Review of Fuel Prices In Barbados for 2018

Twas the evening before Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, except for my computer mouse and the desire to analyze a data set! The spreadsheets were saved with care, in hope that someone would do the analysis for the year! (with apologies to Clement Clarke Moore).

2018 Year In Review

On average, the price of gasoline was $3.64 BDS per litre ($3.09 in 2017).

On average, the price of diesel was $2.91 BDS per litre ($2.31 in 2017).

The average price increase for gasoline was 4 cents (3 cents in 2017).

The average price increase for diesel was 5 cents (4 cents in 2017).

Gasoline, on average, was 73 cents more expensive than diesel (78 cents in 2017).

The price of gasoline was at its lowest in February: $3.29 per litre ($2.78 in January 2017).

The price of diesel was at its lowest in January: $2.57 per litre ($2.13 in June 2017).

Gasoline was at its highest price in July: $3.96 (fuel tax implementation).

Diesel was at its highest price in July: $3.21 (fuel tax implementation).

Read full report posted to caribbeansignal.com website on 24 December 2018 – 2018 Year In Review: Fuel Prices In Barbados

65 comments

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    With the world market price of crude down in the $40-$50 range dropping from their earlier $65-$75 range some pricing relief should be coming. I am hopeful. We don’t actually purchase crude oil we purchase refined fuels(gasoline/diesel/kerosene) which uses the crude oil as their input raw material. Only a few person really know the pricing formula calculation that is applied to the imported fuels. The formula must be a state secret because it has not leaked out into the public domain as yet.

    We must consider that Trinidad has closed their refinery. I am under the impression we got most of our refined fuels from their refinery/location. With the closure will this mean an increase in the shipping/transportation cost of the fuels imported into Barbados? Another question is where are we now getting the refined fuels? Maybe from Suriname or Puerto Rico? Will this mean a better quality of refined fuels or worst quality of fuels.

    We wait with baited breath to see the impact the world crude oil price has on our domestic fuel prices. it should be a noticeable reduction(fingers crossed) but then again it has never be a linear correlation in this country.

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    Does oil prices affect gas prices?

    “Crude oil prices make up 71 percent of the price of gasoline. The rest of what you pay at the pump depends on refinery and distribution costs, corporate profits, and federal taxes. … Oil prices are a little more volatile than gas prices. That means oil prices might rise higher, and fall further, than gas prices.May 4, 2018”

    “The general rule, according to the EIA, is that about two-thirds of your cost of gas at the pump is determined by crude oil cost. The rest is a combination of taxes, refining, distribution and marketing. These are ultimately just some of the 11 factors we determined influence gas prices.”

    Liked by 1 person

  • @sirFuzzy

    The chairman of BNOCL Alex Mcdonald commented on this matter last week. He estimates with the shift from Petrotrin it will result in an annualized savings of over 1 million USD.

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    December 27, 2018 7:35 AM

    @sirFuzzy

    The chairman of BNOCL Alex Mcdonald commented on this matter last week. He estimates with the shift from Petrotrin it will result in an annualized savings of over 1 million USD.

    if you spread the BB$ 2,000,000.00 over all the millions of litres imported into the country i don’t think it will be noticed by the average driver or fuel user. I should make a difference on the BNOC balance sheet or P&L.

    Are u not curious on the pricing formula calculation we use?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Listening to him the savings is a result of downward price movement for a barrel of oil. Why have you presumed the plan is to pass on all the savings anyway. Why should they in the context of a forex problem? If they could find a way to pass on greater benefit to producers!

    #askingforafriend

    Like

  • Both BLPand DLP have something in common. They have refused to make the pricing calculation public.

    Like

  • David

    How is that policy any different to what the duopoly represents, at its core.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Pacha

    The two issues of note:

    Lack of transparency by both parties read B and D as it relates to price formula.

    The urgent need to check a fossil consumption behaviour problem.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU
    Why is it necessary for the SOE or the distributors to share a price formula with the Public? Would knowing the formula lead to a downward movement in the price to consumers?
    What is the “fossil consumption behaviour problem?

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Why preach transparency as a mantra and not follow through? By not doing so how does it add to citizen apathy?

    Remind the blog how many vehicles are on our roads?

    Liked by 1 person

  • David

    No! Capitalism is eating democracy.

    That is the fundamental reality which we are avoiding.

    Like

  • @Pacha

    Have you factored the downside read the rise of socialism and the attendant issues?

