Adrian Loveridge Column – A Time for Change

After writing this column, almost religiously, every week for over ten years and a tourism specific published contribution for over two decades , the almost overwhelming feeling -under the current pandemic situation with a severe lack of good news -is frankly just to give in and stop until meaningful recovery is in clear sight.

But this would of course be defeatist and pander to an increasingly vocal minority that has for some time preached that we, as a country, have become too dependent on a single sector, while albeit at the same time, proffering no viable alternative.

In their own way though, they have a point and perhaps successive Governments have not placed sufficient priority into ensuring that all other arms of our economy were carried along by tourism and its incredible contribution to the building of our country.

Has the time finally come to better evaluate exactly how we can practically involve more people, goods and services to redress this disproportionate imbalance?

Without wishing to harp on what may appear a microscopic and at first perceived inconsequential tiny issue, I would like to return to the subject of serving imported bottled water at Government convened media conferences, which for me highlighted the need to dramatically increase the use of local products where practical.

During my nearly 60 years involved in tourism, what has stood out above all other observations, from the time while working as a humble demi-chef du rang or trainee waiter in one of Britain’s oldest hotels, to finally fulfilling a lifetimes dream into co-owning and managing a boutique hotel, was attention to detail.

A simple example is that certainly in my experience working across more than 70 countries, you could often tell if a particular hotel had a female manager, just by the display of fresh flowers in public places of the property like washrooms. This is not in anyway intended to be sexiest, just that a good manager instinctively knows what impresses their guests of any gender or disposition.

In our very early days on Barbados, I readily accepted that my wife would be a much better hotel manager than I could ever be, in almost every respect. Her degree of attention to detail, empathy to staff and guests, was way above anything that I could ever consistently achieve and it was born-out by the highest possible level of those returning to stay.

And currently, whatever your political leanings or gender preferences, is it now finally the time for our current national leader, together with her team to take the bold step in ensuring there are more tangible mutually advantageous partnerships between all sectors of our economy and reduce the reliance on foreign exchange requirements?

Or do we choose to ignore, during this uniquely challenging period in our history, by failing to address the obvious disparity between our largest industry and its need for goods, services and supplies?

124 comments

  • Unbelievable that we have not done it before. It has been talked and talked about for ages. And the bottled water is the perfect symbol of talk but no action. It is not a minor point.

    One thing though, nobody is proposing that we do away with tourism. We want to reduce our total reliance on it by forays into other, areas some of which have been suggested. I leave it for others to list as I am not au fait with the particulars.

    I see that Caribbean manufacturers have decided to collaborate. Finally. Hopefully agriculture is next.

    Real collaboration between Caricom states is the only way forward. We are simply too small to prosper alone.

    There are also some issues with our tourism systems and product. We need to have the difficult conversations.

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  • @Donna
    That’s the problem, we recycle ideas every two to five years. I was involved in the first or at least one if the first local bottled water businesses. A very young guy asked me to assist with marketing the product.
    This was at least forty years ago. If I recall he also had a locally produced gin.
    The problem is the failure to work smart and build the product. We hear of all these wonderful ideas; they get some press and within two to three years eighty per cent are gone.
    You and others may think I am being funny but Barbados has never been properly marketed as a tourist destination. The hoteliers have fleeced the island and systematically united to destroy small businesses and locally produced products.
    No serious efforts were made until about five years ago to expose and present local menus and our culinary arts.
    In 1986 , I know for a fact, they were taking one flying fish and splitting it in two and selling the meal for $20US.
    They seldom kept their properties in great condition. Paint buckets,wheelbarrows always around the place. Failed to employ enough maids etc.
    That’s why sixty years later, they don’t have one property outside of Sandy Lane and recently Sandals that can really claim to be competitive world wide.
    The sooner we stop depending exclusively on tourism ,the better for the country.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Adrian
    “… now finally the time for our current national leader, together with her team to take the bold step in ensuring there are more tangible mutually advantageous partnerships between all sectors of our economy and reduce the reliance on foreign exchange requirements…”
    +++++++++++++++
    Actually Adrian, it is now time for us to take the bold step in ensuring there are more tangible mutually advantageous partnerships between all sectors of our economy. This Bajan over reliance on Government is a relic of colonialism which guarantees our failure.

    Liked by 1 person

  • And if we are to stop being a kept population with resources to do for self a RADICAL land reform is a prerequisite.
    PLT

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Adrian
    You are correct that attention to detail is the critical skill needed to achieve Objectives and Key Results in a business provided that it is operating in a stable environment.

    If your operating environment is being disrupted by economic crisis or technological change or cultural cataclysm. then attention to detail alone will guarantee your demise… in times like these you must innovate.

    If the new owners of Peaches and Quiet innovate, adapting to long term visitors by modifying suites to be full studio apartments with dedicated Wifi and home office desks, then they will prosper. Otherwise, the business will not survive the coming five years.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Pachamama January 4, 2021 7:49 AM
    No need to wait on the government to enact radical land reform… just use the Land for the Landless (Land Lease) Programme and innovate. You will then drag the Government along behind you in your slipstream toward radical land reform when you achieve critical mass.

    Step 1: use the Land for the Landless (Land Lease) Programme to get to 5 acres of agricultural land with access to water and good southern exposure. http://www.badmc.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/2016/04/AGB_Land-Lease-Programme-Application_06Apr16.pdf

    Step 2: use the Ministry of Energy Sustainable Energy Investment Programme (Energy SMART Fund) to get some concessionary financing compliments of the IDB to bolster your application for a solar farm that sells electricity to the grid. https://www.energy.gov.bb/web/component/docman/doc_download/81-interactive-application-supply-electricity-to-the-public-utility

    Step 3: Use the Enterprise Growth Fund to finance the construction of the solar farm, but with the photovoltaic panels 3 metres off the ground and spaced out so that it creates the optimal partial shade for the crops you are growing underneath. This partial shade reduces water consumption and improves crop yields. Furthermore, the microclimate created by the agricultural use improves solar panel efficiency (see research articles below).
    Elnaz H. Adeh et al. Solar PV Power Potential is Greatest Over Croplands, Scientific Reports 9, Article # 11442 (2019)
    Hassanpour Adeh E, Higgins CW, Selker JS. Remarkable solar panels Influence on soil moisture, micrometeorology and water-use efficiency. PLoS One (2018)

    Step 4: Use the steel framework that supports the overhead solar panels to also support a robust electrified fence in order to eliminate predial larceny by both monkeys and humans.

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  • Sigh! We do make it hard, don’t we? I see nothing hard about it at all.

    Liked by 2 people

  • On your bottled water comments, I do agree that we should NOT serve bottled water from overseas, but… while tap water here is great, the purified bottled water locally is appalling. The taste is just awful. That’s probably why most hotels go for an overseas brand. Should we just do away with bottled water altogether and go plan B; cold tap water… or discover a local spring.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ Adrian
    I am one of the increasingly vocal minority that has for some time preached that we, as a country, have become too dependent on the tourism sector.

    Back in April I framed my arguments with you as a route map to a Barbados beyond tourism… yet, what my innovation has in fact achieved is a life raft for the self same tourism industry that I was so keen to eliminate. I’m sure you appreciate the irony.

    The Weatherhead owned Sun Group has been among the first to understand that they need to pivot the entire tourism dependent financial empire. They have reconfigured one of their south coast hotels and one of their west coast hotels into re-branded co-living and co-working accommodation. https://www.welcomenhome.com/

    ECO Lifestyle + Lodge, formerly known as Sea-U Guest House in Bathsheba, has entered into a partnership with Outsite, an international provider of co-living spaces, community, and perks designed for remote workers and creatives with 17 locations around the world. https://www.outsite.co/locations/barbados

    This is the future of the Barbados tourism industry. We need to find ways to ensure that colossal mistakes like the Hyatt on Carlisle Bay never get built.

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  • @ peterlawrencethompson January 4, 2021 7:42 AM

    That is exactly my point. There is indeed a connection between mental and economic dependence on the welfare state and slavery or serfdom. This is not only the case in the Caribbean, but also in many parts of Europe (keyword serfdom). Americans alone are not affected by this curse. Hence their scepticism about the welfare state.
    Conclusio: We must dismantle the Barbadian deep welfare state and liberate the inmates of the modern Drax Plantation.

