Job Creation a Must for the Youth!

The blogmaster listened recently to an extract from a speech by Minister Ryan Straughn where he emphasized the importance of Barbados investing in our youth because this is where future growth will have to originate. He was quick to clarify for those that would assume the obvious the older demographic will not be neglected given such a focus. The preamble serves to introduce the following article.

CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST


The Jobs Problem in India

Posted: 08 Oct 2019 07:00 AM PDT

One of India’s biggest economic challenges is how new jobs are going to be created. Venkatraman Anantha Nageswaran and Gulzar Natarajan explore the issue in “India’s Quest for Jobs: A Policy Agenda” (Carnegie India, September 2019). They write:

The Indian economy is riding the wave of a youth bulge, with two-thirds of the country’s population below age thirty-five. The 2011 census estimated that India’s 10–15 and 10–35 age groups comprise 158 million and 583 million people, respectively. By 2020, India is expected to be the youngest country in the world, with a median age of twenty-nine, compared to thirty-seven for the most populous country, China. In the 2019 general elections, the estimated number of first-time voters was 133 million. Predictably, political parties scrambled to attract youth voters. It is therefore not surprising that, according to several surveys, the parties’ primary concern was job creation. The burgeoning youth population has led to an estimated 10–12 million people entering the workforce each year.6 In addition, the rapidly growing economy is transitioning away from the agricultural sector, with many workers moving into secondary and tertiary sectors. Employing this massive supply of labor is, perhaps, the biggest challenge facing India

India’s jobs in the future aren’t going to be in agriculture: as that sector modernizes, it will need fewer workers, not more. A common assumption in the past was that India’s new jobs would be in big factories, like giant assembly plants or manufacturing facilities. But manufacturing jobs all around the world are under stress from automation, and with trade tensions high around the world, building up an export-oriented network of large factories and assembly plants doesn’t seem likely. As Nageswaran and Natarajan point out, most of India’s employment is concentrated in very small  micro-firms in informal, unregulated business. The challenge is to add employment is small and medium formal firms, sector often in industries with a service orientation.

The Sixth Economic Census of India, 2013, which combines all types of enterprises, shows that India had 58.5 million enterprises, which employed 131.9 million workers. Nonemployer, or own account firms, constituted 71.7 percent of these enterprises and 44.3 percent of workers. Further, 55.86 million (or 95.5 percent) of all the enterprises employed just 1–5 workers, 1.83 million (3.1 percent) employed 6–9 workers, and just 0.8 million (1.4 percent) employed ten or more workers … Further, comparing India’s formal and informal manufacturing establishments to Mexico and Indonesia reveals the true scale of India’s challenge within this sector. Enterprises with fewer than ten workers make up nearly 70 percent of the employment share in India, compared to over 50 percent in Indonesia and just 25 percent in Mexico.

To put this in a bit of context, India’s Census is finding employment of 131.9 million workers, mostly in very small firms. But India as a country has a workforce of over 500 million, and it’s growing quickly. The other workers are either working for subsistence, in agriculture or cities, or in the informal economy.

Why has India had such a hard time in creating new small- and medium-sized firms? Part of the answer is a heavy hand of government regulation.

India is often considered one of the most difficult places to start and run a business. … One of the biggest hurdles that potential enterprises in India face is the complexity of the registration system—all enterprises must register separately with multiple entities of the state and central governments. Under the state government, the enterprise has to register with the labor department (Shop and Establishment Act), the local government (municipal or rural council acts), and the commercial taxes department for indirect tax assessments. There are also several state-specific legislations—the labor department alone has thirty-five legislations.

Under the central government, enterprises must register with the Ministry of Corporate Affairs for incorporation (Companies Act), the Central Board of Direct Taxes for direct tax assessments, and the labor department’s Employees’ Provident Fund Organization (EPFO) and Employees’ State Insurance Corporation (ESIC). Further, there are registrations specific to sector or occupational categories—for example, manufacturing enterprises with more than ten employees must register with the labor department under the Factories Act.

Based on the application or software employed for each registration, employers also must possess a multitude of numbers: for example, a labor identification number—used to register on the Shram Suvidha Portal, the Ministry of Labor and Employment’s single window for reporting compliances; a company registration number; and a corporate permanent account number. Employees must possess an Aadhaar biometric identity number, an EPFO member number, an ESIC identity number, and a universal account number.

According to current labor laws, service enterprises and factories must maintain twenty-five and forty-five registers, respectively, and file semi-annual and annual returns in duplicate and in hard copy. Furthermore, regular paperwork tends to be convoluted; salary and attendance documents should be simple but instead require tens of entries. In addition to the physical requirements of complying with these regulations—making payments, designing human resource strategies, or meeting physical infrastructure standards—enterprises also have onerous periodic reporting requirements. All these requirements add up to impose prohibitive costs that reduce the success of
these businesses.

This regulatory environment offers a powerful incentive for small firms to remain informal, off-the-record, under-the-radar. A related issue arises because payroll taxes in India are very high–for workers in the formal sector, that is.

Manish Sabharwal, the chairman of TeamLease Services, a staffing company, wrote that salaries of 15,000 rupees a month end up as only 8,000 rupees after all deductions, from both the employer and employee sides. The employer makes deductions for pensions, health insurance, social security, and even a bonus, which are statutorily payable in India and would otherwise increase costs to companies. Consequently, the take-home pay for a worker earning less than 15,000 rupees a month is only 68 percent of their gross wages. Lower-wage workers are far more affected than higher-wage workers, who are protected by the maximum permissible deductions, which lowers the amount of deductions from their gross salary. Further, though international comparisons are often difficult and misleading, a cursory examination suggests that India’s deductions are among the highest in the world and are a deterrent to businesses starting or becoming formal.

Yet another issue is that there are many programs providing support and finance to very small firms. An unintended result is that these firms have an incentive to remain small–so they don’t have to give up their incentives.

Gursharan Bhue, Nagpurnanand Prabhala, and Prasanna Tantri point out that firms are willing to forgo growth in order to retain their access to finances. That is, when certain easier financing access is provided to firms below a certain threshold (say, SME firms), they prefer to forgo growth opportunities that would allow them to cross this threshold: “firms that near the threshold for qualification slow down their investments in plant and machinery, other capital expenditure” and experience slower growth in manufacturing activity and output. The authors also point out that when banks are put under pressure to lend to micro, small, and medium enterprises, they fear the fallout of not meeting those lending targets and consequently encourage their borrowers to stay small.

Nageswaran and Natarajan argue that most of India’s informal firms are “subsistence” firms, unlikely to grow. They cite evidence from Andrei Shleifer and Rafael La Porta that few informal firms ever make a transition to formal status. Instead, the goal needs to be to have more firms that are “born formal,” and which are run by entrepreneurs who have a vision of how how the firm can grow and hire.  In India, this doesn’t seem to be happening.   They write:

Chang-Tai Hsieh and Peter Klenow’s latest work, “The Life Cycle of Plants in India and Mexico,” is instructive in its exploration of the life-cycle dynamic of firm growth across countries. They find that, in a sample of eight countries including the United States and Mexico, India is the only  ountry where the average number of employees of firms (in the manufacturing sector) ages 10–14 years is less than that of firms ages 1–5 years. It is generally expected that, as firms remain in business for longer periods, they would naturally employ more workers. In India, however, the inverse has proven true—employment in older firms is less than in younger firms. Hsieh and Klenow also find that the typical Indian firm stagnates or declines over time, with only the handful that reach around twenty years of age showing very slight signs of growth.

