Life After COVID 19

Link suggested by Dr. GP (reproduced from Bajanthings.com

Life after COVID19. Hope for a new world order.

With the spread of the COVID-19 virus showing no sign of leaving the world any time soon it is probably premature to talk or think of life after it is gone.

It appears that the necessary and common sense restrictions on gathering has slowed the infection rate and by extension the death rate. But as soon as these restrictions are lifted in stages the number of cases again rise. It has happened in S. Korea, Singapore and lately in China.

It will be interesting to see the results in Europe.  In Barbados we have relaxed the 24/7 curfew we had to 8pm to 5am.  The next 2 weeks will tell us if it was premature.  It is a hard balance between halting the spread and getting back to work, or just being able to go outside and socialise.

The human animal evolved as a social animal and to try to change this for any period of time will not work. You can modify it but not stop the need to be in groups or tribes.

I think that we in the Caribbean have found it more difficult not to socialise on buses, streets, shops and everywhere we congregate than those accustomed to life in big cities. There it is considered rude to make eye contact with a stranger. That is not the Caribbean way. We get on a bus and immediate join in any conversation with everyone.

For me I have noticed the enforced change when I go into shops or businesses where all the social interaction no longer applies. I hope that returns soon as that is what makes us one people.

Read fill text @Bajanthings.com

56 comments

  • I suggest following the link to the original article, as it really gets going in the second half.

    The writer posits bold vision as the way forward in the post-COVID reality. One would hope that a cataclysmic event such as this one would be sufficient to catalyse unity on the Caribbean front as we forge ahead. However, sometimes we can pronounce the end of one era and the beginning of a new little too early, leading to unfulfilled aspirations. Indeed, the Western Historical Critical Method, draws for a significant part of its methodology, on the view of early Greco-Roman historians that life never really changes and neither fundamentally do human beings. Thus far, I have seen, regardless of the best efforts of PM Mottley over the last two years, little fundamental change in the modus operandi of the business of regionalism. Yes persons involved will tell you that over the last two years there has been an infusion of life and a rekindling of the idea of regionalism, but that has translated into little real action.

    My fear is that rather than the economic catastrophe wrought by COVID pushing us together to unite our markets and act with singularity of purpose, which would make greatest economic sense, it will cause insular politicians across the region to look within themselves, and push nationalist rhetoric of “fighting for own people first”. If that does indeed take place as I suspect any nation, such as Barbados, which might implement the bold policies such as making the cruise industry pay their fair share, will stand to lose substantial industry activity at a time when we most need the sector to be kicking. Undoubtedly, we need a push to get us aggressively into other sectors and less dependent on an industry which as yet has quite a ways to go for recovery, but in the immediate short term we need cash flows, and that is a simple fact. So while it may take a different form following different protocols, the contribution of tourism isn’t going to go anywhere in the most immediate period.

    So while the writer did not specify a specific time line, the bold policy he exampled, it is conditional upon strong regional unity, as yet absent, and the ability to do so alone without the heavy reliance on tourism, a condition also absent.

    In my view, the next four to five quarters will be chiefly about base survival. We may be well into 2022 or even 23 before bold change is economically viable and more importantly, politically possible. You can decry politics and politicians all you like, but the reality is that little can happen with the absence of political possibility. The PM always says that government is about choices, and making difficult ones based on prioritisation. Let’s hope the priorities are right and equally the choices are best possible, based on the prevailing reality

    Liked by 1 person

  • (Quote):
    The PM always says that government is about choices, and making difficult ones based on prioritisation. Let’s hope the priorities are right and equally the choices are best possible, based on the prevailing reality..(Unquote).
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Which one are you referring to?

    That obvious precept has been around from the dawn of democracy.

    There is nothing earth-shatteringly novel about that political cliché.

    To put it in other words politics is about who gets what and how much. It can also be a ‘blood sport’.

    “Politics is a matter of choices, and a man doesn’t set up the choices himself. And there is always a price to make a choice. You know that. You’ve made a choice, and you know how much it cost you. There is always a price.”~ RPW

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Miller

    Is there a point in there somewhere or is it the circuity that it usually is? I don’t recall it being a novel concept but indeed one that holds true across space and time.

