A Heather Cole Article – I Dream of Africa

Submitted by Heater Cole

Part 1: Why?

I am on a mission to visit Ghana in West Africa and you may wonder why. It is all because of Slavery. It has always bothered me. I never knew that I was descended from someone who was kidnapped and made a slave until one fateful day when I was in Infants A or Infants B at Christ Church Girls’ school. I do not recall which class it was. An argument started in the class between two little girls, mind you we were all little then. One wanted the other one to carry her bag and the other refused. It became boisterous and caught the teacher’s attention. Her name was Ms. Lovell. It was only when she teacher was addressing the matter that I found out what it was about. The first little girl said she only asked the second girl to carry her bag. The second little girl said she was not carrying the bag because she was not a slave.

What was a slave? I had not a clue. I lived in a bubble that was the world that I knew. I do not remember who asked the question out loud. However, Ms. Lovell began to tell us a story which became my first history lesson. I do not remember if anyone else knew what she told us; that we were all descendants of people who were taken from West Africa and made slaves in all the Caribbean Islands. The slaves worked without pay and belonged to the white people who owned the sugar plantations. Her history lesson must have had a profound affect on all of the little girls because from that day on if any one of the of the girls asked each other to do something menial for them the response was “no! I am not your slave!” This story and those words have stuck with me for a lifetime. However, that was not all that those works did, they made me feel as though I had been living a lie for all the 5 or 6 years of my life.

I could not wait to get home after school. When my cousins and I turned the corner onto to our gap from the main road in Cane Vale, I ran home. When I reached the opened back door, I ran inside and I told Aunt V (my grandmother) “the teacher say that we were slaves,” and I waited for her to say that it was not true. Instead of saying no or yes, she calmly asked what had happened and I repeated the story. I was still awaiting and wanted her to say no that is not so but the look in her eyes filled me with a deep sadness as I waited for her to respond. Her failure to respond to my shock started my traumatization and made me ashamed of who I was. After what seemed like an eternity, all she said was to stop worrying my little head, but I never did.

By the time my mother got home from work I was still quiet; engulfed in a state of sadness. She asked what was wrong and Aunt V told her. I do not recall her response. Later that night as I snuggled up next to Aunt V, I asked her to tell me about the slaves. She said she did know anything about slaves but she could only tell me about the old-time people. From that I understood that it was her way of saying that she would never call them slaves; it was as though she was part of the resistance. That was my comfort and from that night on, it was the stories of the old-time people and the old-time days that my grandmother told me.

Not that she knew much but it was a start. We were already close but the stories she told drew us closer. They were the stories that she had been told about mud houses the old- time people lived in, what they wore; about a woman who lost her hand feeding the canes in the mill and about duppies, how the dead were buried facing the East and more that I have long forgotten. I was a curious child one who asked for minute details, one who wanted exact details and if a repeat was not the same version, I would remind her what was missing. So much so, that she would get tired of my questioning and ask me if I was a lawyer. I never got tired of hearing the same stories.

By the time I entered high school at 11, I had long exhausted my grandmother’s informal knowledge. So, I read every history text book every year before the school year started. I had developed an insatiable appetite for knowledge of the people from my past.

The year that I was 16 we did a school project and I went to the Archives and there I discovered that there were slaves at Hannays Plantation whose last name was Cole. My great grandmother somehow made the journey from there to Church Hill of the Christ Church Parish Church and my grandmother moved from there to Oistins Hill and then Cane Vale. I never got a chance to see the oldest Slave Registers because they were closed from public viewing, so I never found out who were the old-time man and woman who lived at Hannays Plantation from whom I am descended.

Throughout the years, I have thought of them, where exactly did there come from, what did they do for a living prior to them being taken away. I may never know who they were, whose big dove shaped eyes I now wear or whose smile grace my face. I will never know what their real names were, or the exact area they came from, which tribe they belonged to, I do not know who gave me this streak of determination and fearlessness that I possess. I wonder if I am a descendant of a griot, yet I have this thing in me that makes me love art and colour. I always want to make things with my hands and then there is this love that I have for fabric. I cannot explain my numerous trips to Abeds and the other stores in Bridgetown that sell fabric to see what they have for sale. What I do know is that my ancestors’ blood still runs in my veins and I still carry their DNA.