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  • @ peterlawrencethompson January 4, 2021 9:04 AM

    It is good that you are speaking out loudly in support of the new settlement policy. I remember talking to local businessmen 10 years ago who calculated for me how many expats we need for sufficient inflow of capital.

    What is clear is that our local economy alone is not viable. More than 50 years of blind insular nationalism cannot hide the fact that we are sliding into insolvency again after 2018.

    We have to be smart here. As smart as the richest Swiss cantons that used to be desperately poor but are now brimming with money thanks to foreign investors. Smartness is not a question of nationality or ethnicity, but of strategy.

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  • PLT

    Yes, yours may a good idea for some we admit. However, these kind of schemes were around for decades with limited utility.

    In our way of thinking ownership of large tracts of land by the currently landless is only the beginning. Production however would not be sustainable if markets are constructed for cheap imports, for example.

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  • @PLT, I do not know if that land for landless program is still functioning. We applied since mid last year. Tried following up but did not even get a response.

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  • @PLT
    @Tron

    Are we not barking up the wrong tree? CoVid should be an opportunity to review the way we live, to re-assess our core values. For example, to redefine wealth from its materialistic conception to a moral one.
    Why do we put a higher value on a lawyer than on a nurse, for example? Had our CoVid policy been a precautionary one from as early as March, instead of patting ourselves on the back for how brilliant we were in controlling the virus, we would have been in a better place.
    Plan for the worst, hope for the best; a simple principle of risk management, whether health, financial or technological. That is why air safety is one of the best, if not the best, in the modern era. Airline staff are encouraged to report every incident without fear it would impact on their careers.
    Equally, if Barbados had an epidemiological model that was communicated to the general public (sanitising, facial masks, social distance is a universal principle), with proper and fair enforcement, the nation would have been better protected.
    Instead, we are trapped in a cultist mass hysteria with chants of the Goddess can do no wrong. A people who cherish education so much can be found wanting when it comes time to put on our thinking caps.
    It is a moral imperative that we should battle to reduce the risk to lives, rather than saving the tourism business and with it a few badly managed hotels.
    This is also a good time to look again at the notion of economic growth and what it entails. Our politicians do not have to queue for food at a food bank; they do not have to struggle every month with having to pay bills or feed their children; their relative wealth puts them in a privileged position. That too should be part of our national conversation.
    We need to look again at material wealth versus moral wealth. CoVid has increased wage differentials, it has reduced opportunities for the poor and disconnected, it tells us that the people in the frontline of this uncontrollable virus are often the lowest paid.
    When this government could pour Bds$300m in to saving these incompetent hotels, most of which will be switched to private bank accounts, many of them overseas, what does it say to poor people?
    Wealth gives people opportunities, it allows people who fall to get up again, wealth reduces panic attacks because if you know you can replace an item you have nothing to worry about.
    There are other conceptions of wealth apart from the scarred, one-dimensional one of economic wealth. Someone raised the issue of fiscal space during the summer, but is yet to tell us what he meant. How about taxing inheritance? Unearned wealth?
    We know that long periods of unemployment between the ages of 16 and 25 makes you highly unemployable for the rest of your life. What is government doing about this?
    CoVid has also given us an opportunity to re-evaluate life and what it means; it gives us an opportunity to re-assess pensioner poverty and working poverty, when men and women go out to work every day and still cannot make ends meet; it also raises questions about the uncertainty of work, with the new gig economy and everything it stands for.
    Wealth increases much faster than incomes, just ask the G4S security guards; or the survivors of the man who died after working for a leading company for 30 years and his family still could not afford to pay for his funeral.
    We have a choice: silly personal attacks on people we only know from their IDs on BU, repeating how clever and better off we are than anyone else, create total fabrications so we could attack the very lies we have created, or have a serious discussion about the society we will like to be.
    The decision is ours.

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  • (Quote):
    This is the future of the Barbados tourism industry. We need to find ways to ensure that colossal mistakes like the Hyatt on Carlisle Bay never get built. (Unquote).
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    ‘Colossal mistake’ or more like a figment of someone’s fertile imagination?

    Which jackass for an investor, whether local or foreign, would sink US$ 175 million (and skyrocketing) into an industry which in its present incarnation is on its last legs, as you quite presciently pointed out?

    Isn’t the old Four Seasons project now appearing to be a more attractive proposition in light of the current and projected circumstances for the long-term in the leisure and travel markets?

    There is absolutely nothing wrong with revisiting that project located on one of the most attractive sites on the West (former platinum) Coast of the Island?

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  • @ Hal
    How can we achieve anything when our intellects remain tied to Eighteenth century Eurocentric economic theories ?

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  • @ Hal Austin January 4, 2021 9:50 AM

    I will take off my foolscap for once …

    No one is forcing local citizens to burn their money on oversized SUVs that are far too wide for our island roads. No one is forcing them to buy expensive foreign water when filtered local water is just as good.

    The solution to less consumption can only be, first, to finally devalue the Barbados dollar to a level commensurate with local low productivity and, second, to bring salaries in line with market value. There is nothing wrong with paying guards, rubbish pickers and nurses better because they add value to society – provided they join together in a union and thus earn a higher wage. A state minimum wage, on the other hand, would be counterproductive because it weakens the unions and tempts employers to always pay only this minimum wage.

    I don’t see this added value with well over 1000 lawyers on the island. 200 would be perfectly adequate, since our indigenous population in its poverty has nothing to inherit anyway.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin January 4, 2021 9:50 AM
    “… an opportunity to re-evaluate life and what it means…”
    +++++++++++++++++
    I completely agree with you Hall.

    However, most Black Bajans remain in thrall of the religious mythologies bequeathed them by their colonial oppressors, completely entrapped by the “White is right” mindset, and devoted to a consumer lifestyle. It will take longer than I have left in this body to emancipate Black Bajans from this mental slavery, so I pursue incremental half measures intended to ameliorate the economic deprivation that Barbados is heading for in the meantime. I’m not a pessimist, but I am a realist.

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  • Peter look, giving good land to people who have the desire but do not have the skills, equipment or knowledge to have it produce year after year seem like the Mugabe effect. Some things are best left to the professionals. fugu preparation for one I do like your idea of giving your people the opportunity to win a Darwin award by electrifying metal around solar farm , do you think your idea could be adapted to burglar bars or drain pipes .

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Tron January 4, 2021 10:31 AM
    I heartily welcome you sans foolscap to this critical discussion. I understand your impulse to punish our foolish compatriots who can afford to waste national resources on imported giant SUVs and bottled water. However, devaluation is a blunt weapon which will impose much more hardship on the bottom 20% of income earners who are already living in poverty than it will discipline the top 10% of relatively wealthy people that you say you are aiming at.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @PLT

    Two points. Re-evaluating our values has nothing to do with anything bequeathed by our former colonial masers and nonsense about white is right. It has a lot to do with an outdated mindset. Let us start thinking from scratch.
    The second point is your economic notion that devaluation will impact the bottom 20 per cent more than the rest of society. Plse direct me to the author of such a theory.

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  • @ Tron

    I fully agree with what you have said. We have over 1000 lawyers at the bar, but a lot more who are qualified, working in-house and at other occupations. It is a waste of taxpayers’ money, which is why most lawyers defraud their clients.
    As to our power as consumers, again you are right. But it does not fit in with the mindset of the Barbadian consumer, who believe it is their money and they can spend it as they like. It is the Bajan Condition.
    It is the result of the cognitive damage done by education by rote; we measure success or failure through having crazy SUVs, compete with bull bars, big houses and overseas travel three times a year..
    The last time I saw a kangaroo in Barbados he was a politician, yet we allow those dangerous bull bars on our motor vehicles.
    Our sense of consumer rights is so poor that we allow the banks to treat us like filth to get access to our own money, and not a word of protest, either for queuing for ages to get our money, or paying for every little so-called service. We allow lawyers to overcharge us without a word of protest.
    And it is not in the interest of governments (DLP or BLP) to improve this situation, as long as they play footsies with the Social Partnership.
    Just look at how this incompetent government is playing with the corrupt hotel sector.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    Hal AustinJanuary 4, 2021 10:52 AM
    Our outdated mindset is our clinging to colonial values. They are one and the same. This is thinking from scratch. Where do you think our outdated mindset originated?? thin air??