    Like

  • @Vincent,

    Come on. Methodologies must/should always be shared with the public. It is the only way of knowing the accuracy of the underlying empirical assumptions of any research. That is why I do not take the central bank’s research seriously. I can duplicate Bank of England, Federal Reserve and any leading central bank’s research. That is what gives them legitimacy.
    The methodologies of all official research, especially those on which policy is based, should be made public. Unless we know the original hypothesis, the methodology and outcomes then the study is not only a mystery, but hocus pocus.
    That is why we have peer reviews to test the verifiability of an experiment. I suggest you re-read Popper’s Conjectures and Refutations. A basic before undertaking any social science research.

    Like

  • David

    Of course! But we should not be afraid of trying to find any other system which serves all the people all the time, while saving the Great Mother.

    Formally, capitalism only started around 1776. Since them it has morphed into the destructive force we now have.

    Point being that systems always go through an evolutionary cycle. Part of that is an end-stage, like we are now experiencing.

    For us, it does not matter what colour the cat is, once it catches mice. And capitalism, has not caught any ‘mices’ for too many people for too long.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU

    Publishing the price formula formula satisfies the mantra of transparency and reduces the apathy of the citizens. Very interesting.

    In my opinion, the number of vehicles on the road is a function of an inefficient public transport system and the scattered development of urban areas in a land scarce country.

    The contribution which Barbados makes to global warming is infinitesimally small. In any case we have started the process of renewable energy substitution.

    I would have thought that so long as fuel prices mirror the movement of the fluctuating price of crude oil there would be no need for a price formula publication. That is transparency enough for the average citizen. Those, like Hal, who want to replicate other peoples research can request the details from the corporations.

    Like

  • Since this thread is energy related, I thought this would be a good place to post this article on the (mostly) hidden costs of solar panels, especially in light of the increasing promotion of these panels as a low-carbon, “green” source of energy to replace fossil fuels.

    If Solar Panels Are So Clean, Why Do They Produce So Much Toxic Waste?

    Michael Shellenberger
    Contributor

    The last few years have seen growing concern over what happens to solar panels at the end of their life. Consider the following statements:

    The problem of solar panel disposal “will explode with full force in two or three decades and wreck the environment” because it “is a huge amount of waste and they are not easy to recycle.”

    “The reality is that there is a problem now, and it’s only going to get larger, expanding as rapidly as the PV industry expanded 10 years ago.”

    “Contrary to previous assumptions, pollutants such as lead or carcinogenic cadmium can be almost completely washed out of the fragments of solar modules over a period of several months, for example by rainwater.”

    Were these statements made by the right-wing Heritage Foundation? Koch-funded global warming deniers? The editorial board of the Wall Street Journal?

    None of the above. Rather, the quotes come from a senior Chinese solar official, a 40-year veteran of the U.S. solar industry, and research scientists with the German Stuttgart Institute for Photovoltaics.

    With few environmental journalists willing to report on much of anything other than the good news about renewables, it’s been left to environmental scientists and solar industry leaders to raise the alarm.

    “I’ve been working in solar since 1976 and that’s part of my guilt,” the veteran solar developer told Solar Power World last year. “I’ve been involved with millions of solar panels going into the field, and now they’re getting old.”

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelshellenberger/2018/05/23/if-solar-panels-are-so-clean-why-do-they-produce-so-much-toxic-waste/#1618740f121c

    Barbados can’t put a plan in place to safely dispose of the mercury filled, low-energy light bulbs when they have to be replaced. Going by past performance it would seem unlikely that there will be any plan in place to properly dispose of worn out solar panels either when they reach the end of their useful life.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    What is your view that he vehicle is a status symbol in Barbados?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Green Monkey at 11:33 AM

    Like you I am not certain that the dis-benefits and hidden costs of the solar generation of energy have all been factored into the equation. The initial high costs of the equipment, the disposal problems of waste.and the use of agricultural land seems to outweigh the savings.
    As you pointed out waste disposal is problematic. Computer printer ink cartridges, lithium batteries, mercury filled bulbs find themselves in household garbage simply because there is no organised system for collection and disposal. These are health threats.

    But David BU will say that it is OK since we cannot stop technological progress. The means to prosperity and well being replaces the social objective. LOL!!!

