The Grenville Phillips Column – The Best Day of Your Life

The displays at the recently held BMEX 2019 shows that Barbadians can create internationally competitive products. With the health and education investments made in our people, we can easily surpass the achievements of a country like Singapore within a decade, if we choose to, or are allowed to.

Many of us choose not to because we do not believe that we can. We believe that great achievements are for those of another: class, race, colour, gender, or nationality. It is time to change that, and the first step on that path is to change our perspective on our life-journey. This awakens us to opportunities easily within our reach.

Your past achievements are not monuments to be adorned and admired, but foundations to build upon. Regardless of your age, health, past achievements, or current circumstances, the best day of your life is always today; and tomorrow is always going to be a better day for you than today.

Today, you get to correct the mistakes that you made yesterday. You get to redo things that did not work-out well before. You get to try something new. You get to repair relationships, and say what you meant in a kinder way.

Today, you get to be a better: child, sibling, parent, employee, employer, and friend. You get to be a better you, and correct any deficiencies you are now aware of, because of the criticisms you received yesterday. You get to learn how to do some things better. You get to improve your products, attract more customers and make more money.

Every day you will face obstacles. Today, you get to try another way around or over them. You do that by identifying opportunities. If your landlord increases the rent, then remind yourself that you are no longer a slave. You do not have to stay there – make arrangements to find a more affordable place. If your employer is giving you grief, then you are no longer a slave – you do not have to work there. Find another job or start your own business.

If a business is giving you bad service, acknowledge that you do not have to purchase anything from them. They have no power over you. Stop wasting your time complaining as if you were a slave with few options, and go and shop elsewhere. You have options that our slave foreparents never had. Earn their sacrifice.

The only obstacles that can limit our success, are bad political decisions that result in unnecessary and excessive regulations and taxation. The aim of these policies is to keep everyone down, so that political leaders can selectively waive the regulations and taxes from their political supporters. Thus, the Government decides who wins and who loses. What is appalling is that those who benefit from this corruption, are then promoted by the Government as persons who succeeded by merit.

Excessive taxation is the normal result of the mismanagement of public services. We entrust the management of our public services to our elected political leaders. If health, sanitation, water, transportation, and all other public services are well managed, then we will spend less time waiting to use them. We will also be taxed considerably less to fund efficiently delivered services.

If public services are poorly managed, then we must spend more time waiting to use them. We must also pay considerably higher taxes, to fund the poorly managed inefficient operations and unproductive employees.

We are not the only country facing the problem of poorly managed public services. This is a common problem faced by every country on this planet. In response, the International Organisation Standardization (ISO) developed specific guidance for managing public services and Government operations to an internationally competitive standard. Unfortunately, despite Barbados being a member of the 161-member ISO, our political leaders have decided that those standards are too good for us.

Instead, we continue to use the same ridiculous management method, that has consistently failed to provide relief to the public and public workers. That is, to appoint extreme political supporters, who have no management experience whatsoever, to boards where they direct the mismanagement of public services. The only time that Barbadians can hope to experience well managed public services, is if we travel to countries that have implemented high management standards.

Grenville Phillips II is a Chartered Structural Engineer and President of Solutions Barbados. He can be reached at NextParty246@gmail.com

158 comments

  • With the health and education investments made in our people, we can easily surpass the achievements of a country like Singapore within a decade, if we choose to, or are allowed to.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    In your dreams!!

    Look at Singapore’s water resources!!

    Don’t waste our time with this repetitive rubbish!!

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    I loved this piece until I reached the ISO plug. But it is essential reading for the young. They need all the encouragement they can get.

    Liked by 1 person

  • That’s a tall order since Singapore has been performing world class for over 50 years. The difference is simply beyond anything you imagine. What you saw and think you saw is small beer.
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexcapri/2018/09/21/5-reasons-why-the-worlds-tech-firms-are-moving-to-singapore/#7bbc80f92aa0https://www.thenational.ae/business/singapore-s-big-play-for-the-australian-exchange-1.588801
    Look at the number of ports in Singapore, a tiny island that’s a little larger than Barbados.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSA_International

    Liked by 1 person

  • Singapore has 4 sources of water … rainfall, river in state of Johor, sewage and desalination.

    People with plans usually succeed!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • TO DREAM THE IMPOSSIBLE DREAM…
    THINK POSITIVELY; IT’S EASIER
    CONTINUE LEARNING AS LONG AS YOU LIVE
    LEARN FROM YOUR MISTAKES
    DO NOT COMPLICATE ONE’S LIFE UNNECESSARILY
    TRY & NEVER GIVE UP; SUCCESS IN LIFE IS A MARATHON
    SET GOALS AND PURSUE YOUR DREAMS

    To dream the impossible dream
    To fight the unbeatable foe
    To bear the unbearable sorrow
    To run where the brave dare not go

    To write the unwritable wrong
    To be better far than you are
    To try when your arms are too weary
    The reach the unreachable star

    This is my quest, to follow that star
    No matter how hopeless,
    No matter how far
    To fight for the right
    Whithout question or pause
    To be willing to march into hell
    For a heavenly cause

    And I know if I’ll only be true
    To this glorious quest
    That my heart will be peaceful and calm
    When I’m laid to my rest

    And the world would be better for this
    That one man scorned and covered with scars
    Still strove with his last ounce of courage
    To reach the unreachable star

    Liked by 1 person

  • John:

    Many have found the article encouraging. However, some, like yourself, will consider it rubbish. If you do not want to waste your time, then do not read it – no one is forcing you to.

    On Singapore, they took a long time to get to where we were in the 1970s – which was a professional public service. Then they professionalized theirs with ISO, while we politicized ours. We can professionalize ours once again – which is Solutions Barbados’ plan.

    Liked by 1 person

  • John:
    Many have found the article encouraging. However, some, like yourself, will consider it rubbish.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    I consider the reference to Singapore rubbish!!

    Singapore is characterized by leadership with vision and a plan.

    To imply we can just get there because Singapore did is just plain misleading rubbish.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece the Legend

    Watch how the man child going come back to malign John.

    He going tell he someting bout he, that is Iso TALIBAN ‘s Singaporean qualities AND HE NEX MAD ASS SIDEKICK Looney Tunes going start singing Frank Sinatra or some sort of shit.

    But I glad Grenville Phillips Whiting he jobby for everyone to see what de ole MSN was telling wunna for a while

    NOW WUNNA SEEING FOR WUNNASELVES

    Outpatient Iso Talibsn

    Like

  • William Skinner

    Are we trying to be the best we can be or the best Singapore is ?
    Should we be thinking of Singapore or delivering water to those who can’t get it?
    What about an excellent bus service?
    Rather than look at the products and think Singapore, why not look at them and just think about markets and export.
    We just keep thinking the wrong way.
    I went to a trade show, I saw some excellent products, we can surpass Singapore in ten years.
    How long has there been BIMEX.