What’s to be done? As is common with emerging market economies, the list of potentially useful policies is a long one. Reforming government regulations, payroll taxes, and financial incentives with the idea of supporting small-but-formal businesses, and not hindering their growth, is one step. Nageswaran and Natarajan also point out that the time needed to fill out tax forms is especially onerous in India.

Ongoing increases in infrastructure for transportation, energy, communications matters a lot. Along with overall support for rising education levels, it may be useful to take the idea of an agricultural extension service–which teaches farmer  how to use new seeds or crop methods–and create a “business extension service” that helps teach small firms the basic managerial techniques that can raise their productivity. India’s government might take steps to help establish an information framework for a national logistics marketplace, which would help organize and smooth the movement of business inputs and consumer goods around the country: “Amounting to 13 percent of India’s GDP, the country’s logistics costs are some of the highest in the world.”

But in a broad sense, the job creation problem in India comes down to a more fundamental shift in point of view. Politicians tend to love situations where they can claim credit: a giant new factory opens, or a new power plant. Or at a smaller scale,  politicians will settle for programs that sprinkle subsidies among smaller firms, so those firms that receive such benefits can be claimed as a success story. But if the goal for India’s future employment growth is to have tens of millions of firms started by well-educated entrepreneurs, this isn’t going to happen with firm-by-firm direction and subsidies allocated by India’s central or state governments. Instead, it requires India’s government to be active and aggressive in creating a general business environment where such firms can arise of their own volition, and it’s a hard task for any government to get the right mix of acting in some areas while being hands-off in others.

157 comments

  • Jobs for young people? Provided you have the brains for it, get into cybersecurity, young people. Looks like there will be an expanding demand for those types of services well into the future, especially since the telcos and industry are apparently intent on deploying the 5G powered “internet of things” to make life easier and more pleasant for us all. Of course depending on how comfortable you were with the risk/reward ratio and your personal ethics (or lack thereof) you would also have the option to take your cybersecurity skills and knowledge over to the “dark side” and make even more money that way too.

    By the way, Bajan taxpayers should keep their fingers crossed that the QEH now has a robust cybersecurity team in place.

    U.S. Hospitals Turning Away Patients and Canceling Surgeries Due to Ransomware Attacks

    By B.N. Frank

    Being targeted by cybercriminals is no laughing matter – especially for health care facilities. Non-payment of ransomware puts lives at immediate risk.

    Thanks to Threatpost for providing details about recently targeted hospitals, as well as plans being discussed to reduce risks:

    Ransomware overall continues to be a concern for governments worldwide: The U.S. Senate this week in fact approved new legislation aimed at helping government agencies and private-sector companies combat ransomware attacks. The legislation comes as local governments and schools continue to be hit by sophisticated – and in some cases coordinated – ransomware attacks.

    The proposed law, the “DHS Cyber Hunt and Incident Response Teams Act,” authorizes the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to invest in and develop “incident response teams” to help organizations battle ransomware attacks. Part of that means that the DHS would create teams to protect state and local entities from cyber threats and restore infrastructure that has been affected by ransomware attacks.

    For many years, security experts have been warning about the vulnerability of 5G and Internet of Things (IoT) technology. IoT already has a 74% failure rate. This hasn’t stopped the U.S. and other countries from forcing its installation (see 1, 2). Cybercriminals must be pleased as punch.

    https://www.activistpost.com/2019/10/u-s-hospitals-turning-away-patients-and-canceling-surgeries-due-to-ransomware-attacks.html

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jobs!

    David, wha happening at the port/airport with this technology upgrade that yuh can’t get nuthin outah dey for weeks?

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    The demographic structure of the Barbados population is completely different from that of India. India “is riding the wave of a youth bulge, with two-thirds of the country’s population below age thirty-five.” There is no youth bulge in Barbados… less than half the population is below age thirty-five. We do need to create jobs, but not the damaging parasitic ones that we have been accustomed to creating in the public service.
    Green Monkey is sort of on the right track by focusing on service jobs in the internet enabled economy… but security is only one of many opportunities. The key to success is that the jobs need to provide goods or services to a global marketplace, not simply to shuffle around the few paltry dollars that are already here in Barbados.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Peter

    The unemployment among the youth segment is high in Barbados notwithstanding your observation.

    Like

  • Some of the youth is unemployable, sorry to say.

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  • @ PLT

    Do you really think our educational system as currently structured can provide citizens with the skills needed. For example it is now known that the four year university degree is no guarantee of employment.
    We have not even started to play catch up. I keep asking where are we planning to end up. Forget fifty or a hundred years. Where are we going to be in 10, 15, 20 years.

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  • @John

    You are blaming the youth?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @William Skinner
    Of course the Barbados educational system is almost completely useless. A Bajan child entering primary school this September will be retiring in about 2080… nobody in or out of the education system has the foggiest idea what challenges they will face over their productive life. The only rational approach to education is to give them the thinking skills that they will need to adapt to an unpredictable and rapidly changing environment. This means primarily that they need to learn HOW to learn. Rote memorization is a damaging waste of time. Teaching them reverence for established authority is putting chains and fetters on their ability to adapt. Marginalizing their creativity is stealing their future from them.
    Actually I need to rewrite my opening sentence: the Barbados educational system is not simply useless, it is actively toxic to young minds.

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  • de pedantic Dribbler

    David Mr Blogmaster… There is a major problem before us.

    It is obviously beyond cliched for any politician to say that job creation for the youth is a necessity so that requires no response … however, looking forward it’s very difficult to determine how one can employ the new crop of workers and continue apace with the wide scale automation of manufacturing and too agriculture and other areas where large numbers of skilled and unskilled workers are needed.

    It’s quite easy to say that the new jobs will be in tech related fields like computer development (hardware and software/apps), repair/maintenance and related services but can the tech growth compensate in suitable numbers to take up a large enough cohort of the youth !

    Seems an impossible convergence to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William

    Youth unemployment is one of the major policy issues facing the country. Yet, for reasons best known to herself, our president has not spoken about youth unemployment, no strategies, not even a proper public discussion.
    There is enormous empirical evidence that if school leavers do not get jobs within a short period of leaving school they go through life experiencing hardship.
    Maybe the president should stay at home and try and sort out some of these problems; but, then again, it is much easier making an unscripted speech, arms flaring, than it is to sit down and work out policy. Details call for a bit more attention. Our president has an attention deficit problem.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @de pedantic Dribbler
    “… can the tech growth compensate in suitable numbers to take up a large enough cohort of the youth!”
    ++++++++++++++
    The answer is yes, without any doubt. Your skepticism is rooted in your mental model of the tech industry… instead of imagining hundreds of independent website builders or cellphone repair shops, imagine instead hundreds of companies like Lenstec Barbados Inc., each employing hundreds of people.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal
    @PLT

    Without radical educational reform there will be no true restructuring of the economy. Unemployment will continue to grow. We are the only country that wants to produce a 2020 model on a 1920 production line. Where are the progressive thinkers?
    But we were the first country to diversify the economy and end up with one viable industry.
    Oh I forgot that by 2033 the full success of the IMF program will be known.

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  • Hal

    Again misleading the blog. What is the First Job Initiative? What about the Blockpreneur? Only yesterday this was in the news:

    “Twenty young persons are currently undergoing training at a Creativity for Employment and Opportunity (CEBO) workshop, being staged by the Ministry of Youth and Community Empowerment and the CARICOM Secretariat.”

    Then I am accused of being an insider for simply repeating what I read in the newspaper.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Enuff,
    The First Job Initiative and the Creativity for Employment and Opportunity workshop are welcome baby steps, but they will not by themselves undo the damage wrought by 12 to 18 years of dysfunctional formal education.

