Police Surrender to Wheelie Motorcyclists

The following video may suggest many things to different people. What is suggests to the blogmaster is a lawlessness and indiscipline that is getting close to mainstream behaviour. A situation where authorities seem helpless in the eyes of the public to curb the rot. A situation where a sub element in society has taken civil society hostage. In fact this unattended lawlessness on our roads is channelling what now obtains in the PSV sector. First we ignored it, then we paid lip service to it and now the behaviour has ‘metastasize’ to all segments of society. Have we observed how ordinary motorist are ‘bursing’ through amber and red traffic lights? Parking on side walks and other unauthorized areas? Using cellphones without handsfree etc?

Source: Nation

BU family member John A posted the following eyewitness account of the unbelievable lawlessness we are witnessing on our roads on a daily basis. This coupled with the fact police and government appear feckless.


David I am so happy you showed that video as I saw the idiots myself on Sunday, so let me share what happened.

I was in a line of traffic moving slowly coming into Warrens from the south coast on the highway around 5pm.

When I finally got to Warrens round about it was these idiots who were the problem. They were riding between the Warrens roundabout and the Shopsmart roundabout taking up both lanes of traffic. Bikes on only back wheels, quads sliding from side to side and no cars could pass them. When they got to the Cost-U-Less roundabout they then went back to Warrens. I saw at least 30 of them in Warrens, but also passed another 20 or so on the side of the road by Kooyman Hardware store.

My point is what de ass are the police doing about this? Why must joggers and others using the road be abused by a handful of idiots every Sunday?

I also noticed in the video when they saw the police vehicles they scattered like flies. No doubt none have insurance and few may even have a bike license. This problem has been going on for months on a Sunday, so why has it not been dealt with? They are certain parts of the ABC highway that have rock faces on both sides, hence no escape. Why hasn’t a trap been set for them in such areas?

It is a disgrace that the authorities are so inept when it comes to this issue. It is only a matter of time before one of these idiots kills either a jogger or someone on the road side.

Dam well get up and deal with it!

This island seems to have lost all control over enforcement of law and the message these idiots are sending to others is WE CAN DO WHAT WE WANT AND NO ONE CAN TOUCH US.

BU Commenter John A

43 comments

  • Simple – if we are dealing with idiots, ban the importation of that type of motorcycle. Peter pays for Paul

    Like

  • @Fearplay

    We definitely need a drastic intervention to haul back this situation. The lawlessness being exhibited on the roads and elsewhere in society should be as concerning as the GIS matter. A strength of the Bajan society over the years is that has enjoyed a reputation as an ordered society. This has been one of the pillars upon which our society was built.

    Like

  • FearPlayMarch 23, 2021 6:25 AMSimple – if we are dealing with idiots, ban the importation of that type of motorcycle. Peter pays for Paul

    Correct. The only motorcycle needed in this lil island is a scooter cycle like the Honda 70 class.

    Waste of foreign exchange.

    Like

  • @Crusoe

    To be seen in Bermuda, the Vespa!

    Like

  • Let it play out as it should, and eventually the collective IQ of the island will go up. What you see as a problem I see as a probable population adjustment Its like telling them dont lick cane toads , you know they are going to lick them .If really were concerned about road safety close the rum shops

    Like

  • Which Minister/Ministry is responsible for stamping out this lawlessness?

    Like

  • @Sargeant

    This problem calls for a combination of enforcement and policy. The AG has responsibility for Police.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @David, the post is serious but the initial comment is quite amusing … it suggests just how facile it is to offer solutions of doubtful practical merit which confuse the narrative around the problem.

    Respectfully to the blogger but in an island like ours banning motorcycles of any size/power is without merit CONSIDERING the oversize luxury cars (which guzzle gas) on the roads … that’s the sledge hammer to kill the bothersome cockroach solution: crazy overkill.

    So more seriously this is clearly a knock on police enforcemen … they surelt do not need us to delineate the obvious measures needed to bring this under control and just need to do their jobs.

    You and I and ‘tante merle’ know that freewheeling bikers taking up the road is a long standing ‘problem’ … I can certainly readily recall some faces and names of over 30 years ago of the guys who used to ride their Suzuki 550s and 750s, Kawasakis etc on weekends and do what then was considered lots of foolishness… I remember some of theirs deaths too!

    But there are lots more cars and undoubtedly more cycles on the roads now so that foolishness becomes a massive possible tragedy now!

    That the police are allowing the type event shown in the vid is beyond ridiculous.

