island is ghetto?
    How much is Heights and Gardens? Did I grow up in a ghetto?
    Do we have projects?

    Like

  • @Bush Tea June 3, 2022 10:22 PM “@Simple minded Simon. So why not have 100% of Bajans be university graduates then? is THIS not even better than 30%..?
    ..and what is so hard about that? All you would have to do is charge the Government $100,000 per year per student …and let the happy lot lime down at Cave Hill talking shiite and taking ‘polls’ for three years. PRESTO… you have 370,000 ‘graduates’….for only 4 billion borrowed dollars. Steupsss.”
    Your suggestion. NOT mine.

    So you can go ahead and implement it.

    Like

  • @Bush Tea “and let the happy lot lime down at Cave Hill talking shiite and taking ‘polls’ for three years.”

    My response: Again your foolish suggestion, NOT mine. I expect students to work hard and to work well. I’ve NEVER suggested liming, you have.

    @Bush Tea “The REAL POINT of a university is to filter out, and REFINE to world class standards, the TRULY talented LEADERS with which the society is BLESSED. This is typically about 1% of any random sample.”

    Where did you get this 1% nonsense?

    Can you please document for BU which countries with 1% college/university graduates are doing better than countries with much higher percentages of college/university graduates?

    Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ TheOGazerts who asked ” Did I grow up in a ghetto? Do we have projects?”

    You went to Kolij.You should know. lol

    Like

  • EXCUSES EXCUSES EXCUSES.

    THERE IS NO LEADERSHIP ON THE 2X3 ISLAND.

    BLACKS MAKING EACH OTHER SUFFER AFTER 50 YEARS IN POWER, SOME WILL SAY NEED ANOTHER 100 YEARS TO GET IT RIGHT BECAUSE OF PAST TRAUMAS.

    FIRST THE NURSES, CBC WORKERS, VOLUNTEERS AND I CAN GO ON AND ON WITH THE BULLSHIT ON THE 2X3 ISLAND WHILST BLACK FAMILIES LESSER FORTUNATE SUFFERS.

    XXXXXXXXXXX

    “I’ve worked from January and there are also volunteers who worked from January and the last time we were paid was in December. I’ve worked January, February and March and there has been no sort of payment,” she complained.

    “This is June, a whole six months later and we are still waiting to be paid. How do they expect us to be able to put food on our tables and support our families if we are going three, four, five and now six months without getting paid?”

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/06/03/volunteers-reveal-they-have-not-received-wages-since-december/

    Like

  • @TheOGazerts June 4, 2022 12:38 PM “How much of the 2×3 island is ghetto? How much is Heights and Gardens? Did I grow up in a ghetto? Do we have projects?”

    I grew up in a rural village. Everybody was poor, barefoot poor, but I did not then or now considered it to be a ghetto. Everybody was striving to make life better for themselves and especially for their children. Neighbors did not prey on each other. My old man born more than 110 years ago was without a doubt poorer than anybody on this blog. Yet he raised all his children safely to adulthood. Nobody ever had to call the police or a lawyer, or a politician for any of them. But he used to speak about “poor-minded” that is a ghetto of the mind.

    Like

  • I grew up in a rural village. Everybody was poor, barefoot poor, but I did not then or now considered it to be a ghetto.

    WHAT A REAL ASS IF YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND SOMETHING RESEARCH IT BEFORE SHOWING YOUR SILLY ASS

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    ghetto
    noun
    a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.

    Like

  • Nobody should have to wait 3 to 6 months for their pay cheque.

    For their first pay cheque weekly paid workers should be paid in later than 14 days after starting work. Workers paid twice per month should be paid by day 28 at latest, and monthly workers by day 60 at latest.

    If this is not happening something needs to be fixed.

    Most poor people have little to fall back and. They need their money. And to quote Scripture “a laborer is worthy of his wages”
    1 Timothy 5:18

    Like

  • I’ve heard a middle aged heavy drinking town man refer to my village as a ghetto. As in “I can’t wait to get out of this ghetto.” He was renting a very nice 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom [wall] house, with electricity, water, telephone, wifi, and solar water heating, fence too. The village has since the 1960’s had paved roads, bus service was 5 minutes walk from his door, he owned a car and he and his wife both childless were both gainfully employed. A lovely beach was less than 10 minutes drive away. A library, post office, public health clinic, private doctors, supermarkets, clothing stores etc. were all within 15 minutes drive. And yet he felt ghettoised.

    I wonder if sometimes ghetto is not mainly of the mind.

    Like

  • Ran into this… Is this where we are heading? Are we there as some are saying?

    https://www.royalgazette.com/other/business/article/20200213/most-would-not-believe-the-poverty-in-cayman/

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    CXC has to be watched….today is Whit Monday and CXC has the students taking Biology tests…

    their useless APP CRASHED during the Math test and had children spending unnecessary hours waiting for the program to work nearly 6pm in the evening……..the program which they did not give themselves sufficient time to test IS CRAP…

    not too long ago, they had kids wading through a flood to do exams with leaking roofs and everything…

    Like

  • The eligible voter turn out is about 43%. A party receiving as low as 22% can win an election.
    Ridiculous scenario
    Look at the possible mathematics
    22% x 30=30
    21% x 30=0
    91 – 0 in your tail

    I can see a time where you will begging for more people to vote. With proper safeguards in place we can increase the number of voters.

