The Grenville Phillips Column – Situation Normal – All Fouled Up

Last week, I visited the cargo port at Grantley Adams International Airport to receive computer equipment.  To clear it, I just had to pay $10.00 stamp duty.  As I reached for my wallet to pay, I heard those four familiar words that all Barbadians who interact with Government departments know all too well: “The system is down.”  Situation normal.

They explained that this would not stop me from receiving the equipment.  All I had to do was to travel to the Bridgetown Port, pay them the $10.00, return with the receipt, and collect my goods.  Polite inefficiency.

People all over the world pay money in exchange for products.  Neither: bad weather, epidemics, wars, nor famines can affect this type of commerce.  But in Barbados, we have our computer system that can frustrate all commercial activity.  This is a secret weapon that can end all wars, and we have tested it on ourselves for far too long.  Perhaps we should export it to warring nations.

How can a computer system prevent someone from recording the transaction in a receipt book, and then transferring this information to the computer when the system is back up?  Why is that so impossible for our Ministers to figure out?

Government inefficiency is the main cause of private sector unproductivity.  It is the extremely poor management of public services that makes Barbados a challenging place to do business.

For those who have been around for a while, we know the likely reason why the system is down.  It is the same reason why almost everything that the Government purchases must be very high-maintenance, very high-cost, and not fit for purpose.  It is the way of the corrupting no-bid contracts, which must go to favoured political supporters.

The normal way of ensuring quality, at an economical price, is through competitive tendering.  However, those who contribute to political campaigns are shielded from competing, and tend to be the least competent.   Since there is no competition, they can charge twice what it would normally cost to do the work.  This allows them to make more political contributions when called upon.  It also means higher taxes for us to pay them this ‘contribution’ – thanks Ministers.

When projects are given to those less-competent political supporters, we can expect that anything that they touch will be done poorly, and require excessive maintenance.  So we can expect the excuses that we are now accustomed, like: the system is down, schools openings are delayed, the department is closed for cleaning, busses and garbage trucks have broken down, the operating theatre is down, the equipment is not working, etc.

Barbados can be a challenging place to do business for those who do not participate in corruption.  To simply pay $10.00 to the Government of Barbados, I must stop working on my client’s projects for a relatively long period of time.

I hate corruption.  However, I understand how some people can be so frustrated by the unnecessary inefficiencies, that they can be tempted to pay a ‘tip’ just get to the next step of an inefficient process.

Barbados’ main problem is very poor management.  It has nothing to do with the amount of resources available.  Our political leaders simply do not manage public services well.  Therefore, we can bring in 300 buses and garbage trucks, and expect that most of them will soon stop working.

We can hire 10 new judges, and frustrate them in the same badly managed judicial system – so we can expect 10 times the number of adjournments and lost files.  We keep putting the cart before the horse.  Why not properly manage the resources that we have, and then determine whether we actually need any more resources?  Why is that so hard?  It is not.  But we must be made to think that it is.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer and President of Solutions Barbados.  He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

156 comments

  • Vincent Codrington

    Excellent!. The problem in this country is management. The latter includes being pragmatic. But if we just follow the rules, like robots ,we will never make progress.

    I disagree with you ,however, in your suggestion that it is the political class that manages. They do not. It is their constant efforts to interfere in management that is causing system failure.

    Like

  • Hi Vincent:

    Barbados’ problem of poor management of public services is not unique to Barbados. Most countries have a similar problem. To address this common problem, the ISO developed the international management standard ISO 9001. It has worked very well in the public services of several countries.

    To bring us relief, the CEO’s of every statutory corporation should have recommended to their boards, that the international quality management system should be implemented. By now, every board should have instructed their CEOs to implement the ISO 9001 system. That neither of these things have been done speaks to their gross negligence, incompetence, and heartlessness.

    When the CEOs and Boards fail us so miserably, it is up to the Minister (who appointed the board) to provide guidance. That they have allowed us to needlessly suffer for so long also speaks to their gross negligence, incompetence, and heartlessness.

    Barbados’ twin problem is corruption. The source of this corruption is the no-bid contracts. The current administration has given out over $100M corrupting no-bid contracts in this short period of time.

    The Ministers approve these corrupt practises. The Ministers allow the poor management practises. Why should they then be absolved from their own actions and negligence?

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  • @Nextparty246

    ISO9001 cannot solve the problems of Customs unless one is going to bring in new vetted Managers outside of Barbados.

    The problem corruption is way too endemic.

    I can’t tell you how many times I have been hit by Customs Supervisors and workers for kickbacks and handouts including Inspectors.

    If it was only bad Management ISO9001 would have a great potential for success in increasing accountability and productivity.

    However you have a system where everybody “thiefing” from top to bottom for many years and laughing all the way to the big houses and numerous trips

    Liked by 1 person

  • Lol…an ISO trap article. With a sprinkle of corruption.

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  • Vincent Codrington

    Wuh Loss!!

    Like

  • The ISO Taliban in all his glory. His contributions are so similar that some already believe that, as with Mariposa, he is only an Internet bot from the workshop of Charles “Wizard” Jong.

    Ten more contributions of this kind and our leader will remain in power until 2050. However, to be on the safe side we need a photo of GP2 with Donville in the background. So that we can be sure that he will go down again in the next election.

    Like

  • The man manages to insult the government, the administration and the new judges in one contribution.

    Not even Tron is able to do that.

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  • @ nextparty246:
    “The Ministers approve these corrupt practises. The Ministers allow the poor management practises. Why should they then be absolved from their own actions and negligence?”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Why do you think ‘today’s generation of educated people’ go into politics?
    Because they have fallen into some deep pit of altruism fuelled with the ambition of creating a ‘better’ society born out of idealistic views heard during their first year at university?

    They go into politics as a ‘career’ path in order to gain control over the taxpayers’ hard-earned money aka the Treasury.

