Pumpkins and Corporate Social Responsibility

Submitted by Kammie Holder

Selfish, unpatriotic, heartless, self serving are but a few choice adjectives that could be attributed to companies within Barbados who would import pumpkin amidst a glut in Barbados. 

Some of these said companies are the same ones who often suck on the nipples of taxpayers via government for economic relief and concessions. Where is your sense of corporate social responsibility? Barbados as a country has always respected Caricom and WTO free trade treaties as required and will continue to respect international agreements as an orderly democracy.

Thus, the least the corporate maguffies and selfish importers could have done is to negotiate with local farmers if they really cared about their workers, workers families and Barbados.  I am not one who believes in carte blanche home drums beat first mantra, for profit and corporate social responsibility must go hand in hand. Would it make sense to have cheap energy generation from a nuclear power plant that spills its nuclear waste water into the surrounding sea, destroying the marine life and livelihood of fisherfolk.

Hell no.

Its time enough, companies in Barbados understand that corporate social responsibility goes beyond just sponsoring fete and sports, as distractions from life’s struggles.

In lieu of the absence of strong oversight in the high casual usage of pesticides in farming  within Caricom I would like to humbly suggest the Ministry of Commerce and Ministry Of Health seeks to ascertain the pesticide residue of level of these pumpkins  to assure the public they are safe for human consumption.  Perhaps some arrogant indifferent person somewhere rather than act on concerns will dismiss concerns as self serving mischief. 

Let me say importers in Barbados need to do better and stop exploit the docility of Bajans whose nipples they have continuously sucked on and are now pre-cancerous. As importers and retailers you want Bajans to patronize local establishments over foreign ones, yet you turn around and exploit our loyalty. If the selfishness continues I shall personally mobilize a boycott of your establishments just as the Muslim are leading a boycott of french manufactured goods, do you can take this as an idle threat at your own peril.

Some day we will awaken from our self imposed slumber and stop seek pity as well as blame others for our lot in life. To live this life without a cause is to live a life without purpose. 

61 comments

  • Been telling yall for years these subhuman parasites are living off Black people’s backs and NEED SHUTTING DOWN…stop spending yall money with them, chase them all OUT OF BUSINESS, no one needs them, they are moochers and leeches.

    don’t wait, start boycotting them, they are greedy and will never change, they believe they are entitled to live off Black people, rip them off your backs.

    Like

  • It is about selling price.

    What’s the cost of landing the pumpkins in Barbados and getting them to market?

    Where are they being imported from and what are they being sold at source?

    If they are imported in bulk they have to be sold in bulk or the importer is stuck with many pumpkins which have a finite but long shelf life.

    The local farmer has advantages the bulk seller does not have.

    He/she should be able to match the bulk seller or be lower.

    The market should determine the price.

    Nothing wrong with a local farmer selling to the final customer at the farm gate to keep his/her costs down.

    The bulk seller will then come to him/her.

    Liked by 2 people

  • While international agreements need to be adhered to, the government should assess whether the imported production meets local standards. This may require some investigation and delay at the port, pending such analysis of each shipment.

    Like

  • Hey, Crusoe! You can’t sleep?

    Like

  • DonnaOctober 29, 2020 2:11 AM

    Lol, but you wake too, sweetie.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Crusoe,

    No, I am sleep blogging.

    Liked by 1 person

  • DonnaOctober 29, 2020 2:45 AM Lol…. I have no answer to that.

    Sleep well. Wake fresh, and may the Gods be with you tomorrow and always.

    Liked by 1 person

  • We need to hear a proper explanation why there is an attempt to import pumpkins. More important is why is the retailer not buying local based on Kammie’s report. There is a systemic issue at play.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Kammie

    Where are these pumpkins coming from? Who are the importers? What are Barbadian consumers doing about it? What is the ministry of agriculture saying? The chamber of commerce?
    Our problem is not with the importers, it is with the consumers. Massy and others can import what the customs allow them to, but no one can force consumers to buy their products. What about carrots from the US and Canada? Ban Massy. Let the Trinidadians go home.
    Remember, Barbados does not have an effective consumer organisation.

    Like

  • Who brought them in? I don’t want to miss and buy any. I plan to make conkies on my own for the first time. Never made them without my grannie.

    Liked by 1 person

  • To say consumers are the problem is to state the obvious. The root issue is that Barbadians have not cultivated a sensitivity to buying local or being strong consumer advocates. What will it take to disrupt this attitude?