    Liked by 1 person

  • The tourism industry will continue to evolve and diversify but traditional tourists will remain a big part of the industry.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal AustinJanuary 4, 2021 10:52 AM
    My economic notion that currency devaluation will impact the bottom 20 per cent more than the rest of society is something that I worked out by myself, but it so happens that mainstream economists agree with me on this point. Mainstream economists are often wrong, but on this point they are correct 😉

    The major and immediate effect of currency devaluation is rampant price inflation, both for imported goods as well as for domestically produced ones since they experience an immediate demand spike caused both by attempts at import substitution as well as by the fact that many inputs to local production, from energy to raw materials to fertilisers, are themselves imported.

    The bottom 20% of income earners are the ones most vulnerable to runaway inflation because they have no assets or savings. Wealthier people often have assets such as property which escalates in monetary value along with inflation and this cushions the shock for them. The rich White boys with their giant $150,000 Toyota pickups valued at $90,000 on the secondhand market will have to pay $8 per litre to fill them up, but so will the ZR drivers so bus fare will go to at least $5. However, since a new Toyota pickup now costs $300,000 the White boy’s pain is ameliorated by the fact that his pickup is now worth $180,000 on the 2nd hand market.

    The rational arguments in favour of devaluation centre around the increased competitiveness of exports, but this is only an advantage if firstly, we had significant manufacturing export industries, and secondly, if those export industries could quickly and dramatically ramp up production to take advantage of increased demand. The only significant manufacturing export industry we have that is not entirely dependent on imported raw materials is our rum distilling industry. No matter how much you increase its competitiveness next wee, it is still going to take 12 years to manufacture a 12 year old rum, so it is impossible to ramp up production quickly.

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  • @ peterlawrencethompson January 4, 2021 10:47 AM

    Of course, currency devaluation works as brutally as chemotherapy or radiation for cancer. I also never claimed that the social consequences are not harsh.

    But if we don’t want that, we should at least implement other measures. We should limit the cubic capacity and size of cars on the island, e.g. to 1 litre cubic capacity and a maximum length of 4 metres. Furthermore, we need massive funding of solar energy, because the sun always shines on our island. The ban on selling water bottles with foreign water would also be worth considering. Furthermore, banning foreign fast food chains would massively save lives on the island. That’s just one example.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ PLT

    The issue of colonialism and so-called white power are looking back. If you re-read my submission you will see I am suggesting that we talk about the kind of society we will like post-CoVid. One is looking back, and the other looking forward.
    No Barbadian under the age of 60 has had any experience of colonialism.
    A new mindset comes through the ability to ignore received wisdoms and think for one self, critical thinking. That is the mission of education, not just repeating what you have been told.
    We need people with new ideas to lead the national conversation, since this crop of politicians and our academics have failed the nation. An obsession with colonial wrongs and reparation will bind us to the past. Take a deep breath, look at the present society and come up with ideas for change.
    Still waiting for the source of your economics of devaluation.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @EnuffJanuary 4, 2021 11:14 AM
    “The tourism industry will continue to evolve and diversify but traditional tourists will remain a big part of the industry.”
    ++++++++++++++++
    And you know this because you have the world’s only flawless crystal ball? or perhaps you consulted Psychic Astra Clairvoyant 425-4370 from the Nation Classified section today.

    The only thing that is constant is change… you sound exactly like the wise men I talked to back in the 1970s who assured me with absolute confidence that the sugar industry would obviously be the centre of the Barbados agricultural economy when my grandchildren were alive.

    They were completely wrong. You are completely wrong. You both based you predictions on your hopes rather than on facts. Take a look at the facts… please.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @PLT

    Thanks. I thought the your notion of devaluation was your own. Thanks for confirming. There is no need for further discussion.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Hal Austin January 4, 2021 11:38 AM
    I am agreeing with you Hal. We need to look forwards not backwards. We need to break the old mindset. “A new mindset comes through the ability to ignore received wisdoms…” EXACTLY! We must “… think for one self, critical thinking. That is the mission of education…” ABSOLUTELY!” “We need people with new ideas to lead the national conversation…” yes we do, and I’m doing my best in my own tiny, idiosyncratic way.

    I was just pointing out from whom we received those ‘wisdoms’ and emphasising that we need to ignore such received ‘wisdoms’.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I agree with Peter We aspire to be like the white people over and away.

    As I had to tell a certain person just a few days ago – my idea of success is not Eurocentric. I see no need for more, more, more! Indeed I have never travelled overseas to shop and bring back stupid trinkets. I took most of my holidays to coincide with school vacations to do volunteer work with “my” children. My house is not small but not large by today’s standards. I have never bought an SUV. I have plenty of mauby in my cupboard but no champagne.

    Some of my very best memories are of my “escapades” with those children and I feel I have “done something with my life”. I am happy.

    But some drop remarks that suggest they are a little confused about the definition of success. They seem a little contradictory.

    I call it the Overseas Bajan Condition. Seriously, I think SOME people have it worse than stay-at-home Bajans. I think the white man has infiltrated some minds and given them a second dose.

    The symptoms are that they don’t know if they are fish or fowl. They claim to be concerned about Bajans but they seem to have no respect for them.

    Indeed they cannot make an otherwise constructive comment without diagnosing us with a peculiar Bajan Condition or even without dropping derogatory remarks like an old time woman at the standpipe.

    Then they claim total innocence just like the white Englishman and expect to be believed and deferred to. As though we can’t see what they do. And they expect not to be challenged.

    Cuhdear Bajan correctly called it an expectation of white privilege

    Just like the white man! Just like the British “star” and her “massive misunderstanding”.

    Now, before I am accused of wanting to “pick a fight”, let me black out the stupid remarks deliberately dropped to provoke precisely the “personal attacks” the hypocrite claims to rail against and be the bigger “man”. I’ll let him be the “woman”.

    Henceforth I shall “ignore” and continue with rational and constructive discussion.

    And one final dig I cannot resist.

    He may have the last word.

    (Whispering – let’s see if he can “man” up and shut up.)

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin January 4, 2021 11:51 AM
    “I thought the your notion of devaluation was your own.”
    ++++++++++++++
    It does not matter whose notion it is, all that matters is that it is correct… and it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin January 4, 2021 11:51 AM
    “I thought the your notion of devaluation was your own.”
    After all Hal, I am simply following your excellent advice about how to build the “kind of society we will like post-CoVid.”
    I am a devotee of developing a new mindset, so I did not refer you to the many expert economists who happen to agree with me, even though that is what you appeared to be requesting when you said “Plse direct me to the author of such a theory.” Instead I opted to follow your other wisdom and use my new mindset. “A new mindset comes through the ability to ignore received wisdoms and think for one self, critical thinking.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Oh hell!

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  • PLT
    None of the above because like you I look at the facts too.

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  • @ William

    Here is a chance to develop a new road map for the nation. We are missing an opportunity created by the CoVid crisis.

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  • Carson C Cadogan

    This is the time for change.

    It is more than time for the 97% of the Barbados population THE BLACK PEOPLE to be given a bigger slice of the FINANCIAL cake. This situation of the 3% of the Barbados population , the WHITE BAJANS AND THE INDIANS have got to come to an end.

    A TINY slither of the Barbados population ruling BLACK PEOPLE HAS GOT TO , stop. These people are not even very smart.

    What ever we come up with must be in favour of the majority of the population, the 97% of the population of Barbados, THE BLACK PEOPLE. For a change giving the MARIJUANA TRADE to the WHITE BAJANS AND INDIANS is a no, no, those regulations must be thrown thru the window and start fresh. Making another MODERN DAY plantation for WHITE BAJANS AND INDIANS is not acceptable. So come again. You BLACK SELLOUTS in the Barbados Labour Party Govt. got act differently.

