Blurred Mirror Image

Mirror Image
Submitted by William Skinner

In a recent post @TheoGazerts, suggested that my mirror image of our country, at this critical juncture, would be interesting. My mirror image of the country has not dramatically changed over the last fifty years. I still see an extremely conservative people, afraid of our past and extremely timid about our future. Too many are devoted to a nostalgic period, which is not returning and even those who profess to want change usually wilt, when the enormity of engineering it is revealed.

There are many who have thrown an old bed sheet over the mirror to hide the image they do not want to see. We have moved away from Little England and are now apparently living comfortably in Little Brooklyn. An amazing irony, of creating the often-maligned Diaspora, right here in Bim!

The cultural penetration, that most progressive voices warned of in the sixties, has been realized and there is extraordinarily little, that successive administrations, have done to curb our enthusiasm for things foreign. Our collective image of Barbados is one littered with sunworshippers from the tips of St. Lucy to Christ Church. Even the utter devastation wrought by COVID, and the persistent tremors in so-called source markets, from where we hail the blistered bodies with specks of sand, have not deterred us from putting our already slender economic future in such sunburnt fun seekers. But that is who we are and more frighteningly, whom we want to be.

We dare not remove the old bed sheet. The image of a well-functioning political engine, as our Prime Minister, now considered, the shining light of the Caribbean and a global political influencer emerges. Adroit at entering the kitchen and recreating dishes, which have been long tried and left to freeze, thawing them out and declaring those new recipes for development. The classical image of skillfully warmed-over soup now dominates our mirror image.

It is the image of a country, that obviously depends on the political docility of its populace to embrace and endure, the corrupt and sinister collective leadership of two political parties, which have long emptied their bowels of any remote semblance of progressive socio-economic policies.

I still visualize, a new and vibrant citizen emerging from our current predicament, within the next quarter century. Our youth are showing exceptional talents in business, the arts, and all aspects of social and economic endeavors. In many instances their ability to overcome the obstacles are rooted in the fact that most of them inherited no generational wealth, to propel them to the next level.

The story that recently appeared in the local press of a six-year-old girl, selling her first piece of art, is the best way to sum up the hope of the nation. We must invest in the cradle our end up as old broke and broken citizens in the grave.

Those who may want to declare this piece as pessimistic and a warped sense of a fading nationalism, should remember that optimism devoid of realism, is nothing more than delusion. It is high time to remove the old bed sheet from over the mirrors and see it for what it is; and change it.

Happy to oblige @TheoGazerts.

Peace.

Viva Barbados

Viva the Caribbean

81 comments

  • Adams ‘the top change agent’

    THE LATE Prime Minister of Barbados, Tom Adams, did more to transform the Barbadian society and economy than any other politician.
    That view by historian Dr Henderson Carter was delivered during his presentation of the ninth Tom Adams Memorial Lecture at the Lester Vaughan School on Monday night.
    “Adams erected the building and put on the roof and prepared the house for habitation. Our role today is to keep the house in good shape and extend it,” said Carter, head of the Department of History and Philosophy at the Cave Hill Campus of the University of the West Indies.
    The historian called on Barbadians to give back to society through volunteerism and counselled Government to restore the Glendairy Prison and Blackwood’s Screw Dock in Bridgetown as tourism and business places.
    The senior lecturer said of Adams: “He led the party [Barbados Labour Party] to a decisive victory in 1976 and for the next eight and a half years did more than any other politician to transform the social and economic landscape of Barbados.”
    Carter said transformation of the society and economy under Adams’ leadership came in four areas.
    Social justice
    “Adams struck a blow for social justice and dismantled the most deplorable features of the plantation system with its glaring inequalities. His initiatives secured a place for culture and heritage on the national agenda, thereby developing a significant national product. Adams played a significant role in creating a modern infrastructure to enhance economic development and social betterment. He repositioned the economy for greater state participation and local ownership,” he said.
    A lawyer by profession, and a 1948 Barbados Scholar, Adams studied philosophy, politics and economics at Oxford University and had a stint as senior producer with the Caribbean Service at the BBC in London.
    Carter said the Adams’ administration transformed the tenantry system via the Tenantries Freehold Purchase Act of 1981 “which released the stranglehold of the plantation system”.
    He noted the Tenantries (Control And Development) Act of 1965 offered some protection for tenants from being ejected from their holdings by landlords.
    Increasing rents
    “Landlords were also forbidden from increasing rents except by application to the court,” the senior lecturer noted.
    Adams however went further by transferring land to those people who had lived on plantations for ten cents per square foot, Carter said.
    “Some got their land for $300. It affected 203 plantation tenantries with 4 200 dwellings; 117 non-plantation tenantries with 2 000 dwellings or ten per cent of the housing stock.”
    “This meant end of rent, end of eviction from plantation tenantries, end of discrimination. They could now erect wall structures with inside toilets. They could now apply for loans and mortgages.
    “It widened land ownership. It led to the modernisation of the area via utilities and paved roads,” he explained.
    The Adams Government established the National Commission on the status of women and enacted the Maintenance Act Cap 216, whereby women could secure maintenance for their children with recourse to the law courts.
    Carter cited several economic development projects such as the development of the airport, seaport, the ABC highway, other road infrastructure, transportation and establishment of the National Cultural Foundation. Health care, including creation of the National Drug Service and the Status of Children Reform Act 1980, which removed the stigma of children born out of wedlock, were among the achievements of Government cited by the historian.
    “Adams struck a blow for social justice for the poor and the underprivileged,” Carter said.
    (HH)

    Source: Nation

    Liked by 1 person

  • How would a French Voting system in Barbados

    The French people go to the polls: if no candidate wins over 50% of the vote, a second round is organized. Only the two candidates with the most votes qualify for the 2nd round. The candidate with the absolute majority of votes cast is elected. Blank or spoilt votes are not taken into account.

    Like

  • Good piece by Skinner. Great piece!

    Separately, Carter is a blp hack. Coming directly thereunder serves to adulterate the literary import of the former.

    Merely served to arrest deep contemplation evoked by a unique insight and the deployment of literary devices with implications for spirit, beyond intellect.