    Like

  • ‘Halt CXC e-testing’
    by CARLOS ATWELL
    carlosatwell@nationnews.com

    AN EDUCATION ACTIVIST is calling for answers from both the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) and the Barbados Government as well as for a halt to national online testing.
    Paula-Anne Moore, spokesperson/co-ordinator of the Caribbean Coalition of Exam Redress and the Group of Concerned Parents of Barbados, is raising concerns following the recent roll-out of online Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) and Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examinations.
    In an interview with the DAILY NATION yesterday, she called for the e-testing to be abandoned as the children had been “traumatised and disadvantaged”. She also wanted Government to reveal to the public its assessment of the online exam.
    “The Barbadian public needs to ask the question as to why a national decision was made to go ahead with e-Testing . . . Guyana, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago refused to implement national e-Testing, as they recognised that their national infrastructure was not ready, so why pursue it? And why continue to force this issue?”
    “In view of the ICT [information and communications technology] problems, it may be prudent to go back to the physical, hard copy papers to minimise stress. If they were available, why weren’t they used?” she asked.
    However, in a written response last night, CXC said it was not accurate to say Guyana, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago had refused e-testing as they were doing it this year, adding it was not compulsory for subjects such as English, maths and chemistry.
    “It is up to the various ministries of education to decide if they want to do e-testing. CXC provides access to e-testing software and works with the ministry of education in each country to determine the level of readiness at schools.
    “A decision to utilise e-testing is based on local factors such as the availability of equipment, Internet connection and trained personnel. CXC will continue to work closely with the ministries of education across the region as they implement e-testing at their own pace.”
    As for the difficulties with the examination in
    Barbados, CXC said: “It is always important to CXC, when there are reports that candidates have experienced difficulties during an examination, whether e-testing or paperbased, that no candidate should be disenfranchised during the sitting of exams.”
    In an earlier Facebook post, Moore stated: “We raised the alarm early this year re the proposed e-Testing, a common sense concern re the lack of pre-testing on a national scale – of school ICT capability, the CXC web browser, interconnectivity, private and public devices used to access . . . and the almost inevitable challenges re potential overload of limited bandwidth capability, especially with those mass subjects like CSEC English A, English B and Maths.”
    Moore charged that the hybrid teaching model adopted with the return to face-to-face classes in Term 2 “also revealed serious ICT challenges in the majority of the secondary schools, so it wasn’t as if the warnings weren’t there”.
    President of the Barbados Association of Principals of Public Secondary Schools, Stephen Jackman, said he had not received formal complaints about the online tests, although he had heard there were issues with bandwidth. He added there was a physical back-up should the online component fail.
    General secretary of the National Council of Parent-Teacher Associations, Nicole Brathwaite, said she had also not received any concerns but would make a check among association members.
    In last Thursday’s DAILY NATION, University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus lecturer Dr Tennyson Joseph, in his All Ah We Is One column titled Another CXC Mis-step, detailed the experiences his daughter had with the online exam. He said the ICT infrastructure was insufficient, causing the exam to take hours to load.
    “CXC is too important to allow these constant hints of weakness. It should be airtight and the least problematic of our institutions. My recommendation to CXC is that it should perfect the basic aspects of its mandate, before venturing off into new territory, especially at a time when the stench of recent failures still pollute the atmosphere,” he wrote.
    Efforts yesterday to reach Minister of Education Kay McConney and Chief Education Officer Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw for a response were unsuccessful.

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    They do not have the SKILLS, DISCIPLINE or COMPETENCY to effectively implement anything,

    no matter HOW ARE HARD THEY TRY, NO ONE in the Caribbean or on the continent of Afrika will follow Slave Society Barbados to nowhere…..they are too NOTORIOUS…dangerous and destructive….to AFRIKAN LIVES…

    “BLACKS MAKING EACH OTHER SUFFER AFTER 50 YEARS IN POWER, SOME WILL SAY NEED ANOTHER 100 YEARS TO GET IT RIGHT BECAUSE OF PAST TRAUMAS.”

    it’s only BUs anonymous clowns talking shite about “patience” over 300 years of chattel slavery and over 150 years OF BONDANGE and social/financial disenfranchisement…..and the idiots still want to sit and wait and believe they sound so clear….steupppsss…

    all ya hear everywhere is people lamenting they are NOT BEING PAID…slave island…

    Like

  • Programming Proverbs 101

    Listen carefully to your data

    Barbados echo chamber was talking about it’s ambition to be a Global IT player in the Big League
    As an IT Subject Matter Expert with skills and experience in all stages of Software Development Lifecycle from business analysis thru > design > development > system testing > user acceptance testing & signoff > implementation > post-implementation support and further modifications development
    I testify that all systems are shit
    Systems Failures are the Industry Standard
    Them Never Know
    Natty Dread Have Credentials

    Like

  • Let me make myself clearER! My recent comment was calling for patience with average Bajans, commonly known on this site as “BRASS BOWLS”. I suggested that THE PEOPLE need time and patient coaching to come into the fulness of their identity as the descendants of Africans. They need time and coaching to put away their fake and forced “Little Englandness” and retrieve their fighting spirit.