    We simply refused to be SLAVES AGAIN.

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  • Carson C Cadogan

    These WHITE BAJANS AND INDIANS can only survive in docile Barbados where the 3% of the population were the most BRUTAL TO OUR ANCESTORS.

    We must not reward their descendants like we are doing now.

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  • Carson C Cadogan

    And now the Barbados Labour Party Govt. is blaming BLACK BARBADIANS for what is going on in the Country. They are are no to be blamed. It is the Leadership of the Barbados Labour Party Govt.

    You have foolishly listened to the WHITE BAJANS AND INDIANS and opened the Country to whosever will to come in with their disease selves and spread that diseases.

    Now the Barbados Labour Party Govt. is shamelessly blaming BLACK PEOPLE .

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Enuff January 4, 2021 1:37 PM
    “… like you I look at the facts too.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++
    Excellent. Please share with us the facts you looked at to predict that “traditional tourists will remain a big part of the industry.” Over what time frame is this prediction valid? 3 years? 10 years? 30 years? What constitutes “a big part” in your estimation? 80%? 50%? 30%? 10%?

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  • @Peter

    Enuff maybe extrapolating from the incoming travel data for November and December 2020.

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  • @ David.

    Extrapolating data on arrivals when covid is still in full force is like me forecasting dry weather for the next 3 months because today sunny.

    No one can predict tourism activity simply because our home markets can be shut down at anytime if infections spike. It’s the unknown factor that makes predictions in tourism not worth listening to.

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  • @ PLT
    “The rational arguments in favour of devaluation centre around the increased competitiveness of exports, but this is only an advantage if firstly, we had significant manufacturing export industries, and secondly, if those export industries could quickly and dramatically ramp up production to take advantage of increased demand. The only significant manufacturing export industry we have that is not entirely dependent on imported raw materials is our rum distilling industry. No matter how much you increase its competitiveness next wee, it is still going to take 12 years to manufacture a 12 year old rum, so it is impossible to ramp up production quickly.“(Quote)

    This is the exact argument I have been making for twenty five years. The only reason Trinidad survived devaluation was its oil industry. Devaluation has destroyed the Guyana economy and has literally sunk Jamaica’s. The Barbados economy is stronger than both.
    Yesterday , I read that COVID had cost the Jamaica economy 76 Billion Jamaica dollars. How much of that is “ real” money? The IMF has been in Jamaica for forty two years.
    We need to move toward a common regional currency. My whole argument is that I would prefer to support a great economic struggle for the next twenty five years and emerge with a vibrant new order, than remain in this dependency/ mendicant economic state.
    We need a new regional economic order but we have no leadership. Your argument is sound however we look at it.
    The problem with us is that we want change but we want everything to remain the same. We are afraid of our shadow.

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  • @John A

    You are correct to a point. The argument being made by enuff is that when heed immunity takes effect there is a reasonable expectation based on demand for travel during Covid that numbers will bounce quickly. It does not mean we should not reduce reliance on tourism kind you.

    Like

  • @ David.

    It’s not that simple either. Remember the hope is the vaccine will have a 90% success rate. So what is 10% of the American population alone? It’s over 20 million. So if let’s say every human in the USA was vaccinated which is impossible, there will still be 20 million plus Americans who could transmit the virus. The vaccine is a good thing but it is not a cure.

    Also we do not know how long the vaccine will work for. Will it be 3 months, six months a year? Will a vaccine resistant strain present itself, if in fact one is not out there already?

    The safest thing we can do is reduce our dependancy on tourism full stop. Expand our agriculture and alternative energy base and go forward on the basis that a USD saved on imports is the same as a USD earned in tourism.

    Like

  • @John A

    It has been established that we will still still need to observe covid protocol and in the meantime we have to work at vaccinating our people. Mia gotthis!

    Like

  • @William

    With great respect, what you say makes political sense, but it is economically wrong and for a variety of reasons, which I will try to explain.
    If we have a high current account imbalance, which overflows in to the debt to GDP ratio, devaluation makes the cost of imported goods more expensive. It will also put the brakes on travelling and spending overseas extravagantly.
    It will also make our tourism ‘product’ (what an awful word) less expensive, thereby attracting more visitors and encourage them to spend more. There is a long literature on this, since the formation of the Brettons Woods organisation, which I will not bore you with. I recommend one, that is a 1953 paper by the rightwing Milton Friedman on exchange rates.
    Our export market is small, and what there is is mainly trading down the islands, which would not have a great impact on the economy.
    In any case, we must include internal devaluation in our calculations. For example, the G4S security guards did not have a pay rise for allegedly seven years, whatever the rate of inflation that is effectively a pay cut.
    A better argument is that devaluation may increase the cost of servicing our considerable debt, most of which is denominated in US dollars. But that is not inevitable. The Debt can be restructured, as per White Oaks, or the printing of money, the only risk of which is asset inflation.
    We control that by limiting what banks can lend and establishing a prices and incomes commission to control all price and wage increases.
    As to its effect on the export of rum, our only genuine international product, it will be minimal. Barbadian (Bajan) rum is a premium product and those who want it will buy it.
    I can go on about rum and the international market, but to do so on BU will only be providing free ideas to the white rum producers.
    The suggestion that devaluation will impact the lowest 20 per cent of workers is simply an economic myth, lacking in evidence. Devaluation will re-energise the economy and create more jobs, mostly low-paid, but jobs nevertheless.
    I do not know anything about Guyana, but CoVid has given us a unique opportunity to discuss the kind of society we want going forward. I have also deliberately left out its impact on the value of property as that could take us away from the substantive issue..

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin January 4, 2021 3:53 PM
    “It will also make our tourism ‘product’ (what an awful word) less expensive, thereby attracting more visitors and encourage them to spend more.”
    ++++++++++++++++++
    BS .. It will make our tourism product less expensive which will mean that the tourists will spend more when it’s denominated in Bajan dollars, but this is supposed to be earning us FX… their spend in Sterling or Euros or USD is constrained by their own economic circumstances, which are depressed. We will simply get more rude entitled racist tourists while, because they are budget tourists rather than high flyers, the spend per visitor declines and our overall FX earnings stay stagnant while we bear the increased environmental, public health, and economic costs of the increased tourist load.

    I am astounded that you quote Milton Friedman… he is so utterly discredited as an economist, in addition to being 70+ years out of date, that his only lasting contribution to public discourse is how to foment a right wing coup by fascist military officers.

    Like

  • @ David.

    Mia ain’t got this at all!

    Based on the fact that permission was given for a bus crawl and that fiasco at Paradise was allowed to not only occur, but proceed for the entire day nobody has this. Add to that the breaches on protocol that have occurred with visitors and nobody ain’t got this.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John A

    From today’s numbers i.e. 170 of the 211 cases prison officers the bus crawl maynot be the source.

    Like

  • @ Hal

    There is no need for devaluation as we have already had a major internal devaluation. If persons have not received a raise for ten 10 years and inflation has run at 3% a year, then an item that cost $100 in real terms would not cost over $135. So the person that is still working for the same $100 would already of had a 35% devaluation in real terms. That’s why if you facture in inflation this ecomomy could be 40% smaller today than 10 years ago. They my friend are frightening numbers!

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal Austin January 4, 2021 3:53 PM
    “Devaluation will re-energise the economy and create more jobs…”
    ++++++++++++++
    More BS. You make this assertion without having provided an iota of evidence or explaining where these jobs will pop up. In tourism? Fat chance because budget tourism is a poor job creator. Beach vending? well we have years of experience trying to grow that with 850,000 cruise visitors per year who sit on the beach, pollute our environment, and spend next to nothing. Prostitution perhaps??

    You correctly point out that “… we must include internal devaluation in our calculations…” Yes, indeed we must because it provides a test case for the economic effect of devaluation. Where is the economic growth that internal devaluation has caused?? Where is the re-energised economy and job creation caused by internal devaluation??