    They see that the control of money is the pathway to Power; not knowledge (ISO 9001 and all that) as is your wont to suggest.

    Don’t you think that the same politicians and senior public servants have been exposed (and in some cases, formally inculcated) to the same sound basic principles of management which you are trying to foist on a ‘class’ of con artists who do not give a rat’s rectum about your ISO 9001 which would effectively put an end to their dirty ways of corruption and kickbacks?

    Just pay a visit to the depot called the workshop of the Ministry of Transport and Works (forget about the Maintenance part) and see the Public Sector version of ISO 9001.

    Why not ‘spy’ into the compound of the Old General Hospital and see for yourself a living version of a graveyard for abandoned vehicles now overrun with wild bush and occupied by rats but which were once used by the Ministry of Health, the very agency which ought to be the exemplar of public hygiene and environmental protection.

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  • Slowly but surely when all the deception is removed, it would be exposed that the Duopoly has mismanaged the country. The much maligned public service, has saved the country from total collapse thereby avoiding what Hal Austin calls “ a failed state”.
    The political contracts will continue because that’s how the Duopoly does business.
    The Duopoly always looks for scapegoats:
    Problems in Health services blame the nurses
    Problems in Education blame the teachers
    Problems in Law Enforcement blame the police
    Problems collecting garbage blame the sanitation workers
    There is no accountability. Rather than hold the Duopoly responsible, we blame citizens, drink cool aid, cuss people and defend the political villains on George and Roebuck Streets at all costs.

    The Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 1 person

  • Will this talk of ISO being our saviour and salvation ever end, as I for one am tired hearing it.

    ISO Is nothing but a management plan that’s all it is. It is no silver bullet capable of slaying the vampire of a broken civil service. Who do you think will have the responsibility of implementing this miracle program of yours, but the same dam civil service.

    You have a system of management that is over 50 years old, with little or no accountability and no party has ever addressed it. You have a broken tax collection system with more leaks than a WWD old main and you think a managemt program will fix it? For God’s sake bury the blasted talk about ISO and realise that you first need a complete overhaul of government and the civil service. One where accountability has its consequences and where the basics like annual audited financials are demanded and not “asked” for.

    If you got a mechanic that can’t use a spanner, you going give him a computerised auto diagnostic system and expect that going make him a good mechanic!

    Stop living in La La Land and join us in reality and for God sake I beg you, stop with the ISO talk it passed it sell by date since May 2018.

    Liked by 2 people

  • They see that the control of money is the pathway to Power; not knowledge (ISO 9001 and all that) as is your wont to suggest.
    xxxxxxxxxxxx

    I like Grenville but he must face the realities of local happenings and shenanigans.

    Rotten to the core.

    THE ONLY PUNCHING ABOVE THE WEIGHT IN BARBADOS ARE KICKBACKS AND COLLUSION.

    LET BEAVIS AND BUTTHEAD COME AND DISPROVE THIS.

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  • @ John A

    We have to hope that Brother Grenville soon realizes that the Duopoly doesn’t engage in serious policy discussions. After all he said that he or the engineering professionals presented Sandiford with guidelines on building codes that were accepted. Nothing was done. The codes passed through Arthur , Thompson and Stuart and were never implemented. Then a few days ago, we learned that we’re going to get some new building codes.
    Question to Grenville: Are the plans he presented to Sandiford now obsolete?

    The Duopoly Rules

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  • @ William.

    Will the squatters at the airport have their properties retrofitted to these “phantom” codes, paid for of course by the bajan taxpayer too then?

    Talk cheap and promises cheaper!

    Liked by 1 person

  • GP’s Christianity prevents him from using the original wording of SNAFU, “situation normal all fucked up” as originally coined by the military.
    Hell yes, I couldn’t get my temporary drivers license because the “system is down” come back tomorrow

    Liked by 2 people

  • Hi Baje:

    For your information, the customs department in El Salvador attracted typical complaints of delays, corruption, and significant abandonment of goods.

    Once they implemented the ISO management standard, it was quickly transformed into the most modern customs department in South America, with significantly improved efficiency and almost no complaints. Not a single employee was dismissed, even though many had worked in the Ministry of Finance for over 20 years and were over 50 years old.

    Barbados is a member of the ISO organisation, and the ISO 9001 international standard was developed for all nations, including ours. So why are we the only nation on this planet to formally reject the ISO 9001 quality management standard? Because we are just too damn stupid. We listen to the worst of us as they criticize an international standard. Who does that? Only the most heartless among us who want the public to suffer, and public workers to be frustrated.

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  • @ William

    Ok this is what going happen with the building codes so we can have UREGENT implementation. Wunna ready?

    Seeing that they was given to Sandford that mean dem old right? So we will set up a committee to review them first. That could take 2 years, but don’t worry we got it. Now when the committee done we going do a white paper On the findings, followed by a green paper and an orange paper ( circa 2022). Now once the 3 papers done and we get a working paper, we going then send it back to the committee for a final draft (circa 2025). Once we get that back we going then take it to parliament and amend a few laws and invent 20 new ones for the town planning to implement (circa 2027). By then they will be 1200 houses up by de airport though and the squatters going got avenues with names as the development so big! So you will have LIAT DRive and American Drive along with Virgin Crescent etc. But don’t worry once the TCP get that sort out, he will look at the new laws wunna want implement with the new codes etc.

    If it didn’t such a dam disgrace it would be perfect for A Laff It Off skit this year!

    Oh and if I see it there I coming for commission as it is copyright infringement and we going court. Wait hold on that could take 20 years! Use the dam thing for free do once I there to get a Laff.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Hi William:

    Barbados received a grant to produce a building code, which was finally published in 1993 while PM Sandiford was in office. It was developed by an Australian, and feedback was provided by local professionals between 1991 and 1993.