    The reality is that the opportunity cost for many of the right decisions going forward will be lost political capital and it will require massive political testicular fortitude to do such. Thankfully, the present Administration enjoys more than sufficient political capital to be able to lose some. I just hope the fortitude to do such is also present.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    The thrust of the submission is that socialization is what defines us as human. The author is longing, like most of us, for the time when we start behaving like humans rather than automatons.

    KK, you have an opportunity to be a vehicle for a new approach to things public. Please do not waste the opportunity.

    Liked by 1 person

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Vincent, re your “The thrust of the submission is that socialization is what defines us as human. The author is longing, like most of us, for the time when we start behaving like humans rather than automatons.”

    And long may he long for that…

    Is there room for the reality that we can socialize quite effectively within covid constraints without ‘glad-handing’ or more direct physical contact with our fellow citizens.

    There is nothing which prevents us greeting our neighbour as eagerly as we ever did with both our masks intact or from the new respectful distance of 6-8 ft.

    Not shaking hands, robust hugs or clapping others on the back vigorously may be a bad idea but warm, sincere greetings can still be performed quite well.

    Life changes and so must we.

    That simple fact of adapting readily and purposefully to the dynamics of life suggests that we are absolutely well pass being automatons!

    Covid need not make us cold and unmannerly or robotic … We simply have to adapt to a new reality of socialization.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ d p D at 11:13 AM

    You keyboarded ” Life changes and so must we”.I suggest that you ruminate on that a bit.
    What do you really mean in an emergency state like the COVID Pandemic? Did you read the submission in its entirety? I suggest you reread.
    I am not going down any rabbit holes today.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Khaleel Kothdiwala May 15, 2020 9:15 AM
    “So while it may take a different form following different protocols, the contribution of tourism isn’t going to go anywhere in the most immediate period.”
    ++++++++++++++++
    Sadly, your statement is completely at variance with the facts. The fact is that the contribution of tourism has ALREADY fallen by about 90%. The only questions that remain are:
    + will the contribution of tourism fall further?
    + will the contribution of tourism recover?
    + if so, at what rate will it recover?

    Like

  • @ PL Thompson May 15, 2020 1:05 PM

    You extracted that with a constrictingly literal interpretation. There is no doubt that tourism is presently comatose, and will be for a bit. However, the central tenor of what was being said is that in the short term when we suffer significant revenue short falls, we have to lay the groundwork for exploiting new and existing industries, but in that period we will also have to re engineer tourism to get us through that period. We don’t need to do one thing to the exclusion of all else, but several things can contend simultaneously. Mr Thompson, Gerald Ford is not running this country.

    Like

  • There is overwhelming evidence that this administration is willing to ignore, bend or break laws and when they do amend they do not follow protocols. I expect those invested in tourism are going to use the pandemic as a opportunity to push for privatization of beaches and certain roads and areas.
    They will argue Barbados cannot survive without tourism and these changes are necessary. They will likely desire an arrangement with restricted autonomous regions for tourists and approved labour. Expect to also see talk of Casino gambling as well.
    This was already where I saw them heading, but the timeline has now shortened

    Like

  • We can try our best to fix tourism, but in the end (like before) the decision to travel lied with the individual.

    Unlike before, the travellers will have problems entering airports and
    getting aboard planes and cruiseships. But even before then, job losses and a dizzying stock market make it difficult to spend money on luxuries.

    The pool of tourists shrunk. We will be competing with other destinations from this shrinking pool.

    We can ‘reengineer’ but we cannot change the underlying issues.

    Like

  • “Is there a point in there somewhere or is it the circuity that it usually is?”

    Brilliant!🤣🤣🤣🤣 He also tends to meander, prevaticate and vacillate regularly too. Sometimes a lil capitulation would suffice.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Khaleel
    Good policy depends on good diagnosis of the problem. You diagnosis of tourism as comatose does not take into account the factors which have rendered tourism comatose and therefore does not provide an accurate prognosis for recovery, or a timeframe for possible recovery beyond your glib references to “short term” and “for a bit”.