    You have thereby proven your own arguments to be false. QED

    Like

  • @ David

    Yes the crawl is part of the problem but the biggest challenge is going to be the paradise issue. Not only did you have the boats there but all day you had walk in people with coolers coming and going.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Carson C Cadogan

    Mia to address the Nation!!!

    Cant wait to watch her. will she take ALL the credit???? if there is any??? BUT NONE OF THE BLAME????

    Some one,s fault????

    Like

  • @John A

    Indeed a grave situation. We allowed complacency to set in after we were off to a good start. We draw strength however from the fact other islands/countries had to deal with breakouts. This is the nature of fighting COVID 19.

    Like

  • Carson C Cadogan

    That’s what happens when you don’t act in your own peoples interest

    Liked by 1 person

  • @PLT

    I am not sure if you are creating a straw man and then knocking it down. I have not, nor do I talk about the idea of earning foreign currency, apart from that it is nonsense.
    So you do not misunderstand, I have been calling for trading in the credit swap markets (derivatives) for the last 12 years for reasons I will not go in to now. I suggest you read my Notes…some of which ere published on BU. The arguments are still legitimate.
    I did not quote anything from Friedman, I recommended his 1953 essay on devaluation. I do not want to give the impression I am defending Friedman, but as a monetarist heterodox economists obviously oppose him. Where is the discredit?
    Ideas do not go out of date. Each generation interrogates and re-interprets old and not so old ideas. In Barbados we still have a half-baked austerity programme; that is Friedmanite monetarism. You yourself have often talked about monetarism’s influence on Reagan and Thatcher, the last time I had to correct you that Friedman did not have any intellectual influence on Thatcher.
    Just look at the Bible. What right-wing coup did Friedman foment. The Chilean military take over was not at his instigation, even so, as any one who knows about pensions will tell you, the 1981 Chilean pension development has led the rest of the civilised world since then.
    Not a single western government has introduced pensions reforms without paying homage to Chile Does that also make them Fascists?
    These range from the US 401(K), New Zealand’s Kiwisaver, Australia’s superannuation, the UK’s personal accounts and stakeholder, I can go on.
    If you are discussing politics, then do so; economics; then do so; history, then do so. But you are all over the place and getting it wrong.
    If we cannot get the history of ideas right then everything that follows will mislead.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    If anyone wants to read up to date economic analysis of the effects of large currency devaluations on impoverished people rather than the 70 year old neo-fascist propaganda from Milton Freidman it is easy to find.
    *THE DISTRIBUTIONAL CONSEQUENCES OF LARGE DEVALUATIONS by Javier Cravino & Andrei A. Levchenko, NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH, May 2017
    *The Socioeconomic Impacts of Structural Adjustment, by Brian F. Crisp and Michael J. Kelly, International Studies Quarterly Vol. 43, No. 3 (Sep., 1999)
    *PERCEPTION ON THE NAIRA DEVALUATION AND ITS EFFECTS ON POVERTY REDUCTION IN NIGERIA by Uket Eko Ewa (Ph.D), Adesola Wasiu Adebisi (Ph.D) and Agida Joseph Ijing, Department of Accountancy, Cross River University of Technology, Ogoja, Cross River State, Nigeria
    *Effects of devaluation on income distribution by Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee Department of Economics , University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee , Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA

    Like

  • @ David

    Here are some more facts as to why the tourism rebound will be delayed.

    Day before yesterday between the USA and England they had over 270,000 new cases. Record days for both countries since the virus started. Secondly the USA has only vaccinated about 13% of the people they thought they would of by January 3rd, so they are 80% off what they thought would of been actual shot in the arms by now. Europe also is having similar challenges. So their is doubt if any herd immunity can even be reached in 2021 at all, based on the reduced vaccination numbers. Add to this now the fact that one of the vaccinations requires 2 shots.

    With all the facts out there no goverment should bank on any rebound in tourism as their salvation. Also remember the threat of a resistant strain could come along and render these vaccines useless as well. As I said this first quarter will show us the largest percentage contraction in the economy so far. Remember last winter season to March wasn’t bad but this one will be our worst in 20 years. From the second quarter though we will be comparing Apples with apples as both comparative quarters would be post covid. .

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ Hal
    We are not discussing pension reform or monetarism or Thatcher or the Bible. We are talking about the effects of drastic currency devaluation on the living standards of the poorest 20% of Barbadian citizens in 2021.

    You claim that it will “re-energise the economy and create more jobs…” I claim that it will “will impose much more hardship on the bottom 20% of income earners who are already living in poverty…”

    Which claim has more validity? We agree with your assertion that “… we must include internal devaluation in our calculations…” because it forms an experimental test case in local conditions which enable us to test the validity of our contradictory claims. I contend that as you say “the G4S security guards did not have a pay rise for allegedly seven years,” and this imposed much more hardship on these relatively low paid employees as a result of this internal devaluation. I am therefore waiting for you to show data or examples to show how this internal devaluation re-energised the Barbados economy and created more jobs.

    Like

  • England is back in full lockdown

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @TronJanuary 4, 2021 11:35 AM
    “Of course, currency devaluation works as brutally as chemotherapy or radiation for cancer. I also never claimed that the social consequences are not harsh.”
    ++++++++++++++++
    I applaud your honesty… there is none of this snake oil self deception that it will miraculously “re-energise the economy and create more jobs.”

    I myself do not have the stomach for imposing such brutal hardship on the least fortunate of my neighbours.

    I do completely agree with your other policy recommendations to limit the size of vehicles, reduce the oversupply of lawyers, dramatically convert to solar energy, ban bottled water imports, etc.

    In fact I think we should go even further and unilaterally abrogate the constraints we face under the WTO using the COVID pandemic as an excuse. We should observe all the procedural minutiae of giving notice, applying for exemptions, and writing exceptions etc, but we would not be asking for permission, just politely saying “excuse me please.” By the time the gears of international diplomacy grind into action over our insignificant economy it will be 2030 and we will have achieved the social transformation that we seek. (In fact this could consume at least 100 person years of lawyer power just on bureaucratic muddying the WTO waters that is surplus to our requirements to do productive things.)

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    🥅….🥅
    Beware of the shifting sands

    Like

  • So with Boris locking down England completely 45 minutes ago to February 14th I guess there will be no British flights till after the 14th except for repatriation.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @PLT

    You wrote this: “I am astounded that you quote Milton Friedman… he is so utterly discredited as an economist, in addition to being 70+ years out of date, that his only lasting contribution to public discourse is how to foment a right wing coup by fascist military officers….(Quote)
    It was false since I did not quote from Friedman. I suggested one of his essays for possible reading. Should I have ignored that reference?
    You called the Jewish Friedman a Fascist, without any evidence. His only public association with Fascists was with the military in Chile. I pointed out that despite its Fascism, the Chilean pensions policy was the most progressive of its time. Should I have ignored that?
    This is what you said the conversation was about: ”

    @ Hal
    We are not discussing pension reform or monetarism or Thatcher or the Bible. We are talking about the effects of drastic currency devaluation on the living standards of the poorest 20% of Barbadian citizens in 2021….(Quote)”
    Again you have created your own straw man. It certainty was not my conversation. My only mention of Barbados was about the government’s austerity programme, and t hat was in the context of monetarism.
    I was discussing devaluation and its impact of the bottom 20 per cent of the working population. And I am saying that idea is false.
    I also mentioned an effective internal devaluation, but Barbados has never had an official policy of internal devaluation so to measure its impact is meaningless.
    As to the defacto internal devaluation, it can be argued, and I support the idea, that because of extremely low wages, no or little pensions and other benefits, some employers and owners of zombie companies could afford to keep on extra workers. But this is not an official policy and so cannot be measured. I am saying the historical evidence suggests otherwise.
    You say again: ” I am therefore waiting for you to show data or examples to show how this internal devaluation re-energised the Barbados economy and created more jobs…(Quote|)

    Is this a test you are setting me, since it did not form part of my conversation. Again, I was talking about economic theory and history, not about the Barbados economy, except where I used it as an example of austerity in the context of a wild suggestion of a 70 yr old essay..