    The Code is still relevant. It was actually far ahead of its time. Parts of it were literally copied by other Caribbean countries.

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  • @ Grenville

    Thanks for your response. As expected 26 years later we are now hearing about getting a new building code. That’s exactly what I mean about how the Duopoly operates.
    Shameful.

    The Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ John A

    Why can’t we just implement the codes published nearly thirty years ago. ? Grenville says they are still relevant; were ahead of their time and have been implemented in other Caribbean countries.
    This should be exposed as a national disgrace.

    Like

  • @ William.

    No no no! You get here and say them was given to Sandford so them is DEMS building codes. I got to now set up a committee or 2 and review them and have a few different colour papers do, so that if they ever see the light of day they will be BEES building codes.

    Plus when you rush my tail to bring them who I going get enforce them, surely not the TCP? I mean after all he let 300 houses get build up there in “Squattersville” and a big able cement bond pun de spring garden without approval.

    No you cool you tool and let things take it course. After all taking you time ain t laziness. Plus I got to sleep pun it too so good night!

    Can’t understand ever body want Everything do now all of a sudden. Wunna ain t known it is soon Christmas and I got hampers to plan!

    Stupes!😁

    John A (MP for Airport North)

    Liked by 1 person

  • @nextparty246 September 10, 2019 11:27 PM

    I havre one statement, BARBADOS HAS NOT LEGISLATED the Building Code, Electrical Code etc.so these documents are meaningless in law. Barbados does not have any building or electrical codes that are mandated under law. Guess what happens, CHAIOUS. TURD WORLD CORRUPTION operating at it’s BEST.

    Like

  • Let the blogmaster repeat the question asked by Grenville et al – why have successive governments not legislated the Building Code?

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  • @Wily

    You have raised a point I have raised on a number of occasions in a different way: I believe most, or at least a large number, of house fires in Barbados are caused by electrical faults.
    Who investigates these fires?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David “Let the blogmaster repeat the question asked by Grenville et al – why have successive governments not legislated the Building Code?”

    Answer : It probaly was not politically expedient. Not sensational enogh to get press coverage……waiting for a major catastrophy. It’s all about political optics. Almost thirty years later might just be about the right time……..who knows ……..who really cares. Drink up Drink up the cool aid ……….

    The Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 1 person

  • Things that make me go hhhhmmmmmnnn an ad in the Saturday Sun of Sep.7 where a portion of land advertised as “mangrove wetlands” is offered for sale, in other words, “do you want to buy some swamp land?”

    Liked by 1 person

  • ” mangrove wetlands ” should be preserved.

    Hopefully whoever buys the land is a conservationist.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ok all jokes aside now what use is a building code without enforcement?

    We are amazing at passing new laws but piss poor at enforcing them. Up to this Sunday at dust I was passed on the highway by roughly 12 scrambler motorcycles with not a light on one of them. How long has that crap been going on, even after all the long talk and threats? Yet another example of no enforcement.

    If a building code was introduced who would enforce and police it? If you look at the amount of additions that people have illegally done to government houses doesn’t this tell you enough? If the state can not even enforce the basic laws on buildings they own, pray tell how do you expect them to do it island wide? Don’t tell me that TCP will do it either, as they allowed one house to turn into 300 in Squattersville. So the point is even if we made a building code legal, it would only be one more document on file in a rulebook where few if any are enforced.

    I sometimes wonder how many of us live here or reside instead in some utopia that we wish we lived in instead.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John A

    If we are to commit that this is the dawn of a new dispensation we need to have a legislated building code.

    A good example is that water storage is suppose to be legislated?

    Like

  • @ David

    I don’t disagree at all but I am saying like everything else it will not be enforced. Our problem runs much deeper than many want to admit here.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I wonder why the matter of refusing payments because the system is down could not be addressed by the Ministry of Finance. Surely the simple solution suggested could be implemented. The responses here suggest that we accept the situation as normal and alright !

    HAVA.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Nextparty246

    We listen to the worst of us as they criticize an international standard. Who does that? Only the most heartless among us who want the public to suffer, and public workers to be frustrated.
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    My education is at an International standard. All my Degrees and Training is from the 1st world.

    There are also several who comment on BU with similar backgrounds.

    Like me most I believe care about the island and those less fortunate than us.

    For you to compare El Salvador a Spanish speaking country and a culture totally different to Barbados is disingenuous.

    You can continue to make the same mistake that many others have warned you about.

    If you want to run your Political Campaign on ISO9001 I strongly advise to pay CADRES which is Peter Wickham and his team to conduct an islandwide survey to the local population and see how they feel about out it and whether it can get Solutions Barbados elected next election.

    This ISO9001 makes sense after election if ONLY successful.

    However you may carry on smartly being pigheaded and one tracked in your THINKING.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I just had to pay stamp duty. I reached for my wallet to pay,but…….

    “The system is down.”

    No problem. Here is the $10.00 and an extra $10.00 to mail the receipt to my address or email to I got sense @ BU.bb

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David.

    The main priority for this government should have been to strengthen all of its departments responsible for enforcement, as it is because of that weakness we found ourselves where we are today.

    Instead of the VAT office enforcing its right to collect outstanding liabilities, instead our MOF forgave $500 million dollars worth of them and in turn introduced $500 million in New taxes.

    Instead of statuary boards being made to ensure that audited annual financials are filed, we instead borrowed $26 million to pay off their overdrawn overdrafts so that they can do the same thing all over again.

    Instead of enforcing our traffic laws we allow hooligans to abuse the roads without fear.

    Instead of fixing our indirect taxation system we introduce new direct taxation, while leaving the indirect one broken and left to haemorage.