    Like

  • Really now:
    @ Hal says

    Our problem is not with the importers, it is with the consumers. Massy and others can import what the customs allow them to, but no one can force consumers to buy their products. What about carrots from the US and Canada…… ………”
    And then @ David says:
    “ To say consumers are the problem is to state the obvious. The root issue is that Barbadians have not cultivated a sensitivity to buying local or being strong consumer advocates. What will it take to disrupt this attitude?”

    The exact thing only stated differently and that is very “ obvious “ to my six-year old granddaughter.
    Peace.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Willian

    Clearly the very difference eludes you. Consumers on their own will not change the attitude. It will call for a leadership intervention to disrupt an embedded mindset.

    Like

  • @ William

    It is clear that the chairman had his education interrupted, or graduated from Trump university.

    Like

  • David,

    Somebody needs to show Bajans how being penny wise often translates to pound foolish. I don’t believe the average person makes the connection. I suggest a simple dot to dot.

    Like

  • @Donna

    The 64k puzzle for us. How do we get Bajans to buy support local. The craze these days is for Bajans to have an Amazon account/foreign shipping address. Just visit temple yard and other street areas where the best leather craft can be purchased. Examine our attitude to street vending which is practiced cross the Caribbean. Several other examples.

    Like

  • I buy whatever vegetables needed at the village corner market stall. From long time.

    Some large companies only dropped their prices after the farmers markets started up. Think I forgot what their prices were?

    Mekking sport.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Donna
    Come on now: All that penny wise pound foolish nonsense. We have to teach them about globalization; many of them don’t even know the acronyms. All this old stupid talk about kitchen gardens/ haven’t you heard that can’t save us. Haven’t you heard about the millions of acres that the Chinese have planted in Africa? You are from a backward old former colonial outpost. Why don’t you get over it.
    Grow your little tomatoes and enjoy the exercise but you always come with these simple things that hold no weight whatsoever in real world.
    Have you heard about Trevor JOB Clarke , well he used to make ties. Now you think we would buy a tie from Trevor Clarke when Cave Shepherd selling proper ties made in Italy.
    And @ David
    Do you see anybody in Temple Yard selling Bally shoes? We like real silk shirts and jacket and tie but wunnuh so just want to carry we backwards.

    Peace.

    Like

  • William,

    Back to basics. Still works.

    My great draining soil is saving my garden. Just one little puddle after all day heavy rain and it is still drizzling.

    Actually, I have been taught a lesson by the rain on Monday and Tuesday. I was not watering enough. Maybe the cool weather helped as well. My plants took off between those days. Kale and lettuce should be ready next week. Kale seems to be very easy to grow.

    David,

    All it takes is a dot to dot. People don’t understand how the economy is connected. COVID has shown us that most Bajans can be led in the right direction once they understand why.

    November would be a good month for this Buy Bajan campaign. A good front woman like Carmeta and away we would go.

    Like

  • Why do people complicate issues until problems seem insurmountable?

    Like

  • I had a friend that owned a chinese restaurant ,one day during a summer they were dropping off vegetables from the supplier .I noticed he was paying at that time 3.00 dollars a pound for green peppers,I said you can go to the market and get peppers for 50 cents a pound he said yes but not in the winter. I pay 3 bucks all year round no off season spikes so I can set my prices for food and not have to worry if produce will be there or not or have to increase or decrease it it every season or disaster , and it kinda evens out in the end. All that to say if steak price is up people will eat chicken not a problem but the tourist industry needs stability in pricing to exist.

    Like

  • @Donna

    A coherent no-BS communication education (whatever you want to call it) will work with a segment of the population. However the blogmaster is unconvinced given the polarizing nature of the environment because our politics that it will bring the masses along. Hope to be wrong about it.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Do the imported vegetables have a grown in Timbuktu label on them? Why do the local farmers not do their own marketing when there is a local glut? Surely consumers should not expect GoB to set up a public mechanism for this purpose?

    Like

  • David,

    Half of the population would still be an improvement. Right now the BLP has more than half.

    Are there really that many yardfowls still alive? Don’t know any young ones myself.

    Like

  • @Donna

    Cannot disagree.