    As the other blogger noted the issue can be stamped out readily enough (trapping between spots)… if there is ENFORCEMENT will .

    The riders likely wear helmets and remove the license plates so onsite road cam identification is not viable and the police surely will not engage in a dangerous pursuit of these guys and put their own lives at risk for THIS nonsense BUT they can still disrupt and curtail these activities .

    And they MUST do that before any tragedy with a motorist and family occurs caused by these lawless fellows.

    Oh BTW, I also thought your remark that a … strength of the Bajan society over the years is that has enjoyed a reputation as an ordered society” was amusing … hilarious even.

    Based on all we know today and the abject absurdities of our deficient, ‘prostrate to those in power’ legal process/judiciary; the commonplace corruption of our politics; the lawless PSV and the subculture around it – as you noted; the drug dons (and corporate dons) who support and are supported by the power elite in subverting true social justice/equity etc, ad nauseam I would counter that your assertion of an ordered Bajan society is absolutely MISPLACED.

    That we cant even handle that very simplistic puerile lawlessness above should readily affirm that.

    I gone.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Dee Word

    One has to start from a point to correct. Do we have the same issue caused by drivers of luxury vehicles?

    About the orderly society it is true if you judge in relative terms in then70s and early 80s. It explains why many from other LDCs and MDCs emigrated to Barbados.

    Like

  • Guys let me tell you what I saw goes way further than that. They displayed a blatant disregard for ALL other road users Fullstop!

    When you can block a dual carriage way So that you can ride as a bundled group, clearly the message is we are commondaring this road until we are finished. You have a police force and a defence force with heavy equipment deal with it to suit. Must every problem we have be left as was the case with the ZR units? We are a country with hundreds of laws and no real enforcement that to me is now clear.

    As for banning these bikes what I have to say is this. Under the road traffic act all vehicles must carry lights and number plates. These bikes have neither. They are illegal as a result. These are off road dirt bikes being used on the road. If they are banned on import that does not address the hundreds that are here already.

    Like

  • @ de pedantic Dribbler March 23, 2021 8:45 AM

    Well said.

    It is nothing but sheer incompetence on the part of both the ‘laws’ makers and enforcers.

    Every single motor cycle imported into the country must have been registered with the Bajan Licensing Authority and must carry valid insurance coverage to be on the roads.

    Why not start there (BLA and the insurance companies or agents) in any audit trail to get at the source of this deviant road behaviour?

    BTW, low-speed motor bikes are more suited to the Bajan network of roads (and weather conditions) than the many 2,000 cc. and over vehicles clogging up the limited Bajan travelling space.

    Why not take a leaf out of Bermuda’s books?

    Like

  • To ban the import of these bikes will not stop it. All that will happen is they will come in knocked down in parts and assembled locally. The problem is enforcement or lack there off. Address that problem and deal with these delinquents before some jogger or child at the side of the road loses their life. After all isn’t that what the police are there for ?

    Like

  • igrunt wrasse whole idiots in Canada too.

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler March 23, 2021 8:45 AM #: “I can certainly readily recall some faces and names of over 30 years ago of the guys who used to ride their Suzuki 550s and 750s, Kawasakis etc on weekends and do what then was considered lots of foolishness… I remember some of theirs deaths too!”

    @ dpD

    I’ll always maintain BU is a fascinating forum. But, you are often a ‘voice of reason’ on these types of situations.

    I remember the famous ‘Mike Happy’s’ father saying on Sundays and bank holidays, he and his friends used to ride their motorcycles “all ’round Barbados” when they were younger during the 1950s. But, that does mean I’m condoning the actions of these current motor-cyclist.

    You also mentioned “the lawless PSV and the subculture around it.” I was surprised when I read the police and society had similar challenges with the private concessionaires during the 1950s.
    I’ve read several reports of policemen, notably a Corporal Cyrus, reporting bus conductors for overloading and bus drivers for speeding, racing, and ‘setting down’ passengers at places other than a designated bus stop.

    We talk about water outages in St. Joseph. But. you’ll also be surprised to know that parish was suffering from water outages before the 1950s.

    Recently, there was a BU ‘discussion’ on racial issues. On Friday, July 14, 1950, the then Governor of Barbados was the featured guest at Queen’s College ‘speech day,’ during which he pleaded for an end to “snobbery of colour by nearly all shades in the community and schools.” He also said, “If we fail to respect each other, if we are hasty in our judgements, if we criticize our neighbours or repeat rumours, our children are liable to develop similar failings.” ‘Sounds’ familiar?

