TEN Habitat Launches Coding School

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The blogmaster congratulates BU blogger Peter Lawrence Thompson and Ten Habitat for launching a Coding School in Barbados. From all reports it is the first of its kind in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean.

Well done!

Related links:

You can see information in these two news articles.

62 comments

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Just to put this in perspective, I’m neither the founder nor the director of TEN Habitat, just a team member. We work hard to make Barbados better, but we know there are others working just as hard elsewhere.

    Like

  • What are the cost to attend?

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    Code 101, the 12 hour introductory course, costs Bd$100. This is 50% less that the same course costs in the USA.

    Like

  • WAIT
    PETER YOU AINT GROW UP AT ALL MAN
    YOU DE SAME HEIGHT YOU WAS WHEN YOU WAS A LIKKLE BOY MAN
    OR DEM TWO FELLAS PUN STILTS OR GOT MARFAN’S OR SUMTIN SO?

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Georgie Porgie,
    Only my mind grew… apparently it took all the nourishment and my body never exceeded 5’4”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Are their any additional cost like enrollment fees and tuition cost

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  • You need to set up a page where people can donate. Catching my butt in the US, but can still make a small donation

    Liked by 1 person

  • Congratulations PLT and company, ya know, quite recently the debate and call was for the implementation of coding in the schools curriculum, kudos for such a speedy implementation, though not within the curriculum, its viable and valuable for entreprenuers… Is there certification?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ peterlawrencethompson,

    Well done.

    Good to see bright educated Bajans returning to Barbados after contributing to other countries.

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  • Congrats to you and the crew @ PT

    I willing to donate to the cause also

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Mariposa
    There are no additional costs for Code 101

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  • @ Peter are you looking to offer QA testing, IT Business Analyst training and Project Management for IT?

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @nineofnine
    Certification is accepted by many US companies. Graduates of this programme in the USA are employed by Microsoft, Expedia, Xbox, Amazon, and other big companies as seen on this page: https://www.codefellows.org/

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Heather
    The TEN Habitat Source Code Developer Academy will offer exactly the same curriculum as https://www.codefellows.org/
    This is because they have a track record of their graduates finding work at major tech companies.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @TheOGazert & @John2,
    Thanks for your generous offer to support this work, but hang on to your money for the moment.
    Our plan is to establish an investment fund that can channel investment from the diaspora and elsewhere directly into Caribbean companies on which we have performed due diligence. This is a tall order… much more complex that string up the Code Academy… so you will need to give us a bit of time.

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  • There have been many institutions offering free online programming courses for some years – https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/250323
    Best to try one to see if programming is a right fit before outlaying cash that can least be afforded. Why not try for free?
    The wake up call has been sounding over these many years.

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  • @Sid
    Quite a few need to be in a classroom setting where professionla are able to offer guidance and set a pace that students can follow,
    The fee of $100.00 for 12 hours is not excessive…

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  • @TheOGazerts
    Agreed some would struggle on their own but in a classroom there is still only an allotted time for completion of tasks. Of course it’s easier in a classroom to ask a question and receive an immediate answer but a lot is gained by having to rely on one’s initiative.
    When you write code as a day job, often you are given a broad outline of the task and a timeline.
    Google doled out lots of Raspberry Pi’s with an expectation that perhaps 1 in 100 would be using theirs productively longer term, regarding 1 in 100 as a success. Many of the best programmers are also self taught and the cost of hardware platforms nowadays is very affordable especially with the proliferation of cheap Single Board Computers and online help is excellent and readily available via google searches or from very dedicated individuals.
    There is hardly a day when I don’t have to offer help online – for free.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Mr Peter Lawrence Thompson

    Good work. I sincerely hope that your organization achieves all of its objectives in this worthy project. However on a related note (i.e training in technical and vocational fields), I read with alarm and distress that 98% of the graduates of the Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic left with unit certificates rather than full diplomas. This was essentially due to failure of “graduates” in some parts of their courses. See page 4 of Barbados Today. According to the Principal of the SJPP the students either could not grasp or complete minor literacy and numeracy based courses!