    You starting to see a common denominator yet? My point is unless these failures are first addressed and our enforcement practices improved, our country and it’s economy will continue to waiver and our people will be overtaxed in an effort to recapture the lost revenue resulting from poor enforcement.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ John A

    Have you noticed the seamless continuity between the Stuart DLP and the Mottley BLP? Allowing fraudsters posing as business people to rob taxpayers by using VAT as cash flow. I really feel for the poor Barbadian taxpayers. Barbados is a failed state.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Nextparty246
    “We listen to the worst of us as they criticize an international standard. Who does that? Only the most heartless among us who want the public to suffer, and public workers to be frustrated.”

    The public services / unions will be the first ones to cat spraddle ISO!

    Name three Caribbean countries that has copied/adopted and implemented the Bdos 1993 building codes.

    Like

  • The food court at one of Barbados major shopping Centres was recently closed according to the CBC for “maintenance “. If wunnah believe that the mangrove property in Worthing is beach front property.

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  • Who criticized ISO???????

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  • @ John A

    However we cut it slice and dice it; it is the same thing: Mismanagement by the useless Duopoly for the past four decades. Not one single problem we have is new. Political hypocrisy is for the gullible. When they run out of excuses they cuss and get vile. That’s what they like. They never listen to issues but always attempt to vilify opposing positions that are put forth with truth and conviction.
    What excuse can there be for the Duopoly refusing to legislate a building code for twenty six years?
    It’s just like the crime debate going on now. Same crap. All you have to do is go back on BU and read what the cool aid drinkers from both sides were saying then. It’s the same old pot calling the kettle black.
    When you pin them against the wall they become very quiet. You notice how quiet they are about the failure with the building code. The reason being that it spans almost six full parliamentary terms. They can’t say a word but ask nonsensical questions.
    Let’s break it down:
    1993 code presented to Sandiford and nothing done.
    1994-2008 Arthur and Company. Nothing done.
    2008 – 2018 Thompson , Stuart and Company. Nothing done.
    2019- New one promised
    So we got a grant and completed a building code almost thirty years ago.Nobody knew about it. Cool aid is blinding.

    The Duopoly Rules

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  • @ Hal
    Anybody in doubt about how seamless it is to move between the BLP / DLP Duopoly only needs to examine two politicians:

    Hamilton Lashley ( The most successful politician post independence ) and Clyde Mascoll.

    Their actions prove as the old people say: It’s six and half dozen.

    The Duopoly Rules

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  • @ Hal
    @ William

    That is why I said the issue runs much deeper than many want to discuss and admit. These same problems have spanned both decades and parties to the point where it is now an epidemic.

    The problem it has now reached though is that it is becoming unsustainable by the bajan tax payers.

    Stop and ask yourself just one question. If the leaks in the indirect taxation system and enforcement generally were fixed, would we have even needed an austerity plan, fearless one as damaging as this one?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Meant far less not fearless

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  • @ Grenville Phillips II,

    Did you get your computer equipment and did you drive to the Bridgetown port to pay the $10. ?

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  • @ William
    @ John A

    This is an historical problem; in Barbados it is personalities, not ideology or policy differences that determines which party one supports. Bees and Dees have more in common than they like to admit. Drain the swamp. Get rid of the lawyer/politicians.

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  • John A

    I agree with most of your comments relative to the implementation of ISO 9001 management system.

    I am one of those individuals who believe ISO 9001 COULD WORK in the public sector. However, we know that resistance to change, lack of productivity and time management skills are endemic in the public service.

    Let me give you an example. Government acknowledged the public sector was facing a number of challenges and the necessary adjustments had to be made to become more customer focused and innovative, as well as improving productivity, responsiveness and efficiency.

    As a result, the Office of Public Sector reform was established in February 1997, to respond to these challenges by offering change management and project management services and to also embarked on a new initiative aimed at improving business facilitation by reviewing and reengineering service agencies in the Public Sector.

    We must ask ourselves why, twenty-two (22) years after Government established an ENTIRE office DEDICATED to public sector reform, we are still COMPLAINING about the attitudes of public sector employees; why computer systems continue to malfunction; delays in business facilitation; how it takes 4 months to process a NIS sickness benefit; financial inefficiencies and not conforming to government’s financial rules as is constantly highlighted by the Audit General; poor management of human resources and the MYRIAD of other problems that prevailed the public sector 50 or more years ago?

    Obviously, over the past 22 years, there has been some resistance to the changes introduced by the office of Public Sector Reform, thereby preventing the department from achieving its desired objectives. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate introducing ISO 9001 will NOT be IMMEDIATELY embraced by employees or change the status quo……… because of a historical attitude of resisting change.

    Interestingly, case studies were conducted on public sector reform. A working paper written by Training Officer, Training Administration Division, Mary E. Bruce, entitled “Key Challenges Facing the Barbados Public Sector” and case study “Public Sector Reform: The Barbados Experience,” written by Gail Best-Winfield, Management Development Officer at the Office of Public Sector Reform, are examples.

    Note what Mary E. Bruce wrote in the conclusion of her working paper:

    “The Government of Barbados’ Public Sector Reform initiative is timely and innovative. IT DEPENDS UPON A THOROUGH CULTURE CHANGE IN THE PUBLIC SERVICE and therefore, it is incumbent on all public sector employees to embrace the vision and play their part in effecting such change. The introduction of Internal Reform Committees (IRC) in organizations will have a positive effect on the Reform initiative and provide the basis for future successes.” [Page 9: Conclusion: Key Challenges Facing the Barbados Public Sector, Mary E. Bruce].

    That I why I have previously suggested government should undertake a SYSTEMATIC and METHODICAL approach to change these attitudes and “indigenous and organizational cultures” that are endemic in the public sector.

    And the TRADE UNIONS should play an integral role in assisting to achieve such change.

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  • @ Artax

    I could not agree with your comments more! Change has to come before anything new implemented can be expected to work. We are talking about a total overhaul here not an oil change.