    Like

  • @William

    Your concern is merited but unfortunately the horse has bolted. The Barbados progressives speak to will always be compromised by our helplessness to slow down far less stop the moral relativism and all that comes with cultural penetration.

    The struggle is real.

    Like

  • Pacha and David are both very wordy today. It seems like everybody in Barbados wants to be an author now. I will light up a spliff and revert back with some words sound and power.

    Like

  • Reality now says from.mirror image to pipe dream
    After almost sixty years of Independence nothing has changed for the working poor
    Instead of donkey pulling laden carts the people have become modern day beast of burden laden and forever burden in debt and taxes
    The promise of self empowerment which the rght Hon Errol Barrow wanted for barbadians to achieve have been replaced by the politics of smoke and mirrors politics of grandstanding and glorious empty promise and in 2022 a govt unto itself and a country having no Republic Constitution
    The majority black expectation of having a piece of the economic pie lies in the hand of a minority white who holds in their hands the economic and financial power of the country
    How did we get here is a familiar cry
    Where do we go from here a question which needs to be answered

    Like

  • Speak like you are singing and sing like you are speaking..
    Here we are
    Fighting a war
    We do not start
    In a we home town
    Pure tribal war
    Down in a South Africa
    Apartheid war
    We no build guns
    We no build bombs
    No nuclear war
    For all we call
    Is love for one and all
    Love

    Like

  • Envisioning
    imagine as a future possibility; visualise.

    Like

  • An honest assessment of the situation.
    In Bushie’s humble opinion however, still very conservative.

    It is NOT possible to TRULY discuss our mirror image without reference to the concept of brassbowlery… 🙂

    Like

  • angela cox April 27, 2022 5:46 AM#: “How did we get here is a familiar cry.
    Where do we go from here a question which needs to be answered.”

    I agree with you.

    However, if you came to the realization that, “After almost sixty years of Independence nothing has changed for the working poor,”…….

    …….. then, you must also admit it is as a result of “the politics of smoke and mirrors, politics of grandstanding and glorious empty promises” by SUCCESSIVE BLP and DLP administrations

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax

    You are aware the political directorate is one stakeholder of civil society?

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Great piece William…

    “THE LATE Prime Minister of Barbados, Tom Adams, did more to transform the Barbadian society and economy than any other politician.”

    this is the type of misleading the people rhetoric that should be slammed……the Adams era brought the Boer apartheid system doubled down in all its glory…..and these would pretend that that evil anti-Black system is not still in place….and VERY ACTIVELY responsible for Black people at the bottom of the socio-economic ladder STILL..

    .and REINFORCED the disgusting elitist system of negros pretending to be above and better than Black people that was created in the 1940s…which doubled down by the 80s….and here they all are….public nuisances…11 plus failures….beggars from one end of Europe and the Americas to the other and beyond…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William….some interesting stories in both Nationnews and Barbadostoday, cant wait to see the actions or NONE of the fake pan africanists and the joke caricom integrationists in this matter.

    heartwarming to see a group take on the case of the problems for children at GIS…it’s time this archaic hellhole have its own international exposure…

    Like

  • William Skinner

    For any historian to claim that Tom Adams was the architect of what is called modern Barbados is a fallacy of laughable proportions. The period 1961-1976, set the tone for the country. All other claims are essentially generic although the Freehold Tenantry Act, deserves some mention, it did nothing to change ownership of the best agricultural lands and certainly did not in great measure or any measure at all affect the dominant and still dominant plantocracy. Some critics of the legislation suggest that it is highly over rated or it simply did not go far enough.
    Serious historians may even suggest that the attainment of adult suffrage and the elimination of school fees at the top grammar schools were far more profound than the Freehold Tenantry Act. Quite frankly ,I seriously believe, that Frank Walcott did far more for the country than either Barrow or Tom Adams. But classism and intellectual dishonesty will never give such a position its true ventilation,

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  • William Skinner

    @ WURA
    Thanks.
    With no real opposition , it is going to take very alert citizens to take on serious issues.
    I still can’t work out why the young ladies were taken back to the same institution.
    These are the kind of issues that must be addressed rather than trying to prop up the same people responsible for the maladies.

    Like

  • @ David

    I’m fully aware “the political directorate is one stakeholder of civil society.”

    Unfortunately, however, we have some people whose narrow political agenda, seems to be politicizing every issue presented to this forum for discussion.

    You cannot acknowledge there has been a reoccurring pattern of failures over the years, and subsequently attribute them to whichever administration is currently ‘in power.’

    What I find in Barbados, is that special interest groups have been infiltrated by politicians and people from the so called ‘middle class,’ while being slowly transformed into elitist organizations.
    Take a look at BARP, Council for the Disabled, Lupus Organization, etc.

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  • Artax
    …….. then, you must also admit it is as a result of “the politics of smoke and mirrors, politics of grandstanding and glorious empty promises” by SUCCESSIVE BLP and DLP administrations
    Xxcc
    What I would admit is that the old standard of education has failed to produce an educational system sufficient and enough to build an economy
    What I would admit that there are some within this society who have a yearning to be come entrepreneurs but are hampered and deny entrance to financial doors
    What I would also state that the younger generation of Barbadians wouldn’t be holding strain for very long when they look across the economic and financial landscape of Barbados and see the few who are gaining while the majority are suffering

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  • Skinner

    What could be expected. A blp dictatorship is in power. A certain deification must happen as would be when the othe people come in.

    These university people are whores, For this is the place from whence we were told about a “Mottley Revolution” which has never been seen.

    This is the same or equivalent to religious belief systems of domination, like christianity.

    Like

  • @Artax

    There is the saying it takes many to make the world spin. People with narrow interest (partisans) serve a purpose to influence others the importance of maintaining an open perspective.