    Again you state: “………..Where is the economic growth that internal devaluation has caused?…..(Quote)

    Plse give a single example on BU when I called for economic growth. You continue to switch and change from foreign currency to economic growth, neither of which I have ever written about favourably, and fabricate. What growth?
    You must stop it, @PLT. If you want to have a discussion about growth, I am your man, but do not fabricate my arguments. I am on the internet reviewing a book on economic growth by the son of the great economist JK Galbraith. In fact, the author generously expressed his thanks. In fact, the review is critical of the concept of growth.
    Especially for @PLT. Over the last two days I have written a note on how CoVid should trigger a debate on the kind of society we should have.
    It does not include economic growth, the materialist conception of wealth, but moral wealth. I am not in support of economic growth, which is limit ed, but improving the standard of living of ordinary working people. There is a difference.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @ Hal
    This is Barbados Underground… we are talking about Barbados. You are correct, you did not talk about economic growth you talked about a re-energised economy and job creation caused by internal devaluation. I made the assumption that you would measure “re-energised economy” in terms of growth. Forgive me. How do you measure an economy being re-energised?

    You have managed to evade the question I asked right after “Where is the re-energised economy and job creation caused by internal devaluation??” We are still waiting for your answer.

    I completely agree with you that the post COVID society we seek to build should not be based on economic growth. I think that it is an outmoded and cancerous concept. I work to “improving the standard of living of ordinary working people” and that is why I cannot support currency devaluation in Barbados when so many empirical studies show that it will do gross harm to the standard of living of ordinary working people.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    So let us move on to talking about improving the standard of living of ordinary working people in Barbados.

    Like

  • THOSE LIVING WITH THEIR HEAD UP THEIR BACKSIDES ON THE 2 x 3 ISLAND HAVE ANOTHER SURPRISE COMING WITH OPEN BORDERS POLICY

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    South African Covid variant could be resistant to vaccine, expert warns

    The coronavirus variant circulating in South Africa could be resistant to the vaccine, a leading expert has suggested but stressed that it could take just six weeks to develop a new jab if one was needed.

    Sir John Bell, regius professor of Medicine at the University of Oxford, said his “gut feeling” was that the vaccines already on stream would be effective against the new UK strain, which was first identified in Kent.

    But he added: “I don’t know about the South African strain – I think that’s a big question mark.”

    South Africa was put into lockdown last week after President Cyril Ramaphosa said the new variant, 501.V2, appeared to be “more contagious” than the virus that circulated in the first wave.

    Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, said on December 23 that two cases of the South African strain had been identified in the UK. The cases and their contacts were quarantined, and the Government placed strict restrictions on travel from South Africa.

    Speaking on Jan 4, he said he was “incredibly worried” about the South African variant of coronavirus.

    “This is a very, very significant problem,” he said.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/south-african-covid-variant-could-181215979.html

    Like

  • @PLT firms could afford

    I am sorry I did not give an answer you were looking for. I have said there has not been an official policy of internal devaluation in Barbados so it is difficult to measure. I then speculated that we can assume that because of internal devaluation some zombie companies could afford to employ a high number of low-paid people. Is that a good enough answer for you?
    As to improving the standard of living of ordinary working people in Barbados, that is a decision for those people. How would I know what is a good standard for an entire nation?
    I may want to start with the educational system, from nurseries to university, and believe this is a good place to start. Others may think otherwise. That is the purpose of a national conversation.
    I may think a one-car per household may improve the nation’s quality of life, others may want four or five cars; I can go on with suggestions about jobs, housing, health care, etc.
    By the way, you can re-energise an economy with modern monetary ideas, it is sometimes boring reoeating yourself, but here is a simple idea.
    Instead of defaulting on our domestic and external debt, the government should have embarked on a massive infrastructural programme, sending the bulldozers in to the slums and then rebuilding. I have explained this numerous times on BU.
    Such a policy may lead to economic growth and an increase in tourists, but that would not be the aim; the intention would be an improvement in living standards.

    Like

  • plt your right dont devalue you have nothing to sell, let the apt, hotel owners etc find their own price point where they can make a living. There is a silver lining about covid, I just got 5 year mortgage money at 2 .25 percent. If you own property and can renegotiate your debt see if you can extend and blend giving you access to monthly cash. I had been paying on term insurance for 30 years instead of mortgage insurance, just cancelled it freed up 400 a month.. You have to get to know the difference between a want and a need ( that car may last another couple of years) the govt should spend on infrastructure and island beautification putting people to work . This may be hard but like trees in the forest some businesses are going to fall but in short order something else will fill that space once this pandemic gets sorted out dont spend govt money trying to prop them up.

    Like

  • I cancelled my term insurance as soon as my children were old enough to work for themselves.

    Next month will be 22 years since I decided that no car works for me. I was able to provide my children with a much better quality and much greater quantity education; since I had to pay no car loans, no car insurance, no road tax. In 22 years that adds up to a lot of money.

    The only “sufferer” has been the banks which sell car loans, and the companies which sell cars.

    Like

  • @ Hal @ PLT @ John A

    I have heard the term internal devaluation bandied about BU. I don’t think that there has been any determined policy of internal devaluation by any of the administrations.
    We are really saying that more money bought less or was worth less. That has been the norm since the sixties. I think we are going a bit overboard here.
    Why aren’t we discussing how we are going to build a new economy. For example , what role would we expect education to play in such a radical process. How are we going o approach land reform. How are we going to revolutionize our public service. What must be the real role of the private sector in the post COVID era. Unless we are discussing that’s matters, we are actually suggesting that we do the same thing while expecting different results.
    We know where we are today; we’ve got a pretty good understanding of where we will be for the next 5/10 years. However, the real vision should be : where will we be the next 25/50 years.

    Liked by 1 person

  • In a recent FB post by Dr. Robert J Rowen, an MD and Functional Medicine practitioner from Santa Rosa, California, he reports news of the successful use of ozone therapy to treat 4 severely ill Covid-19 patients in a Chinese Hospital.

    I have long said that if you turned the ozone doctor loose in hospitals, you’d turn the nation’s (world’s) “health” cost crisis around extremely quickly. I take hits on this page, including on ozone, but from people who are not witnesses to what oxidation therapies have accomplished. Here is a report from near ground zero in China where ozone therapy healed some pretty sick people and apparently at only 10% the cost of conventional management. Even those hell bent on conventional medicine should take note. Their physical and economic lives and those of their families are also at risk.

    Recently published – excellent clinical study on four Covid patients healed thanks to the administration of oxygen/ozone, published on November 25 in the journal Innovation (NY).

    “”” The protocols were carried out at the Haihe hospital of Tianjin University, one of the most prestigious institutes in China.
    Under the title “Recovery of Four COVID-19 Patients via Ozonated Autohemotherapy”, the authors reported treating four Covid patients hospitalized in serious condition and completely healed after undergoing oxygen/ozone therapy.

    Of the four patients (age group 56-77 years; two women), two were smokers and three had no pre-existing medical conditions.
    At the time of admission, the four patients had fever, cough, shortness of breath and diarrhea and had been receiving oxygen by mask. Comprehensive analyzes were performed during hospitalization. Shortly after the start of ozone autohemotherapy, all laboratory parameters returned to normal and those relating to the infection were significantly reduced.

    All patients improved through complete recovery.

    More: facebook(DOT)com/DrRobertJRowen/posts/1457562827775047?cft[0]=AZUhI7HtkqhQR62wjzCPF2m4lMEg8gSDtTZwFao7QyQmVPy-ow-cjTfE9BOzkQcMNlAnrx03oqeYIqJ619J-AAU3ujuQxe6CyjCTByblHN9665uB6eDQJM6ebeLyCmIyl5JPvqyfSzbZ3CEI4iVDNVIP&tn=%2CO%2CP-R

    Here is a short excerpt from another, longer FB post by a different author giving some of the history behind ozone therapy and the difficulties encountered getting this non-patentable treatment option approved as a legitimate therapy by medical authorities and regulators.