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  • @ Hal

    . Drain the swamp. Get rid of the lawyer/politicians
    Xxxxxxxxxxxx

    The truth is most lawyers run 1 or 2 man shops handling less than a $1 million annually.

    They are experts in regurgitation and shuffling paper whilst lying in Court to defend Clients most of the time.

    Those same lawyers get elected in Barbados where they are given Carte Blanche to do what they want and mis-manage multimillion ministries.

    Lawyers are primarily to blame for why Barbados is in the position it is 2019.

    Then you add a jackass and nitwit like Chris Sinclair and the island has gone over the Cliff into the hands of the IMF.

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  • @ Baje

    Got it in one. Worse than that, they do one or two modules at Wooding on finance (I know because a friend rang me up from Trinidad to help with his question) then they emerge as financial ‘experts’.

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  • @ John
    @ Artax
    @ Hal

    I fear that you can’t change a culture without educational reform. It’s not even possible to change consumer habits without properly educating the public about food substitution etc.
    Unfortunately, the Duopoly has not demonstrated that it has grasped this point. Our civil service evolved from the educational system that was grounded in the pre independence era. It served its purpose then.
    In order to fully benefit from a reformed system, it would take at least one generation. Perhaps two.
    We are now like an old tyre, we try to patch one hole , we drive for a day or two, then a new hole needs patching.
    Then the old patch becomes undone.
    Failure to fundamentally change the educational system is the real problem.
    Garbage in garbage out. To use the current catch phrase , the question is: Is the educational system “fit for purpose”?

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  • “It is the same reason why almost everything that the Government purchases must be very high-maintenance, very high-cost, and not fit for purpose. It is the way of the corrupting no-bid contracts, which must go to favoured political supporters.”

    Have you seen yet why these criminals, ministers, lawyers and bribing minorities should be LOCKED AWAY for decades in REAL PRISON CAGES and not given any handsy, pansy, sissy fines which they will NOT PAY anyway, they would prefer pay a lawyer 20 times that amount to avoid paying anything at all.

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  • “Failure to fundamentally change the educational system is the real problem.”

    As we have been saying for years, but neither government think they need eduaction reform, particularly for themselves, to continue taking bribes or leaving the majority oopulation in an endless cycle of poverty …..in the one eyed king syndrome..

    ….hence the reason grown parasites both men and women from the parliament, sucking on taxpayers…sounded unbelievably dumb in a public forum yesterday, when NONE of them even understand a part of the indigenous culture that uses marijuana for MEDITATIVE and MEDICINAL PURPOSES..

    People from coast to cost are laughing at that idiocy that was on display, they never educated themselves about what people who look like themselves use under the UN charter of human rights….for religious purposes, their education STOPPED at criminalizing and terrorizing this group..

    You have some of the most stupid people in ya parliament…POSING as educated…so don’t hold ya breath for education regorm..

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  • @Sargeant

    What can only speculate what was found in the food court to have necessitated such a drastic action.

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  • @ David BU

    I hope you do not wish a public declaration on that. This is routine. The public health inspectors are executing their duties for which they were employed and are paid.They have been doing it for decades.

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  • John A

    What would be amazing is if public sector employees are the ones CHARGED with the introduction, implementation and subsequent management of ISO 9001.

    During the public launch of Solution Barbados’ candidates at Independence Square on the night of Saturday, November 25, 2017, Mr. Phillips II mentioned ISO 9001 “can solve most, if not all, of our nation’s management issues.”

    He invited board members of SOEs, CEOs, managers of central and quasi government departments, and by extension “all Barbadian workers and managers,” to attend a free public town-hall meeting on Wednesday 29 November 2017 at 6:00 pm at Combermere School hall, where ISO 9001 would have been explained in detail. Mr. Phillips II also promised that, at the end of the meeting, training and necessary tools would have been provided to enable implementation of the management system as soon as the following day.

    The mistake Mr. Phillips II made at that time, was to “more or less” THREATENED the public sector with terminations, by suggesting if SB won the May 24, 2018 general elections, public sector managers would be FORCED to adopt and implement his recommended ISO 9001 or otherwise “face the chopping block.”

    It was reported in the media that officials of Solutions Barbados were unfortunately greeted with an EMPTY hall when they arrived to make the presentation of ISO 9001.

    Taking into consideration the “organizational culture” that currently exists in the public sector, as well as Mr. Phillips II’s seemingly autocratic leadership style, the process of introducing ISO 9001 would have been as difficult, or even more so, as the public sector reform initiative.

    Introducing a new management system with the same old public sector attitudes would obviously result in failure.

    Perhaps Mr. Phillips II should watch a bit more of the British television comedy, “Yes, Minister.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • Wiley:

    The Electrical standards are enforced by the Government Electrical Engineering Department (GEED). You cannot get electricity from the BL&P unless the GEED inspector passes the contractor’s work. The Town Planning department can enforce building standards.

    William:

    I was told that it would be political suicide for a politician to enforce building standards. That was based on the incorrect belief that it would be too expensive to comply with the code. It is not.

    Baje:

    I used El Salvador to show that the standard is truly international. It can work across cultures. Even in a country that just came out of a civil war, with entrenched corruption, it can work.

    Like

  • For your information, all three unions (NUPW, BWU, and CTUSAB) were the first on-board with the ISO 9001 international management standard.

    Like

  • “For your information, the customs department in El Salvador attracted typical complaints of delays, corruption, and significant abandonment of goods.
    Once they implemented the ISO management standard, it was quickly transformed into the most modern customs department in South America,”

    The people of El Salvador are much more open to change their ways for the following reason: the country has had a history of violence , coups, civil war and gangs. Fooling around with inertia resulting a person losing worldly goods can result in sudden death. Sudden death (violence is remarkable) in focusing one’s attention on the chore at hand. Barbados needs to do away with appointing people and resort to contracts for all civil servants. As it stands now, having an in depth knowledge of the General Orders( GO) is one of the factors working against change in Barbados. The GO is used in a manner that does not bode well for this country( it is liable that persons may disagree)..