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  • @William

    We should not get bent out of shape by what Carter scribed. There is consensus Tom Adams presided in a period where the economy transitioned from an agrarian base to services. To say he was the architect of modern Barbados is a bit of a stretch.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Some critics of the legislation suggest that it is highly over rated or it simply did not go far enough.”

    aka a great vehicle for stealing estates…that’s the legacy…and the article is OUTRIGHT LIES…

    Like

  • The Past has gone
    The Future has never been
    All efforts are in the Present
    ∴ Mia is the only leader that matters

    Like

  • Mr Skinner some truth in what you have stated.However as usual a lot of generalizations and warmed over cold soup.As for your statement that Frank Walcott now Sir Frank has dome more than either Mr Barrow or Mr Adams for bajans is in my view ludicrous.Free education and the freeholds tenantry act were major game changers in bajans life as rolled out by Mr Barrow and Mr Adams.There is nothing in my view and certainly from my readings Sir Frank Walcott did comes close to those things.I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Lorenzo
    When you look at who controlled labour; developed a labour college where workers from throughout the region were exposed to a new level of education; developed a genuine working class housing estate; built a credit union managed and owned by the workers and brought in some of the most progressive thinkers in the Caribbean to give free lectures to the workers and the public; invested in prime real estate owned by the workers and on several occasions could have derailed governments’ economic policies but worked to improve the lot of all workers, you seriously believe that any PM of our country could match that record.
    Now, I am no disciple of the man but in terms of sheer record, his is hard to beat. We are here talking about a man that could have shut down the country in ten minutes any day of the week. Furthermore neither the free education or free hold tenantry act can surpass the attainment of adult suffrage.
    Frank Walcott’s contribution makes him as important and central to the country’s development as much as the Adamses and Barrow and all who have followed since.

    Like

  • I wish to thank Marsha Hinds-Layne for her commitment to dragging Barbados forward wrt the way we deal with children who have issues, most of which are NOT of their own making.

    I am appalled that these children, neither of whom should have been criminalised for “wandering”, are still being characterised by the media as delinquents who have “escaped” rather than run away from situations in which they were uncomfortable.

    What insensitivity! THIS is part of the problem. Who edits these articles? Do they not know that words matter? Do they not know how their words can shape the perception of their readers?

    Most girls “wander” for good reasons. Most people don’t run away from good treatment.

    Also, her main thrust to move such children to a seperate facility from one which houses children who have run afoul of the law is a no brainer.

    What the hell is taking so long? Does our government not understand the urgent need to solve these problems before they become bigger and MORE COSTLY problems?

    Do we not yet understand that a stitch in time saves nine???????

    Liked by 1 person

  • I felt the Haitian situation deserved its own post but I don’t even know where to begin.

    Barbados does not have the resources to solve all the problems of every would be Haitian immigrant and indeed we have local Bajans who are being evicted right now with no place to go but we have to do better than this. We have to remember that there are Bajans in foreign lands and we must also look out for them.

    We cannot advocate for humane treatment of distressed Bajans who live in white man lands if we cannot set the example for them to follow wrt our black brothers and sisters in distress.

    What is our mirror image? We need to figure it out – NOW!

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Why is CXC not heeding advice from across the region to postpone these exams..

    …how many parents and grandparents do they believe have money just sitting around to panic buy laptops for their children and grandchildren to download programs for the exams the same week….or they can’t take it…

    Liked by 2 people

  • Mr Skinner i seem to recall a situation where Mr Walcott threatened to as you say shut down the country in Mr Barrow, s absence.Mr Barrow returned to the island and squashed the attempt by letting Mr Walcott know who was in charge of the country.Therefore your statement about Mr Walcott,s ability to close down the country holds no water.I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Yesterday I lost my interest in listening to what was said in Parliament
    Absent of an opposition country has no found itself in an uncontrollable position of having to accept govt word
    Finally I had to give up as my mind wander into the arena of wanting to ask questions but no one was sitting in PARLIAMENT having the ability to thread that needle
    Whilst in my wondering moments I between listening to the gifting of land in St. Peter to the Cavehill University and the glorious prospective meant to enhance the University and the people of Barbados by way of the Universirty ideals
    I couldn’t help but ask Who would do the funding of these glorious ideals
    Especially evidence showing that Cavehill over the years have struggled in the red to pay its bills
    Hope or smoke and mirrors for the asking

    Like

  • Barbados govts must with all seriousness finds ways and manners of being a productive country
    Expecting the populace living on low-end incomes to carry household debt and govt debt is unconscionable in a modern society
    The time has long gone for Private Sector act upon those glorious promises made to govts
    Too whom much is given much is expected
    There seems to be an expectation and acceptance from govt and the powerful that the majority tow the customer end of the economic baggage
    Whilst the powerful makes all kinds of demands and the usual reward of govt hand outs

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    William…these pretend elite assholes are always doing something stupid, the cheapest 8-gig of Ram laptop on the island is over $2,000.

    how many parents can afford this at such short notice, a bank would take 2 weeks to process such a loan, but CXC wants it
    by today, and even if they can to pay that lumpsum how many are able to reclaim that unnecessary CXC induced expense…

    Liked by 1 person

  • angela cox April 27, 2022 8:41 AM

    Once again, I agree with you.

    However, one of the first concepts you learn in economics is the problem of scarcity, which simply means, a country does not have all the available resources to satisfy all the needs of its citizens. Hence, choices have to be made.

    Unfortunately, not all those who have a yearning to become entrepreneurs will achieve that objective.
    A guy may go to a financial institution with an excellent business idea, but, without a detailed business plan.
    So, the loans officer has choose between considering him and another individual who submitted a business plan and demonstrated he has the ability to repay the loan.
    And, bear in mind, it will be difficult for anyone who is ‘broke,’ to access loan financing.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    And when these companies and others overseas donate laptops to children, they should be given to THOSE WHO NEED IT….and not to the children of yardfowls for political pimping purposes….who could wait…

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/04/27/magistrate-say-more-options-needed-for-at-risk-men/

    here is another positive solution by a magistrate, last week a judge weighed in on the neglected criminalized youth….need to stop incarcerating Black men, and Black people in general, just because ya have the power….but refuse to arrest let alone convict and imprison criminal CARTELS…who are an obvious danger to the population/island’s security…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    need we say more….it always points to bad faith from reckless governments, sleight of hand and trickery…

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2022/04/27/some-former-liat-workers-to-get-monies-owed/

    “While some of the former Barbadian LIAT employees welcomed the intended settlement for their counterparts in a country with no shareholding interest in the airline, they expressed bewilderment regarding the position of the Barbados government, the majority stakeholder in the company.”

