Barbados is Preparing for the Future – Coding and Robotics

Some blogs posted to Barbados Underground through the years have highlighted the importance of the private and public sectors working together to ensure we allocate adequate resources to maintain a robust IT infrastructure. It is no secret government websites in Barbados are easy targets from hackers. And in recent weeks a few private companies have been penetrated with ransomware attacks severely compromising delivery of services to the public. Events as described serve to undermine our reputation as a fit and proper environment to live productive lifes.

A solid IT infrastructure is the pillar upon which an effective digital transformation strategy can be launched and administered. We have to prepare and equip our people to expertly navigate the challenges ahead. This is a must if we are to sustain a way of life we have become accustomed and honour the obligation as a responsible society to educate our children to be able to compete in the global market place.

Our future growth relies on competitiveness and innovation, skills and productivity… and these in turn rely on the education of our people.

Julia Gillard

 

A positive from the effect of the pandemic (Covid 19) currently razing global economies is that it serves as an health check to measure the effectiveness of IT systems everywhere. Building and maintaining fit for purpose IT infrastructure is an expensive undertaking. Most of the software and hardware inputs have to be procured from external vendors with local players having no choice to be price takers. Importantly is nurturing the interest and make training available to the HR element. For small island developing states like Barbados it will be important for a larger slice of the national budget to be allocated to modernizing IT infrastructure. The same for the private sector. The competitiveness of Barbados hinges on public and private sector harmonizing strategies to ensure the local environment is conducive to transacting business.

Independents will agree the incumbent government has brought a focus to the area of technology and innovation. Government is the significant player in the local market and must lead to ensure a greater effort to move towards diversifying and growing efficiencies in the economy. We have seen quick wins with the facility to pay and access online important services BUT there is a long way to go.

 

It is encouraging to the blogmaster therefore to witness the effort to reform the education system and to improve the use of technology in an innovative a manner as is practical given our limited resources. There are so many priorities to attend to. Minister of Education, Santia Bradshaw speaking in parliament last Tuesday revealed that the government was going ahead in setting up an Education Reform Unit (ERU). The unit is mandated to lead reform to the curriculum to make it relevant for a 21st century mode of operating – fit for purpose. The transformation roadmap includes targeting from early childhood to tertiary level.

Watch the YouTube starting at 2hrs:24mins to view Minister Bradshaw making a request to fund the ERU until March 2020

One of Barbados’ favourite academics residing in the diaspora (and this is important) has been invited to work with the ERU to speed up reforms – Professor Cardinal Warde is a Barbadian professor of Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), one of the best learning institutions in the field of engineering and technology in North America if the reviews are to be believed.

Some of us were excited to participate last weekend in a virtual discussion hosted by the ministry of education on Coding and Robotics in Schools. Professor Warde participated also Jason Stephany, a student of Harrison College who created the Quickorderz app, we have young people doing amazing things on the 2×3 island. See the blog posted last week that featured another HC student Maria Marshall .

Technology affords citizens who want to effectively participate in our democracy to be informed about the issues. Here is the link to the discussion held last weekend.

Discussion hosted by the Ministry of Education

Imagine teaching coding and robotics in our schools.

Something to be excited about as we prepare- some will say a little late to the party- for the future.

We are living in exciting times where opportunities are there for the taking!

50 comments

  • Nice Up The Dance with Computer
    Digital Style

    Sleng Teng Riddim

    Liked by 1 person

  • David
    How come after having companies here like Corcom and Intel during the 1960s and 1970s there was no internal adaptation as measured by say teaching coding and robotics in infant school, for example.

    Will it be ever possible to shift the dated preoccupation from a rote system of miseducation to one connected to development, entreprenuership, measuring ingenuity etc.

    We’ve missed an opportunity to get ahead of this game then it seems. What writer worries more about is that this fixation on catching up may mean missing elements of the fourth or fifth industrial revolution.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    Good question, a few of them developed businesses but was obviously not innovative enough to catapult Barbados on a futuristic path.

    Like

  • “How come after having companies here like Corcom and Intel during the 1960s and 1970s there was no internal adaptation as measured by say teaching coding and robotics in infant school, for example.”

    Sweet, sweet, sweet.

    I like when the balls come from an angle that I did not consider.

    This statement makes me question if our hearts is in what we say. These are two good examples where we could have gotten coding and robotics off the ground. We cannot waste opportunities and then 20 years later act as if we have a brand new idea.