    Tourism is currently comatose; on that we agree. The cause of the coma is COVID-19 provoked: closed borders, cessation of airlift, cessation of cruises, hundreds of thousands of fatalities in our source markets, and the likelihood of an economy shattering depression in our important source markets. When we open our borders and airlift returns that will NOT bring our tourism industry out of it’s coma. The underlying and far more long term effects of the psychological impact of the pandemic coupled with the uncertainty of a vaccine and the deep economic depression will keep tourism comatose for at least 24 months.

    Can individual tourism businesses survive for 24 months with little to no income. No they cannot. You can think of the individual hotels, restaurants, and attractions as the muscles and organs of the tourism industry body; they will almost all atrophy and die long before 24 months has passed. Without them in good health we have no tourism industry.

    So you see, Khaleel, tourism is comatose, but the long term prognosis is death. It does not matter how hard we pray for the patient’s recovery, it does not matter how much money we waste on paint jobs for our hotels… we must look at reality squarely without flinching.

    It is not that I am trying to kill tourism, that is far beyond my capacity, I am simply trying to get you to stop pretending. There is no “short term” livelihood in tourism, and hardly any of the businesses which make up the industry can survive beyond short term without cash flow, for them there is no medium term or long term either. Tourism cannot come out of this coma as anything except a pale shadow of its former self… at best a ghost, more likely a corpse.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ PL Thompson

    It is precisely because of the factors you have spoken to that we need to pivot in tourism to exploit new markets or under-tapped markets. Those restaurants, attractions etc that you spoke of will have to repurpose themselves to treat to different clientele to stay viable. I am not suggesting that we remain reliant on tourism as I am constantly at pains to point out. What I am saying is that there need not be a throwing away of tourism just yet.

    Finally, your analysis, sound though it is, does not factor Government’s intervention in the industry over the same 24 month period, that isn’t only about refurbishment but a great deal more, and is ultimately, intended to have a stabilizing effect. The plan is a larger one, not only including tourism, but as I suggested other areas such as renewables.

    Like

  • Tourism as we know it will change, what it will change to it has to be difficult visualize. From air travel, to changes to physical plant etc.

    >

    Like

  • @David

    “Tourism as we know it will change”

    How will it change, Wily can see only one likely change, DEATH. All this crap talk of repurpurusing, re-inventing etc. Is typical BAJAN TALK which will ultimately result in DEATH. Yes there will always be ” some tourism”, the odd expat coming home to visit etc, however torisim as a viable Forgien currency GDP earner is DEAD. This death would have happened even without COVID 19, the difference is it would have be dragged out over several years and not immediately as the case with the COVID 19 PANDEMIC.

    The bigger problem for BARBADOS IS SURVIVAL, can it survive in any social and economic sense that will give the citizenry some form acceptable live style, granted the future life style will be several notches LOWER that the country has enjoyed in the last 50 years. The inability of past government’s for various reasons, incompetence, corruption, nepotism, graft, SOCIALISM etc has in a COVID 19 fell swoop brought the country to its knees. This in combination with the countries arthritic ideas will keep it on its knees unable to get up.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Khaleel
    “… we need to pivot in tourism to exploit new markets or under-tapped markets…”
    +++++++++++++++
    You need to think more deeply about whether and in what form these “new markets or under-tapped markets” might exist… it is insufficient to blithely pull the concept out of thin air and pretend that it will serve to treat our existing pain.

    If restaurants, attractions etc “will have to repurpose themselves to treat to different clientele to stay viable” you need to point towards a methodology that will allow them to do that. I know you are young but I believe you are up to the task. Work from first principles… where is the money going to come from to pay the check at the restaurant? Do Bajans have that money? If so, which Bajans? If not Bajans, who?