    98% !!!!! Not 9.8%

    Liked by 2 people

  • The report went on to share that the SJPP will be moving to a two shift operation because of the high number of applicants.

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  • 98% of the SJPP students (the future mechanics, plumbers, hair dressers, tailors, electricians, agriculture technicians, etc) have problems with Reading “Riting and “Rithmetic!!!!

    If one takes the SJPP students as a sample of the working class segment of Barbados population and juxtaposes the concerns of Mr Arnold MacIntyre of the IMF (see page 5 of Barbados Today) that 3/4 of the regional talent lives outside of the region then is it any wonder why Barbados is heading for failed state status?

    How do successive Ministers of Education remain so calm and seemingly unconcerned if after overseeing the spending of hundreds of millions of dollars every year for the last 50 years, 98% of the SJPP “graduates” have challenges with literacy and numeracy?

    Liked by 2 people

  • On a related note Marsha Hinds made the point yesterday on a radio show that dialect is we ting and should not be expected to conform to standard English. Not sure where she wants to go with the argument.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Regarding the point made by Marsha Hinds – It’s an example of the mollusc mentality, a shell on 3 sides and the fourth firmly stuck to a rock. The world over has come to grips with the reality that “standard English” is the lingua franca. Not understanding that fact is either a sign of a lazy sloppy mentality or sheer backwardness.
    To my initial surprise I have seen 2 Chinese persons in Borneo chatting, one from Hong Kong and the other from Borneo, their common language was English, likewise for Dutch and French citizens or any combination of nationalities – they all tend to be quite fluent in English.
    I have taught and attended courses where there have been a mixed bunch from all over Europe and even attending one at Management College Europe in Brussels that included 2 Argentinians – all fluent and competent in delivering presentations in English. We all spoke English.
    On another occasion I was in the USA with a group of 6 Germans preparing a computer system for a German bank when someone uttered something in German only to be told by the senior guy that only English should be spoken, that said once never had to be repeated.

    An Asian teenager here in the UK once pointed me to a West Indian senior citizen sitting on a park bench, remarking that the gent was in England 42 years and still couldn’t speak English. I could have told him I knew others who have been here for over 50 years that are exactly the same. If that’s not a shame I don’t know what is.

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  • PLT…you and your team mates are mental and physical GIANTS….you know just what to do to uplift this and future generations of disenfranchised bajans out of the quagmire of stagnation created for them by anal, visionless governments…kudos to you and them…

    “How do successive Ministers of Education remain so calm and seemingly unconcerned if after overseeing the spending of hundreds of millions of dollars every year for the last 50 years, 98% of the SJPP “graduates” have challenges with literacy and numeracy?”

    Because it suits their agendas of semi literate voters/yardfowls who are unable to think for themselves and are easily robbed..that is the population they want to remain imprisoned on the island…the least educated, that is why they keep the schools in that sad condition to spew out those who would blindly vote for and are stupidly loyal to the thieves of parliament….while they sell them out.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Google doled out lots of Raspberry Pi’s with an expectation that perhaps 1 in 100 would be using theirs productively longer term, regarding 1 in 100 as a success. Many of the best programmers are also self taught.”

    Very true…but if you have primary school kids learning coding from esrly.. right up until they decide their career choices, you already have a very skilled generation…branching out into various areas ……with necessary skills..

    One relative of mine started coding in highschool…by the time they reached UW…and accessed what was offered, let’s just say…Japan was the first to recruit them….because doors automatically open for existing skills…worldwide.

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  • There are overheads to cover in shared work spaces, the $100 fee is more than fair, seeing that some parents pay $30,000 Canadian or US per semester in some universities…just so theur children can get access to certain skills….some pay more..

    PLT and his team’s efforts are a springboard for Barbados and the Caribbean’s children, who no one else had the courage or the good intentions to offer them these opportunities before.

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  • RE On a related note Marsha Hinds made the point yesterday on a radio show that dialect is we ting and should not be expected to conform to standard English. Not sure where she wants to go with the argument.