    Like

  • The point was that we can be internationally competitive. Singapore was used because we were far more advanced than them and now we are not. They are a useful standard to currently aim for – not misleading at all.

    Liked by 1 person

  • John: Of course we need visionary leadership and a plan. That is what the article was about. It obviously cannot happen with the current leadership and BERT plan.

    To ensure that I do not misunderstand you. Do you agree that with visionary leadership and a plan, it is possible for Barbados to be generally as internationally competitive as Singapore?

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    Barbados needs future leaders who think that Barbados can be managed and it’s people can achieve more than ANY country in the world!
    We should set out to be beyond Singapore.
    Sir Garry Sobers remains the best all rounder in the worldNobody has come close . He should be the gold standard we aspire to. He is the only Barbadian that has set that standard.
    But then again he was no lawyer or from the so-called professions.
    You take Singapore. Give me Sir Garry!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @William

    What is the point you are making here?

    We need leadership it is true.

    How does the leadership we yearn for emerge?

    Has the Barbados society reached a point where the culture is so entrenched that any attempt to change it will mean failure by those attempting to change it?

    Is good leadership by definition all required to make the change?

    Like

  • Piece the Legend

    WE NEED GOOD LEADERSHIP!

    THAT DOES NOT MEAN WE NEED ANY RH LEADERSHIP!

    GRENVILLE aka Iso TALIBAN IS ANY Decrepit leadership

    What is so hard about this for you to understand Honourable Blogmaster?

    Steupse

    Like

  • nextparty246
    June 18, 2019 11:58 PM

    John: Of course we need visionary leadership and a plan. That is what the article was about. It obviously cannot happen with the current leadership and BERT plan.
    To ensure that I do not misunderstand you. Do you agree that with visionary leadership and a plan, it is possible for Barbados to be generally as internationally competitive as Singapore?

    +++++++++++++++++++++

    No, definitely not.

    Water is the difference.

    We could never compete with Singapore.

    For example, Singapore gets up to 265 million gallons of water per day from the Malaysian Peninsula.

    Our entire water resource is 44 million gallons per day … now if you can get a line to the rivers in Guyana …!!

    Singapore has conquered sewage (look at us) and they have desal … I mean real desal.

    But more importantly, their land use planning addresses the huge issue of maximizing the collection of water.

    We treat our land resource like … well … dirt!!

    We got to make our own way in this world and find our own niche.

    I gave one already …. “Every square inch of Barbados is a World Heritage Site”

    Nowhere else has a history like ours!!

    Use it, give God the glory!!

    Like

  • @John

    Desalination cannot be the answer ?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Of course …. but the question is what economy is going to pay for it?

    Like

  • We are not Dubai!!!

    We have what we have.

    … and by the way, why is it so important to compete with Singapore?

    Why not just do our best in the World with what God has given us.

    Liked by 1 person

  • FOR GODS SAKE CANT YOU ASK A QUESTION PROPERLY?
    DID YOU GO TO SCHOOL?

    CAN DESALINATION NOT BE THE ANSWER……….IS THE ACCEPTED WAY.

    Like

  • William Skinner

    @ David
    Try to see leadership in a broader sense. For example you are a leader, who has given us a blog that we can express ourselves. You should therefore seek to make the blog the best in Barbados and the world.
    Granville should seek to make solutions the best political choice in the country. Then he should seek to make it one of the greatest political parties in the world.
    Brian Lara broke Sir Garry’s record twice. Hence he became one of the greatest batsmen in the world.
    Hope you get my drift.
    The world should be our goal not Singapore.
    You are constantly only seeing leadership in Parliament. Broaden your perspective. You are a leader. Think like one!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece the Legend

    @ Mr William Skinner

    You said and I quote

    “…I went to a trade show, I saw some excellent products, we can surpass Singapore in ten years.

    How long has there been BIMEX…?”

    I have been posting here for over a year about Iso TALIBAN the dufus.

    I have said that, outside of Stinkliar, this man I’d the biggest possible failure we bajan have waiting jn the car park.

    I, AND MANY MORE, including my fellow Myope Dr GP, have repeatedly said that the MAN IS NOT A LEADER

    IN FACT WE HAVE SAID THAT SOLUTIONS BARBADOS MUST NEVER ENTER PARLIAMENT!!!

    And, if only to show his abysmal incompetence he says ” I went to a trade show, I saw some excellent products AND THEN HIS COUP DE GRAS – 10 YEARS WE ARE SINGAPORE.

    A true dufus and one whom I pledge will never enter our House of Assembly

    Like

  • Hi John:

    Thank you for your feedback. It is appreciated.

    William:

    I agree with you. Singapore should not be the goal, but it should be a milestone that we should pass. That is why the first paragraph states: “we can easily surpass the achievements of a country like Singapore within a decade, if we choose to, or are allowed to.”

    We are already internationally competitive in several areas. We are just held back by our perspectives, and bad political decisions that allow political leaders to decide who wins and loses in our economy – which was explained in the article.

    David:

    The BWA is badly managed. We do not have a water scarcity problem, we have a water management problem. Approximately half of all of the water in our mains leaks and is wasted – that is scandalous, but we have learnt to accept that abysmal standard. We pay for that wasted water, but it is never used. Instead, many households must unnecessarily do without.

    Since we politicized our public service, our main problem has been bad management of public services. It can only get worse, until Government decides that the wastage is too costly, and it is more economical to privatize and regulate.

    Why is it badly managed? Because we have adopted, and the public has accepted, the management method of rewarding political supporters.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece:

    I get it. You do not want anyone who has a stellar career of solving problems – you do not want a doer. Instead, you want a talker. You want someone like a lawyer, who can talk around problems, but never fix them. You want a charismatic person who can sway crowds. You definitely do not want an Engineer.

    So you want Verla, or Mia, or Dale, or any of the lawyers in the BLP/DLP. You want an Errol or a Tom. You want a charismatic speaker, rather than a non-charismatic doer. I get that. Compared to Verla, Mia and Lynette, I readily admit that I am a terrible speaker. We get better at what we practise, and I have spent a 30-year career practising doing. However, I am getting better at speaking – because I am practising – but still no where near as fluent as Mia.

    We are at the point in our development when the charismatic speakers can no longer pretend that they are doers. They have failed us. The problems that they have neglected for so long, but tricked us that they were fixing, are affecting everyone.

    If you think that it is your God-given assignment to keep propping up that type of leader, and discouraging persons from considering a doer, then please continue to obey God.

    Liked by 1 person

  • WHERE THERE IS NO VISION THE PEOPLE PERISH…

    True Leadership Qualities are Elusive and Difficult to have in One Package, it is Usually a Mixture of Creativity, Determination, the Ability to Listen, Discernment, the Ability to Act on One’s Beliefs, to Remain Humble, the Ability to Inspire others, the Ability to See what has Evaded others and Loyalty to those whom you Serve and that Serve you.