    Like

  • @ Grenville
    William:

    “I was told that it would be political suicide for a politician to enforce building standards. That was based on the incorrect belief that it would be too expensive to comply with the code. It is not.”

    Thanks for your response.
    Not surprised at all. Everything in this country is based on politics not policy.

    The Duopoly Rules

    Like

  • @ Artax.

    Lord help me I didn’t know that but am not surprised as no politician or want to be one, can dictate to a company or board what management system they must use. The company or board make that decision and not a sole else. As i said anyone that thinks implementing a management system will save our country living in LaLa land where sheep talk and cows fly!

    Now let me give you a classic here that no ISO 3000 or 4000 could fix and this is up your street.

    BRA just sent out cooperation tax prepayment advices, no problem they do it every year. But you could imagine not one “big up” in there bothered to make sure the forms for this year were based on the new tax rate! NO sir them requesting the same prepayment as last year, when the Corp tax rate was roughly 5 times higher! So you know the companies deading with laughter and have advised them to send out the corrected forms reflecting the new rate.

    Now you mean to tell me not a man or woman, in a senior position at BRA hasn’t stopped to advise those responsible for the pre payment forms that ” fellows wunna don’t forget to apply the new tax rates and don’t make we look foolish by sending out last year amounts.”

    You really think that a management system could fix we problem? Stupes.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ William

    Yes I agree with you to see any true change a major restructuring must first be done. The question I ask though is if this is attempted and not seen through, what will be the consequences to those who failed to see it through?

    We have a washpan of rules but when they are broken there is no penalty or consequence to be paid. People who want to skirt the law have learnt that only too well and that is why we have a “brek fuh yourself ” PSV culture and the influx of squatters. I will guarantee as long as we are full of hot air and empty threats these issues will intensify in time.

    Then we sit here and talk crap about becoming the Singapore of the Caribbean. First thing we got to learn from them is the consequence of failure to adhere to law.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @VC yours @12.04 pm

    Sure they were doing their job, that’s why they had to shut the whole place down, is it normal for whole food courts to be shut down? Do you have anymore info other than the old boiler plate “doing their job”

    Like

  • It was reported in the media that officials of Solutions Barbados were unfortunately greeted with an EMPTY hall when they arrived to make the presentation of ISO 9001.
    Xxxxxxxxxxc

    I REST MY CASE.

    TIME FOR SOLUTIONS BARBADOS TO COMMISSION AN ISLANDWIDE POLL.

    Like

  • September 11, 2019 12:19 PM

    For your information, all three unions (NUPW, BWU, and CTUSAB) were the first on-board with the ISO 9001 international management standard.

    Leadership of the unions are not the unions, sir.
    Which of those leaders to ISO back to their general body and it vote on and approved?

    Like

  • GP2

    Name three Caribbean countries that has copied/adopted and implemented the Bdos 1993 building codes.

    Still waiting for an answer – or is it if you name those countries they will get in trouble?

    Like

  • Should we legislate a building code or not, why split hairs?

    Like

  • John2

    CTUSAB is an umbrella body for trade unions and staff associations in Barbados, of which NUPW, Association of Public Primary Schools Principals, BAMP, Barbados Association of Principals of Public Secondary Schools, BRNA, BSTU, BUT, Fire Service Association, Nurses Assistants Aides Association of Barbados, Police Association Prison Officers’ Association and the Sugar Industry Staff Association (SISA) are members. I’m not aware if BWU rejoined CTUSAB.

    As a registered trade union, CTUSAB may have endorsed ISO 9001, but have the individual unions and staff associations, other than NUPW, approved the management system?

    Additionally, I remember informing David BU that the current BLP administration seemed to have accepted Mr. Phillips II’s advice after reading the Barbados Port Authority implemented ISO 9001 a few months ago. Why are Barbadians still experiencing problems in the port?

    Over the years, I have read Solutions Barbados’ articles on ISO 9001, in which Mr. Phillips II has been expressing the same old tired arguments to justify the management system’s implementation. Interestingly, a number of Solution Barbados’ candidates are entrepreneurs that, according to Mr. Phillips II, have years of experience in their individual businesses.

    How many of them have introduced ISO 9001 in their businesses?

    Why not allow another businessman/woman to present another perspective on ISO 9001?

    Like

  • Artax:

    We made the presentation to a meeting that included many of the individual CTUSAB members, and there was unanimous agreement.

    The ISO 9001 system can improve any business. However, it is desperately needed where there are unresolved complaints. The choice is to either keep complaining, or improve the management system. Since the ISO is the international standard, I will keep recommending it – because that is my best advice. I only give my best advice.

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @DavidSeptember 11, 2019 11:47 AM “One can only speculate what was found in the food court to have necessitated such a drastic action.”

    David I am not too sure that you really want to know.

    What if you cannot “stomach” what you hear?

    But good that public health is doing their job.

    Like

  • Its good that these things happen in your own sight and time, for you were warned years ago and you dont listen to no one but your self, Much more to come, It’s all over like Ebola and HIV/AIDS. The entire SYSTEM, ALL SYSTEMS ARE CORRUPT IN BARBADOS! how you think we got in the mess, Now the Crime Minister has the Helm and we are headed for the rocks , Brace for impact !

    Like

  • “Should we legislate a building code or not, why split hairs?”

    @ David.

    If that question was for me, I already gave my view on that on the first serving of this soup.

    NO! Publish it and make it available to the public, contractors etc.
    Those that can afford to will follow the guidelines as much they can.

    GP2 is an engineer and can afford what he is proposing.

    I asked already – If you legislate a building code are you also going to legislate assisted living for those that cannot build their own, has kids to feed and school but salaries are to low to also afford renting up to a certain standard?