    We’ve also discussed ‘government’ and the private sector. In the early 1950s the private sector was lobbying the then ‘government’ to build a pier or deep water harbour, on the basis that they could load bulk sugar directly onto ships. And, cargo could be off loaded without the additional cost of labourers bringing it ashore.

    I could present several more examples. All I’m trying to ‘say’ is, Barbados has been experiencing these challenges even before the island became independent, despite the fact some ‘BU regulars’ prefer to confine them post November 30, 1966.

    ‘The more (times) change, the more things remain the same.’

    What does this say about us?

    Unfortunately, however, there are two particular ‘BU regulars’ who seem to believe their versions of historical events are accurate and should be believed. The opinions of other contributors are dismissed and met with shouts of “historical revisionism,” while accusing them of using ‘Google’ as the primary source of information, rather then reading “old Advocate newspapers.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Miller March 23, 2021 9:04 AM #: “It is nothing but sheer incompetence on the part of both the ‘laws’ makers and enforcers. Every single motor cycle imported into the country must have been registered with the Bajan Licensing Authority and must carry valid insurance coverage to be on the roads.”

    @ Miller

    Surely you can’t be serious.

    Motor vehicles are registered at BLA when the owner/agent submits a valid comprehensive or third party insurance cover note or certificate and the vehicle’s details (e.g. chassis and VIN numbers), upon applying for a registration number.

    Until such time, the vehicle remains ‘unknown.’

    Like

  • @ Artax

    Very true and you can bet that 99% of those bikes and quads i saw Sunday never went close to BLA unless they were passing the main road outside on the back wheel!

    Like

  • John AMarch 23, 2021 8:59 AM Guys let me tell you what I saw goes way further than that. They displayed a blatant disregard for ALL other road users Fullstop!…You have a police force and a defence force with heavy equipment deal with it to suit.

    Heavy equipment what? Snipers do not need heavy equipment. Moving targets would be great practice for them too.

    Like

  • @ Crusoe

    You rough though. Lol

    I was thinking road blocks and you thinking snipers.

    Some heavy equipment between some cut rock and 2 rolls of nail mats from cut rock to concrete road divider. Job done

    Like

  • @ Artax March 23, 2021 10:57 AM

    What you are implying is that those motor bikes might not be duly registered with the BLA so it would be rather impossible for the police to know their ‘registered’ owners.

    Are you confirming that vehicles can be cleared through customs without the BLA & BRA knowing of their arrival on the island?

    Can returning nationals bring vehicles into the island without the BLA being made aware of it?

    Just asking for a ‘friend’ who has plans of returning later in the year!

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    I am thinking this is a skill set which requires support. As we saw, over years with the PSV’s the concept of a Bus Stop or a route are old fashioned and discriminate against parts of society. They taught us they should stop anywhere for the convenience of passengers. And that limits on capacity within the vehicle were merely ‘manufacturer suggestions’. In some cases in slow traffic, lane markings were generally too generous, two lanes could easily replace one. And one can exit at any round-about, from any lane. Without these insights, our roads would resemble order imposed from colonial times.
    The idea of banning sales of these two wheeled transportation vehicles is obscene. What about the small business person who has carved out a niche in this area? They are not banning the oversized SUV’s.
    Why is enforcement needed? For years large trucks and buses have spewed effluent into the environment at alarming rates. Many of these were even publicly owned vehicles. I think we need a weekly award for the best “wheelie”.

    Like

  • John AMarch 23, 2021 12:00 PM

    I heard that fellow who used to hang out by Purity looking for gifts used to be a DF sniper. Can put him back to work shooting the tyres.

    If he is clean, he will shoot the tyres. If he is not…ah well.

    Like

  • @ Miller March 23, 2021 12:02 PM #”What you are implying is that those motor bikes might not be duly registered with the BLA so it would be rather impossible for the police to know their ‘registered’ owners. Are you confirming that vehicles can be cleared through customs without the BLA & BRA knowing of their arrival on the island?”

    @ Miller

    I’m neither IMPLYING nor CONFIRMING anything.

    However, if you’re implying imported vehicles must be registered with the BLA, then, WITHOUT the usual verbosity and metaphors…… or responding to a question with a question, could you please explain the reasons why?

    RE: “Can returning nationals bring vehicles into the island without the BLA being made aware of it?”

    WHY ASK ME, when you or your ‘friend’ could call the BLA?

    I’ll offer you a bit of assistance, ‘free of charge.’ The Chief Licensing Officer may now be contacted at 536-0264 or 536-0265.