    Like

  • Excuses excuses by the same people who daily prop up the same political class . We spend a whole lot of time pretending the masses are ignorant as if there is any real leadership. The reason that the people don’t buy local is because successive governments have put no progressive agriculture policy in place, This ties into land reform and education.
    All the way back in the 70s Bindley Rhynd along with help from the Isarelis, was pushing the need for standards , proper labelling etc. I may be wrong but I think his son or relative now runs the Standards or what I think is called BNSI.
    Four or five years ago, I called Brasstacks and told Janes Paul that we were at least forty or fifty years behind in marketing/ selling our produce. The man told me I didn’t know what I was talking about. My small marketing company had Eclipse biscuits in a large farmers market and then we discovered that almost all the products coming into the USA were controlled by one outfit located some where in NY.
    But then again I never run a bread shop. I can go on but …….,,,,,Let the know it alls fool themselves.
    Pay the consultants $30 000 per month to tell us what every Bajan small farmer and hobby Kitchener gardener knows.
    Peace

    Like

  • Haha! William, yuh like yuh run a BISCUIT SHOP instead!

    Murdah!

    Where is the red rooster? Do biscuit shops count????

    Like

  • William,

    People does brek down Agrofest buying Bajan products. The population would buy Bajan. Good promotion and availability.

    Even Bajan movies are now popular. Marcia Weekes does good stuff that everybody watches. There are others. I do not believe it would be so hard to sell Barbadian stuff to Bajans. Not fashion, not art, not ANYTHING!

    These people just do not have a plan.

    Like

  • “I may be wrong but I think his son or relative now runs the Standards or what I think is called BNSI.”

    his son was still there up until 2012 that i know of, don’t know if that’s still the case.

    Like

  • Who testing for pesticides of these cheap imported Vegetables? I am not saying that I am not also concerned about the high indiscriminate usage of herbicides and pesticides in Barbados.

    @Donna, shout me I have some watermelons certified organic as we weed and pull weeds, no chemicals on my farm.

    The problem we have in Barbados is we hold those with power and leadership as gods and goddesses, while believing we have to accept feces as cake.

    Our society’s undoing is not only deceitfulness, arrogance but our selfishness to care about others and ourselves.

    Like

  • Kammie,

    Last watermelon I bought was all water and no melon. So I have decided to grow my own.

    But if you tell me yours are sweet I would buy a few because my seeds are still in the packet.

    Where de farm at?

    I

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Donna
    I was invited to a meeting of our representatives from the consulates.
    Imagine not one Bajan beverage alcoholic or otherwise in the place. I can relate first hand experience of how a community club saved the country from major embarrassment during World Cup cricket. There are people on this blog , should research before they attempt to insult and denigrate others.
    The only reason, I would not expose the nefarious behaviors of those political jokers , who can’t sell an orange, farless promote the country, is because I don’t want to embarrass them or my country.
    Not one of my neighbors could ever say they children have not eaten Shirleys. No grocery bag enters their house without packs of Shirleys.
    Keep up the good work in your garden,?eat well, exercise and when you get a chance go and get a doctorate and baffle them with BS.
    Peace.

    Like

  • @ William

    It is not just the importation of pumpkins, although this is Halloween season, another import. We import chicken filled with antibiotics, hormone-treated beef, pesticides in fresh fruit and vegetables.
    Americans use six different kinds of growth hormones in their beef, all banned in Europe; its US$24bn a year pork industry swims in chemicals (adrenalin, etc banned outside the US for years).
    US industrial farming (cows that are not fed on grass in the fields, but on grain and silage) is at the heart of the post-Brexit negotiations between the US and UK, and the US takes a holistic approach to negotiations: you take all US products or none. That is why the fear for the NHS. Our media are full of these arguments and so are pressure groups.
    In Barbados we just eat cheap chicken at fast food restaurants, but we do not ask questions about sources and hygiene and we are happy bunnies. It comes back to the regulatory system.
    The US takes a science-based approach to regulation ie if you are not ill then nothing is wrong with it; in Europe they take a precautionary approach, ie don’t eat it unless you have proof it is OK.
    We have previously talked about how US farmers have nearly killed off the saes of Guyanese and Haitian rice in Barbados; they have used their massive fruit farms in Florida and central America to squeeze the citrus fruit sector in the Leeward and Windward islands, they will continue to do it.
    Our politicians are too weak to confront them as CARICOM and try to negotiate nationally then will sit back and talk about racism. The Americans will not outright ban our products, just make the barrier too high. Try selling our ice cream in the US.
    Sovereignty is more than getting on a platform and swinging your arms like a windmill; it is about the technicalities of policy-making. We fail our people.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    I have not change my eating habits for the same reasons you have outlined.Every single thing we grow is available from other countries. I have a friend in New York who cooks the same food he ate as a child in Bim. His children in their thirties don’t touch fast food. You will never see them on vacation enter any fast food establishment in Bim.
    The simple truth is that poor people who could at least buy a bunch of lettuce on Sunday mornings back in the sixties cannot now afford to buy vegetables. They better call Donna and get some help. They need to make sure they plant something and put kitchen gardens in their children’s stomachs rather than crap!
    The BLPDLP don’t give a crap about agriculture. That’s why we importing chemicals , we call meat, and pumpkins.
    Peace.