    Like

  • In my opinion, the number of vehicles on the road is a function of an inefficient public transport system and the scattered development of urban areas in a land scarce country.(Quote)

    @Vincent,

    This is the most interesting thing you, and most people, have said about Transport policy on BU since I have been reading BU. Go to the head of the class.
    I was hoping that part of the change people voted for on May 24 was a new transport policy – one car per household, reducing landuse from an over-supply of roads and hotels and use it more strategically for housing , agriculture and leisure.
    Sadly, the new government has other priorities.

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 11 :43 AM

    The value system inculcated in me at home ,at church and schools gave little consequence to material things as the measure of a persons status. I try to bring up my children and those over whom I have some influence in a similar manner.
    It may be news to you but the majority population do not regard owning a vehicle as a status symbol. For many it is a necessity because of the unreliable public transport system. The minority who view them as status symbols need a slight adjustment to their outlook on life.
    We live in a democracy. We have to allow the wheat to grow beside the tares. So please do not try to legislate a change in behaviour by taxes. The response may be just as equally disruptive.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Many of us were exposed to your upbringing. We live in a different time. Rampant conspicuous consumption. We have to change it but it must flow from the people. The political will not disrupt on its own, it will be unpopular.

    Your thoughts?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 12:46 PM

    Good I know that we all were brought up with the same value system. My question is why are some of us prepared to surrender good work ethics ,living within our means ,and accepting shabby and substandard goods and services ?

    Like

  • @Vincent,

    We live in a different time, says the man of wisdom with his bogus reasoning. You are not technically living so you are not a victim of conspicuous consumption..

    Like

  • @Vincent
    The value system inculcated in me at home ,at church and schools gave little consequence to material things as the measure of a persons status.
    +++++++++++++
    Where is this slice of utopia? Certainly not in the Barbados I grew up in. You may have been taught different values at home but Church and School were the prime areas where material possessions were valued above all else. It is a mindset that is hard to get rid of and many Bajans who return home after a lifetime overseas still build massive homes that far exceed their requirements and some of it is too show I’ve made something of my life so I can afford this castle even though my knees are creaky and I can’t get up the stairs easily.

    Time to get rid of those rose coloured glasses.

    Like

  • On Thursday, December 20, 2018, the Transport Board advertised an invitation for Bids to supply the Board with a fleet of electric buses, together with the requisite charging stations, on a REVENUE-SHARING BASIS.

    If you were to read the terms and conditions in the bid advertisement, it seems obvious that TB is set on becoming a joint public/private sector venture.

    Liked by 1 person

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    the final price of fuel has many variables that make up the final price. Knowing what these are doesnot affect the price i will pay. In Barbados where the BNTCL has a monopoly on the importation of the fuels why is that such a problem for person to know what variables make up the final price at the pump.

    The issue may be the quantum each variable is given that may cause the John public to scream?

    Like

  • Thursday, December 20, 2018

    Invitation For Bids – Supply of Electric Buses

    The Barbados Transport Board in following up on an expression of interest issued on August 24, 2018 the Board is now inviting Bids for the supply of a fleet of electric buses, together with the requisite charging stations, on a revenue-sharing basis.

    The arrangement to be put in place will require that: –

    The Barbados Transport Board breaks even and budget transfers from Central Government be phased out.
    The cost and risk of the acquisition the electric buses be borne solely by the bidder.
    The bidder has adequate equity and resources to absorb shocks to revenue or increased cost without defaulting on the arrangement

    Under the arrangement, the partner is expected to: –

    Provide between 120 to 180 electric buses within 12 to 18 months on the signing of the contract and solely on the basis of the requirements stated above and in conformity with the technical requirements as defined in the specification sheet.
    Conduct all necessary due diligence and negotiations with the Barbados Light and Power company with respect to the timeline, cost of charging stations and electricity rates.

    The scope of the arrangement also includes providing technical inputs related to battery and battery management system data required for the design of electric vehicle chargers and providing support and resources in works related to battery management system interfaces etc., during the commissioning of electric vehicle chargers.

    All bids must be accompanied by a Bid Security in the amount of BDS $5,000 in favour of the Barbados Transport Board and in the form as stipulated in the bidding documents.

    Qualifying Requirements for bidders

    The application must include a copy of the company’s Certificate of Incorporation. The certificate must be in the name of the applicant.
    The bidder must provide proof of its ability to finance the acquisitions and to withstand any shocks in revenue or increased cost. No sovereign guarantee, letter of comfort, or other indication of support will be provided as part of the contract.
    The bidder must furnish, along with its bid, a letter of understanding, supported by a Board Resolution pledging unconditional and irrevocable financial support for the execution of the contract by the bidder in case of award.
    A copy of the most recent audited financial statement must also accompany the bid document.
    The Barbados Transport Board reserves the right to reject any or all bids or cancel/withdraw the invitation for bids without assigning any reason whatsoever and in such case no bidder/ intending bidder shall have any claim arising from such action.