    Like

  • Crusoe March 23, 2021 1:11 PM #: “I heard that fellow who used to hang out by Purity looking for gifts used to be a DF sniper. Can put him back to work shooting the tyres.”

    You’ll probably have to hold a séance to contact him.

    Like

  • @Crusoe: “If he is clean, he will shoot the tyres. If he is not…ah well.

    LOL… But with regards to “heavy equipment”… It would be fairly simple for law enforcement to subpoena Cellular Location Data from the carriers. Could be anonymized by the carriers (e.g. MD5 or SHA1 one-way Hash with a Salt) such that the actual individual isn’t identified until after the data is analyzed, and the authorities ask (by way of a Judge) “tell us who his person who was driving up and down the highways at unlawful speed is”.

    Doubt this will ever actually happen, though. We have many laws; very little enforcement of same…

    Like

  • @ Artax March 23, 2021 1:17 PM

    But but Artax, why are you flying off the handle and hitting the superfluously stupid innocuous miller in the face?

    We all know that based on your many years of experience in the Bajan business environment you are the resident expert on ‘things regulatory’ in Bim.

    That’s the only reason why you were asked to shed light on the registration of vehicles matter. It was not intended to cast any negative aspersions on your intelligence like the ‘MIA’ journalist guy with the overseas Bajan condition.

    Since there is no mandatory requirement or system to enforce compliance we know now why the police can say that there are approx. 130,000 vehicles in Bim with many of them uninsured for third party purposes as is the legal requirement for all vehicles.

    Like

  • Another view.

    [video src="https://barbadosunderground.files.wordpress.com/2021/03/springgarden.mp4" /]

    Like

  • Far from it. “Don’t believe everything you read on BU.” However, similarly to “the ‘MIA’ journalist guy with the overseas Bajan condition,” I’ll give you my ‘litany of woes.’

    I’ve never promoted myself as the “resident expert on ‘things regulatory’ in Bim.”

    That is a fabrication. I can’t even count to ten without making a mistake.

    One BU regular, “self-identified as a male, forgot that I also claimed to be lawyer, when I’ve never been one. ”
    Another buffoon said I’m “an appallingly ignorant bookkeeper that learnt by rote” and “a cyber-bully and cyber-stalker who is in need of psychiatric help.”
    “It takes a special kind of BU regular to try to insult a person by accusing him of not knowing the difference between the stock market and the economy,” when I never made any correlation between the two.
    One idiot said I do not “know the disciplinary body for accountants in the UK. How stupid can someone be?”

    “But, there is a certain slimy kind of pig that likes to score points, even if they make it up to get a cheap laugh.”

    “When people cannot debate with you they resort to all kinds of tricks, including throwing stones from the sidelines. But they really do not want to debate, they are cyberstalkers, a criminal offence in most jurisdiction.”

    Like

  • ArtaxMarch 23, 2021 1:21 PM Sorry, did not realise that he has gone to the great beyond. RIP.

    Chris HalsallMarch 23, 2021 1:24 PM

    That is a very good point. The cellular data and GPS should be used to identify and prosecute the offenders. Note sure if that law exists i.e. re using GPS and location data.

    I wonder how many criminals actually remember to leave their cellphone at home, when out?

    Like

  • @Crusoe: “The cellular data and GPS should be used to identify and prosecute the offenders. Note sure if that law exists i.e. re using GPS and location data.

    Please note that as far as I am aware the local Carriers don’t actually receive the GPS data stream from their clients’ phones. That’s collected by Google (Android) and/or Apple (iOS), and any installed Apps which have been given the appropriate permissions by the users.

    WRT the relevant Law, please see the BB Data Protection Act et al. Additionally, sovereign law enforcement always has access to much deeper datasets, if appropriately requested and managed.

    Like

  • @ DMX says “Stop Snitching”

    Where the Hood At x Ruff Ryders Anthem

    Like

  • I guess when there is virtually no chance of winning a nobel prize a Darwin award may seem like the next best thing. If its not the horrible roads , the coctail crowd a mechanical issue or just bad timing. We is gonna cull the herd. Every cloud has a silver lining if they pull out into a zr drivers lane you are going to have the first bajan in space.

    Like

  • @555dubstreet et al… Wow. I heard some words I don’t like hearing watching that…

    IMO, it’s very cool being one’s own person.

    On the other hand, it’s not cool endangering others. Nor fouling the commons.