Somehow long ago someone did things that are still a part of me. It is as though through me my ancestors live forever. Your knowledge of your distant past may not be much different from mine and our stories may be intertwined.

The President of Ghana is welcoming the Diaspora home in this historic year of our destiny that commemorates the 400th year anniversary of the commencement of the slave trade. Will you join me and friends and be part of this historic occasion from August 5 to 15, 2019 as we reconnect to our distant past?

60 comments

  • Heather your Story Telling is Enjoyable and Visually Expressive but Remember although man may Oppress and Enslave us …God has made us Free. Our Greatest Gift of Sovereignty is Bequeathed to each Individual at birth, that of Free Agency… As you exhibit in and threw your own Life’s Experiences of a Sound Barbadian Family Upbringing the inherent thirst within each individual to learn and grow, demonstrates that Truly “Knowledge makes man unfit to be a Slave”…

    Of Interest Our Barbadian History is Directly Linked to Liberia…

    In the mid-1860s the total number of freed slaves and persons of color who had left the USA to settle in Liberia amounted to nearly 19,000. After the Civil War (1862-1865), the emigration of black people from the USA to Liberia virtually came to a standstill.

    In 1865, 346 emigrants from Barbados sailed to Liberia, among them, Anthony and Sarah Barclay with their children. A couple of thousand more would follow their example in the following years.

    Hopefully we can Learn from the History of Old Barbadian Greats. What Great Attributes Defined ‘the persons who moved into key positions of authority’ in the Settlement of Liberia in 1865?

    ‘One cannot help without being struck with both their character and their intelligence. Two Barbadiand became Presidents of Liberia… President Arthur Barclay & Edwin Barclay …. We put the word Character first, for while indeed well freighted with knowledge, acquirement’s, and culture, they presented the unusual peculiarity of being heavy weighted with the Moral Excellence as with the Intelligent Brightness of Right-minded people. They were seen at once to be a group of thoughtful, self-restrained, upright and orderly people, and their life and character during their long residence in Liberia have fulfilled the bright promise of their first coming.

    It is remarkable to find time and again commentary on the character, skills and accomplishments of the Barclays. These children who migrated were from exceptional Barbadian families. Both Anthony and Edwin grew up in elite activist households where public service was a way of life.

    They were also deeply religious households, and their families became the leaders in the emigration societies, sponsored discussions and other events on Africa, African civilisations, these children were imbued with the Principles, Ideological Consciousness and Commitment that would signal them out as leaders. The same can be said of the other families which have distinguished themselves so well.’

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  • Heather Cole

    I shall continue to reiterate the fact that a lot of our undiscovered history is due in part to our own doing or ignorance … we have failed as a people of African extraction to pass our history onto future generations …

    My grandfather was born in 1910 and my grandmother in 1900, and as a child I remembered quite vividly visiting the both of them on many occasions, but what I did not recall it the fact that the both of them never discussed their childhood or who my greatgrand-parents were… information I do believe could have given me a better understanding of who I am today.

    So before we decide on a visit to Africa in an effort to better understand the journey our ancestors took from the African continent to the shores of the Caribbean….

    We must first look right at home because there is a lot of undiscovered history about ourselves yet to be had at home…

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  • @ Heather,

    Have you ever discussed this subject with the tens of thousands of Barbadians who live in the UK with people from Africa? Their views would be interesting. Also, plse explain Darfur, the Biafra war, Democratic Republic of Congo, the civil war in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Libya and the enslavement of West Africans, Coptics in Egypt, Nigeria and its 250 languages and ethnic groups; or explain why Caribbean people find it difficult to unite.

    Liked by 2 people

  • Hal Austin

    Out of the 2000 dialects that are spoken in Africa … Swahili which it spoken in Uganda, Somalia, Tanzania, Kenya, some parts of Ethiopia, Eritrea and the Sudan could potentially be the universal language of the African people …

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  • Sectarian violence, greed, dictatorship, and social-tribalism continues to delay the progress on the African continent …

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  • Talking Loud Saying Nothing

    @ Heather,
    Interesting column as always.