    The Covid Nightmare: A Quick Solution Out Of The Pandemic
    Marc J. Seifer, Ph.D.
    © 12/28/2020 – Mseifer@verizon.net

    In April of 2020, after learning of the success Ozone Therapists were having in treating Covid-19 in over a dozen hospital in Italy, a Texas health clinic began to offer Ozone Therapy as a treatment for Covid-19. The FDA moved swiftly, and well before the month was out, a federal court slapped on a permanent injunction preventing this clinic from using “so-called ozone therapy as a treatment for Covid-19.” Taking what they presented as the moral high ground, the FDA proclaimed that this health clinic “preyed on public fear, peddling bogus treatments that had absolutely no effect against Covid-19…. As we’ve said in past Covid-19 cases: The Department of Justice will not permit anyone to exploit a pandemic for personal gain.” Assistant Attorney General Jody Hunt of the Justice Department’s Civil Division went on, stating, “The Department of Justice will not stand by and permit the fraudulent promotion of supposed Covid-19 treatments that do no good and that could be harmful…. We are working with law enforcement and agency partners to stop those who attempt to profit by selling useless products during this pandemic.” (Court prohibits Dallas Wellness Center from touting ‘Ozone Therapy’ as Covid-19 treatment – FDA).

    How noble of the Justice Department to protect us because the FDA has proclaimed that, “Ozone is a toxic gas with no medical application.” The fact that Assistant AG Jody Hunt completely ignored the twenty or more medical doctors from Italy who found that Ozone Therapy was indeed helping Covid-19 patients, and also ignored the twenty-year old discovery from Scripps Institute that our own immune system produces ozone for the express purpose of disabling pathogens is inexcusable. Nevertheless, the Department of Justice had ruled and the lemmings fell in line.

    At the end of June, the Texas Medical Board softened this ruling allowing Ozone Therapy to be used with patient’s consent “as long as the physician documents that he or she has tried other conventional methods if any exist,” but the damage had been done. Along with the FDA, Google has buried this counter-decision and the end result is that no doctor that I know of who is not already an ozone therapist won’t touch this procedure with a ten-foot pole. Nor will the science writers for such newspapers as The Boston Globe, Washington Post, New York Times, Wall Street Journal, TIME Magazine, etc. or such talking heads as Anderson Cooper, Jake Tapper, Sanjay Gupta, Norah O’Donnell, Lester Holt, Chris Wallace, etc., etc, act on this information. And thus the efficacy of Ozone Therapy has been overlooked by the President and Vice President, President Elect and Vice President Elect, Dr. Fauci, Dr. Birx, Governor Cuomo, Governor Newsom, Governor Baker, Governor Raimondo and a dozen other governors, forty+ US Senators, the presidents of every Ivy League university and numerous other VIP’s that I have contacted because all they read is that “Ozone is a toxic gas with no medical application,” and then their brains shut off.

    Article in full at: https://www.facebook.com/marc.seifer.3/posts/3615650508513520

    Like

  • I have long suggested on this site that this COVID situation should give us a great argument against WTO unfair regulations. We should just do what we have to do whilst making our arguments.

    This is the perfect opportunity to break those shackles. What with the race conversations now being demanded the environment is perfect to shame the bastards.

    Like

  • In keeping with the “Take your knee off my neck” theme.

    Also the climate change factor where the pollution from these countries disproportionately affects those of us who add little to the pollution.

    Like

  • @ Donna
    We must also break intellectual shackles. We are educating people to think like others. Quite frankly from an intellectual point of view we are copying what our former masters did. Like you said , in a previous post, we are measuring progress by their terms and they set the rules and move the goal posts as they wish.
    There is a lot of work to be done and we need leaders throughout the region to do it. We all agree that COVID has presented a new canvas. The question is whether we want to draw for ourselves or copy others. This applies to the whole region.
    The choice is ours.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    We all see the river. How do we get to the other side if we are not united and all the islands see themselves as little kingdoms. I have realized that on BU , we would spend two weeks discussing USA/ England. Yet , any conversation about Regional development falls flat. Once more it’s an indication that politically ,many have mentally given up on a new Caribbean State. The greatest post slavery failure of the Caribbean was the Federation.
    I have read thousands of posts on BU and we reference all types of writers and thinkers but less than one percent are from the region.
    It’s becoming a very tedious exercise , reading what we write but realizing in many ways we are not only looking for Massa but apparently , desire to welcome him back. Perhaps he never left.
    We seem proud to stand and address an empty United Nations hall.
    Barrow’s question remains: What mirror image do we have of ourselves. It’s a question that should have been asked of the entire region.

    Like

  • Carson C Cadogan

    One big disappointment. The news conference. An exercise in futility.

    “Hard ears you wont you wont hear, own way you will feel.”

    Like

  • Cuhdear BajanJanuary 4, 2021 6:54 PM The only “sufferer” has been the banks which sell car loans, and the companies which sell cars.

    Good for you. The banks have become nothing more than modern day shylocks, the only thing that matters to them is the bottom dollar. Begging to give people loans for the most expensive cars, that only last seven years anyway, that people can scarcely repay, but unwilling to lend for land purchase or a very long term loan on a generally appreciating asset, such as a house or apartments, especially without a deposit.

    And forget loans for business, unless you are a monied person.

    I am convinced that the banks, in their current iteration, have outlived their usefulness in the smaller developing countries. At least, the foreign banks.

    The government needs to set back up the Barbados National Bank, that was a major error by Arthur, in ending that.

    Like

  • illiam SkinnerJanuary 4, 2021 10:10 PM @ Donna
    We must also break intellectual shackles. We are educating people to think like others.

    Why do the Caribbean leaders still cowtow and treat Cuba as a pariah, when it should be welcomed into the fold of Caribbean nations?

    Intellectual shackles indeed. Open the minds and move forward, stop looking back.

    Like

  • Prepare for life after tourism
    I WAS WATCHING a programme on CBC Channel 8 on January 1 on the review of the year 2020. I sat and listened to the economist go on and on about what is necessary to get the economy back on track and talk about the projections for such. Much of what was bandied about by him and other guests was, as usual, tourism-based.
    The presentation that stood out for me, though, was Dr Christina Hinds, when she spoke about the traditional dependence on tourism and the eerie arguments used to maintain this industry as Barbados’ main revenue earner.
    She spoke about the similarity to the 1890s and the fact that similar arguments were raised by the financiers and plantocracy at the time to retain sugar after the loss of protectionism and the competition from beet sugar.
    The assertion then, as it is now, is that there is a reluctance to diversify the economy.
    This is documented in The Rise Of The Phoenix – The Barbados Mutual And Life Assurance Society In Caribbean Economy and Society, 1840-1990 by Cecilia Karch and Henderson Carter.
    So, as I often maintain, nothing much changes as far as the elites are concerned in this country.
    We keep doing things that are told to us by people with narrow self-interests. We are often bombarded with oxymoronic slogans like “sustainable development” and like sheep are often herded into doing what domestic and international elites dictate.
    For example, amidst this whole COVID-19 pandemic, I am hearing less about healthy eating and lifestyles than about the procurement and administration of vaccines. I think this should be our main focus rather than believing like the metropolitan countries that we can fix every ailment that arises out of our unnatural way of doing things.
    At the end of the day, we have to be more productive in this country and truly democratise the economy. There is a tight circle of people who continue to benefit regardless of the political change of guard. This needs to end.
    There are many young people out there with ideas but lacking access to capital. The stranglehold that the banks and credit unions have on the economy stifles true growth.
    Let us return to Karch and Carter for a while. In their book, they spoke about the formation of the Barbados Mutual Life Assurance Society at a time of crisis for the economy then, with Africans suffering unspeakably more than the plantocracy.
    Where is there such an arrangement for African-Barbadians here and now?
    The financial rules are extremely stringent and centralised with a lack of creative imagination from most lenders.
    As much as we talk about promoting agriculture and getting it up and running, this remains elusive. Commercial agriculture is not the answer. The hegemonic dominance of large plantations needs to be broken up and land needs to be distributed to people.
    The stupid myth that commercial farming is the answer to feeding the world and boosting the economy has been largely discredited.
    “Land,” as the African American leader Malcolm X said, “is the basis of independence.”
    Professor Sir Hilary Beckles critically examines landlessness in postemancipation Barbados in his book, Great House Rules – Landless Emancipation and Workers’ Protest in
    Barbados 1838-1938.
    People must be able to feed themselves in a healthy manner and eliminate the artificialities of the unhealthy distribution food sector.
    If labour cannot be found for large-scale agriculture where it still may exist, then we need to import it.
    This is nothing new to Barbados. If you go to dig sweet potatoes, you will see what I mean.
    Chinese are here in their numbers. Why are we not opening up our economy to continental Africans and African-Haitians who would be glad to work and settle here and boost the economy like other races?
    We cannot continue to spin like the proverbial top in the mud because it is us, the African majority, who are the ones who suffer the most from our leaders’ ignominious decisions.
    – IAN A. MARSHALL

    Letter to the Nation

    Like

  • DavidJanuary 5, 2021 6:09 AM Very good article. Though, I disagree, sustainable development does exist and is actually what he speaks of later in the article.