    The Barbados Transport Board is not responsible for any costs or expenses incurred by Applicants in connection with the preparation of delivery of the Bid.

    The original and one (1) electronic copy of the Bid, clearly marked “Bid to partner with the Transport Board in the acquisition of electric buses” must be prepared in English and delivered in sealed envelopes to the following address no later than 4:30pm on Friday January 11, 2019.

    The Tenders Committee
    Transport Board
    Weymouth
    Roebuck Street
    Bridgetown

    The Bid must be placed in the Tenders Box located at the above address.

    Late submissions will not be accepted and will be returned unopened to the applicants.

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    Artax December 27, 2018 2:02 PM

    Given the cost of EV buses and the charging infrastructure required. We will be surely looking at maybe $5.00 per sector or a change in bus fares where the commuters pay for distance travelled.

    The only system i am familiar with is the system in Tdad where the fare decreases as the commuter embarks on the bus closer to the final destination.

    Like

  • @Vincent

    Why does a pastor have three sons two follow the straight and narrow and the other takes the crooked path?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ Sargeant at 1 :51 PM

    We can only speak of our experiences. That piece of Utopia was right here in Barbados. My primary school and secondary school and church taught the same basic principles. There was little disconnect with what my parents enforced.
    I am keeping my rose coloured spectacles,thank you. I am sorry that you did not have the same experiences. But life is about diversity ,is it not?

    Like

  • This is another opportunity to ask the government to be transparent. Who is the minister of transport?

    Like

  • David

    I guess the answer to your question can be found in the parable of the Prodigal Son in Luke 15:11-32 …

    Liked by 1 person

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    “Barbados can’t put a plan in place to safely dispose of the mercury filled, low-energy light bulbs when they have to be replaced. Going by past performance it would seem unlikely that there will be any plan in place to properly dispose of worn out solar panels either when they reach the end of their useful life.”

    Sad to say that is all true. But on the brighter side given the durability of the solar panels, we may have about 12-15 years to come up with and implement a plan or scheme. As many of the current solar panel will be retiring then?

    Like

  • Sir Fuzzy

    A similar bus fare system exists in the other Caribbean islands I travelled to. In Guadeloupe, if you’re on Grand-Terre, travelling from Pointe-à-Pitre to Saint Francois, which is going further along the South Coast, bus fare is about US$4.50 or BD$9. In St. Vincent, the bus fare from Kingstown to Owia is approximately EC$8, while the fate to Edinboro is EC$1.

    I’m aware that such a “stage system” also existed in Barbados until 1976, when Barrow, in an election gimmick, reduced bus fares to 25¢…..island wide, which, in my opinion, was one of the policies that initiated the demise of TB. But a return to “stage fares,” which is inevitable, will obviously come against the political rhetoric from people who suddenly want to sympathize with “poor people.”

    I understand that the number of units the Transport Board currently has in operation per day has decreased to approximately 40, which are the pre-election levels we often complained about.

    This ongoing situation with the unreliability of Transport Board buses is unacceptable, and more so, especially after Mottley, in her June 11, 2018 mini budget, identified TB and the return of buses to the roads of Barbados as part of the government’s list of mission critical policies and actions……. and promised the Board an allocation of $20M to purchase new buses and $5M for repairs.

    And in an interesting and related issue……..unfortunately, due to non-payments from the Ministry of Finance, UCAL was unable to pay its employees for three (3) weeks. One of the reasons given by personnel in the Ministry for the delay in payment, was that the clerk dealing with the matter went on vacation.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    @ David BU at 2:15 PM

    You will have to be an “agent provocateur” . Is it not he who designed the license plate sticker? Do you know of an other?

    Like

  • @Artax

    Why has the fleet number declined to 40?

    Like

  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    As we seem to be mentioning promises, made and possibly kept.

    does any one here know if the second tank at the Bridgetown sewage plant is in operation?
    much was made about how quickly it was cleaned etc,. I just want to know it current status?

    Like

  • @sirFuzzy

    This is a rhetorical question?

    Like

  • @David December 27, 2018 9:51 AM “The urgent need to check a fossil consumption behaviour problem.”