    Sadly there remains a chasm between Africans from the continent of African and their African diaspora cousins.

    It is up to the leadership and the people from the Africa continent to bridge this chasm. Firstly they (all African countries) have to admit their role in the slave trade. Secondly they have to make a universal apology to us. Thirdly they should make some form of reparations and fourthly they should stop looking down on those from the diaspora.

    I have more of an interest in the diaspora who are resident in Haiti, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, India, Kuwait, et al. to whom we share a more common experience with then our fellow Africans from the African continent.

    It is a shame that Vincent Haynes appears to be no longer with us, I am certain that he would have something to say.

    Liked by 1 person

  • millertheanunnaki

    @Talking Loud Saying Nothing February 12, 2019 8:37 AM
    “It is up to the leadership and the people from the Africa continent to bridge this chasm. Firstly they (all African countries) have to admit their role in the slave trade. Secondly they have to make a universal apology to us. Thirdly they should make some form of reparations and fourthly they should stop looking down on those from the diaspora.”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Good point!
    But the question still remains as in what form should the “reparations” come?
    Should those African countries (already heavily indebted to the Chinese) borrow money to settle this ancestral debt of betrayal?

    How about the right to acquire 40(0) acres of cultivable land and 2 tractors instead of a promise to black fools of 40 and a mule which blacks in America are still waiting on?

    Isn’t there such a scheme in Ghana as a ‘token’ of reparations available to the descendants of those who were forcibly dispatched as cargo of ‘human’ gold from the Cape Coast castle?

    Most black Bajans can trace their DNA roots (ancestry) back to Ghana and can automatically claim any reparations on offer; whether from their black ancestral sellers or their British buyers.

    But the seemingly insurmountable challenge (mental emancipation) is first to get black Bajans to accept that they are the descendants of slaves from West Africa and not of their ‘British’ masters called Stuart, Williams, Smith, John(son) Broom(e) or Bra(i)thwaite.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Heather

    History is nice to know. It is how you interpret it. If you have not fully understood your History, your visit to West Africa may be more cathartic/ shocking than the information you gleaned in Infants 1.

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  • This so-called African role in the Transatlantic Slave Trade was not premeditated. And as it was, it only benefited some elites. That so-called role was no different than the role Bajans now play in eating one another, in the extension of colonialism, have always played.

    It is almost entirely a canard with its genesis in the minds of the very people who benefited from what Rodney called, how Europe underdeveloped Africa.

    That regressive idea plays into the cult of divide and rule. Not unlike the ethos which led African elites to themselves be used as instruments in that worst of all Holocausts.

    Instead of viewing this matter with the dominant narratives given, we may want to consider what the Africans scholars themselves have to say as counter-narrative. Some Africans are saying that slavery was a byproduct of a wider war against Africa which continues to this day. And that slavery was a consequence of those larger dynamics.

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  • @Pacha

    Are you able to post a couple links?

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  • We don’t hear, for example, similar argumentations about the Jews who helped the Third Reich in all aspects of the events leading up to, during and after the events causal to WW2.

    Nor about the ‘victors’ of that war who then deployed the same scientists, Operation Paperclip, for example, to boost their own development.

    But we could always depend on former slaves to hate themselves in order to release massa from blame.

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  • Vincent, I studied history to A levels at BCC.
    Pacha, in my opinion what is taught for WI history adequately explains the how we got here and does not address the why. Studying history was all I was interested in and it consumed me and I loved it.
    When I applied to the University it was to study WI history. When I got accepted, I just could not do it as I realised that it would never provide the answers that I was seeking. The reasons why our society has evolved this way, so I choose to study economics instead.

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  • David

    In a rush. Chinweizu

    Follow response later

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  • This is more precise

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  • @ Lexicon, I do not have the answers, perhaps it is clear proof that brainwashing is effective. The people who were made slaves were taken from their surroundings, broken and made docile. Maybe their lives were to difficult to speak about.
    My great grandmother on my father’s side was of the opinion that children should be seen and not heard. When I went with my grandmother to visit her, I could not move from where I sat far less speak.

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  • Hal, Taking out loud,
    We must build a bridge between Africa and all the Africans in the Diaspora where ever they may be.