    MARSHA IS SUGGESTING THAT DIALECT IS A FORM OF CODING
    WUH WUNNAH TINK?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David re “dialect is we ting ‘

    man she rite as shite yuh. effin wunna doan onstan um is wunna dead.

    anedda ting dat is we ting is talking shite on radio programs.

    duh got any courses in dialect online so dat we overseas Bajans can learn to speak betta Bajan ?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Why is she speaking english and not dialect to a Bajan audience?

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  • Back to the topic.

    It is always good to study in a classroom and then go online to ” learn more “.

    Some of us need “structure ” me myself and I included. lol

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  • Good points Hants.

    Nothing wrong with using dialect, it is about also being able to use standard when time and place demands it. The fact we are having the conversation exposes the bigger issue of a dysfunctional education system.

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  • @ David,

    Barbados probably has a dysfunctional Primary school education system.

    By the time I went to HC I could read a newspaper, write an essay and do basic arithmetic without mistakes.

    Primary school education in Barbados used to provide a solid foundation for future learning.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Back in the day the teacher and principal were respected and held all in their charge to a high standard that was not questioned. Today what do we have? A simple analysis but a place to start. We have to establish and enforce standards with the prerequisite a relevant education system.

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  • The ignorance thick enough to cut with a knife, if one tells me that the bajan dialect which in reality is a clear mixture of African, English, Irish and Scottish accents and nuances…I would understand….though many are totally unaware that many English words wrapped in dialect are French, latin and Spanish, because many English words were stolen from other languages by the British…and most people do not know that we speak these three languages…. pronunciation and all…on a daily basis..

    …standard English is a first language taught in schools and used to conduct business so that everyone can understand and be on the same page with what is being said……dialect is spoken at home, among each other and for when ministers/lawyers/idiots on a political platform want to deceive the people.

    …..speaking dialect is just another language like the many dialects spoken in the Yoruba or any other tribe of Africans, Chinese, etc…and should NOT take precedent in schools or business places…does any PM speak dialect at the UN or when meeting foreign dignitaries …no, because they would likely not understand what the hell is being said, it is another language, so Barbados speaks two languages, dialect and standard English..

    I am now familiarizing myself, as I said I would, with the Bajan dialect.

    Turns out while learning the Yoruba language I came across the word Bata and remembered that there was a shoe store on the corner of Swan and Tudor streets named Bata….which in Yoruba means SHOES…so it was just yesteryear as recent as the 70s that the Yoruba language was still being spoken in Barbados….obviously the population was/is totally unaware that some Yoruba/African words survived British criminality..

    But ya idiots in the parliament lost all that power of the African mother language, and it will never return unless they face their African heritage.

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  • I will now retreat for a little while to communicate with my ancestors in Yoruba.

    Liked by 1 person

  • hants
    what you and I learned in primary school in the late 50’s and early 60’s was practical and basic
    it was meant to be functional
    because before our time very few went further in school, and they were given what was thought, and proven to be absolutely necessary

    what our predecessors and we got in primary school was designed to an end——-and it worked

    when my first boy was doing common entrance they were all kinds of text books in which there was stuff that I did not learn in english classes at HC

    the emphasis had been changed and probably not for the better

    when I read job applications for my wife’s business it was easy to tell the age of the applicant by a short glance of the application letter

    writing hand poor
    sentence structure poor
    punctuation poor or non existent
    and on and on

    SAD

    Liked by 1 person

  • Well done PLT, more than just talk. More should follow in your footsteps.

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  • @WW&C
    fyi the Bata Shoe company a.k.a. Baťa, was a Canadian company of Czechoslovakian origins, where Baťa was the founder’s surname. In Youruba it may mean shoes, but that is not its origin. The Bata Shoe Museum can be found in Toronto, the concept of the late Sonja Bata.

    Like

  • Hahaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

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  • “……….though many are totally unaware that many English words wrapped in dialect are French, Latin and Spanish, because many English words were stolen from other languages by the British…and most people do not know that we speak these three languages…. pronunciation and all…on a daily basis….”

    The above comments are not entirely accurate.