    The Mix of these Attributes help to Determine the Effectiveness of a Leader and more of one Attribute at a time in History may Determine the Effectiveness of that leader. To give you a Biblical Example of Leadership and Good Governance we can look at Joseph in Egypt.

    (1) Joseph showed his Leadership Qualities when he was in charge of Potiphar’s Financial Affairs.
    (2) Joseph while in Prison on wrong Charges, was put in Charge of the Organization within the Prison.
    (3) When Joseph gained his Freedom by Interpreting the Kings Dream, Pharaoh made him second in Command in Egypt. Joseph Organized the Whole of Egypt to make it Prosperous, to keep it Prosperous, and to help the Citizenry.

    Sometimes what go missing in the Story were Joseph’s Inspiration and his Moral Character that made him a Cut above Ordinary Leaders to Create Great Wealth.

    JOSEPH WENT FROM BEING A PRISONER TO BEING THE SECOND MOST IMPORTANT PERSON IN ALL OF EGYPT.

    There may be more than 600,000 Bajan’s in the world and every one of them may want to tell you what to do in Barbados. So which Opinion should we follow or do? Is it those who Criticize Day and Night? Is it those who Double Down on Stupid Ideas? Alternatively, do we Look for things that Make Sense and do we not Seek Someone with Moral Fiber that have Leadership Qualities and Choose Not their Own Welfare but the Welfare of All?

    A Person of Understanding of How Things Work, a Person of that maybe Inspired, a person of Good Character, let us look again at the Story of Joseph. His Inspiration and his Ability to Commune with God allowed him to See the Kings Dream and the Interpretation of that Dream.

    After having been put in Charge of All of Egypt and having started the Collection of Grain into Storehouses and the Preservation of that Grain, a Record was kept of All who Contributed and what they Contributed until there were not enough Grain Houses to Store the Grain. In the Time of Plenty All of Egypt Prospered and in the Time of a Seven Year Drought Egypt Survived and those that Contributed had Grain to feed themselves and their families. Even those who did not Contribute had Grain to Eat, but they has to pay back after the Drought was finished, they had to repay 1/5 of their Crops for a number of years.

    Through Joseph’s leadership Egypt Prospered and was a Savior to All the Surrounding Lands, including his own family. Most people Miss the Fairness and Equity that Joseph Dealt with all of the Citizens of Egypt and at the same time making Egypt’s Government Wealthy.

    INSPIRATION, LEADERSHIP AND GOOD GOVERNANCE GO HAND IN HAND, WITH THE RESULT BEING GREAT PROSPERITY.

    Mr.Phillips has shown himself to be a Leader and also shown himself to Insists on Good Governance. He has also Shown himself to be a Man of God. These Qualities should be Sought After and not Denigrated. We Do Not Know if he is a Type of Joseph but his voice should be heard above those who seek to Disparage him on BU. His Voice is one of Reason, his Voice is One of Encouragement, his Voice is one of Illuminating the Path before us and he holds God as his Guiding Light. Whither you Agree with him or Disagree with him his Voice needs to be heard.

    THE NAYSAYERS HERE ON BU PUT FORWARD GOOD CONCRETE IDEAS OR SHUT UP!

    Like

  • @John

    One has to assume adopting/implementing a desalination program must be scalable to address the cost issue.

    Like

  • Good points but Barbados is a democracy and if GP2 want to lead this country he must first get our votes .

    Joseph proved himself to the Pharoah, GP2 has not proven himself to the electorate as yet!

    Like

  • On desalination.

    Please note that whatever we pay the desal plant for water, we must order twice the amount, with half of it being wasted. Plus we pay for the high cost of repairing an average of 3 breaks in the line daily, and all of the associated inefficiencies. So we significantly overpay for public services, and must be taxed accordingly.

    Of course, all we need is a well-delivered speech by a charismatic leader, and we willingly line-up to pay the unnecessary additional costs. Eventually, the ‘house of cards’ will fail, and we will adapt to the new normal, like every other country with a politically ruined economy.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece the Legend

    @ Iso TALIBAN and
    @ Grenville Phillips

    Look at my salutation!

    What am I trying to say to you?

    What cant you see?

    Have I ever over all these years of writing here about you or your character cast EVEN ONE ASPERSION ABOUT YOUR FAMILY LIFE or outside women or men?

    NEVER!!!

    In fact I have commended you for it.

    You started Wentbridge College and made that free offer to grain and I said kudos Grenville and suggested you come back with the real metrics.

    Show us jobs secured, show us PAYE slips give us evidence.

    We have a crime and violence issue with de people killing nuff people.

    I suggested that you stopped talking and showed us your solution.

    You simply are not getting this are you?

    We bajans tired of the lotta talk Grenville, WE WANT ACTION AND RESULTS, SHOW US WHAT YOU CAN DO

    I recognize that you are not a charismatic talker but no one really cares about that when they are faced by people who have said that they are coming in your house eight two clips a short and a long one!

    My man, from de time dem said dem words, I would have been up dem assholes like Messels used to be pun dem botty byoi dem!!.

    All people want you to do is start delivering something NOW Grenville ANYTHING THAT SHOWS YOU ARE CAPABLE.

    No one gives a rat’s ass about Reverend Pastor Bishop Joseph Atherley hijacking your party colours.

    You are not in Parliament and that sort of empty talk is useless.

    What can you do to make a difference?

    Like

  • Who are the other officers of Solutions, apart from president Junior?

    Like

  • Freedom has Witness Mr.Phillips teaching Principles that if Applied would assist others to better govern their affairs. To keep insisting that he “WE WANT ACTION AND RESULTS, SHOW US WHAT YOU CAN DO”…Well what Planet have you been on, as this man has been doing just that, weekly on BU but your Ole Brain has Convenient Memory Vacancies. Yours is just to Disparage and Degrade and Try to Drag a Good man down to your Demented Level!

    Mr.Phillips it’s notable that sense 2002, you assigned responsibility was to develop an action plan to prepare the professional services sector to be internationally competitive by the Ministry of Economic as it was critically important to understand that trade agreements are negotiated to give a country’s industries a competitive trade advantage.

    You oversaw a committee of over 25 Professional Associations in Barbados who Collectively gave a Considerable Value of their time to the tune of approximately $0.5M to develop a report that “detailed strategies and actions that individuals and associations should pursue to allow Barbadian businesses to become internationally competitive. It also included the critical actions that the Government needed to complete to facilitate economic growth in the services sector.”

    This Plan was Successful as it was designed too for those who put it into action. You blazed the Trail in this effort by becoming by becoming the first person to qualify as a Chartered Structural Engineer in 15 years in Barbados. And you did not stop there you then trained others to successfully achieve the same international qualification.

    The Grenville Phillips Column – The End Game, Part 2 – Choking on Worms…The rest of the Article speaks of the seeds planted and the Harvest reaped as you worked on projects worth over $500,000,000 over the next 5 years, and earned foreign currency in 10 Caribbean countries and was awarded for your efforts as the first service company in the Caribbean to attain the ISO 9001 quality management standard, winning the BIDC’s Exceptional Quality award.