    If you legislate and I build to the code and a cat 5 still remove my roof or cause any sort of damage, will government be liable for the repairs?

    Yes I know you will come about insurance but again that is all good for those who can afford it.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @BajeSeptember 11, 2019 8:43 AM “My education is at an International standard. All my Degrees and Training is from the 1st world.”

    Fair enough.

    But were you at the top 25% of your classes, the middle 50% or the bottom 25%?

    Liked by 1 person

  • And taxpayers will shell out the dollars when buildings of a poor constructions have to be repaired/rebuilt?

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @BajeSeptember 10, 2019 9:07 PM “However you have a system where everybody “thiefing” from top to bottom for many years and laughing all the way to the big houses and numerous trips.

    Not everybody.

    I never asked for a bribe.

    I have never been offered a bribe.

    I have never received a bribe.

    Yes i worked in a situation where i could have asked for bribes, but I chose not to.

    Maybe that is why i don’t have a big house, and apart from attendng a wedding, funeral or a graduation every ten years or so I never takes trips. Maybe that is why i have $5.26 BDS in my bank account.

    In my case: Too long foolish, too long poor.

    A truly Simple Simon.

    Liked by 1 person

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @TronSeptember 10, 2019 9:38 PM “Ten more contributions of this kind and our leader will remain in power until 2050.

    The life expectancy of a Bajan woman is 76. Our dear leader will be 76 in 2041. By 2041 I will have been dead for decades.

    Like

  • Barbados should have a building code.

    Obviously there can be sections of the code for Concrete, wood and wall and wood/chattel houses.

    There are enough Architects and Engineers who can prepare a building code that suits Barbados.

    Like

  • “Should we legislate a building code or not, why split hairs but GP2 also makes these kind of statements without backing them up.

    “many Caribbean copied the Barbados 1993 building codes” explain what is meant by COPIED?

    All the island north of Barbados are in the hurricane belt and are more likely to and are affected by storm and hurricanes more often then Barbados. I would like to know at least one (reduced from 3) that has legislated a building code/ Barbados 1993 building code?

    It is more than political, there is a lot of poverty that need to be addressed address, here and in the other islands

    Puerto Rico and the USA Virgin islands, wards of the USA and frequently have destruction due to hurricanes. Do they have a legislated building codes?

    Miami/Florida/USA got building codes and you have to have insurance if you build or buy a home.

    In most of the USA and you have a family to feed and shelter and you are making below a certain amount you can get assistance with paying you rent (assisted) and food(stamps).

    Legislate all you want but when you legislate please legislate some thing to help the poor families also.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hi David:

    A set of building materials can be assembled well or badly. The building code shows builders how to assemble them badly. Those who do not follow the building code tend to assemble them badly.

    Those who have irresponsibly discouraged the use of a building code have done Barbadians a grave disservice.

    Like

  • Government replacing CEO’s. Politics ?

    ” “Mr Boxill and GAIA Inc. parted ways yesterday (Monday),” deputy CEO Terry Layne told the Midweek Nation.”

    Like

  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @SargeantSeptember 10, 2019 11:01 PM “Hell yes, I couldn’t get my temporary drivers license because the “system is down” come back tomorrow.”

    You were lucky to be invited back tomorrow.

    Once at BRA the female security guard threatened not to let me in the building because I was wearing “arm holes.” To tell the truth even though I am a Simon I was actually wearing the whole down to my knees, up to my neck, sleeveless dress. I looked nice in it too.

    I had a small check for the BRA, only a little $1,500 BDS, so I told the guard if you don’t let me in, maybe you won’t get paid this week because I will take the check and enjoy a dirty weekend with my boyfriend.

    You should see how quickly she let be into the building.

    Barbados where fundamentalist bring their Eurocentric religion to work, and threaten to forbid the rest of us paying our taxes unless we are “properly” dressed.

    This is a TRUE STORY.

    Liked by 1 person

  • “And taxpayers will shell out the dollars when buildings of a poor constructions have to be repaired/rebuilt?”

    Currently the taxpayer help those that cannot help themselves when it comes to repairs/rebuilding.

    Since you make me build to a certain standard, are you going to be liable if there is any failures when the real event occurs? I think you should be.

    Like

  • You really need to appreciate how illogical your comment is.

    Like

  • Explain it to me

    Like

  • ” the transmission lines are owned and maintained by a private company which has a monopoly on service.”

    https://www.halifaxexaminer.ca/province-house/power-is-still-out-for-thousands-and-the-power-outage-map-is-sowing-confusion/

    Like

  • @ Simple Simon

    @BajeSeptember 11, 2019 8:43 AM “My education is at an International standard. All my Degrees and Training is from the 1st world.”

    Fair enough.

    But were you at the top 25% of your classes, the middle 50% or the bottom 25%?
    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    All I can say that I was blessed to leave Barbados on a full Scholarship to a 4 year USA University.

    My Masters was also gained through Scholarship.

    I am a product of hardwork and initial poverty background.

    That is why it angers me how poor people have been manipulated for votes by both BLP and DLP whilst feathering their nest.

    I am also blessed where I am in life currently.

    I wish Solutions Barbados well.

    Not all of us need to be Political aspirants to want what’s best for the island.

    However we should never be afraid to call a spade a spade.

    Like

  • Hi Baje:

    Please note that we do not need to do any national poll. We are here to offer our best advice. It it is taken, then Barbadians will prosper. However, if they choose austerity, mismanagement and corruption again, then that is what they will get.

    Our job is to offer our best advise. The public is free to accept or reject our advice.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Nextparty246

    Hi Baje:

    Please note that we do not need to do any national poll. We are here to offer our best advice. It it is taken, then Barbadians will prosper. However, if they choose austerity, mismanagement and corruption again, then that is what they will get.

    Our job is to offer our best advise. The public is free to accept or reject our advice.
    Xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    Whilst I agree %100 with your feedback.