    The English language received its early influences by a mixture of various different languages spoken by the invaders and settlers of Britain, such as Latin, Indo European (Celtic and Germanic), Old Norse and French.

    Latin as a result of the Roman occupation of Britain (29%);

    A mixtures of Germanic languages (26%) spoken by Celts and tribes from the North Sea coast of Germany, Netherlands and Denmark, namely the Angles, Saxons and Jutes, who raided and settled in Britain during and post the Roman occupation.. A “mixture” of their dialects resulted in Anglo-Saxon or Old English;

    Scandinavian warriors/pirates called the Vikings, who originated from Sweden, Norway and Denmark, also raided the coast of Britain and in some instances, made permanent settlements there. Certain English words originated from the Vikings;

    The Normans, who came from Normandy, a northern territory of France, conquered and ruled Britain. The Norman Conquest brought social and political changes to Britain, and the French language (29%) made certain variations to Old English to form what was called Middle English. Geoffrey Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales” was written in Middle English.

    Spanish is included in the 16% of other languages that influenced English.

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  • Artax November 13, 2018 3:59 PM
    RE The above comments are not entirely accurate.
    WARU WILL BE COMING FOR YOUR TAIL SOON

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  • Georgie Porgie

    WARU mentioned on more than one occasions that she does NOT read my contributions.

    As such, my “tail” does not have anything to fear.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    @ WARU

    @ Northern

    The Bata Shoe Store was owned by Hindus. I was under the impression that the shoes were imported from India. The soles were made of rubber and were not the preferred wear, since they could not be half- soled by local shoemakers. Is Bata an East Indian surname?

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  • Dont know Vincent…I do know that in Yoruba Bata means shoes…I was too small to know the quality shoes they sold…however…Bata in Hindi means….tell

    So if Hindis were the owners of the store, they were using a Yoruba/African name for the store.

    What does bata mean in Yoruba?

    English Translation
    Copy
    shoes

    More meanings for bata
    boot noun
    75% of use
    bata
    shoe noun
    25% of use
    bata
    sho
    rare
    bata
    shoelace noun
    rare
    bata, okunn bata
    bootless
    rare
    bata
    pair noun
    rare
    bata, onimeji

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  • @VC
    Bata had shoe plants all over the world. The actual retail stores, carrying the Bata name were a combination of company owned and franchised operations. I know nothing about the Barbadian operation, other than I do recall a Bata Store. The ‘Bata model’ was to build a factory in a town, preferably a small town, and then build all the houses for employee use. In Ontario, the town of Batawa was such a town, the combo of Bata and Ottawa. But they existed in many other countries, though Bata kept its Head Office in Toronto, in a wildly shaped building at the Don Valley Parkway/Eglington, on the site of the newer Ismaili center and Aga Khan Museum. Their retail stores carried 90% Bata made and branded products.

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  • “So between the 1920s and 1940s Bata installed factories in Asia, South America and Africa (which he foresaw as virgin market), thus becoming the largest shoemaker in the world.”

    This would explain the name Bata because his original Czech Republic name was spelt Batia.

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  • lol..I don’t know what I would be going for Artax for, if he wants to research more than the 3 languages I researched to expand how many other languages make up the English language, more power to him, I was only interested in the three languages I actually researched, have intimate knowledge of and spoke about, but did mention the british stole from other languages.

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  • @WARU
    I again agree that the younger they start the more they are to succeed.
    One case in point, a young lad also of Barbadian parentage spent part of his summer holiday with me, started playing games on my Sinclair Spectrum. Not only did he play them, he altered the Basic code to expand what they did.
    When he went back to school and was set programming homework the teacher argued that he could not have written such advanced code so I wrote a letter including my telephone number telling that teacher he was sadly mistaken and underestimated the lad.
    Well in in 40’s now, he has been gainfully employed as a programmer in higher level languages.
    I doubt many of his peers prove to be his equal.