    The plan was so successful that in 2014 you were the front-runner of the National Innovation Competition, and president of Walbrent College.

    The break down came as the Governments B & D failed implement the critical actions to facilitate the economic growth of the sector. And that is where the EU Exploiters stepped in dangling ‘Aid for Trade’ hook-worms to guarantee our participation.

    Mr. Phillips Background and Credentials Speaks Boldly of the Road he Traveled and what he has Accomplished… Where are your Accomplishments Ole Man, besides BLABLABLA!!!

    Like

  • David
    June 19, 2019 9:43 AM

    @John
    One have to assume adopting/implementing a desalination program has to be scalable to address the cost issue.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Been there, done that!!!

    That’s why the ground water unit called Trents was dammed.

    In the words (as far as I can remember them) of Philip Atwell, a director of COW Williams, desal made no sense as a source of water … too costly.

    So the Farmers area was dammed to provide water for Apes Hill!!

    Even though the 2mgd Porters Catchment had already been exploited for Westmoreland.

    If you want to check me out go look in the Nation newspaper in 2006!!

    The best we can hope for is that the cost of desal is falling.

    Liked by 1 person

  • nextparty246
    June 19, 2019 10:06 AM

    On desalination.
    Please note that whatever we pay the desal plant for water, we must order twice the amount, with half of it being wasted. Plus we pay for the high cost of repairing an average of 3 breaks in the line daily, and all of the associated inefficiencies. So we significantly overpay for public services, and must be taxed accordingly.
    Of course, all we need is a well-delivered speech by a charismatic leader, and we willingly line-up to pay the unnecessary additional costs. Eventually, the ‘house of cards’ will fail, and we will adapt to the new normal, like every other country with a politically ruined economy.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Think through the water in the Scotland District.

    Similar problem to Singapore … how to harness every cubic inch of the rain God gives us.

    You are an engineer … and a civil one at that.

    Where are the reservoirs (natural) in Barbados?

    Aren’t they in the sheet water Area?

    No guarantee there is a great volume of water but how would you go about determining what that number is?

    Use your engineering brain, forget about the leadership … for now … and look at solving problems!!

    May need no treatment!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John at 11:29 AM

    Thanks for confirming my hypothesis of a few blogs back.
    Desalination should be the last option after plugging the leaks in piping and BWA revenue. But they are too difficult to handle. I wonder why? Perhaps they are too obvious and too Utopian.

    Like

  • @William and John

    Given wheee were are today fixing the leaks will take some time, in the meantime we have to generate adequate water to satisfy demand.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David at 11:41 AM

    You are unbelievable. “Fixing the leaks will take some time.” And building another desalination plant? That only heeds steel? WDR!!

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Enough has been said about the 140 year old mains and the time it will take for replacement to take. Off the shelf Desalination Solutions are available. This has also been widely discussed in the period of the water warriors.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 11:41 PM

    Did you put us where we are today so that you may have an excuse not to execute sound advice? Wuh Loss!!!

    Like

  • Sharing an opinion Vincente.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David Bu

    At what point are you going to deal with this problem? When there is a 100% leakage? Are you going to get the desalinated water free of cost? Or build your own desalination free of cost ? You are the same person who stated on this Blog that the BWA Office building resources should have gone into the BWA leaking distribution repairs.

    How is this new scenario different? Time for some linear thinking.

    Like

  • Piece the Legend

    @ Mr Vincent Codrington

    De ole man will answer your question which you prefaced by saying

    “…You are the same person who stated on this Blog that the BWA Office building resources should have gone into the BWA leaking distribution repairs…”

    Then you wisely asked why this volte face?

    Because this is the information that the Minister of Disinformation has been given to share out.

    Why else?

    Follow this reasoning Mr Codrington

    Prior to May 24th 2018, the scant resources should have fixed ghd leaks AND NOT BUILT A BUILDING

    Now one year later THE EVEN SCANTIER RESOURCES MUST NOT FIX THE LEAKS BUT BUILD A DESALINATION PLANT!

    What you think is the message Mr Codrington?

    MUGABE AND MY PEOPLE GOT TO GET SOME OF THE LOTTO MONEY FOR THE PREVIOUS LOTO (Leader of the Opposition)

    You should understand now

    But I dun know that you do, and you only playing you slow heheheheh

    Liked by 1 person

  • David
    June 19, 2019 12:10 PM

    Off the shelf Desalination Solutions are available

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Been there, done that too.

    A second brackish “desal” plant was operated in the Content groundwater unit in St. Lucy.

    However, there was not sufficient freshwater feeding the freshwater lens (sheet water, to prevent the salinity rising to levels the “off the shelf” package unit could handle … or so I was told or read.

    You are confusing seawater with brackish water.

    It is far more difficult and expensive to process seawater to potable water than it is to convert brackish water to potable water.

    So, before we get to desal … I mean proper desal … we need to exhaust whatever fresh water sources are economically feasible!!
    .

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Vincent

    If the blogmaster was running things the new HQ would not have been built and government resources through borrowing instead diverted to aggressive mains replacement.

    The reality is that it will take years to replace the rotten mains, in the mean time short term solutions are required to satisfy demand for water today and in the short term. Hope you understand the point.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    I have read what you wrote . It makes absolutely no economic sense.You are desalinating water at high cost to put into a system that is losing between 40% –60% of what is pumped into it.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Please note the following.

    Priority 1 – Addressing Leaks

    Replacing the mains to stop 50% of leakage does not have to take years. It is the old mains that leak and result in expensive road maintenance. The pipes are relatively inexpensive. It is the installation (and road rehabilitation) cost that is expensive. Therefore, we can have a 2-phased approach.

    Phase 1 is to stop 50% of wastage, thereby reducing the supply cost and building-up a reserve. This can be done by generally running surface lines, and sub-surface at traffic junctions.

    Phase 2 is to bury all pipes according to an importance schedule, as we can afford to do so (with the reserve).

    Priority 2 – New Water Sources

    It may be that we do not need new sources once we have stopped wasting 50% of our water, and the new lines can take the pressure that the old ones cannot. However, if we do need additional sources, then we can increase extraction from wells that have available capacity. Again, we cannot exploit the available capacity because the pipes do not have the capacity to distribute it.

    Priority 3 – Implementation

    The problem is not with coming up with workable and economical solutions. Any of the above can be refined based on the current state of affairs – I understand that leaks may now be as high as 60%. It is in implementation that we always fall down. That is why advising doers to “forget about leadership” and spend a few more decades giving advice that is never implemented, is terrible advice for Barbados, but great advice that only benefits the BLP/DLP party.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ GP II

    Good.

    Like

  • @Grenville

    Have you told this to the BWA? Why have they embarked on the other option of laying the pipes underground?