    Indeed.

    I checked my fossill consumption behavior problem in February 1999 which was the last time I owned a private vehicle. I will NEVER buy a private vehicle again. Why should I buy a ton of metal and plastic, and pay extortionate prices for fuel, taxes and insurance just to cart my little 125 lb body around?

    Like

  • @Vincent Codrington December 27, 2018 10:24 AM “What is the “fossil consumption behaviour problem?”

    A Simple Response: Buying a ton of metal, glass and plastic to cart our little bodies around. Then paying through our noses for fuel, taxes and insurance.

    Which idiot was it who said ‘every family should have a little car at the door?

    The lack of a decent public transportation system has beeen Barbados’ biggest public policy failing since the rebellion of 1937

    114/74 and 82, blood pressure and heart rate in my 7th decade. Going into my 3rd car free decade.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David BU

    The same repair issues that existed prior to the general election, exists today. Buses are “breaking down” on a daily basis. And there is a continuation of scraping buses to maintain others, which would obviously decrease the fleet.

    I previously gave an example of a Mercedes Marcopolo, BM42, which was refurbished and awaiting to be licensed and insured. BM42 has been completely stripped and the its body was “propped up” on four barrels.

    I also mentioned that the approximately 56 buses allocated to Speightstown terminal has been decreased by 35, 8 of which have been transferred to Weymouth and Mangrove. This means ST should have approximately 21 units available to service the north, which is seldom.

    As a result, service to the north has been extremely poor.

    These are the types of issues we should be exploring, but we seem more interested in “Trump being a phenomenon” and making EVERY issue about him and US politics.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ARTAX

    A few commenters based overseas discuss Trump every chance they get. Don’t see how it affects discussion on the myriad of domestic issues. You are aware there is nothing preventing you and others from submitting note to post.

    What happened to the plan by the BLP team to wrestle the problem to the ground?

    Liked by 1 person

  • According to this document:

    https://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/road_safety_status/2013/country_profiles/barbados.pdfs
    as of 2010 there were 133, 835 registered vehicles on Barbados’ roads, and that number does not include those rascals who do not register their vehicles.

    According to Barbados’ 2010 census, there were 215,380 people aged between 16 and 84, that is people who are old enough to drive and young enough to drive safely.

    The question we should be asking our policy makers is:

    Do we need 133, 835 vehicles to accommodate 215,380 possible drivers?

    i am only a Simple Simon so of course I do not know the answer, but maybe our brightest and best who make policy can think about it and give us an answer.

    Like

  • @Simple Simon

    The establishment will not change the model unless it is made to do so. How will the citizenry force it? The 64k question.

    Bear in mind government revenue flow is hitched to the vehicle well.

    Like

  • @Hal Austin December 27, 2018 10:44 A “The methodologies of all official research, especially those on which policy is based, should be made public.”

    Agreed.

    Especially as we the taxpayers pay the researchers salaries, fringe benefits and pensions.

    They work for us.

    We are their employers.

    Like

  • @David December 27, 2018 11:43 AM “What is your view that he vehicle is a status symbol in Barbados?”

    Fortunately I am proudly lower class/working class, so I have no need for expensive, polluting status symbols.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @David December 27, 2018 12:46 PM “We have to change it but it must flow from the people. The political will not disrupt on its own.”

    So David please explain to me in real real simple terms so that even I can understand why do people offer themselves for leadership positions if they then do not wish to lead?

    Stupseee!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David, I think this is the type of information that should be public in Barbados

    Crude cost Cost: 23.4 ¢/L

    Wholesale margin Cost: 40.5

    Retail margin Cost: 10.1 ¢/L

    Federal excise tax Cost: 10.0 ¢/L

    Ontario tax Cost: 14.7 ¢/L

    GST/HST Cost: 12.8 ¢/L

    “Prices are made up of various components, shown here for Toronto regular unleaded gasoline. The average pump price was 111.5 cents per litre in November 2018. Note: crude oil costs are estimated based on supply from Western Canada.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Simple Simon,

    A few years ago the police said there were about 30000 uninsured vehicles on the roads. Has this number increased or decreased?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Don’t know. A quick web search did not provide any new estimate.

    Like

  • SIMPLE SIMON
    YOU SAID Fortunately I am proudly lower class/working class,

    WHAT DOES MAKE YOU?
    FIRST OR SECOND?

    AFTER ALL 2nd is 2nd. 2nd is what comes AFTER 1st. 2nd is NOT first.