    Don’t think that I’m giving you or the government a hard time though, because this is a cultural problem that is beyond the ability of our current government to fix.

    They cannot begin to address it until they address their own mindset; until our leaders understand that leadership is being in service, not being in charge, they will continue to replicate the plantation behaviors that have plagued our entire history.

    Liked by 2 people

  • William Skinner is correct.

    There can be no meaningful talk about jobs without first of all thinking long and hard about what sort of jobs we want to create and whether we are preparing our students adequately. So the discussion must start with what sort of economy do we want and how best do we equip our citizens to take us there.

    Without these fundamentals in place we will continue to hand out weed whackers to the boys on the block and call it entrepreneurship.

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  • @ Enuff

    Nice way to debate. Plse explain the youth employment policy initiatives: start with the First Job initiative, what it is and how many jobs it has created; then the blockpreneur, what it is and how many jobs it has created; and in regard to CEBO, what is youth unemployment in Barbados?

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  • @ Dullard

    ” Without these fundamentals in place we will continue to hand out weed whackers to the boys on the block and call it entrepreneurship.”

    It is called mental conditioning. We grew up seeing men sixty years ago , with a hoe througout the neigbourhood weeding bush and grass from around homes. Sixty years later, we replace the hoe with a weed whacker and call it a “new” employment/youth policy.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    does not seem to be aware of the successes achieved by the education systems of Japan, China, Taiwan and Singapore.

    These systems emphasize order, discipline, hierarchy and what some have called “rote memorization”. They have produced workers who fuel the economic dynamism of East Asia.

    In the Caribbean, we produced three Nobel prize winners with a “colonial” education system based on British models. Since replacing that system with a more “student-centered” approach, our best graduates appear unable to match the accomplishments of earlier generations.

    An orderly, hierarchical education system based on classroom drills can transmit knowledge more efficiently than a system that burdens young children with the responsibility for being “creative”. Self-teaching doesn’t work for most individuals unless they are experienced learners with a large body of knowledge already under their belts.

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  • @ Hal
    @Dullard
    @ PLT

    Its very simple; replace the hoe from sixty years ago with a weed whacker and hail it as “new” employment/youth/business policy.

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  • PLT

    I always respect your comments and you can knock the government and me.

    Hal

    The fact is your initial comment was false. I therefore have no intention of responding further. Once you start with an agenda, I am not interested.

    Like

  • @ William
    @PLT

    Arthur was in power for 14 years; Thompson/Stuart for 10; and Mottley for one so far, a total of 25 years. Anyone aged 30 years and under had their entire education under these governments, we do not have to go back to Barrow and Independence, so let us do an audit: the ratio of school leavers who went on to higher education; the subjects they studied, and the post–qualification jobs they got.
    What percentage of GDP is spent on education: nursery, infant, secondary, and post-19? We also need to cost the brain drain.

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  • Youth unemployment is one of the major policy issues facing the country. Yet, for reasons best known to herself, our president has not spoken about youth unemployment, no strategies, not even a proper public discussion.(Quote)

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  • David
    October 9, 2019 9:05 AM

    @John
    You are blaming the youth?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Just stating the obvious.

    … and it doesn’t apply to all youth, just some.

    Just as it should be criminal to raise a criminal, it should also be criminal to raise an unemployable!!

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  • All you need to do is to watch how cell phones are used to appreciate that many of the youth (older folks too) just will not have an attention span that will match the requirements of many jobs!!

    Working on their own is probably a better option where they quickly learn to be more circumspect with the use of their employer’s time!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Business minded Black people, particularly the young should get the hell out of a stagnant island economy like Barbados and spread their wings….your leaders are useles and will never tell you this or give you any encouragement..

    https://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A0geKen4Ap5dgqwAlCNXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEyNWNiaW4yBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDQjI5NDRfMQRzZWMDc2M-/RV=2/RE=1570665337/RO=10/RU=https%3a%2f%2fwww.expert-market.com%2fbusiness-ideas-investment-opportunities-in-ghana%2f/RK=2/RS=KoMxpeHFNvJjwQUcNxEfaQXNj5o-

    Ghana, a country well known for being Africa’s richest country with a rapidly growing economy, also happens to be the second largest Cocoa producer in the World.

    Culturally rich and economically independent, Ghana is often referred to as the ‘island of peace’. The country is popular for its picturesque beaches and lush green forests that serve as a home to a diverse range of wildlife. Considering the improving economical conditions of the country, we decided to bring about a variety of small scale business opportunities and investment ideas in Ghana. Accra and Kumasi are two cities in Ghana which is suitable for small business startup. The population in these two cities are 2.5 million and 1.7 million respectively.

    Your business choice should not be restricted to a certain idea, instead you should allow yourself to explore beyond your limitations and boundaries. Utilise the most popular places and occasions in your country to make them your unique selling point. For example, setting up stalls at the Bugum Festival or the Gologo festival can be an interesting investment opportunity. Not only this but also the Accra great olympics which can be a good opportunity to promote your football academies. These 20 interesting and profitable business ideas do not require a heavy capital or a large labour force; instead all they demand is the perfect sourcing along with the right decisions made.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Enuff
    “The fact is your initial comment was false.”
    ++++++++++++++++++
    My initial comment read “The First Job Initiative and the Creativity for Employment and Opportunity workshop are welcome baby steps, but they will not by themselves undo the damage wrought by 12 to 18 years of dysfunctional formal education.”

    Which part is false: are they not welcome? are they not baby steps? will they by themselves undo the educational damage?

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    Sorry Enuff, I now see that the question was not for me.

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  • WORTH REPEATING……forget your useless leaders, they have nothing to offer the people who pay their salaries….not even good advice… and head to countries where your skills, talents and gifts are welcomed…do not sell yourself short by being reduced to SLAVES by small island crooks steeped in colonial mentalities…and self-aggrandizement.

    “They cannot begin to address it until they address their own mindset; until our leaders understand that leadership is being in service, not being in charge, they will continue to replicate the plantation behaviors that have plagued our entire history.”

    Like

  • @PLT

    I am yet to hear what is false about my statement. But, sadly, I am used to the negative way some Bajans debate. It is the Bajan Condition. Let us extend it: the president has been making lots of speeches about climate change, but where s the policy. Intuition often runs ahead of analysis then policy. A speech may be a first step, but it is not a journey.
    An argument is a system of ideas, but an idea s not a policy. There is a fundamental difference between being good and doing good. As to the Confucian cultures, we must decide if there is anything we can learn from them, we cannot pick and match.
    By the way, we have had four Caribbean Nobel Laureates, not three.

    Like

  • Hal AustinOctober 9, 2019 9:22 AM

    @ William

    Youth unemployment is one of the major policy issues facing the country. Yet, for reasons best known to herself, our president has not spoken about youth unemployment, no strategies, not even a proper public discussion.
    There is enormous empirical evidence that if school leavers do not get jobs within a short period of leaving school they go through life experiencing hardship. Maybe the president should stay at home and try and sort out some of these problems; but, then again, it is much easier making an unscripted speech, arms flaring, than it is to sit down and work out policy. Details call for a bit more attention. Our president has an attention deficit problem.

    EnuffOctober 9, 2019 10:11 AM
    Hal

    Again misleading the blog. What is the First Job Initiative? What about the Blockpreneur? Only yesterday this was in the news:
    “Twenty young persons are currently undergoing training at a Creativity for Employment and Opportunity (CEBO) workshop, being staged by the Ministry of Youth and Community Empowerment and the CARICOM Secretariat.”