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  • If anyone is interested in going on the tour please contact me on Facebook.

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  • @ David
    Pacha is absolutely correct.
    The “Africans sold slaves too ” argument is just another tool to deflect from white racism.

    See this interesting link:

    https://abagond.wordpress.com/2010/09/22/africans-sold-their-own-people-as-slaves/

    Liked by 1 person

  • Thanks for the links, bedside viewing.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Is there a Black / African studies degree/program, at UWI?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Heather at 11 :18 AM

    Was your grandmother’s behaviour African, Caribbean or European in culture?

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  • Heather Cole

    Ghana is a good start because a great many Barbadians are descended from the Akan Nation of Ghana … and as a matter of fact … Rita Marley lives in Ghana … she lived for a short time in Shashamane
    Ethiopia …

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  • Skinner 12:19 PMare you kidding me? Pure Jobby,, Beckles a sell out nothing in there , but they may have slavery topic to keep the people down!
    I never seen My family name in Any Slave book, even if all the slave is dead!
    We live each Day as Free Born, MY Grandmother 97 , I just asked her if her grandmother was a Slave! She told me No, but she work very hard,!

    I got int to ” Trouble ” Meaning with a White Judge in NY after I told her I was no slave and she asked who or what is a Slave,I said anyone with a SSN and card, Yes she had One! leave it there for now. next, she asks me what work I do, I told her I free slaves, now many years later i am doing just that in Barbados 2019
    As Barbados records will show and they have removed all the records to show that all Persons were not slaves and hold land and Plantation in Barbados then to remove 129 Plantations and give us the crook C.O Williams as the new Master of all things controlled by Black Slave Masters.
    If the education in Barbados has slave stuck in your head then go back to before you was kidnapped and stand that ground,I claim no slavery and seek no Funds, Most of the History is a lie and we were moved around the Caribbean as “Garifuna ” and not Carib! another white made up Name that was not in Africa another wrong White made up Name,
    You cant even Clear Plantation History information, missing but Slavery records stay intact to keep you down, Move like a Slave be treated like a slave! Move Free Moors!

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  • https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=AwrC3HwC.WJcgRsAzO8PxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–?p=garifuna+flag&fr=yhs-Lkry-SF01&hspart=Lkry&hsimp=yhs-SF01

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  • Vincent, a mixture of African and Caribbean. When I knew her she was elderly. She raised all the children of her niece and her grandchildren. She used to bring us lunch before the school meals program had started. We would meet her and sit under a tree and eat whatever it was she brought in a big basket.

    She was beautiful, kind and a wise soul and deeply religious. However we all turned out it was all because of her.
    My paternal grandmother was the flip side of the coin. She too raised children and she owned a shop. No one in their right mind would cross her.

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  • Can everyone share how old they were and their experience of how they found out that they were a defendant of a slave?

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  • Heather Cole

    David

    You were quit right to distrust the limited historiographies forming dominant narratives in Caribbean academia. We have a lot to say, in a few hours, please.

    Maybe those instincts represent the Ancestral collective as passed down in DNA from more than 200,000 years ago. This is what African philosophies teach us. In order to understand the last 500 years we (I) have had to go back than far.

    But later please.

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  • Heather Cole

    We also have to be mindful of the fact that some black families never experienced slavery … not all black families who came to the United States, South America and the Caribbean were Slaves…

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  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    Thanks Heather. Beautiful essay.

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  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    This is an American story, but I think that it is well worth a read:

    Hurston, Zora Neale.
    Barracoon: the story of the last “black cargo” / Zora Neale Hurston, edited by Deborah Plant; foreword by Alice Walker; 1st edition; Amistad: New York, NY
    ISBN: 9780062748201

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  • The Ideology that tries to Limit Free Speech is Leftism…The Ideology that believes that man can Choose and Choose Righteously is Conservatism. And it is true that there are Scoundrels on both sides, but it is far more dangerous to limit Free Speech that Not limit it.

    The Uproar that Abraham Lincoln caused with the idea of Freedom for Slaves produced the formation of the Republican Party. His idea was so considered Un-PC that a War was fought over it, the Civil War of the US where over 2% of the Population of the US died. That would be the equivalent of fighting in Barbados and Seven thousand people died and this was because of Free Speech. And the Slaves were Freed because Abraham Lincoln had the Legal Right to Speak!.