    An English lad, Leigh was at college studying computer science when the their Windows 2000 system went down and all solutions were catch 22. Leigh said he could fix the problem, it involved them driving him home to collect his Linux system and back at school he fixed the problem easily and quickly. They refused to allow him access from home and followed him around saying he was a hacker and they had to be watchful.
    He dropped out of college and went to work as a systems administrator/programmer for a London company.
    Last I heard he was the Technical Support Director for Cable & Wireless worldwide, not bad for a lad totally self taught.

    At Amdahl (UK) our director thought that hiring First Class Computer Science University graduates, giving them 18 months of intensive training and 18 months working under the wings of experienced guys would result in fully competent staff — WRONG! of the 12 hired, 10 were let go when layoffs started, the other 2 were up to the job – the lady eventually went off to Australia to work for a bank and the guy who had US citizenship (1 parent was American) went off to the states.

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  • The original spelling I was told is Baťa. The others Batia, Bata, Biata are all various forms of Baťa.
    Their first plant in Africa was in Kenya, the second in South Africa. Both well after the name Baťa was used as the company name, beginning in the 1890’s.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ WARU

    @ Northern

    Thank you both for correcting my Bajan commercial history.

    Like

  • “He dropped out of college and went to work as a systems administrator/programmer for a London company.
    Last I heard he was the Technical Support Director for Cable & Wireless worldwide, not bad for a lad totally self taught.”

    Sid…… for some reason dudes like you referenced they ALWAYS turn out to be the most successful programmers…just like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, the dude who attended Bronx Science, dropped out, tinkered in his basement and sold Tumbler, I believe it was… for 1 billion dollars before he was 18…all have one thing in common, they are true genuises who did not need any degrees..

    .Africa is also infested with pure geniuses who do not need degrees to invent and be worldwide successes…genuis is NOT taught in schools, it is gift one is born with, not manmade.

    ..having multiple degrees or even one degree DOES NOT AUTOMATICALLY TRANSLATE TO BEING A GENIUS…I do not know when people…particularly in the Caribbean are going to learn that,…particularly in programming, which is largely self taught once you are exposed to the basics of algorithms, combinatorics and optimization, cryptography etc…they just need that push from a VERY YOUNG age…and they are off and running..

    And it is really better for children to start from the primary level because they are such sponges, absorbing everything around them at warp speed..

    Vincent..ya welcome, I did not do as much research as NO…but stuck to the Yoruba language I am familiar with, the shoemaker did a name change which served his purpose in Africa, the Caribbean and worldwide in that era….it is quite obvious, he was a businessman.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Peter Lawrence THompson

    De ole man was instructed to come here since it was noted that “I had not commented on your blog .

    First of all let me say congratulations on the effort.

    There are two points made by Dr. Boyce of the European Union I beleive (it that is the same guy) the first being coding persistency and obsolence and cost.

    For those of us who are computer illiterates we would appreciate if you could do a debrief for the benefit of the class idiots of which i am one of the foremost.

    What is the learning curve?

    What from a practical point of view will a student aged x be able to do at time y and who does this mean in deliverables? Will we have any programmers arising out of the exercise in 3 months? 6 months or a year?

    At what time do beleficiaries start to become revenue generators? what is the time line?

    Where is the beef? is not meant in anyway to detract from the sterling achievement but as one of the leading proponents at the helm, note is made of the outlay but one would benefit from your macro vision

    Here is the thing PLT what is the vision, where is your vision @ today and what is your destination are of import for the following reason.

    If there is no destination that is defined and reaistic, we would have started the first in Habitat as there was a 1st with PRT and Toon *** and then ***

    Now a few felers going say bout how it appears dat de ole man want too much information but let me explain this to you.

    De ole man knows the faces around you and would suggest that you use specific tools and strategies of “disclosure” to safeguard yourself.

    At all points while (i) authorship is important make sure that (2) your integrity is not tainted by your associations – a word to the wise is sufficient.

    One closing point that i tell all creatives, deliver something, or show that what you did, DELIVERED so that when dem talks dem shyt%% you can say LOOK AT MY STUFF HEAH, where is yours?

