Evil Triumphing Because Good Men do Nothing

Olu Black & White

Olutoye Walrond

Throughout history, it has been the inaction of those who could have acted; the indifference of those who should have known better; the silence of the voice of justice… that has made it possible for evil to triumph” – Ethiopian Emperor, Haile Selassie

Evil is triumphing in our land today and the voices of those who know better are silent. The first picture reproduced in this post was not taken on a remote corner of the globe yet to be introduced to civilised standards of public behaviour. They were taken on an island with a long history of civilisation and a high level of literacy.

How did we get here? How did we get to the point where on a public stage young, scantily-clad girls are bending down on all fours like four-legged animals while young males gyrate behind them? How did we get to the place where it is OK for young males on a public stage to engage in X-rated dance movement?
How did we reach the point where we have to vet national Crop Over events on television for our young children if we want to save them from the corruption that has befallen our artistic culture?

Shouldn’t national artistic events be of such a standard and character that the entire family can enjoy them? How did we get there? We got here with the complicity of those responsible for promoting and overseeing national cultural events, and by the silence of those we expect to be the guardians of public decency and morality.

For these are times when anything goes in the name of culture, and when we’re all afraid to be labelled prudes and Victorians if we speak out against the disgusting behaviour of some of our artistes on the stage. Normally we would look to the Church as the watchdog against moral decadence, but even this institution now seems to have been cowered into silence, except when it comes to issues of sexual morality.

But as the bashment bandwagon rolls along, bells and whistles blaring, more sober minds cannot help but ponder on what will be its final destination. Will it, like the Gadarene swine rushing head-long into the sea, end up in perdition, or will decency, traditional values and sobriety withstand their most gruelling test to date? The signals do not offer me much cause for hope. The shrine of Bacchus in Barbados is well served by worshippers.
But as bacchanalia take over the national landscape, evidence is emerging that our advancement in social and economic terms could be in jeopardy.

The future of any society rest in the hands of its young people, especially so in an aging society like ours, for the human resource is an indispensable factor in economic and social advancement, all the more so in these difficult times. It’s a fact that was recognised by the (now deceased) visionary leader of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew many years ago. The economic power-house that is Singapore today is predicated not only on foreign direct investment, but on a highly trained workforce of young people.

Lee could not do that if he had a population of young people living from wuk up to wuk up, afflicted with the mental state of bunnies in perpetual heat. Today his country is one of the wealthiest in the world. In two years’ time they are expected to have 188 000 millionaires, in a population of 5.6 million.

So what can we report in Barbados – that our young people are equipped and ready to take on the world? Well, if we are to go by the findings of a government survey on the fitness of high school graduates for the work environment, the answer sadly is “no”. Conducted by the Ministry of Labour and Social Partnership, the survey found that secondary school students show poor decision-making skills, poor innovative and creative skills and very poor conflict resolution skills.

Chief Research and Planning Officer in the Ministry of Labour Ricardo Norville said the findings meant that a significant number of secondary school students were not graduating with the generic skills needed to function in the workplace. We may add to that the report of a Senior Education Specialist with the Inter-American Development Bank, Dr Mariana Alfonso, on the Barbados education system, based on studies done between 1999 and 2012.

According to Dr. Alfonso, the research shows that many school leavers cannot even meet the basic requirement of four Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) passes for entry into the public service. In fact, she said only 6.1 per cent of the students in Barbados get the four passes in the first sitting of the exam. These unflattering facts fall on top of the shockingly low level of certification among secondary school leavers. The percentage leaving school without certification in a single subject stands at a staggering 80%.

We’re cultivating a culture among our young people that is indifferent to intellectual pursuit. The study of music, fine art, drama and other disciplines that stimulate and develop the intellect is fast becoming old fashioned, as the new rough, crude and vulgar bashment culture establishes its roots.

With the full blessing of officialdom and the slavish promotion of the electronic media, this base musical culture, with its degrading treatment of the female body and its mindless – often vulgar – lyrical content, is now in complete ascendancy. The purveyors may earn tens of thousands of dollars in prize money from various competitions; and their lewd offerings are regular fare on television.

Meanwhile young soloists, Pianists, Organists and Saxophonists who devote years to studying music and who play a far more valuable role in the nourishment of our souls, especially at concerts and ceremonies like funerals and weddings and religious gatherings, are almost completely ignored.

It is my view that Barbados has produced one of the most beautiful soprano voices – I make bold to say – anywhere in the Caribbean. Amanda Fields, a student of Doris Provencal, has thrilled audiences wherever she has sung in Barbados and elsewhere. But where are the competitions, the organized events at which her talent can be exposed and rewarded?
How many Barbadians have seen her on television or heard her angelic voice on radio? Very few.