    Like

  • This Is America
    Lyrics:
    This is America
    Don’t catch you slippin’ now
    Don’t catch you slippin’ now
    Look what I’m whippin’ now
    This is America (Woo)
    Don’t catch you slippin’ now
    Don’t catch you slippin’ now
    Look what I’m whippin’ now

    Todd Terry x Louie Vega x Kenny Dope Remix

    Like

  • @555dubstreet et al… LOL…

    I see your YouTube links. And raise…

    Like

  • Hopefully those Canadiennes on the blog can explain if this is a widespread practice and if not how was it arrested.

    Like

  • Boy….you bajans are everywhere

    Like

  • Donks, Gripe and Josh

    The police have earned respect and do a good job with inadequate pay under trying working conditions.

    They drop the ball with the wheelie men who break the law with impunity and pose serious danger to the lives of road users, pedestrians and drivers.

    Any ordinary man in the street witnesses dirt bike cyclists without helmets do the most scary wheelies, eg racing in the wrong direction on one way roads. The police on patrol see the crazy stunts too.

    The police commissioner reportedly said a ban on dirt bikes was coming. What is the latest commissioner ?

    Communities live in fear of the wheelie men as they speed through little gaps filled with children and old people.

    The Attorney General talks about everything except violent crime he dont speak about the unruly cyclists.

    It is unacceptable that little effort is made by law enforcement to curb the wild behavior.

    The wheelie riders with the ear splitting noise machines are as scary as any gun man.

    Compensation for property damage ,injury or worst is unlikely from uninsured unlicensed cyclists.

    The police, working with insurance companies, importers and the AG should bring these dangerous practices to a halt. Is there the political will?

    Like

  • @David: “Hopefully those Canadiennes on the blog can explain if this is a widespread practice and if not how was it arrested.

    This Canuck can’t speak to your question. I immigrated from Canada twenty years ago, and none of my friends nor family live in TO (only one friend lives in Vancouver).

    It might be safe to say, however, that the phenomenon of young people thinking themselves immortal likely exists just about everywhere…

    Like

  • @Hants
    Over to you

    Toronto police have charged a dump truck driver captured in a shocking TikTok video Tuesday pushing a Mini Cooper “over half a kilometre” onto the westbound lanes of the Gardiner Expressway

    The dump truck and Mini Cooper collided at the ramp to the westbound expressway. The larger truck then continued up the ramp and onto the Gardiner, “pushing the vehicle sideways the entire way,” said Campbell

    https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2021/03/24/dump-truck-driver-charged-after-pushing-mini-cooper-over-half-a-kilometre-onto-the-gardiner-expressway.html?li_source=LI&li_medium=star_web_ymbii

    Like

  • Mascoll tipped to lead transit talk
    Government’s economic advisor, Ambassador Dr Clyde Mascoll will be spearheading discussions on the proposed new transit system.
    During the Estimates debate last week, Minister of Transport Ian Gooding-Edghill said Government could no longer afford to subsidise public transport, adding the establishment of a Mass Transit Authority was in the works.
    On Wednesday, Information and Communications Officer of the Alliance of Operators of Public Transport Mark A. Haynes said they were waiting on a date to meet with Mascoll. “Dr Mascoll is supposed to roll out the entire framework for the mass transit network, hopefully within the next few weeks. Nothing has been outlined to us as yet but based on what they say, we will then be able to better respond. We are looking forward to that meeting,” he said.
    Haynes said he remained hopeful that whatever the plans were for the Mass Transit Authority, they would redound to the benefit of the Public Service Vehicle (PSV) sector.
    “We are not sure if Government is looking to divest completely from the Transport Board but we believe this may be the case, where they will pass the responsibility for the board to private concessionaires,” he said.
    In the meantime, the AOPT officer lamented the reduced capacity PSV operators were recently mandated to carry due to COVID-19 protocols, adding he hoped this too would be rectified soon once it was safe to do so.
    Not word yet
    “We have no word as yet as to when this will be lifted and that has implications on the sector as well as on the travelling public. I hope the next announcement by the Prime Minister will allow us to revert to 100 per cent, once it is safe,” he said.
    However, Haynes admitted there were still many people without jobs or working from home so the ridership would not be what it once was, full capacity or not. At any rate, he said the PSV sector should be taken into consideration.
    “We are still not earning the money we need to earn. Some vehicles are off the road or are working reduced hours. We have to navigate the times and we hope when the all-clear is given for people to get back to work, the PSVs will be back at 100 per cent capacity, if not before,” he said.
    Haynes assured the public the PSV operators were adhering to the safety and health protocols, despite some early setbacks.
    Chairman of the Association of Public Transport Owners Kenneth Best was previously quoted in the media as saying he had to check with his board before making any comments on the Mass Transit Authority. When contacted Wednesday evening, he said he was in the midst of just such a board meeting and would comment later. (CA)