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    @Grenville
    “The pipes are relatively inexpensive. It is the installation (and road rehabilitation) cost that is expensive. Therefore, we can have a 2-phased approach.”
    +++++++++++++
    This is an interesting idea, but the road network here is crossed by so many gaps, driveways, and other access points that it might not be feasible.

    They are trying to replace water main infrastructure out by me in Long Bay St Philip. They have been working on it for 18 months and the road is only 500 meters long. In that space of half a kilometer there are 51 gaps, driveways and crossroads on one side or the other that have to be accommodated. This makes above ground water main infrastructure problematic. It has been 18 months and the work is only half done. For 500 meters. Do you see the problem.

    The BWA needs proper tools, techniques and management. This job should have been completed in two months. They are using a backhoe to dig the trench as though it is still 1940. A modern trenching machine could have dug the entire 500 meters in a single day and steel plates could have been deployed over the trench to maintain temporary access to gaps and driveways.
    http://nextrencher.com/en/pr/zanjadoras-de-cadenas-sobre-ruedas/zanjadora-de-cadena-sobre-ruedas-rp-385-510-RP..385/510-15

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    Sorry the URL above showing a trenching machine got mangled. Here is a little video of competent trench digging.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Piece the Legend at 12 :35 PM

    David Bu claims that he playing idiot. I have decided to write my self into the Play and have taken on the role as Boss Idiot.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ PLT at 3 :43 PM

    It is interesting that you should mention Long Bay Development. That is a relative new development( younger than 50 years). Yet the impression given is that the leaks are in the mains laid over 100 yrs ago. I wonder is the leakage not mostly in the post 1970 privately developed lands.

    Like

  • peterlawrencethompson

    I’m not in Long Bay Development, but in Long Bay Village, a much older community.

    Like

  • We look at Singapore and say we can be there too. You forgetting one major factor. The leaders of Singapore never pandered to the electorate for a vote. They made the decisions did what had to be done and moved on.

    We can’t even get 6 cameras installed at customs because the officers told the union no and the politicians seem to answer to the unions.

    Who stood in the way of the laying of the new water mains not the same union? Why government didn’t override the decision and call in private contractors at the point ?

    Be like Singapore my tail never happen undo the Duopoly .

    Also Greenville drop the ISO talk
    I tired hearing it. Who going implement it the same ones that can’t get the 6 cameras install?

    Liked by 1 person

  • A 50% leakage figure has to be rubbish given the following logic!!

    I have been hearing that 50% figure since the 1990’s.

    It is incomprehensible that it could still be the same because the volume of water pumped per year has been constant since the mid 1990’s!!

    Go and look at the GOB’s own Economical and Social Report and you will see why it cannot be that 50% of the water is lost through leaky pipes.

    Here is one from 2007.

    http://www.economicaffairs.gov.bb/archive-detail.php?id=198

    Check Appendix 28 and look at the volume of water the BWA has pumped by year.

    You will see that it flatlined in the mid 1990’s.

    The reason it flatlined was because (my reading of the various earlier reports) the maximum extraction had been reached.

    It is simply inconceivable that 50% of the water pumped could have been lost in the mid 1990’s and even with the addition of 20K plus connections between then and now 50% could still be leaking!!

    In 1987, the total number of consumers was 79,746.

    In 2007, it had surpassed 100K … it was 102,542.

    The numbers give the lie to the leakage rate.

    It is simple logic.

    50% has to be rubbish or the numbers are wrong in the reports!!

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ PLT at 4 :11 PM

    Thanks for the clarification.

    Like

  • Piece the Legend

    @ All

    Wunna see this Peter Lawrence Thompson?

    You see dis PLT??

    He is a next fellow who want LOCKING up!!!

    Imagine dat man say AND I QUOTE

    “…The BWA needs proper tools, techniques and management. This job should have been completed in two months.

    They are using a backhoe to dig the trench as though it is still 1940…”

    WHAT MORE EVIDENCE WUNNA WANT???

    Den de man gone on to provide an url dat show de very equipment dat we need to dig up de RH pipes and or replace dem wid new one!!!

    He is definitely a seditionist!!

    He want LOCKING up!!

    Whu de next ting dis Peter Lawrence Thompson going saw is dat de PIPES should be placed as near to the side of the road as possible and WHERE POSSIBLE HOLLOW TUBING OF AN APPROPRIATE SIZE AND STRENGTH BU USED AS TRUNKING AS OPPOSED TO BACK FILLING THE RETROFITTING

    FURTHERMORE, I expect that this treasonous man WHO ENT NO CIVIL ENGINEER LIKE GRENVILLE AND DE REST OF THE BWA ENGINEERS, I expect he to say something real stupid like HOW HE GOING IDENTIFY DE PLACES WID DE GREATEST LEAKAGE.

    Now i expect he to suggest dat IF DE WATER BILL IN AN AREA IS FOR DE CUNTSUMPTION OF 10 GALLONS BUT DE BWA SUPPLYING 50 GALLONS TO DAT AREA dat that area got more leakage dan a place where, 100 people cuntsuming 75 gallons but dem supplying 80 gallons!

    Indeed people and sheeples, de ole man humbly putting it to wunna dat Peter Lawrence Thompson need to get lock up for dese seditious thoughts and banned from Barbados Underground forthwith

    Liked by 1 person

  • David
    June 19, 2019 12:10 PM

    @Vincent
    Enough has been said about the 140 year old mains

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Whatever may or may not have been said I will bet no one even knows where these mains even are!!!

    If you go back to the years after 1854 and the Cholera epidemic you will see that the first piped water to Bridgetown came from Benn Spring in New Castle Woods.

    That’s the reason for the Fountain by the Treasury Buildings.

    There are no and I repeat no 140 year old mains in Long Bay Village or Long Bay Development!!

    There are no such mains in St. Lucy, or St. Peter, or St. Thomas or St. James!!

    St, John, St, Philip, St. George, Christ Church and St. Michael you may find some!!.

    St. Andrew and St. Joseph were not served by the first distribution pipes from Benn Spring to Bridgetown.

    There would only have been 5 parishes that had piped water 140 years ago.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John at 4 :55PM

    Surely the measurement of leakage is the difference between what is pumped and what is consumed. How can the total of connections be an indicator of leakage? Am I missing a link some where?

    Like

  • Also Singapore’s tax take for 2017 -2018 period grew by 6.8% based partly on a growth in their economy and ” continuous improvement on their collection systems.”

    In Bim we got a broken Vat system and an indirect tax system that leaking worst than Vincent water mains. Instead of fixing the indirect tax system what do we do? We introduce new direct taxes like increasing land taxes in some area by 61%.

    When we talk about being like Singapore we can’t even get the basics for our economy right, far less trying to implement an economy that could even be 10% the size of Singapore’s.

    Just a pipedream that politicians like to throw to the peanut gallery. When you ask them to explain the process we will implement to get there what do yo get?

    A DEAFENING SILENCE!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Piece the Legend

    @ Mr Vincent Codrington

    You is a next fellow who want banning!