    Then I am accused of being an insider for simply repeating what I read in the newspaper.

    Hal AustinOctober 9, 2019 10:59 AM
    @ Enuff

    Nice way to debate. Plse explain the youth employment policy initiatives: start with the First Job initiative, what it is and how many jobs it has created; then the blockpreneur, what it is and how many jobs it has created; and in regard to CEBO, what is youth unemployment in Barbados?

    If nothing has been spoken about, how could there be something to discuss? I left BU to determine who vacillating and who is not. I don’t have the energy because I am familiar with the way the pole shifting to shift to avoid being proved wrong.BU can even look to the Barbados Youth ADVANCE CORPS, which also addresses school levers and unemployment. But I am an insider, yardfowl, bottom feeder, ‘Bajan condition’…. though all I am doing is posting what it is in the press. I dun on this too.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Ewart Archer
    You are looking backward instead of forward… a common dysfunction engendered by our educational system. The four educational systems you point to are each radically different from each other, but you radically overestimate the degree to which any of them relies on rote learning in 2019.

    “Self-teaching doesn’t work for most individuals…” precisely because we are not TAUGHT how to teach ourselves. This is a cognitive skill that needs to form the core of formal education.

    Like

  • @ Enuff

    20 young people getting a job is good, but it is not a policy. So young people going to work in a restaurant is a policy? Do you know what social policy is? We all read the press, in my case the electronic press..
    Who has accused you of being an insider, etc. Grow up and behave like a civilised man. I said a proper public discussion. Has there been one? I said your behaviour was typical of the Bajan Condition. I do not indulge in vulgarity and I have not seen anyone referred to you in a vulgar way in this discussion. Admittedly, I do not read all posts to BU.
    Again, I am saying there is no government policy on youth employment. If there is, spell it out for a simple mind like me. THERE IS NONE.

    Like

  • Every now and then, I come across information posted on this site that is so outrageously false, I feel compelled to offer a correction.

    So, GHANA IS NOT THE RICHEST COUNTRY IN AFRICA. NOT BY A MILE.

    It is not even the richest country in sub-Saharan Africa Even if you exclude Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia, etc., Ghana has a LOWER GDP per capita than Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Botswana, Angola, Namibia, Eswatini and South Africa.

    To put this in a Caribbean perspective, Ghana is poorer than each and every English-speaking Caribbean country, including Dominica.

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  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal & @Enuff,
    I listened to Avinash Persaud give a presentation on economic growth last Friday that shed some light on this discussion (I know that he does not make policy). He explained that the different programs that are aimed at economic enfranchisement do not constitute the totality of the government’s economic growth agenda because economic growth is fundamentally the responsibility of the private sector. This government’s approach is to make sure that the ownership structure is much different in the future than it has been in the past by changing the investment environment to make the $9 billion in Barbadian savings accounts available for productive investment rather than being channeled into loans for consumption of cars and refrigerators. He acknowledged that the current administrative regime was very discouraging for entrepreneurs in Barbados; in fact he said that the regulatory regime amounted to “criminalizing” entrepreneurship, but that the government was working to change this.

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  • @PLT

    I hope this is a fair representation of what Prof Persaud said. If it is, it is economic crap. If not, my apologies. Economic growth is an outcome of government macro-economic policy. The private sector is just part of the economy.
    The others are consumers and government (I am surprised Prof Persaud would say something like this because it is Economics 101) . How is government going to get savers to invest their Bds$9bn, apart from sound fiscal policies?
    They have been in power for 17 months. We need more than speeches; we need policy documents to encourage public debate, debates in parliament, bills and Acts. That is called law making. And we need good financial regulation. What we have now is a scandal.
    But, as you said, nobody elected Prof Persaud. We want to hear from our elected representatives.

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  • Mia is not an economist. She is a second-rate lawyer.

    So it would be better to listen to Mr. Persaud (and other policymakers — e.g., in the Ministry of Finance) for answers to policy questions.

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  • Article for the BORG……

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/09/stanford-psychology-expert-most-important-work-skill-of-the-future.html

    “Some” of the BORG will read the article and “some” of the BORG may even drawl patrolled to Barbados youth, the question is will any of the BORG understand.

    Like

  • draw parrellels

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  • In a parliament democracy, it is the elected people who make decisions, not technocrats. Advisers advise, politicians decide.

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  • parliamentary

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  • “It is not even the richest country in sub-Saharan Africa Even if you exclude Egypt, Algeria, Tunisia, etc., Ghana has a LOWER GDP per capita than Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Botswana, Angola, Namibia, Eswatini and South Africa.”

    yall to covetous…i was not looking at the rich part…IT IS A GROWING ECONOMY…ya look at the PEACE PART…compared to the ones ya now describing….yall dont want to help build ya only want to TIEF….that’s on U.

    Like

  • Run off to South Africa why don’t ya and see those negroes whose minds have been DAMAGED even LONGER then ya own, don’t chase ya greedy asses OUT…it is about BUILDING not seeing what ya can huff…

    Some i know took a trip to Uganda and the opportunities they saw were amazing…but go to Gabon and Angola, Equatorial Guinea and South Africa with ya greedy agendas and see what happens…..fools..even Rwanda though they have come back from the brink…..is still easily triggered.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    I believe that I have given an accurate precis of Prof Avinash’s remarks. I don’t think it is crap, although I don’t think it is sufficiently ambitious. The devil is in the details however, so if Barbados is one of the first jurisdictions in the world to implement crowdfunded equity investment technology then that will have an impact. We could also develop Local Innovation Bonds for early stage financing of entrepreneurs: https://hbr.org/2019/01/one-way-to-finance-tech-startups-outside-of-superstar-cities. After all Prof Persaud is chair of the Financial Services Commission, which is responsible for supervising and regulating non-bank financial institutions in Barbados.

    Like

  • @PLT

    If your precis is accurate, it is economic nonsense. That is why I think something has been left out. Did he mention anything about Innovation Bonds, or is that your idea? Don’t confuse the discussion, let us stick to what Prof Persaud has said, allegedly. The devil is not in any details. The private sector is only part of the story of economic development. It is a virtuous circle: government, consumers, business.
    By coincidence, I have been reading a biography of John Maynard Keynes over the last few days. Do you know he once described himself as a liberal socialist?
    I repeat again, our financial regulation in Barbados is woefully bad, no matter who is chairman of the FSC.

    Like

  • From reports it was a brief presentation.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wily Coyote at 2:18 PM

    A very educative upload. Required reading for those of us suffering from information overload on youth education for future employment. Thanks!

    Like

  • Hal Austin

    Four Caribbean Nobel prize winners? I only know of three: Lewis, Walcott and Naipaul. Who is the fourth?

    Like

  • @Ewart Archer

    You mention those from the English-speaking Caribbean. One came from the French-speaking Caribbean, a poet, not Aime Cesaire. it was St John Perse, in 1960.
    By the way, why didn’t Cesaire get one, or Kamau Brathwaite, or Alejo Carpentier, or Claude MacKay. can go on. Remember, the Harlem Renaissance was a significant Caribbean experience.

    Like

  • @ Peter Lawrence Thompson October 9, 2019 9:17 AM

    ” The only rational approach to education is to give them the thinking skills that they will need to adapt to an unpredictable and rapidly changing environment. This means primarily that they need to learn HOW to learn. Rote memorization is a damaging waste of time. Teaching them reverence for established authority is putting chains and fetters on their ability to adapt. Marginalizing their creativity is stealing their future from them.”