    I would expect those who rise to political leadership to be smart enough to have long rid themselves of the eurocentric folly as I did while still a child watching Saturday morning cowboy and “indian” movies. They should be ready to govern FOR THEIR PEOPLE, recognising that they will remain NOBODIES and JOKES on the worldstage, mere puppets to be played with until they access the true power that comes with fighting “righteous” causes for the right reasons.

    THAT is the way to earn the respect of those who would write you off as insignificant.

    Now, go back and see that my comment was in response to somebody berating the Bajan people for not responding forcefully enough to being ripped off!

    Or…continue to get your jollies by calling me whatever pleases you today.

    I, however, will be engaged in more pleasant pursuits.

    Like

  • TheO,

    The last thing we need if for us to stop voting and youall to start.

    If we don’t vote there is a chance, however slight, that the duopoly will get the message and will realise that “dum en mek dumselves”.

    Why would we want overseas voters to cloud that message?

    Like

  • Correction – “is” not “if”.

    Like

  • Baje,

    What I meant was that not everybody is strong enough to do what you have done. Some just go with the flow or follow the leader.

    Like

  • In The Ghetto, Sugar Minott, Zion Land, Calabash & Fourth Generation Band

    Like

  • Bullwackie’s All Stars

    KEEP ON RUNNING ⬥Major Irie & Wackies Rhythm Force⬥

    Like

  • WHAT A REAL ASS IF YOU DON’T UNDERSTAND SOMETHING RESEARCH IT BEFORE SHOWING YOUR SILLY ASS

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    ghetto
    noun
    a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.
    #############

    Let me try to understand something here.

    Black people is who live in the slums and them is the MAJORITY GROUP bout here.

    So what is it that you really trying to say? You like you is the real ass here yuh, because it look like you ain’t really apply commonsense to this thing.

    Like

  • Rudder: Backup to CXC e-testing in place
    There are avenues for those who had difficulties with the recent Caribbean Examinations Council e-testing, said Deputy Chief Education Officer Dr Roderick Rudder.
    The platform and CXC in general, came under severe criticism by Paula-Anne Moore, spokesperson/co-ordinator of the Caribbean Coalition of Exam Redress and the Group of Concerned Parents of Barbados as well as from University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus lecturer Dr Tennyson Joseph.
    On Wednesday, Rudder said: “With regard to e-testing, provisions have been used for the use of the backup paper-based examination. In instances where there are challenges with the technology, whether it be bandwidth, connectivity or faulty devices, the provision for the backup paper based examination is activated immediately.
    “Therefore for those who started off pursuing the e-testing platform and they experienced any technological challenges, the resort was to the backup,” he said.
    However, this backup was apparently not utilised in all cases, resulting in some students possibly not performing as well. To this, Rudder said all hope was still not lost.
    “Under CXC’s guidelines there is provision for hardship consideration and the appropriate action will be taken between the Ministry of Education and CXC with regard to those candidates who would have had some challenges with regard to the technology,” he said.
    ‘Exams ill-timed’
    Reports indicate there were extreme issues with the online examinations, with some taking hours to begin. Joseph, in his Daily Nation column last Thursday titled Another CXC Mis-step, wrote: “CXC is too important to allow these constant hints of weakness. It should be airtight and the least problematic
    of our institutions. My recommendation to CXC is that it should perfect the basic aspects of its mandate, before venturing off into new territory, especially at a time when the stench of recent failures still pollute the atmosphere.
    For her part, Moore said the online examinations were ill-timed and called for them to be stopped. She also queried why Barbados allowed CXC e-testing to take place when the information technology infrastructure could not handle it.
    “The Barbadian public needs to ask the question as to why a national decision was made to go ahead with e-testing . . . Guyana, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago refused to implement national e-testing, as they recognised that their national infrastructure was not ready, so why pursue it [here]? And why continue to force this issue?”
    To this, CXC said it was not accurate to say Guyana, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago had refused e-testing as they were all doing it this year, adding it was not compulsory for subjects such as English, Maths and chemistry and it was up to the various ministries of education to decide if they were prepared to utilise e-testing.
    (CA)


    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Looks like this year’s CXC battle will start shortly. Hopefully, I am allowed to comment on this year’s battle.
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/09/01/advocacy-group-anxiously-awaits-cxc-results/

    Like

  • I just realized that the title here is “time to get it right”.
    All across the landscapes folks are demanding “Get it right”.
    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/09/06/cxc-boss-urges-stakeholders-to-end-confrontation-as-exams-move-toward-normalcy/

    Like

  • Seems as if at first we will get a trickle

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/09/07/advocates-propose-cxc-changes/

    Will the dam burst?

    Like

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