    In one simple paragraph WITHOUT ONE CURSE WORD, you debunk John’s uncharacteristic incomplete reasoning.

    Normally he would have increased the volume of the water consumption as opposed to saying “flatlined” and would have made the connection between consumption AND THE REPORTED INCREASE.

    He erred because he is tired I guess due to arguing on the Sovereign Default issue simultaneously

    (By the way thanks for the likes.

    I would reciprocate but it requires you to have javascript and other things enabled on your browser XSS etc and dem tell de old man to selectively enable these features pun BU cause……

    Liked by 1 person

  • VC

    Humor me and agree with me that in the mid 1990’s the BWA extracted all that could be extracted from the aquifers.

    Lets say it was 100 gallons!!

    If 50% was lost that would mean 50 gallons would be available for consumption.

    Lets say there were 80 consumers in the mid 1990’s and they consumed the 50 gallons.

    If the leakage rate remained constant where would the BWA get the extra volume to supply a further 20 consumers?

    What happened between the mid 1990’s and now was that

    first

    the water rates were increased reducing what the 80 consumers demanded

    second

    leak detection programs addressed the 50 gallons that was being lost.

    There is a third component.

    The supply to the 100 consumers is also periodically cut!!

    In other words, during droughts, BWA supplies all that it can until it runs out of water!!

    Leaks are not the issue,

    The issue is that we have run out of easily available water 25 years ago.

    The far bigger issue is that nobody is any the wiser …. not even Grenville!!

    Like

  • @ peter

    You know the biggest joke is that there is a trench machine like the one in your video sitting in the yard of a construction company right here in Bim in perfect working condition.

    If you recall it was used a few years back when Flow laid some underground lines in the island.

    Like

  • The reason that no one is any the wiser is because BWA personnel are banned from stating the obvious, even though they know.

    No water = no land development!!

    No land development = no kickbacks!!

    Here is an example of how some farmers in St. Philip are affected not by the simple fact that if there is no rain there is no water, something that seems to be incomprehensible to persons on BU.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2019/05/30/st-philip-farmers-wilt-under-water-shortage/

    Like

  • John A
    June 19, 2019 5:45 PM

    @ peter
    You know the biggest joke is that there is a trench machine like the one in your video sitting in the yard of a construction company right here in Bim in perfect working condition.
    If you recall it was used a few years back when Flow laid some underground lines in the island.

    ++++++++++++++++++++

    It was probably used a couple of years ago to lay the water mains from Fort George to St. Philip along the top of the Ch Ch Dome.

    … and the main from St. Stephens to the Belle!!

    Where ignorance is bliss ’tis folly to be wise!!

    Like

  • My point is the equipment is here and should have been used in the main replacement instead of being put in a situation where because of politics and unions, water continues to leak through mains that could of been long replaced using technology.

    I am discussing the principle of using technology to simplify a job not whether a piece of equipment was used on highway X in whenever to lay pipe. I don’t want a history of where the trencher was used, what I do want from the powers that be is an explanation of why it’s not being used now in a badly needed main replacement project and why we prefer to pay twice as much as we need to pay the desal plant so as to accommodate the leaks?

    If you have the answers to those questions j would like to hear them as opposed to a history lesson in pipe laying in Bim since 1886.

    Your comment of bliss therefore has no place in the point I made.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John

    Bu Household could not have pulled the notion of leakage and the variable percentage there of out of the conjuror’s hat. These figures were reported as official coming from from BWA. Are you saying that there is no leakage? Are you saying that there is no data re the amount of water consumed ? I am looking for hard data. I do not argue in a vacuum.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John.

    Please ignore the unintended badgering at 6 :11 PM. I think I need to take another ride on my favourite ZR van.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Piece at 5 :36 PM

    Thanks . I understand. I will be guided accordingly.

    Like

  • @ Vincent

    Size around and make room

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington
    June 19, 2019 6:11 PM

    @ John
    Bu Household could not have pulled the notion of leakage and the variable percentage there of out of the conjuror’s hat. These figures were reported as official coming from from BWA. Are you saying that there is no leakage? Are you saying that there is no data re the amount of water consumed ? I am looking for hard data. I do not argue in a vacuum.

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++

    VC

    All the hard data you will find is in Appendix 28 of the report referred.

    I quoted my source … I did not pull anything out of a hat!!

    I am not saying there is no leakage, just that what is there is not the issue!!

    Here is an article that quotes leakage rates of both 50% and 27% in 2000.

    https://barbadostoday.bb/2012/09/05/money-leak-at-bwa/

    “One study conducted by Klohn-Crippen Consultants and made public in 2000 estimated that water leakage was about 60 per cent. Though this figure was determined to be too high subsequently, any figure close to that “error” was still cause for great concern. A subsequent study by WS Atkins in 2000 put water loss at about 27 per cent — still too much.”

    Which is it?

    I would say, neither!!

    I would say that the real issue is that we have utilized all readily available water.

    Leakage is used to obfuscate!!

    Think about it.

    Suppose in the mid 1990’s we actually had a responsible Government who was into husbanding resources.

    The Porter’s Catchment would not have been blown on Westmoreland and there would be no Apes Hill!!

    There would be no need to engineer the structures built in these two projects.

    No need for folks like Grenville!!

    No need for all the real estate agents to sell the houses and land to foreigners.

    No foreign exchange … Rooney would not have resold for $100 million US …

    Think of all the issues we could have avoided … and our folks would have a more water available.

    Same type of issue with Hyatt now.

    If there is no capacity to supply the demand, somebody will go without!!

    …. but think of the $$$ that flow .. just a few more peoples inconvenienced.

    If all we had to do was fix the pipes, then we don’t have to address the availability of water … a fundament issue Singapore faced and faces since it came into being!!

    Leakage is a red herring, one that needs to be addressed but there is a far bigger fish to catch!!

    But then we are not Singapore!!

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    The missing ingredient in the success of Barbados in the third decade of the 21st century is management at all levels.Limited natural resources set the parameters within which we have to operate. Envy of others and simply following others will no longer do it .Each country is unique. Barbados is unique. So we need those Social and Environmental Impact Studies going forward.

    Like

  • Is every project a scam of some kind?
    Every frigging project?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John at 7 :02 PM

    Now that the little red herring of leakage is out of the boat.Tell BU Household about these bigger fish. Miller already identified the loan sharks. What else do you have to add to the fishing trawler ?

    Like

  • Also tell us why the mains replacement project has not been placed as a priority as opposed to being held up in “politics”. In the meantime we are paying Williams twice as much as we need to for desalinated water so that it can in turn leak back out through the said strainers we got for mains.

    No more history lessons either please just answers based on facts would do fine.

    Liked by 1 person

  • On leaks. The latest formal study (Halcrow, 2012) identified leaks between 43% and 48%. Since then, things have only gotten worse – which is why 60% is not an unreasonable estimate for 2019.