    Why are so many plantations sitting idle? I hope not for development for the few to get rich by selling off small lots for housing. These plantations should be legislated to only be available for development as multiple small farms, no less than two acres each.

    There should be a parliamentary vote permanently outlawing any breakup of existing plantations, other than for agriculture, with the limit as stated.

    But that will not happen and we know why.

    Like

  • @Crusoe

    A directive in law as you suggested must be supported with relevant financial and technical support. Bear in mind agriculture/food production is using scientific approaches these days.

    Like

  • @ David
    Most sensible article in years.

    Like

  • Barbados does not treat Cuba like a pariah. Not for ages. Did not the US start trying to pressure us about the Cuban medical team here helping us to fight COVID?

    And what was our response?

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  • You came to mind after reading the letter to the editor William. We have some academics who are not talking heads for the establishment, regrettable that there are so few of them

    Like

  • “Barbados does not treat Cuba like a pariah.”

    @ Donna

    You’re correct. Over the years, Barbados had a relatively good relationship with Cuba.

    There is Cubana Airlines Disaster Monument at Paynes Bay, in memory of all the passengers who lost their lives as a result of the Cubaba bombing. A few years ago, Cuban coaches were assigned to the National Sports Council (NSC); several Barbadians benefited from the Eye Surgery Program; and now we have Cuban nurses assisting us in the fight against COVID-19.

    We talk about ‘forging closer ties’ with our Cuban sisters and brothers. But, remain silent on racial discrimination and abuse of human rights in that island.

    Also, we only remember Haiti by singing songs and offering support for that country only when it is hit by some natural disaster. However, were is our concern when Haitians are murdered in neighbouring Santo Domingo?

    It’s worth discussing.

    Like

  • (Quote):
    Why are so many plantations sitting idle? I hope not for development for the few to get rich by selling off small lots for housing. These plantations should be legislated to only be available for development as multiple small farms, no less than two acres each. (Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    That situation will prevail as long as the Barbados is in a position to receive, on credit, financial crack cocaine from its ‘mothering’ loan-shark the IMF to prop up its balance of payments in order feed the hungry beast of conspicuous consumption with imported processed foods.

    But one day coming very soon sweet-living Bim is going to find itself in rehab and those fields and hills now overgrown with grass (and not ‘weed’ to feed herbivores) will be its only hope of recovery and source of survival.

    There is nowhere in Europe (and even Israel) would you find such ‘deliberate’ waste of good arable land relative to the size of any country on that landmass.

    Like

  • @ David
    I think that during this year , we may hear some of them come out. Sooner or later, we would all accept that it’s a new world post COVID and we can’t just keep hearing the same voices with the same worn and tired responses.
    We must develop small businesses and move rapidly into production of dozens of local products. And I am not talking about only those we eat.

    Like

  • @ Artax
    Well said. However, why would we expect a discussion about racism in Cuba when we to this day, have not had a discussion in depth about racism in Barbados.
    That’s the conversation we need to have.Can’t question my Neighbour about his dirty backyard if mine is dirty.
    All the best to you and yours in 2021. May all good things attend you.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William,

    Another friend of mine has a brother who has recently opened a business of the non food kind. It is doing rather well at present.

    Like

  • @William

    You must have heard the prime minister mentioned the fact we need to have serious talk about race in Barbados? She used the opportunity as a good political mention this is why Comrades Prescod and Grant were recruited to the PM’s Office.

    Like

  • Good Morning,

    I am happy that I was able to find this forum as I love to hear liked minded individuals. I own ECO Lifestyle Lodge and want to thank peterlawrencethompson for the nod as we do believe that there is a need for a change in some of our tourism products. More importantly as David wrote in the beginning of the column, we could have just gave in and waited until this whole thing blows over but I am not willing to roll over. I wanted to find ways to sustain our employees and even grow during this time period.

    That lead me to take on another issue that has been mentioned in a few of these comments… bottled water. I have created an off grid water farm in Saint Thomas @ecoskywater in which we extract H20 molecules directly from the air and add Magnesium and Calcium which gives you the purest form of water possible. It has ticked a few needed boxes both in Barbados and Globally:

    We are creating high end water that does not need to be brought in from overseas (still and sparkling)
    We bottle in Glass and 100% compostable bottles that we compost on our farm made out of non GMO Corn
    We are creating water not taking it from the municipality and manipulating it.

    We have been donating water throughout the island to those in need and we will continue doing so as much as we can. What I really want is to create water for villages, schools, and other people in need and help solve the problems that we have on island so any help with the private and public sector is greatly appreciated. If any of you that have been on chatting on this column want to test the water or see what we are doing please contact me anytime at 246-832-8253 and I would be happy to give you samples.

    Like

  • @ Donna
    Great. We need hundreds of such ventures well financed and employing at least 5 people. Once they get the packaging right and maintain quality/ consistency, they will be on their way. This is about believing in ourselves and capabilities . That is the opportunity that COVID presents.

    Like

  • @ William

    It is crucially important that we have a national conversation about the kind of society we will like Barbados. I have suggested that CoVid is a good stepping off point for this.
    It is quite frustrating when some people come on with the same one-note argument about colonialism or slavery or racism, as if no-one else understands those concepts.
    It is particularly when people who should know better fall in to this trap; or in discussing the economy there is no alternative to a form of Keynesianism, with useless talk about foreign reserves and economic growth – oft en which they hardly understand.
    If I, or anyone else, say we should ignore the stockpiling of foreign reserves that it is bad economics and economic growth is pie in the sky, we are dismissed because we are not exposing the normative story.
    About devaluation, it is very difficult to discuss important economic issues when people want to make political points, often lacking in history or understanding,
    Sadly, to criticise this government’s economic policy is seen by some as a personal attack on the prime minister. It is a smear meant to hide an inability to engage.
    Barbados deserves better..

    Like

  • Founder and chairman of the ATL Group of Companies, Gordon “Butch” Stewart passed away last night. He was 79.

    https://www.nationnews.com/2021/01/05/butch-stewart-passes/

    Like

  • I have created an off grid water farm in Saint Thomas @ecoskywater in which we extract H20 molecules directly from the air and add Magnesium and Calcium which gives you the purest form of water possible. It has ticked a few needed boxes both in Barbados and Globally:

    We are creating high end water that does not need to be brought in from overseas (still and sparkling)
    We bottle in Glass and 100% compostable bottles that we compost on our farm made out of non GMO Corn
    We are creating water not taking it from the municipality and manipulating it.

    We have been donating water throughout the island to those in need and we will continue doing so as much as we can. What I really want is to create water for villages, schools, and other people in need and help solve the problems that we have on island so any help with the private and public sector is greatly appreciated. If any of you that have been on chatting on this column want to test the water or see what we are doing please contact me anytime at 246-832-8253 and I would be happy to give you samples.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    EXCELLENT INITIATIVE.

    HOPE THOSE WHO ARE FORWARD THINKING TAKE UP YOUR OFFER.

    Like

  • Carson C Cadogan

    should be “did not ” on line 3

    Like

  • @ Carson

    Did you see last night’s performance by the president on CoVid?

    Like

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