    You expect that “Government’s intervention in the industry over the same 24 month period” can help the industry cope. Keep in mind that the industry needs a cashflow approaching US$1 billion per year to cope… how much money do you think the Government can pump into the industry? The $100 million they have promised is about 10% of what the industry requires to stay operational… do you think that will be enough, or is it just throwing good money after bad?

    You are “… saying is that there need not be a throwing away of tourism just yet.” What I am patiently trying to communicate is that there is no “throwing away of tourism” but it just went into a comatose state and is almost certain to die without anyone ever throwing it away.

    Like

  • In my opinion, we will again reach the level of the tourist winter season 2018/19. We have already had many serious crises. The only question is when. With vaccination in 5 years, without it takes much longer. In the end we will talk about the last 20 years since 2008 with zero growth.

    In the meantime, the indigenous masses have to tighten their belts, and tighten them considerably. Not every Barbadian family needs two cars. In my opinion, two cars per village are enough. Walking, cycling or the donkey are good alternatives.

    In this context, it is very much to be welcomed that our Most Honourable Prime Minister wants to cut civil servants’ salaries de facto by means of “forced loans” (the term she copied from me). I hope that we agree that this “patriotic” loan will never be repaid. But the naive masses of civil servants should believe in repayment at first, because they will be voting in 2023. After the elections we have to make new arrangements to secure the nation.

    Like

  • We all have to face reality some time, been telling those in Barbados for years they have been living on pipe dreams, fantasies and delusions….welcome to reality…,the facade is now pure dust..

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/sohee/permalink/2942814789144408/

    “Says growth is expected to be negative throughout the region
    BY KELLARAY MILES

    Business reporter

    milesk@jamaicaobserver.com

    Friday, May 15, 2020


    As the world and by extension Caribbean economies reel from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is believed that special effort will have to be undertaken in order to combat the debilitating impacts and chart a path of positive recovery for the region.

    Inter-American Development Bank’s (IDB) resident representative for the Caribbean country department, Therese Turner- Jones, said that as the virus progresses it will take the region some time to get back on track in the post-virus era.”

    Like

  • Every dog has it’s day, some have two…they were warned and warned but thought fake colonial titles could save them…ticktock…

    “The inability of past government’s for various reasons, incompetence, corruption, nepotism, graft, SOCIALISM etc has in a COVID 19 fell swoop brought the country to its knees. This in combination with the countries arthritic ideas will keep it on its knees unable to get up.”

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Tron May 15, 2020 2:58 PM
    “… our Most Honourable Prime Minister wants to cut civil servants’ salaries de facto by means of ‘forced loans’…”
    +++++++++++++++++
    I am wondering whether our PM is going to get into a similar bind that our AG blundered into. Is she going to ammend the relevant legislation before she makes this decision, or is she going to enjoy another tongue lashing from Senator Caswell Franklyn?
    BARBADOS PROTECTION OF WAGES CAP 351
    “… Wages to be paid in legal tender [1975-16.]
    3. (1) Subject to subsection (2), in all contracts of employment, the wages of a worker shall be made payable in legal tender and not otherwise, and if in any such contract the whole or any part of such wages is made payable in any other manner, such contract shall be illegal, null and void.
    …”

    Like

  • @ peterlawrencethompson May 15, 2020 3:06 PM

    PLT,

    Laws are made to be changed. By the way: In St. Lucia, civil servants are treated the same way.

    I quickly drew up a plan to implement our “patriotic bonds” with which we milk the public service:

    The amount of the forced loan is:

    blue-collar and white-collar workers in state-owned enterprises: 20 % of gross income
    management state-owned enterprises: 40 %

    civil servants in grades Z, 10%
    Grades S6, S5, S4 20 %
    Grades S3, S2 25 %
    Grade S1 30 %
    Cabinet Ministers, Ambassadors and Judges 40 %
    Prime Minister 50 %
    GG 60 %
    Special Ambassadors and other government advisers 100 %.
    Pensioners in public service 40 %

    So the scale evolves with the salary level. The government’s economic advisers only get bonds paid out because it is their own economic policy. So they have to bear the full risk. Pensioners are equated with ministers, because at an age over 65 one should primarily think about dying and not about the shameful Mammon.