    To stop all leaks, we can replace all 2,000 km of distribution pipe. The estimated cost to install subsurface pipes is approx BD$1B. The cost of the pipe is approx 10% of this cost.

    Since we can only do what we can afford to do, we can start by replacing the leaking pipes under our roads where the high traffic loads can cause leaks. Surface pipes (with collars) can be installed. At intersections, pipes can be installed through shallow sleeves.

    Construction normally takes longer when there is no profit incentive to earn.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Greenville let me ask you a question based on your professional opinion

    Would it be best to address the changing of mains in the densest populated areas first, or should we replace the larger mains first and work down based on main size?

    Based on our limited finances and volume being lost which as you say could be as high as 60%, how would an engineer proceed?

    Liked by 1 person

  • William Skinner

    @ Vincent College

    You are absolutely correct. We allowed the infrastructure to run down. We sounded off a lot of nonsense. One ex parliamentarian declared That we were a “ mature democracy”. Then we were the “gem” of the Caribbean and had the highest literacy rate in the world. We were at sometime developed country status.
    Not putting down these lofty beliefs but we apparently did not care about mains or maintaining public buildings. We allowed housing states to run down. No electrical and plumbing maintenance
    No planning . Almost every announcement about anything is now changed or withdrawn the next day.
    How can two political parties be both so incompetent?
    We simply don’t plan anything. Water mains want replacing we rebuild Kensington and same thing with the new BWA new office building.
    The nonsense goes on and will continue.
    A lot of window dressing nonsense cart before the horse mumbo jumbo.
    I know a lot of people criticize Granville about ISO standards but at least he is talking about standards. The BLPDLP hadvmore than fifty collective years to create and implement standards. They have none!
    How can governments that cannot have a standard for keeping schools free of rats run a damn economy or a country?

    Duopoly Rules

    Liked by 1 person

  • nextparty246
    June 19, 2019 9:48 PM

    On leaks. The latest formal study (Halcrow, 2012) identified leaks between 43% and 48%. Since then, things have only gotten worse – which is why 60% is not an unreasonable estimate for 2019.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Here is what does not make any sense about leakage rates of 43%, 48%, 50% or 60% … even 27% I find hard to believe.

    If the output as reported in the GOB’s own Economical and Social Report flatlined since c.1995 how is it possible to be losing that much water year in year out for 25 years?

    How is it possible to be increasing the number of connections?

    That makes no sense at all to me!!

    We say the economy has grown since 1995 … how is that possible with no increase in water output to feed it?

    http://www.economicaffairs.gov.bb/archive.php?cid=10

    Unfortunately, Appendix 28 disappears after 2010 or thereabouts.

    Like

  • I think that leakage is being confused with Non Revenue Water (NRW)

    Like

  • @Grenville

    Is it an easy process to detect mains that are leaking?

    Like

  • Poor policy polluted Barbados
    June 18, 2019

    Land pollution is the degradation of the soil due to human activity that causes toxins and contaminants to leach into the ground. Most of the freshwater in Barbados comes from rainfall that filters through the ground into aquifers that supply the community with drinking water.

    As the Mottley government looks to overhaul their development policy it is important that they look to protect and rejuvenate the land – especially land adjacent to the water aquifers (Zone 1) – from the toxins that are leaching into the groundwater.

    One of the biggest causes of land pollution is agriculture. Back in the 1960s when the Barbados GroundWater Protection Policy was created, planners thought agriculture was an ideal way to protect the soil from contamination. They didn’t know or worry about the use of highly toxic fertilizers and pesticides. With decades of fertilizer and pesticide use dangerous toxins have built up in the ground surrounding the aquifers that supply Barbados with drinking water. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has identified three chemicals used in pesticides that are conclusive causes of cancer. Read report here

    Perhaps the biggest worry facing the Barbados Water Authority is that cancer causing pesticides are slowly leaching into the islands drinking water. The biggest question residents should ask is:
    Why restrict land use in highly sensitive water zones areas to agriculture when the science shows that farming is one of the biggest causes of land pollution?

    Another big contributor to land pollution in Barbados is vacant land. A century long habit of tossing trash out the window has caused 1 to 2 feet of garbage to collect on vacant land. And while weeds and bushes may grow over it the trash below decomposes leaching toxins into the soil. The restrictive land use policy around our aquifers has caused most of the land that isn’t farmed to be left vacant.

    The truth is the Barbados Groundwater Protection Policy did not protect the land but contaminated it by limiting use in zone 1 areas to agriculture. Restricting land use also stopped pollution protection innovation and technology from developing here. Luckily other countries weren’t so foolish and green technology advanced. From natural cleaners to localized sewage treatment systems, there are many innovative ways to protect land abutting our aquifers from pollution.

    The Groundwater Protection Policy is currently under review, and we are hopeful that policy makers do not ignore the science that has identified agriculture and vacant land as contributors to land pollution. We encourage policy makers to look at innovative ways to protect our land, and take a “be green not militant” approach to land use. Much of the land around our aquifers needs rejuvenating and we should look to eco tourism, and organic farmers for help in the process.

    Fertilizers, pesticides and garbage will continue to leak dangerous toxins into the ground water without a complete overhaul of the Groundwater Protection Policy. Banning the use of fertilizer and pesticide on all agricultural land in zone 1 is essential but hard to police; and vacant land will continue to collect garbage unless policy makers allow other forms of land use.

    It is our suggestion that zone 1 land be opened to ecotourism initiatives that introduce and promote pollution prevention systems; and that all initiatives be required to clean up and rejuvenate the soil. Pollution prevention systems and soil rejuvenation could easily be made part of the planning approval process for all ecotourism initiatives in zone 1 areas. It is the right, reasonable and responsible approach to tackling the growing pollution problem in Barbados.

    http://www.womenspost.ca/poor-policy-polluted-barbados/

    Like

  • Who are the other elected officials of Solutions, apart from president Junior?

    Like

  • David
    June 20, 2019 3:32 AM

    @Grenville
    Is it an easy process to detect mains that are leaking?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    As far as I recall, the BWA was using the most modern methods of leak detection 20 odd years go!!

    There was a comprehensive leak detection programme.

    There are two ways water is “lost” …. check this link!!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-revenue_water

    Like

  • I don’t know if they are metered and billed but consider what would happen if QEH, the Polyclinics. the schools, the Police Stations, the Fire Stations, the Ministries etc etc etc did not pay their water bills?

    Would the BWA turn off their water?

    I recall Hilton used to be in constant arrears with its water bills.

    These are sources of non revenue water or NRW!!

    The water is not physically lost, just not paid for, accounted for if you like.

    Like

  • nextparty246
    June 19, 2019 9:48 PM

    On leaks. The latest formal study (Halcrow, 2012) identified leaks between 43% and 48%. Since then, things have only gotten worse – which is why 60% is not an unreasonable estimate for 2019.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Regarding NRW,

    “Barbados estimated at 43% (Halcrow 2012), 7% apparent losses + 36% real losses”

    This is an extract from the presentation … different from what you are portraying it would appear.