    Like

  • The thing is consumers cannot know where the pumpkins have come from as often the pumpkin is sold in pieces about 1/2 to 1 kilo big and and are not labelled with place of origin, unlike say a can of corned beef.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Simple Simon

    If we were told the retailer?

    Like

  • Anyway me and my planting buddy both picked 20+ pounders today. I had some home grown spinach/kale in [foreign] rice, with a big, big slice of pumpkin steamed on top of the drying down rice. Delicious.

    I’ve also promised a FREE kilo or two or three of the pumpkin to a couple of friends. An in-law passed by unexpectedly and she got a big, big FREE hunk too.

    Doing my best to undermine rampant capitalism even in this minor way. And my way is WTO compliant. I dished out some free spinach too.

    Lol!!!

    Picked 20 pounds of okras. Sold most. Saved 2 kilos for my home which I have to wash, dry, slice and freeze before I go to bed.

    But the merchants are stink if they will buy foreign if there is a surplus of local. Some thought that Covid would starve us before year end, I see the bountiful pumpin crop [and breadfruits earlier in the year] this as a blessing form the Lord.

    May not make conkies this year as the high winds over the past few days have shredded the banana leaves. Will make a big pan of corn pone instead.

    Liked by 1 person

  • From the time it left the field to the time it reached my stomach, less than one hour. Fresh.

    Like

  • @ David October 29, 2020 6:23 AM
    “To say consumers are the problem is to state the obvious. The root issue is that Barbadians have not cultivated a sensitivity to buying local or being strong consumer advocates. What will it take to disrupt this attitude?”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    You want to find a disruptor?

    How about the coming scarcity of foreign exchange (due to Covid-19) when there will have to be trade-offs between the importation of food that can be grown locally and the sourcing of pharmaceuticals to act as placebos in the ‘management’ of the rampant NCDs about to plague the fast-food generation in an aging population?

    Like

  • @William Skinner October 29, 2020 8:46 AM “Haven’t you heard about the millions of acres that the Chinese have planted in Africa?”

    Three or four years ago a couple of Chinese guys passed saw me working in my family plot deep, deep in the country and expressed an interest. They got a cheerful “no”, becausin’ I feel if Chinese people like my family land then it is my duty to like it even better. It is still feeding me and my children and grandchildren. Getting my exercise and vitamin D. When I was in second form, more than 50 years ago, a elderly American offered to buy the land from my middle aged father, ]the American even sent a Sir Lawyer Parliamentarian to persuade my dad. my dad responded to the American and the Sir Lawyer Parliamentarian “And when I sell my land to you, how then will I feed my children?”

    Please note that I have nothing against Americans Chinese, Sir Lawyer Parliamentarians or anybody else. I just love my belly better than i love any of them.

    Like

  • @Donna October 29, 2020 9:45 AM “My great draining soil is saving my garden. Just one little puddle after all day heavy rain and it is still drizzling.”

    Lucky you. I work with something which seems like clay, slippery and heavy in these rainy times. I swear that I should start making pottery/ceramics. But I persevere.

    Like

  • Before I left Barbados many moons ago, there were many vigorous “Buy Local” campaigns, what happened in the interim?

    Like

  • Cuhdear Bajan,

    Got a small pool now. It’ll be gone in the morning.

    William,

    Easy peasy!

    Like

  • @ William

    Environmental health should investigate the source of all imported foods to Barbados. Bu could be a source of educating the general public, and one person who could have done that was @Robert Lucas. But the BU predators hounded him until he withdrew.
    His knowledge could have been invaluable. Crabs in barrels, Bajan Condition, all those come to mind.

    Like

  • Those who appreciated Dr. Lucas’ professional knowledge far outnumbered those who did not.

    Like

  • The just love to spew negative bullshit.

    Like

  • David:
    “@Artax
    It is a matter of principle, did the PdP select a party colour that was already in use? If yes it is unethical behaviour.”

    There are many shades of green, starting with caterpillar green and going all the way up to emerald, including olive green, etc.

    Like

  • @cudhear:

    My late uncle owned about an acre outside the gates of Sam Lords castle. It has on it the family house and his enterprising daughter built a convenience and sandwich store on the land. you cannot count the number of Chinese who have approached him to sell his land. He asked them where would he live, and what would he leave for his children.