    Like

  • Everybody always talking about Barrow and freee education. At the time, there were according to Hinds of the Truth, 30,000 children in high schools across the island. Barrow gave free education to 5,000 or thereabout that were already in the nine cheap government sponsored schools, with their rented text books, etc. Please, give us a break. Everyone who had to pay private school fees were subsidizing and paying for those in the government schools. Was that a good thing?

    Liked by 1 person

  • ArtaxApril 27, 2022 11:51 AM

    angela cox April 27, 2022 8:41 AM

    Once again, I agree with you.

    However, one of the first concepts you learn in economics is the problem of scarcity, which simply means, a country does not have all the available resources to satisfy all the needs of its citizens. Hence, choices have to be made.

    Unfortunately, not all those who have a yearning to become entrepreneurs will achieve that objective.
    A guy may go to a financial institution with an excellent business idea, but, without a detailed business plan.
    So, the loans officer has choose between considering him and another individual who submitted a business plan and demonstrated he has the ability to repay the loan.
    And, bear in mind, it will be difficult for anyone who is ‘broke,’ to access loan financing
    Xxxxxcc
    Yes
    However there is where govt guidance plays an important party in the individual live placing necessary laws and guidelines a mechanism which can be of help for the idealist to overcome challenges
    Again at the root of all these problems is a educational system is in dire need of change
    A change which reflects the many changes of a global economy
    Yes small islands individually might be scare on resources but networking and sharing goals and ideas as well as resources can help them achieve plenty
    The biblical story of the feeding of the five thousands serves purpose for govts as well as individuals to learn and how to achieve plenty with little

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Been telling them for years to stop the crap about free education from Barrow, give the credit to whom it belongs, those people who BROKE THEIR BACKS in the cane fields and other areas, that generated the funds to pay for education for everyone else..

    that lie has run its course…..all Barrow did was FACILITATE the process of allowing everyone to access colonial education….and am sure HE HAD HELP…

    Liked by 1 person

  • angela cox April 27, 2022 12:46 PM #: “However there is where govt guidance plays an important party in the individual live placing necessary laws and guidelines a mechanism which can be of help for the idealist to overcome challenges…”

    I understand where you’re coming from and agree there needs to be fundamental changes in our educational system.

    But, despite whatever ‘laws, guidelines, or mechanisms’ any ‘government’ introduces, because of limited resources, choices will have to be made as to whether who will access them or not. And, what other services ‘government’ will have to forgo or reduce to facilitate implementation.

    Like

  • “A standard definition of economics could describe it as: a social science directed at the satisfaction of needs and wants through the allocation of scarce resources which have alternative uses. We can go further to state that: economics is about the study of scarcity and choice.”

    https://www.soas.ac.uk › page_07

    Like

  • There was once a group of women studying the book of Malachi in the Old Testament. As they were studying chapter three, they came across verse three, which says: “He will sit as a refiner and purifier of silver.” This verse puzzled the women, and they wondered what this statement meant about the character and nature of God. One of the women offered to find out about the process of refining silver and get back to the group at their next Bible study.
    That week this woman called up a silversmith and made an appointment to watch him at work. She didn’t mention anything about the reason for her interest beyond her curiosity about the process of refining silver. As she watched the silversmith, he held a piece of silver over the fire and let it heat up. He explained that in refining silver, one needed to hold the silver in the middle of the fire where the flames were hottest as to burn away all the impurities.
    The woman thought about God holding us in such a hot spot … then she thought again about the verse, that he sits as a refiner and purifier of silver. She asked the silversmith if it was true that he had to sit there in front of the fire the whole time the silver was being refined.
    The man answered “Yes”, and explained that he not only had to sit there holding the silver, but he had to keep his eyes on the silver the entire time it was in the fire. If the silver was left even a moment too long in the flames, it would be damaged.
    The woman was silent for a moment. Then she asked the silversmith, “How do you know when the silver is fully refined?”
    He smiled at her and answered, “Oh, that’s easy. When I see my image in it.”
    If today you are feeling the heat of this world’s fire, just remember that God the Father and His Son Jesus Christ have Their eyes on you.

    Like

  • God is the empty space between all atoms in the universe

    Like

  • Thanks.
    Excellent.
    Great ideas followed by solid input from other contributors.

    Thinking.

    Like

  • DavidApril 27, 2022 1:24 PM

    “A standard definition of economics could describe it as: a social science directed at the satisfaction of needs and wants through the allocation of scarce resources which have alternative uses. We can go further to state that: economics is about the study of scarcity and choice

    Xxccc
    My philosophy of economic scarcity is using whatever u have and building upon it in ways which can be productive
    The Carrbbean basins is a reservoir of untapped knowledge along with millions of people
    Hence I refuse to buy into the mentality of scarcity when all it takes is a United front for the basin to prosper
    Again I lend an e.g of a boy only having three barleys loaves and two fish and which was enough to feed a multitude
    Which begs the question When will they learn

    Like

  • The story of the Haitians placed on the street along with a pregnant mother
    Is also a reflection of individuals mirror image
    A person seeking help when in need and desolate is ushered into the streets
    What also that was of interest were the many comments of attacks that deemed the person heartless for not giving the Haitians refuge in time of need
    Needless to say no one made mention of helping them
    Another mirror image of individuals who speak of good but cant find it in their hearts to deliver
    BTW where is Comissiong voice in all.of this
    Hopefully some one might come to their rescue 🙏

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Some are looking through a glass darkly. Interpretation is a very interesting exercise. The original coiner of this phrase intended that Barbadians look into the mirror and examine the reflection of the person therein. How can we stretch it to reflect these interventions? Where is the self examination implied there in?
    Are we proud of our contributions to the development of Barbados? Surely it cannot be about deprecating statements made about Barbados and the leaders of GoB?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    This is what is meant by people operating from self serving positions. It does not matter the topic some will find a way to fit their agendas.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Just heard CXC pushed back their crazy crap by 3 weeks but am still not impressed….and no one should be ..the kids gotta get used to this new program…yall are too goddamn arrogant…and lack a social conscience…

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu at 3:26 PM
    I empathise with you We do need to examine where we as individual citizens have not lived up to our part of the agreement and redouble our efforts. It is not about us : it is about all of us.