The British historian, Edward Gibbon, author of the literary work, “The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire”, identified the root cause for the fall as the loss of “civic virtue and individual morality”. If Gibbon is right, then, as I said in my book, Westminster’s Jewel – The Barbados Story, we have (definitely) crossed the Rubicon and the bottomless pit is now our only destination.

49 comments

  • “CULTURE” Doan mek I larf – there is NONE. Barbados has taken all it had, and stuffed it up its own RH.

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  • “the survey found that secondary school students show poor decision-making skills, poor innovative and creative skills and very poor conflict resolution skills.”

    Still missing the point about the root cause, the education system of miseducation has been flawed from the get go…from way back in the 50s…it was not designed to educate, but miseducate….or you would not have found at least 85% of the “professionals” from that era in leadership roles now being known as crooks. ..and the other 15% known as clueless….

    All that has been piled on and called upgrades to education has only succeeded in making a useless system that much worse, the most important life skills that would make successful workers, graduates etc are completely ignored to teach mostly crap that has no place in real life experiences. …until that is changed, the miseducation system will remain a fail for more than 75% of students.

    Then the tourism prostitution sector is not helping an already dire situation but succeeded in making it much worse, the adults created a wukkup culture to entertain tourists and involved the children.

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  • i would like someone to post for discussion an education system that meets all these lofty criteria of preparing students for the job market, preparing them to make good decisions and teaching them morals?

    Liked by 1 person

  • Talking Loud Saying Nothing

    So what do we expect from our young? It is a nonsense talking about our slack culture when we chose not to discuss, annotate, document and to sign post our ancestor’s history from when they were brought to this island in chains as slaves. Why do we refuse to acknowledge that we will continue to regress as a people unless we are prepared to revamp our education system?

    We in Barbados live in blissful ignorance.

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  • It is the educational system, we continue to soak and distribute the characteristics of other cultures. Our base system of education has been compromised.

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  • “We in Barbados live in blissful ignorance”

    Speak for yourself. teaching victimhood and dependency will do the young generation NO GOOD AT ALL..

    Liked by 2 people

  • I can say that most places in the world are going thru this cultural dilemma- it is not only Barbados as we seem to think.

    that is not to posit an excuse but to show how global the eschewing of past systems and so called morals are.

    every so often these shifts in thinking and perhaps behaviour take place. of course such shifts need articulation if not leadership for positive direction and of course in Bim we will be playing catch up

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  • Disgusting. I went to one crop-over party this year (first on 10 years), it was enough to remind me that the whole damn thing is disgusting and sickening from top to bottom. I do not know how civilized people think this could be either a culture or a form of entertainment. Sickening and NASTY really!!

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  • This is what we have come to. If I was to ever see my daughter behaving like a common dog in heat out in public……………it would be the first and the last time.

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  • I laugh when it is for the tourists they say Well there isn’t many tourists at these events I think the locals get right into it tourists or not. When you see riannha or Alison wukkin is not out of the norm for kids growing up and it is just attention getting dancing But some people have to take it to extremes which makes out and out pornographic
    It into something dirty

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    “I can say that most places in the world are going thru this cultural dilemma.”
    Mentioning other countries are facing the same problem is always a part of our response/dsolutiomn

    Took the liberty of looking at some of his (OW’s) FB posts. Would be good if we could see him here now and then …..

    Anyone can see a reason why not?
    Of course a pew pecks from both groups of BU citizens should be expected if the scratch grain is not the desired flavor.

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    In totality, what we have is an island that is failing on many fronts.
    Failed adults can mostly produce failing youths, as the youths sees them as role models.

    Liked by 1 person

  • TG,

    i have no problems with you quoting me in context, you know.

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  • The following comment was posted in error to another blog.

    Thank you Mr Olutaye Waldron
    Thank you for your thought provoking commentary which should be required reading in church today in place of the traditional lessons.
    From time to time I make it my business to post the sewage we have fashionably embraced as culture to concerned citizens overseas to show them the levels of depravity our country has reached under the syndrome of “Fete”; hypocrisy and corruption in high places notwithstanding.
    We are slowly reaching the point of no return and sad to say the women to whom the care of children are entrusted seem to be in the forefront of these declining standards as told by Franz Fanon and I quote
    “Whenever the moral standards of a country begin to decline
    It is reflected in the dress, attire and behaviour of its women”
    Dante Alighieri- The Divine comedy
    And I quote”The darkest places in hell are reserved for those who remain neutral in times of moral crises”
    And some argue that these are better days

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  • I have what’s up. All I want to say to Olutoye is that you too will learn that you can’t run with the hare and hunt with the hound. You are right when you say that things crumble when good people do nothing. It also crumbles when good people defend the same collective political class that has controlled the festival from its inception. Like I said: I have what’s up.

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  • Exactly Skinner.

    Persons should read carefully what Skinner has said.