    Beautifully stated. I noticed you didn’t mention the role that UWI needs to play in the effecting change. I have noticed that when positions are advertised at UWI, there is a recurrent phrase used ” A team player”. The new member is expected to be a team player and in the sciences team players are hinderances. Take for example Vannevar Bush ( no relation to George Bush) an American engineer, inventor and science administrator, who during World War II headed the U.S. Office of Scientific Research and Development (OSRD), through which almost all wartime military R&D was carried out, including important developments in radar and the initiation and early administration of the Manhattan Project. He emphasized the importance of scientific research to national security and economic well-being, and was chiefly responsible for the movement that led to the creation of the National Science Foundation…. He was a doctoral student of Arthur Gordon Webster(Clark University), but Webster wanted Bush to study acoustics. Bush preferred to quit rather than study a subject that did not interest him.. Most scientific discoveries are made by one or two persons not by teams contrary to what one may read in the press. This idea of a team player leads to mediocrity (the situation arises where there is no independency of thought; a collective opinion is desired so that if things go wrong there is CYA syndrome).There is need to allow divergent views and to allow those with ideas to pursue them, no matter how outlandish the main stream think them to be.. Until such is done, coping with the future will be difficult.

    @Ewart Archer October 9, 2019 11:11 AM

    “peterlawrencethompson
    does not seem to be aware of the successes achieved by the education systems of Japan, China, Taiwan and Singapore.
    These systems emphasize order, discipline, hierarchy and what some have called “rote memorization”. They have produced workers who fuel the economic dynamism of East Asia.”

    The question that needs to be asked is as follows: Who invented the technology that is being used by these countries? Originality of thought does not depend on rote learning. America is one of the least discipline countries in the world; yet the American environment has resulted in some of the greatest technological events.

    Liked by 2 people

  • robert lucas

    Please do not encourage PLT in his advocacy of chaotic, student-centered education programs. They are not efficient or effective in primary or secondary schools. They are not even effective at the undergraduate level in post-secondary education.

    We do not need “creative” thinkers. Or to put it another way, the Caribbean does not need to come up with original ideas to be globally competitive. For example, Barbados has had a significant tourist hotel industry for 75 years. By now, we should have accumulated enough industry expertise to launch one or two hotel construction and management firms with a global clientele. But nobody has the discipline, the resourcefilness, the brainpower or the organizing ability to make this happen, even though it’s not that complicated.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Team playing can lead to mediocrity and is antithetical to scientific progress. For that reason alone I believe that the UWI must mean more than the general notion attached to team player. Universities are about the pursuit of knowledge and truth. But I do admit that there is a level of proselytism in some universities. The building of schools of thought.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hal
    You are correct in asserting that the private sector is not the entire economy; nothing that Persaud said contradicted that. He simply said that the government’s plan is for the private sector to be the primary engine of economic growth. This is hardly a surprising statement because it is neoliberal economic orthodoxy. I don’t personally agree with it, but it is the routine stance taken by just about every country in the G7 as well as by the IMF.

    Persaud did not specifically mention either crowdfunded equity investment technology or Local Innovation Bonds. Neither of them is my idea either; they are both widely discussed among forward thinking economists who understand that we are no more going back to a Keynesian economic order than we are to a Marxist one.

    Economics is not a science… there are no eternal verities… it is rather a pragmatic discipline like construction, whose tools and techniques evolve with available technology. You are welcome to continue to bow your head to Econ 101 in ritual obeisance, but by the time anything makes it into the Econ 101 curriculum it has ceased to be of relevance for some years.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Ewart Archer
    A little over a month ago the organization that I work with launched Kids Who Code; we teach computer programming fundamentals to children between 7 and 15 (two hours twice per week after school. It is student centered and not at all chaotic… the children have such fun that they super motivated to come to class, and it is both efficient and effective in teaching them dry topics like variables, data types, objects, classes, and properties. So I don’t need Robert Lucas or anyone else to “encourage” me. Nor do I spend much time on “advocacy;” I prefer to do rather than talk.

    You bemoan the fact that “By now, we should have accumulated enough industry expertise to launch one or two hotel construction and management firms with a global clientele.” Have you not yet noticed that the largest global tourist accommodation enterprise owns no rooms and has built no hotels? All they knew how to do was use the new tools that technology places within our grasp… tools that we are teaching Bajan children how to use. Capiche?

    Like

  • PLT

    Anyone trying to compete with the Europeans, the Americans and the Chinese in developing software tools is asking for a hard life. All of them, or nearly all of them, will burn out before they get rich.

    Barbadians are better suited to older industries. You don’t have to be an Einstein to set up a hotel management company or a construction company.

    Like

  • PLT…remember the mentality is to tell you how things CANNOT BE DONE….never how they CAN…you will be going around and arund and around hearing the same negativity, oh Bajans CAN’T…not how Bajans CAN…..give it time ya will hear bajans will always be slaves to other groups, never independent and free thinking…because they CAN’T….that is the attidute ya get from those so infected.

    could never understand why that type of mentality is so prevalent and still in play in 2019…..which means something is very WRONG with the education construct..

    Like

  • @ Ewart Archer October 9, 2019 11:51 PM

    “Anyone trying to compete with the Europeans, the Americans and the Chinese in developing software tools is asking for a hard life. All of them, or nearly all of them, will burn out before they get rich”

    How did you arrive at this nihilistic conclusion? My dad once told me to strive to reach the top of my profession, that blacks were contented to settle for half-measures. You are condemning the hopes of the young to the dung heap. No one has a monopoly on knowledge and with today’s technology and an ample input of curiosity, every thing is possible. The future is going to be knowledge driven and those of us whose imagination is limited, will restrict the development of a country. Size doesn’t matter: with automation all things can be achieved. In agriculture, migrant farm labor is going to be a thing of the past. There are machines for harvesting most crops( melons, sweet peppers etc). In the tourist industry, robots will take over the tasks that cleaners used to do. Medicine and law will increasingly be roboticized..We are looking at an entire new world. The Luddites tried to stop the industrial revolution but are now an oddity of history. You mean well, but get on board or be left behind..

    Liked by 2 people

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    ….this is a cultural problem that is beyond the ability of our current government to fix.

    They cannot begin to address it until they address their own mindset; until our leaders understand that leadership is being in service, not being in charge, they will continue to replicate the plantation behaviors that have plagued our entire history….

    A most profound statement and one that aptly describes the brain-drain condition of elected party governance. Statements alluding to the major problem facing Barbados’ inability to move forward at a much quicker pace has been argued time after time. And, in spite of the revelations brought to bear to this stuck in the rut mentality, the production of one different notion capable of pushing past the ingrained position of – why fix it if it is not broken, is yet to be birthed from the minds of the ‘intelligent’ leadership lot. There seems to be an inability on the part of our governance to accelerate a single purview towards meaningful change, with ventures that persist on developing our human intellectual index far beyond the concept of a dependent state instead of a creative and productive one.

    Nicely put Mr Peterlawrencethompson. You ain’t no slouch.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Robert Lucas

    Who is inventing or have created all of the above you just mention?

    Like

  • Our leaders come from among us. There is a suffocating culture that prevails how we go about our business. There will be a price to disrupt it. First we need some leaders to stand up to show the way.