    Liked by 1 person

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Weeks and weeks i watched people in Barbados and across the region beg this uppity entity to push back the exams, but they were determined not to, they resisted EVERY request…there are children not eating properly due to economic conditions and severe strain… and they expect parents who can’t pay bills or buy food to find over 2000 dollars to buy a laptop..for their kid’s exams…by Friday 29th when exams start.

    ..i was laying comfortably in my bed and had to go out and buy one for a grand….and yall tink yuh gine geh wey wid dah deh…..

    this is cruelty and arrogance…

    Like

  • “I empathise with you We do need to examine where we as individual citizens have not lived up to our part of the agreement and redouble our efforts. It is not about us : it is about all of us.”

    You should watch Raised by Wolves Season 2 Episode 4 Review: ‘Control’
    Mother has regained her eyes — she’s weaponized again — and she’s already taken down The Trust. She’s now the one in charge of the Atheist collective and is claiming she wants everyone to have freedom and eventually govern themselves

    Like

  • A black hole, a glass of milk and a cat walk into a bar..
    The glass of milk asks the cat “why does the black hole have to tag along with us, everywhere he goes he sucks up all the energy.”

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Skinner, very well said. And to @Codrington re the origination of the ‘mirror image’ you are also right re: _”The original coiner of this phrase intended that Barbadians look into the mirror and examine the reflection of the person therein…”

    Mr. Barrow spoke quite ‘sweetly’ that night but for all the soaring oratory he was quite contradictory himself when he dulled that self same mirror image and cussed the then US President reflecting the part when you said “Surely it cannot be about deprecating statements made about Barbados and the leaders of GoB [nor the world]?”

    EWB directly said he wanted us to “have self-respect […] have a desire to move [the country forward by [our] own devices [and not be] waiting for anybody to come and give [us] handouts.”

    He shamed us when he bold facedly said “If there are corrupt ministers in Barbados tonight, you have made them corrupt.” because as he said: “… although the law says that he that giveth is as much guilty of bribery and corruption under the Corrupt Practices Act as he that receiveth, we know that even on polling day, people were given envelopes with $100 bills in them.”

    He told us that we are a bunch of lying, good for nothing scallywags whose “… greatest ambition is to try to prove to the people of the United States Consulate that you are only going up to visit your family […] and you are the only person dishonest enough with yourself to realise that you do not have a strong reason to return to Barbados, because Barbados has nothing to offer you. You are not being honest with yourself, but you tell the man down there, ‘Oh yes, I’m returning.’”

    But then he lambasted Ronald Reagan in a very snobbish Bajan way when he said: “If Reagan had to take the test [a reading proficiency test] , I wonder if he would pass.”

    In simple term we are still exactly as he described us then and his persona is exactly as we mimic too: we speak in soaring terms and yet so incredulously badly reflect that which we rail against!

    So what exactly is the imaging that we are trying to mirror … do we even UNDERSTAND the reflections staring back at us!

    Thus it always will remain:

    I’m starting with the man in the mirror
    I’m asking him to change his ways
    And no message could have been any clearer
    If you want to make [Bim] a better place
    Take a look at yourself, and then make a change”

    Not Barrow, Not Adams or not Walcott … they polished their mirror images and we have to shine ours too. And NOT with any damn Windex either!

    Liked by 1 person

  • This image is crystal clear

    Read ePaper
    Home / Local News / Some former LIAT workers to get monies owed

    Some former LIAT workers to get monies owed – by Emmanuel Joseph April 27, 2022
    The St Lucia government, which is not a shareholder in LIAT, on Tuesday announced that it will pay all outstanding monies owed to its citizens who were terminated by the regional airline two years ago.

    Prime Minister Phillip J Pierre broke the news today during his 2022 maiden budget presentation to Parliament in which he promised that termination payments due to former St Lucian LIAT workers will be settled.

    “The government has entered into an arrangement with the non-management LIAT workers who were terminated by the closure of the company in 2020. We are currently in discussion with the former management staff, including the pilots, to arrive at an acceptable settlement,” Prime Minister Pierre revealed.

    “Our decision to settle these outstanding payments is yet another demonstration of our continued commitment to the upliftment of the welfare of the workers of St Lucia,” he told Parliament.

    While some of the former Barbadian LIAT employees welcomed the intended settlement for their counterparts in a country with no shareholding interest in the airline, they expressed bewilderment regarding the position of the Barbados government, the majority stakeholder in the company.

    The Mia Mottley government had been giving the ex-workers from Barbados a monthly advance of $2,000 to run for a year, but on March 31, on the eve of the second anniversary of the termination of the LIAT employees, one of the affected pilots from Barbados, who did not want to be named, said they were informed that the payment had been discontinued, two months short of the promised 12-month period.

    “The last payment was already made this month [March]. So we are in no-man’s land. People were expecting 12 months and then some further assistance to get the matter settled. But the employees were notified about two weeks ago now, that the tenth payment would be the last payment. We are just awaiting further [word]. We are very much in the wilderness here,” the ex-Bajan pilot stated.

    Minister of Tourism and International Transport Senator Lisa Cummins could not be reached for comment this evening. (EJ)

    Like

  • “So what exactly is the imaging that we are trying to mirror … do we even UNDERSTAND the reflections staring back at us!”

    many Bajans are Americans
    citizenship can change
    children born there are yanks

    Like

  • @Dee Word

    A reasonable comment. At the root is the cultural penetration mentioned. It seems we have no core values to reference or frame that Bajan identify;value set, some of us love to romanticize.

    Like

  • In every exam, we will always find some who are unprepared.Give more time and some will still be unprepared.

    Sometime in the past, there was a call to regrade some papers. This year the call is for more time to study. What will it be next year?

    Give an inch and folks will try to take a mile. CXC need to stand firm or it will find itself being challenged every year.