    I know wunna like big names, but I believe PLT is already trying his darnedest to get coding to be a part of the Bajan solution. I hope PLT participated/was invited.

    Like

  • The ” coding ” is easy. You need computers.

    Robotics ?

    What raw materials are required to build robots and robotic machines ?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    Information Technology was always part and parcel of Barbados Economic and Social development. Intel was set up in Barbados before it moved or returned to Silicon Valley in the USA. I think we tend to be putting a burthen on IFT that it is not designed to take. It is not the panacea to our problems of inefficiency and ineffectiveness.. IT is just another man made tool with a high propensity to cause catastrophe if not carefully used and applied.
    For the record, both The Private Sector and the Public Sector have been pioneers in the use of IT in delivering services. The Banking and Telecommunication Industries have been the leaders. Like most skills/ technologies, they have economic value and are used to garner economic benefits.
    As to coding,it is best left to the post General Education phase.Education is itself a coding exercise. How much can a young brain absorb in its first twenty years? We need to avoid”garbage in” so that we will not get too much” garbage out.” We are getting more than our fair share of that already. The sources will remain nameless for those who have not already discerned them
    .
    .

    Like

  • VINCENT
    YOU ARE OFTEN BRILLIANT…………ONCE YOU STAY AWAY FROM BIBLICAL EXEGESIS. LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • 1/1
    @VC
    “As to coding,it is best left to the post General Education phase.Education is itself a coding exercise. How much can a young brain absorb in its first twenty years?”

    I beg to differ here. If we adopt this approach our youngsters/country will be always playing catch-up.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    If you do a gap analysis to determine what is required to compete in the global space today and the future, we are lagging. We also have to educate our people to participate effectively (engagement) to ensure the transformation to how we do business is assured. It is now a brave new word.

    The time has passed where being takers of technology will work for us. Preferential trade treatment, tax shelters to help us compete have been dismantled to support the globalization project. We have to transform or die, no gradualist approach here Vincent. Our young population must be given the opportunity, they are not happy with applying to be a public worker in order to wear a collin tie.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU
    What gap analysis are you talking about? IFT is a work in progress. There is no gap. Wake up .We are living in a Global Village. Time to change your spectacles. Our people are well prepared and are taking part in the design of IFT. You are analyzing the World using a 1950s Model. That model is useless.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Let us agree to disagree.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Q What gap analysis are you talking about?
    A MAYBE HE IS ANALYSIS WHATS GOING ON IN ST LAWRENCE GAP………..LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ TheoGazerts

    Did you learn reading before you learnt the alphabet ? Did you do arithmetic before you learned to count ? Well computer scientists who use code need to learn the subjects we now call STEM. That is the basic foundation. But of course many of us on this blog want a nation of artisans. Too bad. The unfolding world is not moving in that direction. Furthermore with the advent of Artificial Intelligence and Machine learning coding may soon be a dinosaur. Stay tuned.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ GP at 10 : 25 AM

    You are too kind. But thanks nevertheless. Wuh Loss!!!

    Like

  • I AM INDEED KIND VINCENT ESPECIALY TO THOSE WHOSE NAME IS DERIVED FROM THE SAME LATIN ROOT AS MINE LOL
    I HAD A CHILDHOOS AQUAINTANCE CALLED VINCENT (HE OF SOLAR FAME) HE WAS THE FIRST CHAP IN OUR VILLAGE AND FOR MILES AROUND TO BECOME A HARRISONIAN……AND ANOTHER IN ST KITTS IN A SMALL CELL GROUP. WE WERE SHADRACK, MESHACK AND A BAD NEGRO. WE HAD LOADS OF FUN TOGETHER

    Liked by 1 person

  • Does this mean we will be able to get and pay our water bills online soon?

    Like

  • Why does the Water Authority connect water to land that squatters are on without the landowner’s written permission?

    Like

  • Because the BWA doesn’t care who the LAND owner is, only whom the User (Bill payer) is. Imagine if in all those areas in Barbados where the land is on long term lease they had to contact the land owner? You will know the meaning of tenant-try.

    Like

  • What about people with pit toilet s. Will they allow them to install ‘water toilets’ without permission?

    Like

  • I do not know. I was unaware the BWA installed toilets, or even the plumbing or sewer/septic connections to accommodate them.