    The National Diversification Strategy of Barbados does not have 3 years, in fact it does not have 2 years and it ent got no 1 year neither

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @pieceuhderockyeahright,
    Your questions about the learning curve are answered here:
    https://www.codefellows.org/learn-to-code/
    You can find reviews by former students here:
    https://www.google.com/search?q=code+fellows+reviews

    A sequence of coursed that will qualify a student for lucrative employment can be completed within a year… the total cost will be about Bd$20,100.

    In Seattle the job outcome results reported are:
    * 83% Graduate on-time
    * 80% Employed in-field
    * at a median salary of US$70,106

    Of course, the results we achieve in Barbados will depend on the students themselves.

    Like

  • This is how real startups are accessed, not like that fly by night shite UWI is trying to hobble together with Gabriel Abed, if you are going to do something worthwhile..at least get it right the first time .

    PLT…check it out.

    “These African Tech Startups Set To Change The World
    By Editorial_Staff – Nov 15, 2018

    Kenya’s iHub technology incubator
    AFRICANGLOBE – Four African tech startups – Kenya’s Pawame and BRCK, Ghana’s AgroCenta, and South Africa’s Sun Exchange – have been named in the Global Disrupt 100 Index.

    The Global Disrupt 100 Index 2018 ranks this year’s 100 most innovative startups from across the world. Compiled by Tällt Ventures, a global data intelligence and innovation company, it celebrates the ventures with the most potential to influence, change or create new global markets.

    The ventures were judged by global brands including Google, Uber and Oracle, as well as tech accelerators and renowned entrepreneurs.

    Kenyan startup Pawame, an off-grid home solar company, is the highest ranked African venture at number 44. With Pawame’s pay-as-you-go (PAYG) Solar Home System, customers can benefit from clean and affordable electricity, whilst also building a credit history that can unlock access to other products and services.

    The startup announced in March it had raised US$2 million in funding through Gulf-based investors to help it reach its goal of electrifying 150 million households in Africa, after which it crowdfunded an additional US$543,000 through TRINE.

    Another Kenyan startup, BRCK, is the next best placed African company at 63rd on the list. Launched in 2013, the original BRCK is a rugged router designed for harsh environments with limited connectivity and power, which is able to hop between various sources of connectivity and has a built-in battery for use in the event of a blackout.

    In March, the next generation of the BRCK, the SupaBRCK, was launched. The SupaBRCK is an enterprise-grade device, which effectively functions as a rugged data centre in a single, solar powered, all-weather box.

    Next on the list was at number 68 was Ghanaian online sales platform for smallholder farmers AgroCenta, which was recently named winner of the globa Seedstars World competition, while South Africa-based buy-to-lease solar marketplace Sun Exchange was number 90. The startup has developed a fintech platform that promotes sustainable business practises by connecting conscious capital to commercial solar projects

    “This is now our third year celebrating disruptive global innovation – and this year’s cohort are a truly exciting bunch. Each company featured is revolutionising their particular industry, as well as the world we live in, and we’re looking forward to seeing how they grow and effect change in the coming years,” said Disrupt 100 founder Matt Connolly.”

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  • Talking Loud Saying Nothing

    Congratulations PLT. Does anybody know why Kenya has such a vibrant, practical and a relevant IT industry? It would be great if PLT’s school could team up with and collaborate with Kenya’s high tech industry which is light years ahead of us.

    Like

  • Sid…… for some reason dudes like you referenced they ALWAYS turn out to be the most successful programmers…just like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, the dude who attended Bronx Science, dropped out, tinkered in his basement and sold Tumbler, I believe it was… for 1 billion dollars before he was 18…all have one thing in common, they are true genuises who did not need any degrees..

    Quite right, I doubt Einstein was the sole product of schooling.

    One individual to really admire is Linus Torvalds the creator of the Linux operating system back in 1991. It’s free, he works and draws a salary from the Linux Foundation. His goal was not to make billions which he could have because of the wide usage of Linux. His stated objective was to enable anyone, especially in poor countries to develop their own local software industry – something I mentioned here some years back. It’s FREE as in Free Beer and in use by many large corporations like IBM, NASA, USPS, SPACEX, Disney, US Courts, Wall Street and many of the world’s stock exchanges, Even Microsoft is a Platinum member of the Linux Foundation, e.g Google could not have reached where it is without Linux. IBM has just bought RedHat for $34bn US, not bad for a company started by a guy in his bedroom – his intention was to use Linux for a project he had in mind but after finding he was spending almost all of his time customizing Linux the idea hit him he could make a business of it.
    Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Linux.