    Like

  • ,*some time

    Some folks are throwing their weight around with the sole purpose of mollycoddling these youngsters.

    This is sheer speculation on my part, but I doubt if this call for an extension was to benefit all students. This is for the benefit of a few.

    When this select few get their scholarships and move to universities outside of the Caribbean, real life will kick them in the ass. Big shot parents become just a cog in one of several wheels. Rescheduling is a thing of the past.

    CXC must stand firm.

    Like

  • TheO,

    The children hardly went to school. The issue seems to be made worse by technological requirements.

    These are special circumstances caused by covid.

    Next year should be different.

    Please!

    Like

  • And as for AC, do I have the resources to help everyone who needs help? I do what I can. I am referring here to our government taking some action to assist.

    Like

  • @ Donna April 27, 2022 10:04 AM
    (Quote).
    I wish to thank Marsha Hinds-Layne for her commitment to dragging Barbados forward wrt the way we deal with children who have issues, most of which are NOT of their own making.

    I am appalled that these children, neither of whom should have been criminalised for “wandering”, are still being characterised by the media as delinquents who have “escaped” rather than run away from situations in which they were uncomfortable.

    What insensitivity! THIS is part of the problem. Who edits these articles? Do they not know that words matter? Do they not know how their words can shape the perception of their readers?

    Most girls “wander” for good reasons. Most people don’t run away from good treatment.
    (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    A beautifully sensitive contribution there, Donna, for your heart is truly in the right place ! Even animals run away from bad treatment.

    9 out of 10 times these girls are running away from conditions involving child abuse; especially of the sexual ‘breed’ (no pun intended).

    And that is the reality the pseudo preachers of Bajan morality refuse to confront.

    It’s ‘high’ time the authorities stop with the blatant violation of the rights of those vulnerable children as enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child to which Barbados has been a long-term signatory but adhering more in the breaching of those very rights rather than their morally right observance.

    Even your friend Jesus was specifically instructive on the need to protect and love our children; so why can’t so-called Christian-minded Bajans?

    Like

  • angela cox April 27, 2022 6:40 PM #: “This image is crystal clear.”

    Since the “image is crystal clear,” please explain to those of us to whom the “image” is ‘cloudy.’

    What is “crystal clear” to me and anyone who has been following the LIAT saga, is a blatant display of irresponsible journalism.

    Firstly, I congratulate the new Phillip J Pierre administration of St. Lucia for making arrangements to pay former St. Lucian LIAT employees.
    It is the least that island could do under the circumstances, especially after its economy benefited for years off the backs of taxpayers of the shareholder islands, while continually refusing to invest in LIAT.

    Secondly, the former LIAT employees based in Barbados, would have contributed to the NIS and were paid unemployment benefits. They were also to be paid severance payments through expedited hearings by the NIS Tribunal.

    As it relates to those Barbadians employees that were BASED IN ANTIGUA, they would’ve contributed to ANU’s Social Security Scheme and are entitled to severance under that island’s laws.

    The GoB made arrangements for them (Barbadian former LIAT employees BASED IN ANTIGUA) to receive an advance of $2,000 per month, for one year, which was supposed to have been terminated earlier if they were able to find alternative employment before the end of the proposed period, and “to be paid back at a future date from any eventual severance settlement.”

    Why were the payments discontinued?

    Did the former employees received their severance payments from the Government of Antigua & Barbuda?

    These are important questions that should be answered before jumping to conclusions.

    Also, remember, iCaribbean Airways took over the operations of LIAT and hired several of the former airline’s employees.

    Like

  • This year, a special International Leader Award was added to honour Mia Mottley, the Prime Minister of Barbados.

    https://canadiansme.ca/the-bbpa-announces-the-recipients-of-the40th-annual-harry-jerome-awards/

    Like

  • Tenantries Freehold Act — A joke on the working class?
    “The most revolutionary piece of legislation outside the Americas and Cuba.” That’s how the Honourable Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley described the Tenantries Freehold Act at the republic celebrations.
    “It is doubtful that in the annals of the history of Barbados whether any initiative will be as encompassing, of the scale, or as uplifting of the spirit as the social and economic revolution of the Tenantries Act.” —Honourable Owen Arthur, Tom Adams Memorial Lecture.
    You would think that with such public acclamations for this piece of legislation that, in practice, the government would do everything in its power to ensure eligible Barbadians benefit fully from this Act.
    You would think those who qualify would actually get easy access to the subsidies they are entitled to by law: PART II Principle for the determination of purchase price of lots within other tenantries [2001-19] 1.
    The price payable by the tenant for a lot in a tenantry other than a plantation tenantry shall not exceed $2.50 per square foot; but where the open market price of the lot exceeds $2.50 per square foot, there shall be payable to the landlord a Government subsidy of the difference between the open market price and the $2.50.
    However, it seems the talk on the platforms is miles apart from the reality on the ground. It seems this “great” Act is only an act because every day, many Barbadians are being deprived of their rights to these subsidies. When was the last time Urban Development received a cent from the government to pay subsidies to those on tenantry land? Very reliable sources say not since 2015. So for 7 years, no government has seen it worthy to allocate any money to ensure this “revolutionary piece of legislation” creates the social and economic revolution in this country it was intended to by Tom Adams.
    Where has this left the working class tenants? Those who can afford to purchase their lots at the full price can do so.
    But they may lose their moral and legal rights to get a subsidy because refunds are not guaranteed. Woe to those who can’t pay the full price. They continue to be disempowered, disenfranchised, demeaned, ignored, live in worry, and unable to own property and enjoy modern amenities. They are left at the mercy of the landlords. Year by year they get older and their 5-year limit to exercise their right to purchase runs out.
    So Honorable Prime Minister and minister in charge of Urban Development, are you serious about what you said at Golden Square or is this a joke on the working class? Barry Gooding

    Like

  • People don’t spend their life’s looking in mirrors, they look outwards, not inwards for self reflection.
    Why are the following considered threats to society:
    Educated black people
    Strong black people
    Young black teenagers
    Angry black people

    #ilchilee #inspirationalmessages #drumming
    The Rhythm of Life | Inspirational Messages