    Like

  • @PLT

    This is what you said originally:
    I listened to Avinash Persaud give a presentation on economic growth last Friday that shed some light on this discussion (I know that he does not make policy). He explained that the different programs that are aimed at economic enfranchisement do not constitute the totality of the government’s economic growth agenda because economic growth is fundamentally the responsibility of the private sector(Quote)

    This was my original reply:

    I hope this is a fair representation of what Prof Persaud said. If it is, it is economic crap. If not, my apologies. Economic growth is an outcome of government macro-economic policy. The private sector is just part of the economy.
    The others are consumers and government (I am surprised Prof Persaud would say something like this because it is Economics 101) (Quote)

    Now you say:

    You are correct in asserting that the private sector is not the entire economy; nothing that Persaud said contradicted that. He simply said that the government’s plan is for the private sector to be the PRIMARY engine of economic growth.(Quote)

    Now you got it right. The private sector is part of the economy and it would be better if business led growth, but it is not FUNDAMENTALLY the responsibility of the private sector. That is GOVERNMENT’S. The private sector’s fundamental responsibility is to make a profit (benefit) for its stakeholders.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    David

    Dynamics, social to be more precise, within the walls and halls of BIM dictates various development levels and experiences to what is wider and beyond. It is a matter of the amount of outside exposure to the unaccustomed that fosters a change in mindsets. In other words, a difference in what others do that has benefitted them should become a lust to adopt to see if you can replicate what worked for another. Our stratification varies and you can expect those who have never been beyond the 21×14 will simply be fused into the existing norms and beliefs that they are all that we should know. So though they might have come from amongst us, the ability to go where others, unfortunately, cannot, provides them with the exposure and various experiences from others far more developed than ourselves, to return with ideas to make a try towards producing differences that result in change. The mere fact that they have remained stuck in the rut means that they like what is, and feel that to embark on something else, might affect personal outcomes much to their detriment.

    Like

  • Agree with your statement. One can only be more curious and exhibit a willingness to be different if exposed to competing’ ideas and environments. Perhaps this is why some promote inviting immigrants with predetermined skill sets to enter the country. Then there is the xenophobia factor to contend.

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  • This is a non point. Clearly a government by definition is responsible for intervening or influencing the type of economy it prefers. However there is a leadership role to be taken by owners of capital. It is a dynamic one should be careful not to speak in absolutes. Another mistake is the demarcation some insert between public and private sector that often leads to an adversarial approach. Both must be configured to seamless work to achieve national priorities.

    A committee approach is required now more than ever in a world where it is necessary to adopt a non standard and disruptive approach to be competitive.

    Like

  • David

    Answer muh neh

    Wha happening at the port or in Customs that yuh can’t get nuthin out uh dey.

    Wid this computerization ting.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Pachamama

    We have discussed the matter on other blogs. Big bang implementation. Lack of understanding by players i.e. broker et al. A mess!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Oh!very simple implement a 2020 gathering that will create jobs
    A bunch of losers told the youth that “this” govt had a formula in place which would get the youth of the streets
    A year later all one hear is long talk
    PM no where to be seen on the island and the only sound be sung is one if 2020
    I guess govt is now relying on simplistic measures for creating jobs
    Oh and not to be overlook Prescod made utterances of creating jobs for former psychiatric inmates as sanitataion workers
    What a bunch of losers

    Like

  • You need a whole new private sector, the ones you currently have carry the plantation massa mentality while being racist, selfish, greedy, criminal, corrupt and useless, in a BLACK MAJORITY COUNTRY..they are common class thieves who are well known drug and gun traffickers and who bank their illgotten gains offshore in far off countries like middle east etc… to the detriment of the majority population without whom they CANNOT enrich themselves..,they should all be KICKED OFF the island…..and if ya had an intelligent less backward government, they would be, the people cannot progress under such stifling destructive decades old practices….every opportunity that presents itself to be shared by the people…these parasites ALWAYS jump in front…just like they attempted with the current Cannabis mess and were slapped down back into place….the very first time someone was able to successfully tell them get lost, they will not be stealing this trade too and it was not ya useless government ministers told them that…..they would just pick it up and give it away to them for THEIR CUT….despite none of them knowing what the hell they are doing…that would have been another opportunity lost to the YOUTHS who would then be employed as slaves with the lowest possible salaries.

    They only do this because your stupid, greedy leaders condone and enable them and have for decades….nothing will change unless they are pushed out to give the majority population a fighting chance.

    …start fresh with a clean skate…ya can’t keep the same nasty lot of parasites decade after decade and expect changes or progress to benefit the majority.

    That is like keeping slavery intact then claiming the people are free….a nonstarter.

    You CANNOT keeping doing the same DISENFRANCHISING shite decade after decade to ya own people WITH THE SAME DANGEROUS PARASITES and got the nerve …TO EXPECT DIFFERENT RESULTS.

    Like

  • @ Sunshine Sunny Shine October 10, 2019 3:35 AM

    Who do you think I referred to? The answer is quite explicit in the context of the statement I made.

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    …Perhaps this is why some promote inviting immigrants with predetermined skill sets to enter the country. Then there is the xenophobia factor to contend….

    Many countries are built on the skill levels of immigrant migration. This should never be a contentious issue because history bears out the evidence. The determination, though, has to be made on what level of skills we want to attract and what mechanisms we intend to put in place that would result in a ”symbiosis” that is profitable and beneficial. What obtains in our current state, as you know, is that we have used conventional methods and other enticing packages to bring business into our shores. The benefits of that are not in my determination to be too profitable to Barbados in that crumbs we are given, while the big over sized lump of loaves goes off our shores to fill coffers of various shapes and sizes. As you would know, we cannot develop ourselves in any meaningful way living off of crumbs. Where is the nourishment in that to give us flexibilty to expand and develop? This model that we have used for so long certainly speaks to a beggar cannot be choosers situation, so be thankful with what you get and the fact that we have come. A more robust type of investment interest has to be predetermined on a basis that puts Barbados firmly in charge of what stays and what goes. Adopting business models that have improved economies of scales for countries never considered to reach the level of development they are enjoying right now must not become a thing to be excused or justified under bare shite reasoning and twisted logic. We must at some point take risk. Countries such as India and China, Indonesia and Japan are placed on the phenomeon category as threats to the countries considered the giants of the world’s economies because they diversified and took risk in spending millions to develop minds to produce and create Either we spend the money to build industries that we can profit from and bring in the expertise to show us the way, or we continue to mow the lawn with shite clippers, and spend years trying to figure out how to do it better. Adopt, adapt or we die further as we are already dying.

    Like

  • And don’t tell me it can’t be done, because both toxic governments have been instrumental FOR DECADES in helping these SAME PARASITES push the black majority out of successful businesses as a matter of course, shutting them down brutally or SPITEFULLY making it very difficult for them to start a new business…we know the drill.

    Black leaders REMAIN black people’s biggest and worse enemies.

    Like

  • @ Mariposa

    If the government has a youth employment policy (so far no one has shown a policy document on youth employment), and is still making people redundant, how do the two add up? Is there a disconnect? A job is not a policy.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Robert Lucas

    You are scientist, the sentence is hyperbole, and you are far deeper in thought than most here, including me. Please engage me, while I feel like intellectualizing before my B comes out again. What you wrote is clear, I got it, but lend ear to my sentence, and engage me before the marijuana juice wears off and I start typing attacks again. In other words, do some comparative analysis base on what you wrote so you can delve deeper in that wealth of knowledge you accumulated over so many years.

    Like

  • Again agree with your comment SSS. We are inclined these days to politicize every issue. The politician is now being regaled as the godsend. We have ceded our lifes to this group. The politicians have to be made to address issues of relevance. The fact they do not reflects more on us and not them.

    Develop countries across the globe cherrypick the skills required to mesh with national strategic interest.