    Conditions:
    Length of salary reduction: as soon as possible (2020) until the end of the crisis (2022-2030).
    Maturity: five years after the end of the crisis.
    Interest: 0.5 % pa.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    Are GoB Bonds deemed to be ‘legal tender’? I am sure they can find some official body to state they are. They can be cashed at any time, albeit at a serious discount.

    Like

  • NorthernObserver

    “because they will be voting in 2023”
    Didn’t the current government default on Bonds? You are opening the door, for the focus of 2023 to be that default. The naive masses did not directly suffer, their NIS holdings did, something most are unaware of. Now with a meaningful personal store of these instruments, they will be told, if they can default once, why not twice? The consequences of default will be something they all appreciate. Imagine, the story….they default pun dem udder bonds already, dey cant do it again, dis time the default will only be pun your bonds. Murdah!
    The Lucians may have done it, but Bajans need to more creative.

    Like

  • Piece the Prophet

    “…There is overwhelming evidence that this administration is willing to ignore, bend or break laws and when they do amend they do not follow protocols…”

    Redguardyou have spoken wisely and economically as you usually do.

    Interestingly, while the thread is yet another thread, that theme is central to all recovery efforts

    The compulsory implementation of lays and strategies by this DRACONIAN government will lead to one of 3 things.

    Success which is utopian and thereforewe will see a deepening of the hardships

    A dissatisfaction of the electorate with the BLP for the hardships that follow which manifests itself in the BLP being voted out.

    Or

    Mugabe Amin Mottley, seeing her imminent dismissal from office, INVOKES DICTATORSHIP (one that she is enabling as we speak/write)

    Like

  • de pedantic Dribbler

    @Vincent, I read the submission above before I posted and I see no digging into any rabbit holes.

    I simply disagree that the
    “emergency state like the COVID Pandemic” needs to make us become ‘automatons’.

    Let me use the author’s own word to illustrate how unneccesary that is.

    When s/he says ‘The human animal evolved as a social animal and to try to change this for any period of time will not work. You can modify it but not stop the need to be in groups or tribes” he is making an absolute assertion that one CANNOT socialize withing tribal groupings and simultaneously social distance safely.

    That is wrong in my view… and I explained why above.

    S/he also offers that in the big cities ‘it is considered rude to make eye contact with a stranger [and that] is not the Caribbean way.

    Why does wearing a mask or greeting someone from a car-length distance stop us warmly making eye contact and greeting each other?

    In many cultures folks greet close friends with a simple bracing of the palms together as in a prayer (🙏🏿) and a robust hello or likely ‘Namaste’ or ‘Shalom’.

    Even now long before covid Bajans would easily greet each other ‘across the way’ with a ‘wha up, my bro’ and without close contact chat for a bit and move on.

    So why do we need to stop getting on ‘a bus and immediate[ly] join in any conversation with everyone” as long as we are wearing a mask???

    When I interact with lots of Spanish speaking folks I adapt(ed) to their practice of robust kissing on both cheeks when greeting some female friends… I would have been viewed as the very odd man if I had simply stuck to my practice of just shaking hands … I adapted then … As I absolutely readapted now and DO NOT do the kissing method or even hand shake … Yet I am still socialble .

    We can be sociable during covid !

    Life changes and so must we adapt to it’s movementations… just like science, not so!

    Like

  • 2023

    Barbados greatest FX earner = TOURISM – and climbing it way back.

    The hotels/restaurants etc that cannot survive the few months/years until the turned around – will be closed, bought out in the turn around and put back into business. ITS ALL PART OF AN ECONOMIC CYCLE.

    Like

  • As usual…rushed out to gush about “FORCED SAVINGS” with USELESS BONDS…which sounds more like another SCAM to get SLAVE LABOR… AND without CITING the requisite legislation to see if it’s ILLEGAL…

    half-assed lawyers pretending to be leaders…

    “BARBADOS PROTECTION OF WAGES CAP 351
    “… Wages to be paid in legal tender [1975-16.]
    3. (1) Subject to subsection (2), in all contracts of employment, the wages of a worker shall be made payable in legal tender and not otherwise, and if in any such contract the whole or any part of such wages is made payable in any other manner, such contract shall be illegal, null and void.”