    Liked by 1 person

  • TheophiliusGazerts

    Again, a hearty good morning to all.
    ——————-
    @JG
    My intent was to simply point out that Bajans usually resort to “It happening in the US, Britain, Japan, elsewhere’ regardless of the topic.
    ———————————-
    Mr Walrond has a very persuasive document. Indeed, I agree with most of what he wrote.

    However, we separate after the statement “The future of any society rest in the hands of its young people, especially so in an aging society like ours”. The statistics and quotes that follows points to a failing of the Barbadian youths and ignores the many elephants in the room; the failing of the parents, the fact that it is not our youths but the educational system that is failing, the failing of the leaders, the failing of the church, …..

    Mr Walrond has pointed to the patient’s back pain and missed the fact that the patient suffers from pancreatic cancer.

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  • Yes the worn cliche is that the future rest with the young people but there is more- they must be guided by the adults. We need sensible adults in 5he home, school, church and everywhere showing leadership

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    @8:57
    In a misogynistic society women will be blamed for its failing. Men enjoying, supporting and encouraging their behavior get a free pass. Indeed the women are often make a spectacle of themselves; the ‘things’ gyrating on their backside are not items of clothing or appendages but are men.
    It’s the men and women who are failing.

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  • Sensible adults, not vulgar, single-minded, intolerant ones. We, the adults, must set an example. Is BU a good example for the young?

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    @8:57 -edited for cladrity
    In a misogynistic society women will be blamed for its failing. Men enjoying, supporting and encouraging their behavior get a free pass.

    Indeed, women often make a spectacle of themselves, but the ‘things’ gyrating on their backside are not items of clothing or appendages but are men. No one gets a free pass.

    It’s the men and women who are failing

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    Hal,
    You and can enter and post what we want.
    We can be earth men or Martians.
    To take the temperature of BU and apply it to Barbados may not give accurate readings.
    Having said that, I believe that the net contribution of BU is well within the positive range.
    Go fish elsewhere

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    Obviously this theater of revelry has a lot of patrons.

    We can turn off the television.

    We can refuse to line the streets to watch the revelers.

    We can tell the revelers to cease and desist.

    We can instruct our charges that the behaviour is unacceptable and that we will not tolerate it.
    But in all fairness those of us who appreciate the performing arts ,we know that dancing exists in all cultures. Ours is strongly representative of African dance forms. I see it in Haitian dancing. I see it in Jamaican folk dancing. I see it in West and southern African dances . I see more extremes in Brazilian carnivals.

    Are dances meant to be erotic or pre-erotic?

    What are we really protesting.? Perhaps we should all dance in private. But then the exhibitionists will have no audiences. Good or bad thing?

    Does dancing serve a useful social and psychological purpose? I think so. Like King James the first of England, I would say let my people dance. I do not have to watch nor encourage them.

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  • @Bernard

    The type of dancing Olu and others are referring you probably have not had the opportunity to view. You have to link the lewdity to the decline in the social fabric of society. Do you appreciate the point? The time for a generalized analysis is long gone.

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  • i would like someone to post for discussion an education system that meets all these lofty criteria of preparing students for the job market, preparing them to make good decisions and teaching them morals?”

    It is a work in progress for some societies and countries, ya will have the pros and cons in any transition….but Barbados and the Caribbean are not even trying, they kept the same old 60 year old slave system of education in place…never tried to remove the heavy baggage that serves no useful purpose….and does nothing educate the rotating generations of children adequately..

    … plus what is called culture on the island is crap…African slaves arrived with their rich African culture, it was stolen, it should be taken back.

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  • I have been to Mardigras in New Orleans and seen women walking in full body paint and not a man dear go and try “wuking up on one”. I would venture to say if anyone tried to do the “dog and slut” on Bourbon Street they would quickly be arrested. What is most interesting here is the apologist who try to justify it as being ” cultural.” Before change must come acceptance and we aren’t even willing to do that yet it seems.

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    Going back to bed..
    Find myself in agreement with John and Lawson….
    HAGD all.

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  • Bernard Codrington

    @ David BU

    The point I am making is that we are straining at a gnat.Each generation always jumps to the conclusion that the social fabric of a society is in decline. How do you expect transformation to take place without throwing out old, preconceived ,circumscribed notions.

    Barbadians were wukking up in Barbados for generations. The landship with their choreography. The Mudda Sally exaggerated gyrations. And I can go on and on. You must think outside the box.
    You are again engaging in cognitive dissonance . Ignoring information that does not fit your narrative.
    If I did not know you I would be asking myself:”What bad news is coming next? Why is this diversionary activity taking place?”

    I repeat if there is no audience lapping up the exhibitionism the revelers will desist. No demand . No supply. But that will make the Holier than thou unhappy.