    Like

  • It would be best to seriously look at @Pacha’s post on this subject. Anybody who feels differently or opposes his position should not be taken seriously in such a decision.
    Our students / children are about 25 years behind as far as technology is concerned.
    Peace.

    Like

  • @ William

    We have had 14 yrs of Owen Arthur, ten years of Thompson/Stuart, and over two years of Mottley – a total of over 26 years. Who were our education ministers over that period? What radical contributions have the UWI and community college made to our progress?
    Who are the people responsible for betraying the nation? What changes/improvements have been made to our educational system over those years? What proposals are now in the pipeline? How do we expect to compete in a highly technological world when our young people cannot communicate or reason and have limited ability in STEM subjects
    We allow our leaders to offer us flawed policies because we do not make any demands on them. We get what we deserve.

    Like

  • @Hal
    It’s obvious that we think the world waits until we are ready. I can’t brr believe some of the posts I have read in this thread so far. It’s dark ages stuff !
    I have said from the very first time I came on BU that planning to reform any economy cannot be successful without educational reform.
    After World war 2,Japan reformed its educational system. There would have been no advancement for us if we didn’t reform it back in the 50s and 60s. Those models have served their purpose and are now irrelevant.
    These remarkable people believe that it’s a joke. In the USA, the four year degree is almost anachronistic. High school children complete the Associates degree before graduation. Nowadays , people do coding which guarantees jobs paying $45000 and up. There are children who became millionaires before leaving elementary school by developing apps and so on. Our children will have to compete with those in what we call the global economy or village.
    All we ever do is keep believing that a 2020 economy can run on a 1920 system.
    That’s why I constantly attack those who come here gloating and spouting gradualism. We need to make a quantum leap. But that’s not possible under the essentially bankrupt of ideas and vision, decadent incompetent BLPDLP.
    We are going no where very fast.
    But the apologists and obstructionists are spreading like the love vine. They will eventually use their parasitic skills to engulf the entire country and squeeze it to death. That’s the kind of love they have for their country.
    As far educational ministers we have not had any of real worth since Billie Miller and perhaps Erskine Sandiford. All the rest have been below par. Every single one!
    Peace

    Like

  • @ William

    We must not let the Bajan professional middle class blind side us; they provide their children with a decent education, while leaving ordinary people to find their own solutions. They are fundamentally dishonest.
    But we will always claim racism instead of getting up and fighting for our rights. Keep up the good work.

    Like

  • It takes financial resources across the board to build on the kind of technology all is speaking of to reform our education system on levels to compete with a off and fast running global Environment
    However govt rather than pursue resourceful avenues
    Horse back rides into the early morning sunrise of politics with million dollar consultants
    Where does this govt priorities rest
    Only God knows
    Time and time again the words educational reform is repeated only to fall on deaf ears
    Even the CXC has failed parents and students as many outburst reveals all kinds of glitches in the system

    Like

  • @William

    Now that you have ‘relieved’ yourself, the causal factors are waiting to be explored.

    Barbados has a large so-called middleclass. What is middleclass anyway. A segment that is able to secure a mortgage and a car loan or two which means that they depend on a salary from some organization owned by the money elite read the establishment. If they are beholding to an organization for that salary what does it mean as far as being able to be the activist required to accelerate change?

    Let us turn our attention to the so-called political class. Who are they again? Do they have the confidence for the same reasons as above to transform the system to one that is more equitable? Being Black does not count in this scenario. So stop with that already.

    Finally, the big one – conspicuous consumption and cultural relativism. To what extent have we passed the point of no return regarding the things we value in our lives. How do our decision makers; movers and shakers measure success?

    Over to you Sir William.

    Like

  • There should be ethics and morality in Government and also in coding and robot tech.
    Drone warfare and automation by west are examples of abuse of technology and people.

    Rightwing is in the House
    There are corrupt biased leaders, corrupt biased MPs, corrupt biased Police, corrupt biased Judges, corrupt biased media, corrupt biased people. It’s the rightwing way.

    Likewise in gross and subtle layers of humanity.
    Black lives matter is about life and the antithesis of racist prejudiced whites ways of life.

    Whites took religion and abused it to hold down blacks.

    John and GP are examples of corrupt peoples thinking.