    Like

  • Friends of Barbados

    ” The statement said that the leaders discussed the important role Canada and Jamaica can play, as co-chairs of the Group of Friends of Sustainable Development Goals Financing, in support of the UN’s efforts to mobilise international action to assist developing countries in both responding to and recovering from the pandemic, in a way that builds more resilient and inclusive economies and societies. “

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hants at 4:48 PM

    In what ways is it possible to build “more resilient and inclusive economies and societies”? Resilient to what? ; and Inclusive of whom? Is it really possible to anticipate and plan for uncertainties?

    Like

  • @ Vincent,

    I am not bright enough to respond to your query. I can read but my comprehension skills are not very good.

    Like

  • @Piece
    One of the Prime minister’s first tasks since returning to work was overseeing the demolition of the liquidation centre, along with Maloney, while Ms. Ram still has a case pending.
    Last week the Ministry of Tourism offered a free vacation to 20 UK healthcare workers. Why
    The construction of the private terminal at the airport continues.
    They plan to let the ship go down with Tourism, they will double and triple down

    All of these grand dreams for revamping and reshaping the Barbados economy cannot occur without nothing short of a revolution. Anyone thinking the country can simply pivot is delusional.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hants at 5:15 PM

    If I did not know you ,I would believe you .I will translate your answer to mean:” I reserve my comment at this point in time”. Fair enough. I also have a problem in comprehending it. Hence my asking for your assistance

    Like

  • Redguard
    Not just the demolition of the liquidation centre.🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Vincent Codrington May 15, 2020 5:00 PM
    “Is it really possible to anticipate and plan for uncertainties?”
    +++++++++++++++++
    It is not only possible, but anticipating uncertainties is the primary reason for planning in the first place. The plan itself is out of date as soon as it is picked up off the printer’s output tray, but the process of planning is indispensable if you wish to create anything that lasts.

    A good process of planning uncovers hidden assumptions, exposes the power structures which constrain action, and builds a spectrum of feasible activities with which you can confront a crisis.

    To fail to plan is to plan to fail.

    Like

  • Wages to be paid in legal tender [1975-16.]

    (1) Subject to subsection (2), in all contracts of employment, the wages of a worker shall be made payable in legal tender and not otherwise, and if in any such contract the whole or any part of such wages is made payable in any other manner, such contract shall be illegal, null and void.

    Interpretation. [1975-16.] 2. For the purposes of this Act –

    ”wages” means remuneration or earnings however designated or calculated, capable of being expressed in terms of money and fixed by mutual agreement or by law, which are payable by virtue of a contract of employment either expressed or implied by an employer to an employee for work done or to be done or for services rendered or to be rendered;

    “worker” means a person to whom wages are paid or are payable under a contract of employment (including a contract of apprenticeship) expressed or implied

    Like

  • “To fail to plan is to plan to fail”

    looks like you have been reading my messages…today too..lol

    Like

  • ARE BONDS LEGAL TENDER?

    Like

  • Federal Reserve notes are considered legal tender – I cannot find anything on Barbados bonds as yet.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @john2 May 15, 2020 7:00 PM
    “ARE BONDS LEGAL TENDER?”
    +++++++++++++++++++
    A defining characteristic of legal tender is that you can legally tender it for the purchase of goods and services… duh. Will a government file clerk be able to take a government bond to Massy a legally tender it in exchange for groceries??

    Like

  • ” Air Canada plans to lay off at least 20,000 employees as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the airline industry.”

    https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/air-canada-to-lay-off-20-000-workers-amid-travel-industry-collapse-1.4941791

    Like

  • fortyacresandamule

    Social mass gatherings is not my thing. Plus I have phobia for city life. Rigt now I am in my element. Social animals indeed are us, but the law of self-preservation trumps everything else, except those who are on a self-destructive mission.