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  • @Bernard

    Understand the point you are trying to make. However, is it fair to suggest that using your perspective on the matter means that there is no point in offering critique? Doesn’t the tension between generations serve a purpose?

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  • sirfuzzy (i was a sheep some years ago; not a sheep anymore)

    Feed this monster and it will survive and even flourish. Starve this monster and it will surely die. We got choose what we want in our culture.

    Liked by 1 person

  • Theo, dont go yet I commenting soon, yuh could disagree wid me!

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  • Its not that the good people are silent.Its that they are being drowned out by the cacophony of foolishness.

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  • re Thank you for your thought provoking commentary which should be required reading in church today in place of the traditional lessons.
    FROM TIME TO TIME WE READ A LOT OF RUBBISH ON BU
    HOW ON EARTH CAN WHAT GLYNE WALROND WROTE BECOME required reading in church today in place of the traditional lessons.? HOW?

    SURELY THIS IS ONE OF THE MAJOR PROBLEMS IN BARBADOS AND THE WORLD TODAY………..A DEPARTURE FROM CRYSTAL CLEAR TEACHING FROM THE WORD OF GOD, AND THE DESIRE TO REPLACE THE WORD OF GOD WITH THE WORD OF A MAN

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  • TheophiliusGazerts

    @MB
    I already did on a next post
    And now agreeing with GP

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  • “Its not that the good people are silent.Its that they are being drowned out by the cacophony of foolishness.”

    Well SuckaBubby, part of that lewd foolishness is the name you have adopted. What is it for?

    Liked by 1 person

  • What about the home. Train up a child in the correct way through discipline and Godly guidance and the child will never stray towards the road of immorality
    In this modern era wrong has become right
    Self gain has eroded people sense of values which has led to greed
    The word morals has been dumped onto the heap of forgetfulness
    What can society expect from a people who have no regard for that which is proper and right to do
    Just take a look at how leaders can justify immoral values under the guise of “business” and which can be accepted by most of society as righteous even when that immorality causes pain and hurt to a brother or sister
    Barbados has arrived at a dark place where it present not a nice picture that is worth more than a thousand words

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  • @ Mariposa
    Just take a look at how leaders can justify immoral values under the guise of “business” and which can be accepted by most of society as righteous even when that immorality causes pain and hurt to a brother or sister…
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Yuh mean like CLICO…right?
    So are you advocating the return of the $3.3M then…?
    …or should the non-leper be locked to donkey up…?

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  • Daggering jamaica

    Liked by 1 person

  • Maybe you have been taken over and don’t even know it

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bush tea i am talking about you and your self righteous attitudes

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  • 45govt, sir or mam,look at this way.

    When we want to highlight a vibrant strong civilization we talk about the Romans , where Romulus and Remus suckled on the breasts of a she-wolf as it’s founders.Likewise all through the ages the suckling of the breasts has been synonymous with the acquiescence of knowledge and wisdom.A suckabubby is that.A drink in the hot lunchtime as a primary school boy.Something to enjoy , to partake to be refreshed.Likewise I read here on this blog.Learning and being refreshed (updated) on what goes on in Barbados.Has no vulgar connotations to it.Its Bajan.

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  • Yet those who complain cannot see the evil which is beong done to worthing beach daily as huge mass of sewage is beong dumped into the sea
    Where is the cry

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  • odd suck a baby this is one of the few times where black and white bajans are seen as one . where they could not be more different….bizarre

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  • SaB – your bollox shines like dog stones on a moonlight night..

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  • Georgie if your ass falls in the pit on the Sabbath would you literally let it remain there the Sabbath was made for man and not man for the Sabbath as the Christ is reported to have said but your point does have merit and could be the subject of discussion perhaps in the now fashionable view calling for more inclusion of the secular to replace the traditional in an attempt to lure the youth back to the church of England which has obviously lost its way because they have been producing leaders masquerading as messengers of Christ because they practice not what they preach.

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  • Pray for the people of Venezuela

    Evil will triumph when humanity strives to do wrong
    Yesterday earthquake could have been a reminder which gives all nations and nationalities another chance to take a step back and look at what is happening in Venezuela under an evil and vindictive govt
    If the eyes of the world were close
    Mother Nature made a way for all eyes to re-opened yesterday
    Peace and love to all of Venezuela

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  • @ Mariposa
    How about tomorrow’s trial in the USA…
    You praying for Dumbville too?

    …or do you think that Karma (Mother nature’s big sister) will make a way for the DLP to have wunna eyes opened to what transpired over the last ten years in Barbados?

    Are the others sleeping at nights?
    …or does every noise from the wind sound like the authorities coming to ask difficult questions based on whistle blowers who are looking to cover their own donkeys…?

    Bushie calls it dying a thousand deaths….. Karma at her wicked worst….

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  • Also Bush Tea here is some more evil for u to put yuh two cents worth .

    Like

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