    Liked by 1 person

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Ewart Archer October 9, 2019 11:51 PM
    “Barbadians are better suited to older industries. You don’t have to be an Einstein to set up a hotel management company or a construction company.”
    ++++++++++
    This statement is so utterly, catastrophically wrong that it is repugnant. It appears to be rooted in a completely racist view of Barbados and Barbadians.

    Barbadians are human beings capable of everything that other human beings are capable of. We are suited to every industry. The smarter ones among us will understand that it is the wrong historical moment to make a fortune in horseshoes and saddles.

    Liked by 1 person

  • AI and Automation will make many unemployable due to the irrelevancy of some jobs. Jobs in the market economy is used to distribute income, thus decrease income distribution means fewer spenders. How will the poor without money store no existing income? Will governments or corporations own labor in exchange for income/welfare? Will the poor such as vagrants be seen as an outcast in the new era?

    I don’t know but what I do predict is , we are doomed to make many unborn and persons under age 5 feel hopeless thanks to a dinosaur educational system.

    Like

  • Barbados does rank high on laws and fanciful rhetoric but very low on systematic implementation. We are in a society were many nonsensical things go unchallenged because of social invites trump conscience.

    its a fact that we are capable beyond our wildest imagination, however too often persons who are linear in their thinking are given a task way above their heads and not held accountable or given outcomes to be benchmarked. Ultimately, we are to blame for the sheepish docile attitude that causes silence and ignorance to be pervasive.

    For many years we have insisted that persons caught littering be punished. Oh is was posited by a past politician that we cannot be so harsh. Never again will I clean up any part of BIM… LET THE PERSONS WITH THE POWER WHO SEND THE LITTERING OFFENDERS THEIR MERRY WAY DO IT!

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    David

    Where does vision take you and where does the visionless end up? Also, where does planning take you and where does no plan cause you to end up. Take note of the businesses we have allowed to come into our little rock in the name of investment:
    Hotel 1
    Hotel 2
    Hotel 3
    Hotel 4
    Hotel 5,6,7,8,9…
    Bank 1 Bank 2, Bank 3,4,5,6 offshore and so on.
    In the name of Industry, very few industries are owned by the state or local population. The money generated goes out and the crumbs are scraped into our treasury to pay off our debts and occasionally used to deal with structural matters. Very little wiggling room disposing of income into ventures that can contribute growing good minds and healthy states. Check it, we are always scraping the bottom of the barrel. Borrowing to spend, spending without good planning, and wasting through various streams, schemes and cart roads. Let us be truthful here, what really in Barbados that we can say that we are proud of that is working and producing results?
    I am an advocate for investment, but investments that are homegrown. The government seems to be afraid to go that route but have no problem investing millions in shite hotels that do not take off. Ya mean to tell me that the only thing attractive to invest in is a hotel. They could invest in a big ass Supermarket, invest heavily in renewable energy, invest heavily in the recycle waste industry, invest heavily in tech development and the expertise needed for that We wasted millions that have amounted to a few billion over the years in shite initiatives, might as well take the risk to invest ing in something else that might just bring significant returns.

    Like

  • Hal
    You continue to fascinate me with the shifting. The “president” has not addressed youth unemployment, no strategies, no public discussion, you declare. Evidence is provided to dispute your statement and now you resort to asking me if I know about social policy. Of course I don’t know about social policy, but I do know that the CEBO is not about 20 young people getting a job. Vacillating, twisting and reading to respond rather than to understand, as usual. No honest (or senile) individual would read the story about CEBO and conclude that 20 people got jobs.🤔

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Enuff

    Here it is:

    Hal
    Again misleading the blog. What is the First Job Initiative? What about the Blockpreneur? Only yesterday this was in the news:
    “Twenty young persons are currently undergoing training at a Creativity for Employment and Opportunity (CEBO) workshop, being staged by the Ministry of Youth and Community Empowerment and the CARICOM Secretariat.”
    Then I am accused of being an insider for simply repeating what I read in the newspaper.(Quote)

    @Enuff
    Nice way to debate. Plse explain the youth employment policy initiatives: start with the First Job initiative, what it is and how many jobs it has created; then the blockpreneur, what it is and how many jobs it has created; and in regard to CEBO, what is youth unemployment in Barbados?(Quote)

    Hal
    You continue to fascinate me with the shifting. The “president” has not addressed youth unemployment, no strategies, no public discussion, you declare. Evidence is provided to dispute your statement and now you resort to asking me if I know about social policy.(Quote)

    Apologies for missing the evidence. Plse repeat it or give me the time of the posting.

    Like

  • Ewart ArcherOctober 9, 2019 11:51 PM

    PLT

    Anyone trying to compete with the Europeans, the Americans and the Chinese in developing software tools is asking for a hard life. All of them, or nearly all of them, will burn out before they get rich.

    Barbadians are better suited to older industries. You don’t have to be an Einstein to set up a hotel management company or a construction company.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    WHAT???????

    Like

  • “This statement is so utterly, catastrophically wrong that it is repugnant. It appears to be rooted in a completely racist view of Barbados and Barbadians.

    Barbadians are human beings capable of everything that other human beings are capable of. We are suited to every industry. The smarter ones among us will understand that it is the wrong historical moment to make a fortune in horseshoes and saddles”

    That’s the policy both governments HAVE DRIVEN…for all of 60 years….despite Black Bajans EXCELLING in every field outside of the island….so you see the major PROBLEMS are the leaders and how they articulate in their narrow destructive minds their people’s talents, gifts and abilities.

    If you manage to escape that trap they have nurtured for the black population over the decades…you are a success..in their minds…but stay out…unless like now they are desperate to have you back because they robbed the island with their minority friends ..,and now need to rob you..

    If you get stuck on the island…they are IN CHARGE of you and get to decide if you are a success or not based on your yardfowl attributes…..most often you are used as fodder to enrich them.

    If you a black person displaying any talents, gifts or special skills….which is a major boost for the island….you are a TARGET to be ROBBED and disenfranchised so that them and their minority parasitic friends can fill their pockets…AND LOOK GOOD…at your expense..,ask David Weekes and many others who have had to RUN…or be destroyed…we can’t even ask the Professor Headley…who was instrumental in the development of solar…they say he committed suicide.

    If you fight them they go out of their way to destroy you..,reduce and degrade you to less than human.

    The nastiness of the black experience from covetous leaders and evil minorities…they are toxic and dangerous, nothing will change as long as they continue to pollute the parliament and social environment.

    But now they are being FULLY EXPOSED…despite people warning…they will attempt to set up their SHOOTERS…to target those who are fighting back…

    Again…i call for human rights organizations with boots on the ground in Barbados…it has become a very dangerous situation. DECEPTIVELY SO.

    Like

  • Depressing comments made by Kammie and SSS. We may need to build hotel 1000 before we get it RIGHT! Let us stop talking about this government and their failures. Let’s talk about what we as a people can achieve if we had the balls.
    Let us develop a system that excludes the antenna of our government. Let us go down the path of self autonmny where we strive to manage our affairs without the dead hands of government and those parasitic private companies who offer us both an expensive and a terrible service. There are enough brains and brawn on the island who could ensure that the citizens of the island thrive. The BLP and DLP are cancerous and should be disbanded. They are failures and must be revoked in order for the country to thrive.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ewart whatever sounds like a very toxic sell out negro…or a dangerous, vicious criminal minority hellbent on keeping the destructive system just as it is…for his and their selfish benefit…at least some of us are cognizant enuff to expose this decades old evil.

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  • “Let’s talk about what we as a people can achieve if we had the balls.”