    Darkness Covers the Earth when there is no Free Speech. No matter how offensive you think those Ideas are, Free Speech is the main Component of a man’s Freedom. Freedom is made up of every Individual to State his Ideas that will Ensure the Freedom of the Nation. A person or a Group telling you what you Can or Cannot say is not for Freedom. Under which System would you prefer to live? Under the System that is for FREEDOM of the Individual or One on the ROAD to TYRANNY?

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  • SirSimpleSimonPresidentForLife

    @Lexicon February 12, 2019 6:34 AM “My grandfather was born in 1910 and my grandmother in 1900, and as a child I remembered quite vividly visiting the both of them on many occasions, but what I did not recall it the fact that the both of them never discussed their childhood.”

    Sometimes people don’t talk because the have been deeply traumatised, and because they believe that to speak of that trauma would be to “burden” the younger generation. So please do not be too hard on your grandparents. They may have believed that they were “protecting’ you.

    But yes, people do need the freedom to talk. And “yes” we must listen respectfully. And we must document the stories.

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  • Go to Youtube

    How Ghana’s Capital Accra is Quickly Modernizing under Fastest Economic Growth

    Liked by 1 person

  • Heather,

    I cannot remember when I found out about slavery because it didn’t really affect me that much. Man’s inhumanity to man would have been evident to me from quite early on because I grew up with television and I loved reading. I felt no shame because I had done nothing to be ashamed of and being a slave was not my reality. Sexism had more of an impact on me than racism. I have fought that all my life. I have never felt less than because of my colour and I have never before social media experienced racial insults at a personal level. I have experienced racial segregation at Queen’s College at lunch time but we never really cared because we didn’t feel deprived of worthwhile company. We were sufficient unto ourselves. We thought it was funny.

    The first time slavery bothered me at all was while watching Roots. That is the first time I really identified and felt the pain of my ancestors. That was the first time I felt any anger. That anger dissipated shortly after the end of the series.

    The fact that the remnants of the slave system still exist in today’s world has become evident to me since I’ve become an adult. I consider it something we need to continue fighting to change. It makes me angry that more progress hasn’t been made but what makes me more angry is that most of us go about our daily business without a single thought of how we are going to do that. Many carry around inferiority complexes that need to be addressed before any movement forward can be made. Learning out true history before slavery would be a good place to start.

    I cannot yet make plans to join you in August but I will try to make it possible. Ghana is not going anywhere and so if not this year, next year I will make the trek.

    Pachamama,

    I will watch your videos. I hope I am not in the doghouse.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Hants February 12, 2019 1:34 PM

    “Go to Youtube

    How Ghana’s Capital Accra is Quickly Modernizing under Fastest Economic Growth”

    They Must Progress their President is Practicing Free Market Principles unlike some their Communist/Socialist Neighbours!!

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  • Thanks for sharing Donna, yes next year!

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  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Heather

    Wuh lordddd. I does be really impress with you writing skills. I really would like to write like you, here. Maybe Puff Enuff can help me. Anyhow, on to the main topic at hand.

    Here is the problem that I have with your column. You see, me hair curly and long. Me complexion bright and light. Me nose straight. Me father dey tell me that me ancestry got just as much white as em got black. Me great to the power of 8 granfather was a whiteman. One of dem dere slave driven masters. He had a punch of slaves (including poor whites) living on he/she plantation to whom he use to take pride in messing with the pretty slave girls. Me father tell me that me great by the power of 8 or more grandmother was a pretty little African girl whose complexion was also quite light. ( I thought all Africans black?) How am I to determine the true nature of my roots when my ancestral line all messed up? Me either European or African. How do I identify so that I can go with you to the cradle of civilization to where me diaspora was founded and became part of the transitioners to whom the modernday Africans does look down upon.

    Ya Sister

    The SSS

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  • millerthe anunnaki

    @ Lexicon February 12, 2019 1:07 PM
    “We also have to be mindful of the fact that some black families never experienced slavery … not all black families who came to the United States, South America and the Caribbean were Slaves…”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Lexicon, please let us know from which period of time since 1492 that black people were able to travel (as families) from West Africa to the so-called Americas without manacles?