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • Missing man suffered ‘meltdown’
    by SHERIA BRATHWAITE sheriabrathwaite@nationnews.com
    WHEN TROY ANTONIO KING lost his only means of earning an income, he just could not face his elderly mother and 19-year-old son.
    The 46-year-old packed a bag and left home during the curfew hours last Friday and said nothing to them.
    King, who lives in Free Hill, Josey Hill, St Lucy, was reported missing to the police. A bulletin was issued stating he left home between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. on Saturday.
    Yesterday evening, a MIDWEEK NATION team encountered him in Speightstown, St Peter, on his way to the District ‘E’ Police Station.
    Holding back tears and at times lost for words, King explained how he reached the point where he walked away, resting at random places that offered some comfort, unable to face those he loved.
    Cut-throat industry
    “The public sector vehicle industry is a real cut-throat thing,” he said. “I complained to the authorities that the 3D vans, which are supposed to be turning around by the airport, are going up Eastbourne, Long Bay, Kirtons, The Crane and Wellhouse (all in St Philip). The men went and told the police and Transport Authority that the van I lease was not up-todate with insurance or road tax . . . . On Friday while I was waiting in line to make the trip to Sam Lord’s Castle in the afternoon, the police pulled me off the road.”
    King said he was disheartened because he was unaware that the van owner’s paperwork was not right and at that moment he knew he no longer had a job.
    Clutching his red drawstring bag close to his chest, he said at that moment all he could think about was his mother and son’s wellbeing and the fact that he would not be able to pay bills or provide for them.
    He promptly gave the owner of the van his keys, went home, washed his clothes, packed a bag and left.
    Very worried
    “I was upset; this thing worried me so much. I told myself there was nothing for me. I didn’t even call home because I couldn’t face my family,” he said, his head hung low.
    King said he wandered around, lodging anywhere he felt comfortable, looking for anywhere to lay his head.
    “I slept by the Seventh-Day Adventist Church in Mile-and-a-Quarter, St Peter. Then I slept by Barclays Park, St Andrew; King George V Memorial Park; in the cane ground out Thicketts and Foursquare; and the abandoned buildings I slept in were between Mangrove and Ruby, all in St Philip,” he said.
    King said what also contributed to his meltdown was his fondness for public transportation and the fact that he was working hard for several years to lead a new life after serving time in jail.
    “I always had a fantasy of buses and in the late ’90s this led me to steal three buses from the Transport Board. I was convicted for a long time.
    “I started all over again and because of that, today I have a minibus licence, tour coach licence, maxi taxi (ZR) licence, taxi and limousine licence. The only licence I don’t have is motorcycle, omnibus or tractor licence. I worked hard to get myself to this point and I am really proud about it,” he said.
    Without going into much detail, King said he leased the van for $300 daily and he was making just enough to contribute to his household needs.
    Since all this unfolded, he said he called several people in the industry asking them for work, but did not receive any favourable answers.
    Several missed calls
    After turning off his cell phone “for quite some time”, King said he turned it back on yesterday morning and saw several missed calls from his mother, friends and members of his church. He added that two people called him while he scrolled through the numbers and encouraged him to go back home and try to shake off what he was feeling. They informed him about the police report and suggested he visit a police station.
    He left the abandoned building in Mangrove, went to Grantley Adams International Airport and caught a bus to Speightstown.
    King said he would be glad for any opportunity to work and appealed to business owners for help.
    He also apologised to his family and loved ones for making them worry.
    “I just needed a timeout and some time alone. I promise not to do it again.”

    Source: Nation

    Like

  • He speaks the truth. Those 3D vehicles are outrunning the legitimate minibuses assigned to that route. The drivers on that route are mostly orderly and reliable but this could make them lose it. There have been numerous complaints lodged with the Transport Authorities and the police yet it continues unabated!

    This smells very fishy!

    But the stupid passengers do not realise that once they catch a vehicle that is off route there will be trouble with insurance coverage in the event of an accident?

    This poor man has successfully rebuilt his life. I wish I had a job to offer him.

    Like

  • @Donna

    A deeply troubling story and one that afflicts many in the prevailing environment. The effect of COVID 19 will be long lasting on people everywhere.

    Like

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