    YOU DISMANTLE…these toxic, sell out negro bitches with the dead empty souls…and when you do.,.all of the above crimes against the black population will be over…the minority criminals will have to scatter…when no one patronizes their businesses.

    GROW SOME BALLS…ASAP.

    Like

  • @ WARU

    You are once again correct. I have not heard or seen much of the private sector since they got the NSRL removed. They said it was to reduce prices. Lie. They are not creating any jobs and they are not leading any major investments for growth. Oh, I forgot ; I heard them complaining they can’t get the cars out of the port.
    The private sector has the Duopoly in its pocket.

    The Duopoly Rules

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    DSLN

    I would say the same thing if the situation in Barbados was not depressing, and we want to pretend that after many years of it existing the way that it has for so long, we can spur hope in the direction of the people to rise up and do something about it. I would love to see it happen, believe me, I do. But, let us examine and put your comment into a context and decipher it. Here is what we get? A figment of a pipe dream or a conjure of the imagination for a hope that we keep on hoping since the post-independence period. It is the reason why the eloquent blog master is calling for leadership that is effective and base on direction that the entire island can follow. If the people are to achieve anything, what are they going to achieve it with? Grass, potato slip, eddoes and trays in hand? Are they going to throw an island-wide big ass meeting term to assist in Barbados development by building businesses of their own. Perhaps they will realise after the 1000 hotels are built that they can all start planting organic kitchen gardens to sell their produce to the hotels for rates that the hotels will fling on them. What about the great divide that exist on the island. Who will mend the bridges between haves and have nots? By the wayl, tho, tho, which people you talking bout, bosie?

    Like

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Donna

    Girl, you does not know how to ignore shite went you read it? Not all things are to be interpreted.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh loss !! We lost in truth.Where are the recommendations for job creation ? Who is responsible for job creation? What factors drive job creation? I think we need to dig a little deeper for the obvious facts.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Vincent Codrington

    What moves Barbados have afoot for job creation. What is established for young people to execute their creative imaginations? Will the approach to job creation come from the usual conventionals such as investment, investment, and investment. This is a very interesting topic.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Any of you BU bloggers going to create jobs in Barbados ?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Hants October 10, 2019 10:47 AM
    “Any of you BU bloggers going to create jobs in Barbados?”
    +++++++++++++
    Yes!

    Liked by 2 people

  • https://www.facebook.com/groups/1832542123658358/permalink/2540854412827122/

    Gotta love the Chinese.

    Just to drive home my point…Rihanna who resides and works out of a MAJORITY WHITE country…and we all know how the US can be re race relations…..absolutely REFUSED to compromise her INTEGRITY to SELL OU her black brethren Colin Kaepernick to the racist league…she told them straight up to fcuk off.

    ….that is called standing up for your people…which PROVES as we have been saying all along that the trash in the parliament and bar association…DELIBERATELY and with MALICE aforethought SELL OUT their own black majority to criminal minorities and anyone who would bribe them…THEY WERE NEVER FORCED…that is the nature of the sell out negros.

    Many have tried to create jobs for the people outside of the toxic slave system over the decades and were destroyed..it will be easier now though..they dont like the exposure.

    Like

  • Vincent…they MUST be dismantled…they have successfully destroyed the island with corruption, now flying, begging Mia fully expect others to pay for what they themselves have done….fat chance.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Rihanna is pure loyalty…this is what you call a role model for Black people in Barbados and the Caribbean…..something the young people. can emulate…certainly can’t follow their toxic, corrupt leaders.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/sohee/permalink/2469707936455098/

    Like

  • The discussion has to be about scale, how do we move the needle in a way to move the needle significantly.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @David October 10, 2019 12:11 PM
    The following three things are required to achieve job creation and economic growth at scale:
    1. A change of mindset among Bajans which moves from the fruitless expectation that the government will solve their problems, to the realization that it is their own responsibility as citizens to create change. This change also involves escaping from the historical plantation racism which results in such cognitive distortions as that Bajans “are better suited to older industries.”
    2. Redeployment of local capital resources to productive investment rather than consumer goods. As long as we rely on foreign direct investment we will be continuing to enslave ourselves to their foreign agenda and their foreign priorities. A significant percentage (30%) of the $6 billion in local savings needs to be put to work through such innovations in Barbadian capital markets as Local Innovation Bonds and crowd-sourced equity investment.
    3. Reinvention of the Bajan education system to serve the 21st century rather than the 19th. We need to learn from global leaders like Finland and Denmark, but contextualize that learning to our specific history and challenges. We need to reduce the class stratification in our system: stop pretending that Harrison and Queens are “Colleges” rather than secondary schools; incorporate apprenticeship type training into the secondary school curricula; build a national service program for school leavers without any stupid militaristic “discipline” but with entrepreneurial venture training and the chance for young people to acquire ownership stakes in the businesses they help develop.

    Like

  • First ya have to REMOVE those in the parliament…being paid a salary by taxpayers, acting like they are doing the people a favor, while things are getting steadily worse….and people aren ot happy, they are complaining bitterly….they all want Mottley and her Crew gone..

    “#BTEditorial – 500 days of the Mottley crew
    Article by
    Barbados TodayPublished on
    October 8, 2019
    The landmark of 500 days of the life of the current administration of the Government of Barbados offers the opportunity for sober reflection on the performance of the largest Cabinet in Barbadian history.

    Granted, these ministers who serve at the pleasure of the Prime Minister each entered into existing portfolios or founded new ones in a bid to right a tottering ship of state, nearly foundering on the rocks of incompetence, economic stagnation and apathy.

    But now serious questions must be asked as to whether it is not now time to assess whether the individuals entrusted with the general direction and control of the Government of Barbados as currently configured may long continue to bask in the glow of prime ministerial favour.

    This is ultimately a question that can only be answered by the First Among Equals in Bay Street

    Like

  • David
    Is facilitating and promoting entrepreneurship part of what is required? Training and re-training? Access to cheap finance? Is intervention in the labour force-incentivising apprenticeships, job attachments etc? A new approach to recruitment? Access to government procurement?

    Like

  • YES and YES

    “2. Redeployment of local capital resources to productive investment rather than consumer goods. As long as we rely on foreign direct investment we will be continuing to enslave ourselves to their foreign agenda and their foreign priorities.

    Reinvention of the Bajan education system to serve the 21st century rather than the 19th. We need to learn from global leaders like Finland and Denmark, but contextualize that learning to our specific history and challenges. We need to reduce the class stratification in our system: stop pretending that Harrison and Queens are “Colleges” rather than secondary schools; incorporate apprenticeship type training into the secondary school curricula; build a national service program for school leavers without any stupid militaristic “discipline” but with entrepreneurial venture training and the chance for young people to acquire ownership stakes in the businesses they help develop.”

    stop calling high schools colleges UNLESS they are on par with GIFTED SCHOOLS like Hunter…which is not even called a college because it is a GIFTED HIGH SCHOOL….or even Stuyvesant HIGH….a college is NOT a high school and vice versa…

    .yes sixth forms are really 2 year ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS…but…it is time to define and separate the 2……

    “Under two ministers of transport, Barbados has had to endure possibly the worst level of bus service in history.”

    And to think this is barbadostoday exposing this…will wonders never cease….wuh i can remember one of those two ministers cussing me very soundly on BU for the same Peter….wuhloss…..

    we are entering a brand new phase of exposure that started with the very unfortunate Stephen Archer…do not blink…according to what am hearing.

    Like

  • May i extend the info to include that there is Hunter High School for gifted students and then there is Hunter College…the two are separate and distinct..

    Like

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