    PLT — That sounds like a lot of money up front for people of modest means. If you start with almost an empty tank and can get up to 60 MPH in seconds, a journey of a few miles may prove to be impossible.
    A Raspberry Pi, an internet connection and an urge to learn and participate in collaborative projects gets you noticed, companies tend to look at what you are engaged in and seek you out as opposed to you sending in an application form.

    I have been happily retired for 14 1/2 years and still get calls and job offers which I politely turn down.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Sid Boyce
    “That sounds like a lot of money up front for people of modest means.”
    +++++++++++
    You are correct. However, it’s not all up front; it breaks down as follows:
    Code 101, $100: lets you know if coding is something that suits you
    Code 201, $3,500: qualifies you for an internship position in web development
    Code 301, $4,500: qualifies you for an entry level position in web or app development
    Code 401, $12,000: qualifies you as a web or mobile app developer

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    And it’s 50% less expensive here than in the USA…

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  • “Quite right, I doubt Einstein was the sole product of schooling.”

    You can guarantee AND he was also dyslexic.

    The Caribbean needs to get with the program and stop trying to turn everything into a major production….so far most of the people their school system has produced are sheeple, human drones following a script and their true genuises are marginalized and sidelined while most of those with degrees are abject failures…but they cannot see it, too full of stupidity.

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  • @WARU
    Your finger is right on the button. It’s not as easy as wanting the big salary, attending a few courses and sitting back on a beach enjoying cocktails. I had a step son who told me he wouldn’t be working past 40 as I was, that he would be sitting on a beach with cocktails having made his millions. Sadly he died in a road accident at age 38 and nowhere in sight of making millions as a Systems Analyst, a job he hated – he didn’t even have any significant life cover to pass on to his young son after his death.

    Everyone with $$$$ in their eyes and contemplating IT as a career should read Jack Wallen’s article
    https://www.techrepublic.com/article/10-signs-that-you-arent-cut-out-for-it/?ftag=TRE20d3f17&bhid=121495013
    So much of it is brutally true – having worked all the hours 24/36 and even 72 hours without sleep over 34 years, bullet 3. makes me smile, 3 am dense fog, a foot of snow around and I have difficulty getting down our road with a motorway journey of 150 miles in snow with 1 or 2 lanes blocked and idiots speeding and sliding on my way to fix a problem is when I have questioned why I did the job but that thought lasted only minutes. I really loved the job and the lifestyle, technology has always been my passion.

    @PLT The cost still seems non-trivial to me if a youngster is starting out today with modest means – a youngster with parents who have struggled to give him/her lunch money and that’s with free education and free bus travel, a rare talent who is more the real Mc Coy than the affluent ones who are able to stomp up the fees without a second thought.

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  • To every upside there has to be a downside and technology is no exception.

    Psychologists Call Out Tech Industry and the Psychologists They Hire to Design Programs to Hook Kids on Tech

    By B.N. Frank

    While American public school systems collectively spent billions to provide “high tech” educations to students, Silicon Valley parents have been limiting their own kids’ use and exposure to technology in their homes and sent them to private low-tech schools. These Silicon Valley parents have been getting more media attention recently for their increasingly desperate and extreme measures in preventing their own kids from using and being exposed to screens. This includes spying on their nannies.

    snip

    According to an August article from Vox, most people have no idea these companies hire psychologists to assist them in designing these programs. Classy, huh. Many former tech designers, inventors, and investors have expressed remorse for their past roles in creating addictive technology. Some are trying very hard to raise awareness so that this will be stopped.

    More:
    https://www.activistpost.com/2018/11/psychologists-call-out-tech-industry-and-the-psychologists-they-hire-to-design-programs-to-hook-kids-on-tech.html

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