    Like

  • However what is mind boggling is the PM silence on this sensitive issue surrounding the GIS and the children
    An issue having to deal with children’s abuse and human rights
    I take note of the many other issues involving other ministries that the PM became involved stepping out front delivering PR messages to calm the rising tides
    I also take note that Barbados assigned to several agreements having to deal with human rights and child abuse
    I also take note that the PM have used her sense of advocacy to inform the people of Barbados that barbadians should be a country sensitive to the human rights of others
    Now a problem that begs for sensitivity and corrective measures her leadership is missing throughout the months the story made way across Barbados landscape
    Truly mindboggling and sad 😢😭

    Like

  • Any thing that comes out this PM mouth must be taken with a grain of Epsom salts and flushed down the toilet ASAP
    Her utterances most of the time are hoisted on political meanderings and self interest which only appeals to her foot soldiers
    In a recent article on housing her sound off was to tell Barbadians her intent on making rent disappeared
    However she did not tell.of her social and economic plan in doing so especially for the very low end employee
    Her utterances of recent makes for comedy central in many of her responses in Parliament
    Now absence of an opposition the PM has a bully pulpit to present as many flip.flops and gigs as only she can
    Kind of which reminds me of when Trump was President

    Like

  • A bad vibration of negative energy
    Holding up a mirror to angela AC cox it is difficult to express the feeling of repulsion to her being

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    “Tenantries Freehold Act — A joke on the working class?”

    some say a well oiled, well-used vehicle to tief land and estates from those who can’t fight back that has worked well to enrich the corrupt..,,for decades…long before the 80s when that act was created…to reinforce those crimes…

    “CXC must stand firm.”

    in case you did not notice CXC already had to blink after at least 2 months of “standing firm”..

    .as i said, those 3 weeks are not nearly enuff for these children to learn a new program to download their exams…AND…90% of the parents/guardians/students CANNOT AFFORD an expensive computer in this current economic meltdown….so they will AUTOMATICALLY FAIL for non participation…which will still ONLY BENEFIT THE FEW who can efford to buy a laptop at short notice, it may take some 3 weeks or more to get a bank loan and then still have to learn the program…..’

    on the subject of Liat, these shite islands and corrupt governments love too much free labor WHICH IS SLAVERY…the pilots worked and SHOULD BE PAID….years and years now they have always had problems being paid their salaries and benefits…….while the crooked ass boards with all their crooks on board….had these disgusting looking swollen bellies and faces from feasting like pigs…and taxpayers kept pouring money into the liat hole..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    CXC is arrogant and backward, hence…all of this is happening, let’s if they screw up the exams this year too, and the CAPE within the next 2 years, i have vested interest, so they are very unlikely to escape…

    . They need EXPOSING even more for that shite they pulled this week…….they will not get away with anything….too disrespectful like they don’t depend on the same parents and students to keep their doors open through taxpayer/government funding…they will not get any pass…

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    CXC tried to pull that same crap last year with the new program and new laptop needed for downloading exams……but it BLEW UP ON THEM and they had to revert to their manual set up…

    this year ..instead of preparing parents for the transition and give them sufficient time and wiggle room for those who need to find 8 gigs of ram and windows laptops because not all laptops are thus equipped, had to search through a bunch and only found 2 that fit the criteria and one was not completely appropriate.

    ..there was only ONE CHOICE..so, choices are very limited….and so is the stock, when i left, i believe they said there were only 4 more left and they had to go to another location to get the one i purchased, because the only one left was a display………..they also have to give parents/guardians/students TIME TO FIND THE MONEY….but no, they came at people on Tuesday to have the laptops by Friday and Thursday today, is a goddamn holiday….and someone is supposed to feel pleased…as far as am concerned CXC owes me and am going to collect one way or the next…..

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    If they weren’t so goddamn uppity they would have known that the Caribbean does not manufacture laptops, or any computers, so STOCK WILL BE LIMITED ACROSS THE REGION…in any GIVEN MONTH..

    ….and these clowns and their annual cockups are the ones setting and grading examination papers for our children and grandchildren…….FAILURES….useless breathers…

    Like

  • Story making the rounds

    Has anyone else heard this?
    “David Ellis ain’t holding the special position anymore”
    he gets dispensed like two panadol…so I hear! I don’t know but anything founded on dishonesty has to fail or collapse at some point in time.

    Like

  • African Online Publishing Copyright ⓒ 2022. All Rights Reserved

    Tighten ya seatbelts, big ting a go on…lawd.

    “”This afternoon, the Premier of the British Virgin Islands, Andrew Fahie, was arrested in the United States on charges related to drugs trafficking and money laundering.”

    Like

  • WTF? No subsidies paid since 2015??????

    This need further research to expose how many have suffered because of this! This is only half of a story!

    Like

  • What is our mirror image?

    What is our mirror image is a silly question in the land of the blind. Thank God we still have a few one-eye men/women with us

    I have been following various posts and the image that emerges is not a positive one. One minute we are walking with the giants and talking with leaders of major countries (what some consider as punching above our weight). But when we focus on ground zero, the walk does not match the talk.

    What is directly in our control is seriously out of control. Where action is required/desired we are inactive and impotent. Indeed, a more accurate description is that we are only talking above our weight.

    Examples:
    Systems experience problems and take much longer to fix than was scheduled. We then emerge and state that we are ahead of when there were no problems.

    We buy vaccines from beauty supply specialists and the story fades as if it has never happened.

    A state system experiences problem over a number of years, we conduct an investigation and then claims there are no issues with the system. Silence or claims of perfection or doing better are the only responses we know.

    Youngsters flee from a state institution, are captured, returned to the institution and are ‘declared mad’.

    For decades, lawyers’ separate clients from their funds and we are unable to fix this simple problem.
    Instead, we have the Bar Association mouthing the same useless refrain they have made over the years.

    Tourism slogans that are paid for (overpriced), created and no one can repeat one word of the slogan?

    Brilliance is seen as removing the keyword from OFF. No real justification is provided on how and why the decision was made.

    Sam Lord’s Castle is rebuilt and looks more like a modern prison that an old English Castle.