    Like

  • @ David
    I have stated my position over and over. As early as 1987 I submitted my views to the Task Force on Employment. I along with other progressives if the mid-seventies called for the abolishment of the Common Entrance Examination.
    We’ve neglected our primary schools and the necessary curriculum changes have not been implemented.
    In some countries the elementary schools are now constructed like corporate offices. The class rooms are like offices. It is all preparation for the real world.
    Where are the primary school cooperatives so that our children can learn how money grows and the discipline necessary. We then make those cooperatives paperless by making sure each member student has their own tablet/computer.,Then we get volunteers to teach them basic accounting. Apply this to their sporting events; agriculture projects, environmental project etc. In twenty five years , those entering public life and leadership would have a different culture because they will be wired differently from the clowns we now have.
    So, that’s a relative basic vision of how we ought to see education for the future.
    That is the way to incorporate IT into the system. Almost every child in a proper school system anywhere in the world can type and use a computer as easily as we used to write in exercise books. We need to stop fooling ourselves.
    Peace

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Traveler

    After installing a disruptive and expensive remote reading system ,BWA cannot/do not read the meter from the office.

    Like

  • Hey
    Is the CXC imbroglio over?
    If it is, then the less-reasoned opinion I was advocating is basically the solution arrived at.

    Like

  • ANOTHER DAY OF THE PRESENTATION OF PURE PABLUM BY THOSE WHO PRETEND THEY KNOW SO VERY VERY MUCH.
    BARBADOS HAS GONE TO THE DOGS IN A WORLD THAT IS GOING TO HELL REAL FAST

    COVID 19 HAS PROMOTED THIS. AND UNFORTUNATELY THERE ARE MORE PANDEMICS TO COME AS PREDICTED IN THE OLIVET DISCOURSE.

    LOTS OF TALK HERE BUT NO ACTION
    LOTS OF HEAT BUT NO LIGHT.

    Liked by 1 person

  • A career in IT is a waste of a life
    corporations use and abuse you
    and will throw you away on the scrapheap when done

    Book of Rules
    Isn’t it strange how princesses and kings
    In clown-ragged capers in sawdust rings
    While common people like you and me
    We’ll be builders for eternity
    Each is given a bag of tools
    A shapeless mass and the book of rules
    Each must make his life as flowing in
    Tumbling block on a stepping stone
    While common people like you and me
    We’ll be builders for eternity
    Each is given a bag of tools
    A shapeless mass and the book of rules
    Look when the rain has fallen from the sky
    You know the sun will be only with us for a while
    While common people like you and me
    We’ll be builders for eternity
    Each is given a bag of tools
    A shapeless mass and the book of rules

    Like

  • Which Way Is Forward?

    God’s Own Children

    Black Lives Matter is about Life
    it is the antithesis of White Peoples’ Lifetimes of Racism

    10K

    Like

  • “Why does the Water Authority connect water to land that squatters are on without the landowner’s written permission?”
    Garbage as usual! A self-proclaimed expert who has clearly lived in the UK too long.

    Like

  • https://barbadostoday.bb/2020/11/27/charity-is-out-of-cash/
    It is a sad state of affairs when we rush around saying “two legs good, four legs bad”. It appears that “Phillipa Challis” has been making and effort to help Barbadians in distress. I like her for her “I’m sitting there thinking. “greally guys”. We need to put food on people’s tables.”

    What a polite way of putting it.

    Excerpt for BT.
    “Challis went on to question the priorities of some of the smaller charities in the room, some of which have been seeking assistance with extravagant projects that are seemingly out of touch with current realities.

    “There are so many of you in this room that apply to us and we smiled recently because we had a couple of proposals that have come in looking for buildings or projects, some of which cost up to $200,000 and I’m sitting there thinking ‘really guys?’. We need to put food on people’s tables.”

    Going forward, she suggested that smaller community-based organisations do more work to convince those with the means, to assist those without.

    “Little things can make a massive difference in our communities and those people that you know are struggling, everybody can help. It’s like the old bajan saying ‘it takes a village to raise a child’. I think every one of us should take a little bit of that,” Challis concluded

    Good job, Philippa. Have to put her on Theo’s list

    Like

  • The author of this article is so out of step with what is unravelling.