    Do you know of any family in Barbadoes- or even in the land of the free and home of the brave- whose name is not of some European origin like “Fenty”?

    Oh yes, you can! King Jaja!

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  • Dear SSS,

    Thanks for sharing. We simply got to go. That is the only way we will find out if we will be personally accepted or not. A friend who lives there told me that he thought we would have all visited by now. Is Barbados a signatory to the one drop rule? There are so many different shades of color in Barbados that there may be few pure Africans. Truth be told we are all mixed some to more degrees than others. My paternal great grandmother was a descendant of the poor whites who lived in Foul Bay. She had 5 children. 2 came out very fair and 3 very dark like her husband.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Miller

    Not all Africans who came to America were slaves; a few came even in the 17th century as free men, sailors working on ships in the early colonial years, some African came as indenture servants who were freed after a set period of years, as did many immigrants from the British Isles.

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  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    Hmmm Heather

    I really do not know, sister. I have visited Africa, Swasiland now renamed, I think, after their mad king Eswatani. Very lovely place with diversity and a lot of national parks. I went on a Safari, and to tell you the truth, I was more afraid of the African men then I was of the big tailhole lions, rhinos, and other big animals. All dem animals big and for a lion to take them down you got to understand the power of these big cats Look, to see dem dere animals in real life is far greater site then when you see them on TV. Dem big is france here. Anyhow, the men in Swansiland, and base on what the women there told us, every one of them seems to think that they are to be worshipped and served. Their behaviour is completely totalitarian. They seem to think that the women belong to them, especially black and light skin women. It is not a comfortable feeling the way they stare at you and if you are not African they instantly label you by referring to you as ” those people.”

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  • Heather Cole

    As the saying goes: for every good that comes into the world there is a correspondening evil and with that being said: I am here to tell you that some African people have a poor view of West Indians and African Americans…

    Now, I dated a British girl who used to live in America, but she decided to returned to England where she married this Nigerian guy, and out of the clear blue sky she called me one day, and as we got talking she lamented to me that her husband said that West Indians were slave babies.

    And yet again I worked with this Nigerian fellow who used to be married to this Jamaican woman, and one day I over heard him saying to someone that his family forbid him from marriaging to slave babies…

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  • Heather Cole

    Now it would be ignorant to used the example of these two individuals to judge the entire Nigerian people, but I think it is fair to share some of the views of African people …and it is no different than when I was a little boy in Barbados, and a friend upset me and I got back at him by calling him a Black African…

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  • millertheanunnaki

    @ Lexicon February 12, 2019 4:52 PM
    “Not all Africans who came to America were slaves; a few came even in the 17th century as free men, sailors working on ships in the early colonial years, some African came as indenture servants who were freed after a set period of years, as did many immigrants from the British Isles.”
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Do you mean bondservants like Olaudah Equiano who was freed by his Quaker master, a benevolent ancestor of our own BU King John?

    You have taken the movie “12 years a slave” too seriously.

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  • @ SSS and Lexicon, we must try Ghana not Swaziland or Nigeria.

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  • Sunshine Sunny Shine

    I can see that you are passionate about this Heather. I will do a bit of research to determine Ghana’s position on the diaspora.

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  • Heather Cole

    Ghana is the most progressive country in West Africa… I think Ghana found oil in the 1990s, but Ghana is known for its gold …

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  • Africa Dreams of Europe – The Nightmare. What Africa has to offer its young.

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  • Sidboyce

    Africa has a lot to offer young people, but you must understand that suffering is also part of the human condition, and just because we are told about the number of young people that go to bed hungry at night in Barbados that does not mean it does not occur …

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  • I Shake my head at the Article that has been written and Twisted by Commenters into Putting One Race Against Another! These people wear Glasses and they see through that Prism of Race and everything they see and do pertains to Race even Rewriting History to Suit their Narrative of Divide and Conquer!

    Ms. Cole sometime ago I warned you of those who use their Magnets to Influence the Direction of other Peoples Inner Compass.

    Either you seemed to have fallen for it hook line and sinker, or that’s the Direction you were headed all along and your piece was the Magnet to take us there?