    How can the blind see what is in the mirror? How can they see the empty eyes, the vacant stares, the blank faces which seem to reflect the minds that are devoid of ideas.

    We listen to the soothing voice of an orator, but the words are empty and usually do not apply to us at ground zero. Talking above our weight? Imagine a cheap magician taking the stage, performing many tricks and at the end of the act receives a thunderous applause. As the audience leaves the arena, they know that it was all a show; little of it was real. They move to the next act and will toss fishes at the performing seal.

    What is our mirror image? I do not know. Who are we? Pretenders? Honestly, I do not know

    Liked by 1 person

  • TheOGazerts,

    You should be acknowledged as a member of the elite maguffees on BU.

    Like

  • Some body on.anorher social media platform stated that barbadians mirror image .is a reflection of self hate
    To which I totally agree

    Like

  • @TheoG
    No one can accuse Bajans of having long memories at least there is always Cropover.

    BTW whatever became of Toni Moore? The leader of the largest labour union in the country has disappeared without a trace.

    Like

  • Ssrgeant

    BTW whatever became of Toni Moore? The leader of the largest labour union in the country has disappeared without a trace.
    Xxccc
    Hope u do not get your daily servings of news from Bu
    Toni Moore has been all over the news pushing the goal post away from govt workers need to have an increase
    Replacing it with utterances of workers environment needs and protection
    Same subject matter Union’s turned away from when Caswell brought the issue to govt concern as was mocked

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    You inquired about Toni Moore?

    Moore shines spotlight on unequal pay

    General secretary of the Barbados Workers’ Union, Toni Moore, is questioning how some sectors are getting away with unequal pay and reneging on National Insurance Scheme (NIS) payments for employees.
    In a message to mark May Day today, the Government backbencher also said after linking up with the ruling Barbados Labour Party, there have been some achievements for workers, including a new minimum wage.
    “The BWU is proud that today, in just over 18 months of re-establishing its identity with a political party which supports the aspirations of workers, there have been a number of marked achievements which we can report,” she said.
    Moore said the anomaly that denied workers of the Transport Board access to a gratuity was corrected; and a resolution calling on Government to review its value added tax policy on fuel was submitted and the measure announced in March’s Budget.
    Talks on trade union bill
    She said discussion has started on a Trade Union Recognition Bill after decades of agitation and agony, injustice and indignity faced by workers to have the trade union of their choice represent them. She added the BWU had also caused the Government to accept that the Labour Clauses (Public Contracts) Act could no longer be observed only in the breach.
    “For at a time when a number of capital projects are being anticipated, as the Government works to restore the economy and rebuild public infrastructure, the Government must resist the temptation to enter into contracts at conditions below an acceptable level of social protection – whether for the construction of public works, or for the manufacture of goods or the supply of services,” she warned.
    She applauded the ruling administration for moving to strengthen the legislation but said the BWU was insistent that while it is always a good thing to strengthen and introduce laws, it is more important to enforce existing legislation.
    “One therefore has to wonder why for years companies have been rewarded by successive governments for observing hours and conditions of labour which are less favourable than those established over time. The G4S dispute in late 2020 corrected this at least as far as wages are concerned in the security sector, but in construction it is still glaring where companies pay sometimes at half the rates established in the industry and they get the bulk of Government contracts.”
    More added: “One has to wonder why these companies would be allowed to renege on NIS obligations . . . by consciously misclassifying workers as being on contracts for service and are still getting public contracts. This is why the BWU has been insisting that Government leads by example in this regard. So that even where it is understood that Government might need to walk a tightrope with regard to new hires, given the prescripts of an IMF [International Monetary Fund] programme, the BWU has not accepted that denying a worker social security and protection and possibly even a pension can be excused.
    “A responsible Government must not enter into arrangements where it knows and chooses not to know that it is doing so, where the minimum provisions of decency are not being adhered to,” she said.
    No convincing needed
    In relation to the public service and calls for and against salary increases, Moore said since the BWU’s focus in the past has been on productivity and performance-based bonuses, it did not need to be convinced about increasing the levels of productivity, or jump on any bandwagon “to commit to a national response to encourage renewed personal commitment to work and to work ethic . . .”.
    “We get it, we teach it and live it to the extent that since 2001, it has been an addendum to our rules and regulations. What we do not get is the fact that while there is the call for greater productivity, for every percentage increase given to a worker, an employer
    wants ten times the amount in blood, sweat and tears.
    “So unions still have to be fighting the traditional issues that were being fought before Independence. The simple lesson of which we are reminded daily is that greed does not disappear.
    “There is still a certain class that will continue to fight against enfranchisement and worker empowerment in order to maintain its supremacy over the masses. That is why in 2022, we have an employer in production ready to go to war over a half percentage point increase to workers, in circumstances where that employer openly admits to doing well,” the general secretary said.
    She said the BWU was therefore demanding from the public and private sectors, agreement on a transparent arrangement where effort and output translate to a return for employees.
    In the last Sunday Sun, senior economic advisor to Government Dr Kevin Greenidge said any salary hikes for public officers in response to the rising cost of living should be in line with an increase in productivity.
    Both the Congress of Trade Unions and Staff Association of Barbados and National Union of Public Workers have called for wage increases for public officers – with the last occurring in 2018 – or, at the very least, a coping subsidy.
    Greenidge said while such decisions were up to the Prime Minister and Minister of Finance Mia Amor Mottley, “my view is that any raise on salary must be in line with productivity and we are far from where we need to be in terms of output”.
    ‘Stay in your lane’
    In her message, Moore said: “On issues of public sector increases and related matters, it is fair to say that technical advisors should stay away from public commentary on matters that will be subject to political determinations. I like to call it holding your lane. Where you start by recognising that you really have no place to speak . . . then you should not.
    “We have already signalled to the Government of the need for an increase, but our focus, specifically for the past two years, has been more to do with ensuring that workers are not being taken advantage of using an IMF programme as the basis, or a pandemic and now the war, to push the worker to the point where he is unable to take care of himself and his family,” she said. ( AC)

    Source: Nation

    Liked by 1 person

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