    A value for leaks of 60% makes no sense.

    I suspect Halcrow “real losses” refers to leaks … 36%

    Values from 2000 were Klohn and Crippin, 60% and WS Atkins 27%.

    I don’t have the easy answer for the value of the leakage rate but what is apparent is neither do you!!

    It doesn’t matter me not knowing, but for you not to know is a big deal!!

    Make it right!!

    Water is a technical problem requiring technical solutions.

    You are supposed to have those skills!!

    If you don’t, go and acquire them … it is far easier for you to get it than any monkey lawyer politician.

    … and if you get it clear in your head, you have a significant advantage over your opponents who do not have a clue!!

    Singapore’s success I would posit is based on its understanding of water and it availability.

    So when you dream of Singapore, do the due diligence on Barbados … you could reap huge rewards politically!!

    Like

  • There should be zero leaks, water is too scarce … but that is impossible, unachievable .. but still a worthwhile goal.

    What you will find like most things in life is that there is a law of diminishing returns.

    There will probably be a level of leakage beyond which it makes no sense spending money to better.

    More sense to keep it under control!!

    But, what is that level and where are we in its attainment?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David June 20, 2019 4:03 AM

    Your file photo highlights a rather burning issue for those genuinely concerned about pollution in Barbados and its consequential environmental degradation’ both on the land and in the sea.

    What is the Mottley’s administration policy position on the importation of piped-water’ in single use plastic bottles?

    Would these forex-burning ‘water’ bottles fall under the upcoming ban on single-use plastic containers or would they be treated under the returnable containers regime as applied to other imported sugar-laced beverages from T&T, Jamaica and outside the region?

    Is the quality of water produced by the BWA of such poor and health-threatening quality that it cannot be further purified and sold locally as “Bowmanston Special or Spring Vale Delight?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ John

    Leaks whether revenue or potable water need to be identified and measured. BWA knows what is pumped . How can it not know how much is metered and paid for? Simple arithmetic would indicate the difference between the amount paid for and the amount pumped. The product of that exercise will indicate the volume not paid for and the actual physical leak.
    In the good colonial days, there were meters at strategically placed nodes. It was very easy to measure where the volume of water actually went. And those were the days of public stand pipes. So John forgive me if I do not buy your axiomatic approach to this problem. I am not amused.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Miller at 10:07 AM

    Have you not read in previous submissions of the level of nitrates , insecticides , pesticides and other pollutants that enter the water supply at the Belle and elsewhere?
    When BWA raises the quality of pumped water to International Standards we will stop import water, bottled in plastics. To be sides , if we do not keep this supply of bottled water,old people like me will get complications caused by dehydration. The levels of interrupted supplies has risen along with the level of violent crimes. Is there some correlation ?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    One would of thought in 2019 the BWA could of deducted by zoning where the biggest problems lie.

    In other words take the total cubic metres pumped to an area then deduct the total amount metered in turns of usage by that area. One would then deduct the metered amount from the pumped amount and arrived at the amount lost in cubic metres for that zone.

    Once this is done in a structured way in defined zones, that data would then tell the BWA the zones with the largest volume of wastage, hence identifying them as the priority for main replacement. I mean if you roof leaking you wouldn’t fix the biggest leaks first?

    Don’t tell me in 2019 data as basic as this is not available. If we going replace mains in a real world way one should change the mains where the lost is identified to be greatest first. Especially in a case where finance is in short supply.

    Of course that is if one applies linear thinking to the solution.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I mean whether you call it leaks unaccounted for water or what ever is irrelevant. It’s water that left point A was not used by the consumers at point B and thus represents a saleable commodity lost in delivery. Dress it up all you want, if it was sardines leaving a bond on route to a customer it would be a a Saleable commodity lost in transit why should water be viewed differently ?

    That is assuming the BWA look at their operation as a business.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ John A June 20, 2019 10:44 AM
    “I mean whether you call it leaks unaccounted for water or what ever is irrelevant. It’s water that left point A was not used by the consumers at point B and thus represents a saleable commodity lost in delivery. Dress it up all you want, if it was sardines leaving a bond on route to a customer it would be a a Saleable commodity lost in transit why should water be viewed differently?”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Of course the BWA is in possession of equipment which can measure the amount of potable water pumped from their stations into their various distribution networks.

    They also have collecting procedures which records the amount of water used by consumers attached to their various networks.

    The plan designed by the politicians from both sides is that similar to that they executed for the Transport Board.

    That is, drive the BWA into the financial and operational ground through structurally planned mismanagement to hypocritically justify its eventual privatization to foreign investors as demanded by the country’s new financial management Master the IMF.

    What the current political managers are promising to improve the BWA are the same empty promises made by the David Thompson Cabinet.

    The biggest problem facing the BWA is the disease of willful neglect over the years by the political masters over the years along with the managerial misfits sent by politicians to be their handmaidens of inefficiency and incompetence.

    How do you explain how a commercial entity can continue to charge less than a Bajan cent for a liter of potable water while the same consumers are prepared to pay over Bds $ 1.50 for the same liter of imported ‘piped’ water stored in a plastic bottle for weeks if not months?

    Isn’t it true say that a liter of water of any kind cost more (and has greater value in every sense of the word) in Saudi Arabia or Kuwait or Dubai than a liter of petrol?

    Like

  • @ Miller June 20, 2019 11:29 AM

    Should read:
    ‘ The BWA also has billing and collection systems which record the amount of water used by consumers attached to their various networks’., 2019 11:29 AM

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Miller at 11 :29 AM

    Wow! Excellent retort. I do like it when you think linearly.

    Like

  • @ Miller

    Sadly I have to agree with you on your points. It looks like public services such as water and transport have taken a back seat in terms of priority for both parties for a while now.

    I think the demise of the BWA started when the money they had put aside for mains replacement was moved into the consolidated fund. I think that move alone should of told us how politicians saw the BWA.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I worked in Curacao for a while and you know how you knew if someone there was wealthy? Not by the car they drove but by whether they had a lawn around their home. Reason being water there was so dam expensive!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Miller

    Let me give you an idea of what paying for water means to some. In Curacao a cubic metre is 10.35 guilders or roughly $11.60 bds a cubic metre.

    Now if you if need water delivered add to that A 40 guilder delivery fee on top of the cubic metre rate.

    So if you think a tank truck
    Pulling up and filling your buckets and bottles for free more fool you !

    You see the difference in approach when water is seen as a business now?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Miller at 11 :37 AM

    The BWA must use these bits of information as feed-backs into the decision making process. It is called data mining. It removes guessing and speculation out of the policy making at the BoD level and at cabinet meetings.
    Adopting a privatization policy, overtly or covertly, in order to march in step with a perceived ideology is not what the Electorate voted for.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Have a read of the auditors general BWA Special Audit to appreciate the quality of decision making plague a very important institution responsible for satisfying water usage.

    Like

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