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  • WE ARE MODERN DAY SERFS, BLACK WHITE AND INBETWEEN…

    In Barbados People received their Freedom as it was heralded as something great they even Erected Statues to Celebrate Emancipation paid for by the Government, and then they proceed to make us Serfs. We have thrown off the Colonial Masters and now we have another one, Government and they are Celebrating Freedom with us while making us Slaves to the State!… Any kind of Slavery is Anti-Christ, it takes away peoples Freedom to Choose and its Ideology is that of Bondage!!

    SOCIALISM is the Big Lie of the Twentieth and Twenty first Centuries!

    Socialism has no theory of wealth creation; it’s just a destructive, Envy-Driven Fantasy about Redistributing Wealth after something else (and somebody else) creates it first. The slow poison of Government and Corporations, Crony Capitalism has infiltrated almost every level of Socialist Countries and is now being used as fodder to promote Socialism.

    What most do not realize is that Serfdom still exist today in the guise of Socialism and Prospers Worldwide and we that are on the Isles of the sea are not exempt. The same Convoluted Philosophy that erected the Statue that Supposed to represent Freedom is Binding us in Chains of ECONOMIC SLAVERY.

    That is the Ultimate Deception!!…OVER TAXATION IS THEFT…

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  • CRONY CAPITALISM IS VERY MUCH ALIVE IN BARBADOS…

    Peace and Security are better established through the means of economic liberty. It is only when a people are individually and economically free can a society establishing a self-respecting and self-governing citizen. Free Enterprise (Capitalism) = Free Markets

    Capitalism, which is a Communist word removing the (Free Enterprise aspect of it), + Governments = Crony Capitalism/Corporations (Not a Free Market)

    Cronyism is where big business and governments collude to give special favours to those entities to the exclusion of the ordinary person. Crony Capitalism is an attempt to label the System of Free Enterprise by regulating it until it is no longer Free.

    A Prime Example is that the BMC was bringing in Chicken wings as cheap source of protein for the small man and shops etc. However recently the original plan has switched and only Large Traders are allowed to purchase wings in Quantity and the small man is limited to One Box per purchase…Thus Squeezing small business and Individuals while Propping up Big Businesses…I wonder who is responsible for these decisions in Government or at the BMC and what Kickbacks they are receiving?

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  • WE ARE MODERN DAY SERFS, BLACK WHITE AND IN-BETWEEN…

    In Barbados People received their Freedom as it was heralded as something great they even Erected Statues to Celebrate Emancipation paid for by the Government, and then they proceed to make us Serfs. We have thrown off the Colonial Masters and now we have another one, Government and they are Celebrating Freedom with us while making us Slaves to the State!… Any kind of Slavery is Anti-Christ, it takes away peoples Freedom to Choose and its Ideology is that of Bondage!!

    SOCIALISM is the Big Lie of the Twentieth and Twenty first Centuries!

    Socialism has no theory of wealth creation; it’s just a destructive, Envy-Driven Fantasy about Redistributing Wealth after something else (and somebody else) creates it first. The slow poison of Government and Corporations, Crony Capitalism has infiltrated almost every level of Socialist Countries and is now being used as fodder to promote Socialism.

    What most do not realize is that Serfdom still exist today in the guise of Socialism and Prospers Worldwide and we that are on the Isles of the sea are not exempt. The same Convoluted Philosophy that erected the Statue that Supposed to represent Freedom is Binding us in Chains of ECONOMIC SLAVERY.

    That is the Ultimate Deception!!…OVER TAXATION IS THEFT…

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  • Notice Heather Cole is steering clear of barbados politics these days
    Wuh happen the pill too bitter fuh u to swallow

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  • Heather a pity you were not recognized and place on the big wig consultant team after all your efforts to catspraddle Cahill

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  • @ Heather Cole,

    A good place to start.

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  • And to think Mariposa was awaiting the many articles which Heather Cole would have presented on BU reflecting a guiding light as a path on which her beloved govt would pursue
    A path which would have placed barbadians into economic success
    Boy was i fool

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  • Africa has much to offer. The Europeans still take all that’s why the Africans flee to Europe.

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