    Liked by 1 person

  • It is very clear this government cannot be trusted, especially with their slave master wannabe hangerson in the minoritiy community, the descendents of UKs REJECTS…just waiting for any opportunity to get free labor..

    lets see the next lie coming out where she claims to have already changed the laws to make paying people with useless government bonds …legal…because she believes no one will check, this government has to be watched very carefully, they will have no problem selling the majority black population into slavery to fill their own pockets and those of the criminals who have helped them for decades to rob the treasury and pension fund.

    Like

  • Lotta long talk. Accept that the bond in lieu is a wages cut and that is that.

    They are effectively worthless, unless one can go to a broker the day after receiving and said broker is going to buy at say 60% of face value. Doubtful.

    Twenty five or thirty percent making that eight look small now, nuh?

    Like

  • The economy was overheated, with overheated wages and prices for a long time. The action that will protect the future of the Barbados economy and give air to those who are looking at job losses, is for the mortgage lenders, the big banks, to take an immediate write off on their portfolios.

    They have made billions from the economy over the many years, between local and offshore operations.

    It is time for them, along with everyone else, to take some of the strain and write off twenty to thirty percent of all mortgages, both commercial and residential.

    Might sound crazy to some, but they have repatriated profits for years and done very well from Barbados.

    They will also make it back in years to come, by assisting their much loved and loyal CUSTOMERS, whom we are sure they know intimately, at this time, so that everyone takes a piece of the strain.

    Also, they are going to have write offs anyway, so just bite the bullet, nod the head as a thank you for the past fifty years of profits and do the right thing.

    That will give every business and citizen some breathing room and allow for the island to recover.

    This is not business as usual, though some may think that they can squeeze blood out of stone.

    We are sure the banks, with their sound ethical practices and keenness to assist their customers, will do the right thing.

    Like

  • Watch your asses, these wicked little small island governments would twist even further and misuse these things for their own advantage..

    Like

  • @ Crusoe May 16, 2020 3:58 AM

    You’re looking at the situation all wrong. Once again.

    The government has forced commercial banks to make a major debt write-off as early as 2018, after Chris “Decimal” Sinckler had previously forced banks to buy worthless government bonds.

    The local masses were completely spared in 2018, if I disregard the NIS. On the contrary, the slackers in the civil service even got a big 5 percent wage increase.

    After the government has therefore only slaughtered the banks in 2018, it is now finally time for the local masses to make great sacrifices. They have had enough time since 1966 to idle at the expense of the international capital market. This is now over.

    Like

  • 40 days Global Sadhana* in something like starting a daily exercise routine for good health is enough time to change the brain and make it part of a permanent regular routine

    (*) Sadhana disciplined and dedicated practice or learning, especially in religion or music.

    Like

  • Barbados has good young musicians with “world class ” potential.

    Invest in the youngsters now so they can make money ” after covid 19 ”

    N.B. I was a wannabe musician in my youth but never made the grade.lol

    Like

  • Start planning the Ater Covid 19 concert featuring the best musicians in Barbados including….

    Like

  • World class musicians.

    Like

  • Sorry for the double post

    Like

  • You Tube

    The Nicholas Brancker Band “Feting Family ” Featuring Mikey.

    Like

  • Hants!

    I might have missed it but I have not yet seen where the BU commenters have weighed in on the world class performances of a very large number of our young musicians across several genre of music, including Jazz. I hardly listen to or attend performances these days but when I do I am blown away by the general extremely high, world class music they produce. I wonder if there is some way that they could be assisted to propel Barbados into a new post covid-19 elevation of our island and its music as a major ingredient of a new service economy.

    Awesome youtubes!

    Like

  • @ lyallsmall,

    I am hoping that Bajan musicians and artistes keep stepping up their game with the use of technology;

    The brilliant arrangement of Lil Rick songs by Nicholas Branker and his band is awesome.

    This younger generation of musicians are really good.

    Like

Join in the discussion, you never know how expressing your view may make a difference.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s