    Technology taking away our privacy
    By Bert Riley
    I see you. I hear you.
    On arriving home from the office one afternoon recently, I was met at my gate by a police officer and noticed quite a large posse in the background.
    He said he saw the security cameras installed around my home and explained that the previous night a crime had taken place and he wanted me to peruse the video footage from the cameras for a particular time and make a copy for them.
    As a good citizen and following the Golden Rule of “do unto others as you would have them do unto you, I was happy to assist. However, while reviewing the footage and seeing the back and forth of vehicles and pedestrians at all hours of the night and early morning, I wondered if these people considered the total lack of privacy which exists in today’s modern world.
    I’m not sure how many of you have paid attention recently to the rapid expansion of installed surveillance cameras around the island. I’m not referring to the private security cameras many of us have at home. I’m taking about those mounted on major roads, intersections, and round-abouts. What are Barbadians’ rights regarding this recorded footage?
    In recent times, driven by security breaches and disclosures of mass surveillance by governments and the private sector, service providers and legislators have introduced limited measures to make sure that individuals have some measure of control over their personal data stored and used by organisations.
    Accept it without question
    I believe that in most cases we’re too far gone, and the more ubiquitous something becomes, the more likely we are to accept it without question. The rapid increase (over 400 per cent in the last six months by my count) in surveillance cameras on our roads has not even garnered a passing comment on call-in programmes or in the press. But non-opposition is not consent.
    Unfortunately, we now live in a space where
    we have forfeited our rights to personal privacy. As I explained in a previous article, many of the free services we use in this information age really aren’t so free. We are trading information about ourselves in exchange for the service. “Sign-up” isn’t always very explicit.
    Have you ever wondered how Google Maps or Waze is able to determine traffic conditions? They’re tracking the location, direction, and speed of most folks with a smart phone. I’ve heard folks give the argument that since it’s everyone’s data, or video footage, that’s being collected and, if they’re not doing anything wrong or illegal, they really are just a needle in a haystack. Not true.
    Using artificial intelligence there is no such thing as a needle in a haystack. Regarding the “nothing to hide” argument, as Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who revealed mass worldwide surveillance by United States intelligence agencies said: “Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.” Given the mass surveillance now occurring on our streets, a few important questions must be answered.
    1) Who is capturing and storing this footage?
    2) Is the footage being stored in Barbados or elsewhere?
    3) Who has access to the footage and under what circumstances?
    4) Are there protocols, processes, or checks and balances to ensure proper access and reasonableness for access?
    While in recent times governments have tried to rein in the horse that got away by passing legislation such as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in Europe and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) in California – the US does not have privacy laws at the federal level per se, this may all be too little too late.
    The Barbados Data Protection Act 2019 passed on July 24 last year has many similar
    features to GDPR but lacks one critical aspect that I’ll discuss in the coming weeks.
    Suffice to say every time you turn on your mobile phone, tablet, laptop, pick up the landline, or even take a walk down the street you should be concerned about who is tracking, listening, watching, and profiling you.
    Bert Riley is a sales and marketing professional with more than 20 years’ experience as a data scientist and a passion for AI innovation.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    This article will interest you if only because it NIS a buttress of your position.

    https://amp.ft.com/content/335f279a-c72a-4313-8dd2-311a4ee39312

    Like

  • Teachers prefer ‘face-to-face’
    Minister says it would ease pressures
    AS TEACHERS GRAPPLE with blended learning in COVID-19 times, the majority would prefer more face-to-face contact, says Minister of Education Santia Bradshaw.
    She added this would not only help mitigate challenges in the use of online learning technologies, but also socio-economic pressures at home that were hampering student learning. The mix of face-toface and online learning was introduced at the start of the 2020/2021 academic year to minimise social contact within schools in order to prevent the spread of novel coronavirus.
    “For the most part, what I’m getting a sense of from the principals, in particular, and the teachers is they want to find a way to get more students in the face-to-face environment because, for the most part, there are lots of distractions at home for students trying to get online,” Bradshaw told the DAILY NATION in an interview after taking part in a panel discussion on The Impact Of NGOs During COVID-19 And Beyond hosted by the Barbados National NGO Network at Hilton Barbados last week.
    “Sometimes the home environment is not as supportive as we would like. They recognise, especially in an environment where we have so many layoffs across the country, there are a lot of vulnerable households and children were relying on the meals that were provided at school.”
    The minister admitted that the blended learning system was not functioning smoothly and there was no one-size-fits-all for schools.
    “Obviously, that has had its challenges depending on what the schools have
    rolled out because different schools have rolled out different ways to deliver instruction. You have some that are going to school with half of the school population one week; another week, another set of students. So they have found creative ways to basically get as much face-to-face time in, then also be able to deliver the instruction online.”
    Nonetheless, she said her ministry was pressing ahead with digital literacy, having brought a Nordic university on board to help get teachers and other staff up to speed on the use of online technology that was now pertinent to teaching and learning during the pandemic.
    “Obviously, we’ve had to do a lot of training and retraining of the ministry staff and also we started the process of training the teachers. We recently partnered with a university in Finland, which is best known for their quality educational system,” Bradshaw said.
    120 teachers
    She said the training with the Finnish university started last month with 120 teachers and “is ongoing as well, so another batch of teachers will also go into that programme”.
    She noted that the change to teaching and learning was particularly stark for special needs teachers and students, having met with the Student Support Services Department last Tuesday in preparation for Estimates. This required separate training for information technology coordinators (ITCs) to appropriately assist students who learn differently from the general student population.
    “It’s been very challenging for them, even more challenging for them than with other
    students. One of the major concerns was that the ITCs at many of the schools were not necessarily au fait with how to integrate these students into learning about digital literacy ….” (SNR)