    Liked by 1 person

  • My son,Canadian born and bread, eats bajan. That is because I have always eaten it when they started importing it. At first it was expensive, but as the market grew and demand increased the prices came down. Now, i eat rice once a week. With sweet potatoes and pumpkins, okras, callaloo, beans and peas, brussels sprouts, canned tomatoes, all grown with horse down, no pesticides, chemicals or herbicides, I am set for winter. I don’t by those 6 week chickens, I buy hens or mature chickens, goat or Canadian lamb. I have more English potatoes than I will eat this winter, so I invited my Trini friend who helps me in the allotment to come get some tomorrow. I grew these in the home garden.

    I harvested 36 pumpkins and I kept 15 for myself. I just threw out one from last year that had started to go soft. In Canada we have a short growing season and I can grow food to feed myself, my son and friends all winter. there is no reason why Bajans with practically year round growing cant do the same.

    @Donna, it does not matter how much you water. Rain water seems to do something to the plants up here too, especially the greens, they double in size overnight. Maybe Dr.Lucas could tell us why.

    My neighbour behind, an Indian, admired the okras in my home garden and begged me for some seeds. I told him I got them from the Indian lady on my street, two doors down. They are having problems with a fence and hedge. However, I left 3 to mature and will give him one next time I see him in his backyard. This way they are my seeds. He cant tell her he got seeds her husband brought for me from Bangladesh. lol. He has a bigger house and his lot backs onto my neighbour and one section of his fence backs onto me and two sections onto the Bangladeshians.

    Like

  • Dame Bajans,

    I use rain water. Have hardly ever used anything else. But when it comes straight from the skies unintercepted my plants stand up and take notice.

    Well, my small pond is now a puddle. My soil drains really well.

    A little sun would be nice today. Warm sun to kiss my skin, not this cold watery stuff.

    Like

  • “there were many vigorous “Buy Local” campaigns, what happened in the interim?”

    they will bombard you with “buy local” and then allow make it easy for their crooked friends to IMPORT DURING A GLUT.. effectively SABOTAGING YOUR ATTEMPTS,.just as they are doing now….assbackwards.

    Like

  • No puddles for over an hour now. There is no substitute for good soil.

    Like

  • Its with great pleasure I tell you over the years I have been able to eradicate every piece of grass from my property by decks and interlocking stone.I am actually in awe of people that like to garden and grow vegetables but it is not for me.
    Dame I always talk about the best beer I ever had, it was outside of the gates to Sam lords extremely hot day an ice cold banks out of a cooler in a little shop near the bus stop.

    Like

  • Its with great pleasure I tell you over the years I have been able to eradicate every piece of grass from my property by decks and interlocking stone.I am actually in awe of people that like to garden and grow vegetables but it is not for me.
    Dame I always talk about the best beer I ever had, it was outside of the gates to Sam lords extremely hot day an ice cold banks out of
    a cooler in a little shop near the bus stop in 1982.

    Like

  • I too have always been in awe of people who grow good food. I always longed to do it but didn’t think I could. Now I am doing it. Getting better every day.

    Like

  • @Dame Bajans “Rain water seems to do something to the plants up here too, especially the greens, they double in size overnight. Maybe Dr.Lucas could tell us why.”

    I expect that it is the chlorine, maybe flouride etc. that is used to amend water to make it safe to drink,that makes it “less fertile’ for growing plants. But since the plants will be growing in dirt and cow, sheep, chicken manure etc. it is safe to grow food, especially food that will be cooked before being eaten.

    My old man used to say “the food int grow in a plastic bag on the supermarket shelf ya know.”

    Like

  • I tried growing water melons once. I got one melon, about the size of a lime. Lol! Since then I have been scared to try again. Yet this year I grew pumpkins on the same spot and got nice, large pumpkins.

    I hope that robert is not sick

    Like

  • Cuhdear Bajan,

    That still does not explain the difference in rain water from my watering can and straight from the skies.

    Hopefully Dr. Lucas just got fed up battling the few poppets who insulted him unnecessarily. We battled on some matters but not his area of expertise.

    Like

  • a fella I worked with had a farm and grew giant pumpkins to show at the fair, he told me they could gain 30 pds a day

    Like

  • Nonsense. In the UK you can get pumpkins all year round. The ones used for Halloween are of course vulgar and silly.

    Like

  • @Artax

    That is a click and bait comment. Will be removed.

    Like

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