    Don’t allow PRIDE to be your downfall and Solutions Barbados.

    On this Forum many times you have been given good and solid strategies.

    You and your party Solutions Barbados are in to win it or wasting time and resources.

    You are not fighting ordinary Christian people, you are fighting demons who have a spell OVER the masses of either DLP or BLP which is the reality on the ground.

    You need to change your tactics and perform guerilla warfare WHILST practicing turning the other cheek.

    They are a number of smart people on this Blog giving nuggets, a word to the wise should be sufficient.

    Like

  • @ Baje September 12, 2019 9:08 AM

    Ask yourself what the many billions of educational investments on the island have accomplished. The answer is: nothing. We used to be a banana republic with sugar cane, today it is tourism. But you don’t need a higher education either for the old plantations or for the new ones, i.e. the hotels.

    Like

  • @ Tron

    I consider you an idiot and a troll.

    Education has obviously not benefited you and your Lawyer colleagues who keeps raping the island and abusing the trust of the voters.

    There are many people I know on the island working in the trenches operating successful Businesses in ALL sectors whilst employing others.

    Like

  • Hi Baje:

    I am in it to offer Barbadians a competent alternative to the inept leadership that we have had to tolerate for far too long. We will do our best and nothing more – we will certainly not go into debt or take bribes.

    Jesus explained to His followers that they should give their best advice to a community – for a time. If the advice is rejected, they were not to persist, but shake the dust off of their feet and offer that advice to others. Whatever happens, this will be the last time that I plan to offer my self to voters.

    If we win, then Barbadians will prosper. If not, then I would have completed my assignment and whatever will happen will happen. I do not crave anything, except to finish my responsibilities as best as I can.

    If we win, then that will be good for Barbados. But it will harm my professional career and earnings, since I will have to work as a full-time public servant rather than for my normal clients. If we do not win, then I will not be disappointed in the least.

    There is a lot of things that I do, which I do not talk about – because Jesus explained that you should not let your left hand know what your right hand is doing when doing charitable works. So that makes me a poor politician. I am also, perhaps the most introverted person you will meet. That makes me an even worst politician. Yet, I cannot see wrong and incompetence and do nothing about it. I suppose that I care too much.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Jesus explained to His followers that they should give their best advice to a community – for a time. If the advice is rejected, they were not to persist, but shake the dust off of their feet and offer that advice to others. Whatever happens, this will be the last time that I plan to offer my self to voters.(Quote)

    Are you inviting us to compare you with Jesus?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal Austin September 12, 2019 11:12 AM

    You’re absolutely right about that. I on the other hand have to correct myself: GP2 aka “the chosen one” is not a simple ISO Taliban. It obviously suffers from the Messiah complex. Quote from Wikipedia: “… symptoms of the disorder closely resemble those found in individuals suffering from delusions of grandeur …”.

    Like

  • @ David. You ask if we should legislate a building code.

    My answer is what use is legislation with no enforcement.

    I say before we legislate anything new we must first put in place enforcement for not only the new but current legislation.

    It is putting the cart before the horse and expecting a different outcome time after time.

    You want the entity known as the TCP to enforce a code when they have allowed mass squatting to occur on the islaNd for decades?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @John

    We are singing from different parts of the song sheet. We must do both.

    Like

  • @ David.

    Yes but not at the same time, enforcement must be in place before legislation. If that is not done all it will do is ensure failure as we have seen so many times before.

    Liked by 1 person

  • John A

    You got the cart before the horse. You have legislation, regulations, then enforcement. In that order. You cannot enforce regulations that do not exist.

    Like

  • @ Hal
    @ John
    @ David

    Why can’t we just admit that it’s appalling that we got a grant to create a building code and the code has languished for nearly thirty years which is a national disgrace.
    Imagine we are hear going back and forth on whether to legislate a building code.
    Why can’t we just enforce the code?
    Oh, I forgot we going to get a new
    one.
    Incredible

    The Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal.

    We already have legislation for the TPC which is not enforced hence the squatters etc. That clearly shows we need serious attention to enforcement upgrades before we bring new legislation. Let’s take the building code which is a good idea. How can we enforce a building code under the current levels of enforcement? We need to first upgrade this or how can we expect the current level of enforcement we have in place now, to address what we want in the future.

    If you want a clear example of what happens when this is not done let’s look at the PSV sector. When we had half as much of these on the roads we knew they were running red lights, overloading, stopping where they like etc. What did we do then to improve enforcement? Not a dam thing. So today we have twice as many on the road, a garrison of new laws, but still piss poor enforcement, hence the epidemic of lunacy we all see daily now exist. Then some bright person decides we will put them in uniforms and that will fix everything. Lol

    That’s why I say upgrade enforcement before we bring new legislation.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ John A

    Barbados is a regulation free nation. The BU regulars think it is to do with corruption; |I believe it is incompetence. Just look at financial regulation, national insurance and VAT collection and consumer protection.
    In a small society, where everybody knows every else, or someone who knows who is influential; or went to school together, or belong the same clubs, it is very difficult to enforce regulations for anything.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal

    I can agree with you there for sure. I think the most glaring example of that was the forgiving of $500 million in VAT receivables after implementing over $400 million in austerity on the backs of the bajan tax payer!

    Also what happened to those at the The Vat office who allowed this liability to be racked up? Probably got promoted who knows.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Hal at 1 :22 PM.

    @ David BU

    John A and I agree on the uselessness of new legislation and regulations when past behaviour indicates that they will not be enforced.
    We believe that we are just going through the process but have no intentions of implementing. The record is there. Rules for the effective functioning of our fiscal ,financial regulation and justice systems are in place and we have failed to enforce . Then we add insult to injury when we pass new laws and regulation to legitimize past breaches of these rules.
    Are we really serious about implementing the concept of Rule of Law?

    Like

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