    Like

  • The future is unravelling in the present.

    https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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  • https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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  • DOES THE BIOCHEMISTRY ILLITERATE UNDERSTAND THE BEAUTIFUL PICTURE HE HAS POSTED?
    CAN HE HELP ANY ONE ON BU TO UNDERSTAND IT?
    HILARIOUS
    CAN HE TELL THE BLOG WHAT A WIDGET IS?
    HILARIOUS

    Like

  • SMART TEACHERS AND INFORMERS NEVER POST PICTURES THAT THEY CAN NOT EXPLAIN……………….
    I HAVE ONCE POSTED SUCH A PICTURE KNOWING THAT AN ERRANT FOOL IN THE CLASS WHO LIKED TO CHALLENGE HIS TEACHERS, WOULD DO SO………………AND THEN CRUSHED HIM INTO SHAME WHEN HE DID AS I EXPECTED

    DAVID IS THAT A PICTURE OF “RIBBONS” FOR POSIBLE USE IN INDEPENDENCE CELEBRATIONS

    Like

  • @ David December 1, 2020 5:07 AM
    “The future is unravelling in the present.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You got that one right!

    Many ‘routine’ jobs currently performed by humans like pumping gas and supermarket stocking and check-out functions in Barbados will soon be done by AI ‘workers’.

    So it begs the question as to why the ‘need’ to increase the adult population by 80,000 in tiny Barbados which is no longer punching above its weight.

    What kind of jobs will there be for these additional hands?

    Barbados is not Guyana or even Belize.

    Like

  • RE The author of this article is so out of step with what is unravelling.
    ACTUALLY HE IS RIGHT IN STEP
    HE UNDERSTANDS THAT THIS IS EVEN THOUGH UNWITTINGLY, ALL A PRECURSOR TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF TOTAL CONTROL IN THE IMMINENT ERA OF THE ONE WORLD GOVERNMENT, WHICH IS ITSELF AN OBVIOUS PRECURSOR TO THE PREDICTED SCENARIO IN THE TRIBULATION PERIOD , THAT FOLLOWS THE RISE OF ANTICHRIST

    Like

  • https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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  • @Hants
    “The ” coding ” is easy. You need computers.

    Robotics ?

    What raw materials are required to build robots and robotic machines ?”

    Computers are cheap and powerful … SBC’s such as RaspberryPi, Odroid, NanoPi, Jetson Nano, etc. Microcontrollers like Arduino for a few dollars, very cheap breadboard or building dead bug (Manhattan) style. This combines programming and electronics knowledge and construction.
    Robotics … cheap motors, a robotic arm made up from scrap bits of wood or a small branch off a tree and a few screws is a good start.
    Absolutely essential — an enquiring mind. Anyone who hears robotics mentioned on TV and is curious can find all the software resources online for free. All the answers when questions and help is needed is typically available with a search on google or by subscribing to an appropriate group.

    Youngsters have all the resources that can easily be acquired unlike myself and others who only had the loan of a magazine back in 1955 which start the “juices” flowing to start building simple radio receivers and end up enjoying a long and successful career with the largest computers and still active building and programming 17 years into retirement.

    For anything you engage in there is an online group to offer help and at some point you will find yourself as the one who is offering help — It’s called COLLABORATION and it’s what the whole technological and scientific world spins on.

    Like

  • https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

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