    Like

  • “What happened to the plan by the BLP team to wrestle the problem to the ground?”

    David BU

    Perhaps you should direct that question to Mia Mottley, Dr. William Duguid, Peter Phillips and Gregory Nicholls.

    What I can tell you is the Ministry of Transport, Works and Maintenance has TWO ministers and there has not been any SIGNIFICANT or FUNDAMENTAL changes at the Transport Board.

    Liked by 1 person

  • David

    Isn’t the government moving to wheelchair accessible and AE buses? I am sure I saw tenders in the newspaper.

    Like

  • @enuff

    Isn’t that a long term solution if it becomes a reality? We say IF because of the garbage truck fiasco.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Artax
    what was missing was….tenders received by 4.30pm Friday January 11, 2019. will be PUBLICLY opened at 4.45pm Friday January 11th @”specific location”.
    A public tender process, given all the multiple reasons for exclusion or disqualification, is without merit, unless the tenders are OPENED PUBLICLY, as soon after receipt as is possible, to avoid any ‘post tender bid adjustments’.

    Like

  • Unsure in a monopoly market that a formula has value.
    In cold places, there is long a story of the elderly gentlemen who ventures out at 6am, clad only in a mid-length skirt and a long sleeve shirt and boots, who walks 1km, returns home, and calls the weather office to tell them what the temperature “feels like”. You will later hear, based on the mercury the temperature is -7C, but “feels like” -15C.
    The price of gas at the retail pump, is based on how much money the GoB “feels like” making. It follows no fixed formula.

    Liked by 1 person

  • NorthenObserver

    What government seem to be proposing is a public/private sector arrangement, where they are essentially saying to the bidders: “you are responsible for sourcing and financing the importation of 120 to 180 electric buses over a period of 12 to 18 months, as well as building the necessary electrical infrastructure to accommodate the maintenance of these buses………. you also provide technical support services……..

    …………. while we, the Transport Board, are responsible for providing the administrative support services, licensing and insuring the units, installing fare boxes, etc.”

    My problems with this proposed arrangement are:

    (1). How will this arrangement affect UCAL’s contract with TB, especially if there is a plan to completely phase out the old buses?

    (2). Since the bidder will have to finance the cost associated with the importation of the buses and other technical arrangements…….what will be the profit sharing ratio?

    (3). Supposed after reviewing the audited financial statements of local bidders, TB decides they do not have the requisite finance to qualify?

    (4). Supposed, for example, ANSA McAL Motors Group or Massy Motors bids and wins the contract? Based on the terms and conditions as outlined in the bid proposal, Trinidad would have a “controlling interest” in our “public” transport system.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Vincent Codrington

    This is another classic example of spinning top in mud. How did we reach here?

    Like

  • Vincent Codrington

    I agree. That is why it is necessary to isolate the tax components before assessing the relationship between the price of crude-oil and the local supply price. Please note the ratio of tax to the price at the pump in Ontario( 37.5 cents out of 113 cents Canadian submitted earlier.

    Like

  • Barbadians have adjusted to the transportation problem and are no longer crying out. It does not take long for the Barbadian to shrug a shoulder and say, “Wuh yuh want me do?” Once the noise dies down so does the effort to address the problem Try starting a conversation about the poor transportation with the average Bajan and you will see what I mean.

    Like

  • We got here by shrugging our shoulders and asking, ” Wuh yuh want me to do?” No real demand for accountability from the electorate. We vote and we done.

    Like

  • Good reasons why the tender opening should be public?
    I am guessing the TB will be responsible for more than you stated, like the provision of drivers/conductors, scheduling etc etc
    It becomes analogous to a PPP, BOLT, BLOT etc. I imagine the profit you speak of, is taken care of in the tender, by the provider of buses. The TB then has to eek out a profit based on these and other input costs deducted from revenue.
    Given the cat is now out of the bag, namely the risk associated with a public venture in Barbados is not ZERO, that risk factor will be reflected in bids?
    Given the apparent difficulty in acquiring a dozen used garbage collectors, one may assume acquiring this number of electric buses is well beyond the GoB’s capabilities. We know that “maintenance” of anything is a perennial challenge in the public sector.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Barbados’ lone electric utility has served notice it wants an increase in electricity rates.

    http://www.nationnews.com/nationnews/news/229151/bl-rate-hike

    Like

  • SirFuzzy (Former Sheep)

    Like

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