Bajan Pride Harmed | Inflating the Bajan Psyche

William Skinner asked the blogmaster to clarify the following comment posted to Donville Inniss blog on the 2018/08/06 at 8:26 pm  currently choking local news feeds.

Another BLACK mark on the Barbados brand. How much more can we take? Interesting this old charge got laid on Inniss at this time. A conspiracy theory in the making.

On reflection the reply was too concise to effectively convey what was troubling the ‘mind’ of the blogmaster.

For many years Barbados enjoyed an enviable reputation in the region and dare we suggest the world? It was frequently referred to as a model island operating above its weight class. People visited from far to observe our electoral system and prominent Barbadians were invited to participate in election observer missions across the globe. A clear demonstration of the respect for how we managed the electoral process in the recent past.

The most frequent feedback shared by foreigners about Barbados centred on the sense of order to the way affairs of the country was managed. The quality of the infrastructure – road network, telecommunications, health services, educational system, political landscape, stability of the financial system, quality of justice, low level of crime and quality of justice dispensed etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. Much of which was reflected in Barbados’ high position on the Human Development Index , Transparency International and other respected international indices.

The 2007-2008 global economic recession exposed vulnerabilities and for several reasons discussed in this space and elsewhere the country  has not been able to correct the ‘wobble’. As fate shared, the recession collided with the election of a young prime minister who died early in the term. The tragic occurrence of David Thompson’s death catapulted his deputy Freundel Stuart to office. The jury is about to return the verdict on Stuart’s legacy, however, it is accurate to state that under his stewardship Barbados was locked in a perpetual state of abeyance.

As a people we have had to suffer frequent downgrades by Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s eventually attracting junk status under the former government. The final nail was delivered three months ago when the newly elected Mottley government deliberately defaulted on foreign loan payments and the inevitable SD rating resulted.

Another dent to the psyche of Barbadians etch forever in the blogmaster’s mind is the spillage of sewage that occurred on the South Coast. Some argue that it is a poorly design plant that brought us to this point. Even if this view is accepted there is evidence that the plant was poorly maintained and misuse by consumers largely ignored- even today-  which has contributed to the current state. The lethargy shown by the last government to quickly address the problem on the South Coast given the catastrophic ramifications continues to be a source of discomfort for the blogmaster. What manner of people would have approved millions to build government buildings, travel first class and be accommodated in 4 and 5 star hotels, buy luxury vehicles, BUT, ignore the warning that the South Coast Sewage plant was under stress nearly two years before it escalated to the public attention?

We can engage in the useless political exercise of blaming Bees and Dees, the challenge confronting BARBADIANS is rehabilitating the Barbados brand which has been done irreparable harm. The job at hand- should we chose to accept- how do we inflate the Bajan psyche to create people confidence by encouraging many hands to make light of the work to be done.

 

 

 

77 comments

  • Nothing encapsulates the despoilment of the Barbados “brand” more than the emergence of the shrill, counter-productive racist victim-mongers like the odious SSDumbShit and Well Well Wot An Igrunt Loser I Is,
    Barbados was famous worldwide for its PEOPLE, and their friendly, outgoing welcome bestowed on anyone from the whole international, and local spectrum. They were in stark contrast to the miserable Antiguans for example, and light years more advanced than their Caribbean neighbours in general. This enormous asset has been effectively squandered, and replaced with an unpleasant mien of surly entitlement, and resentment for their own customer base which is evident from the moment a visitor encounters the fat, idle govt staff at GAIA,
    What can be done to cure this is difficult to see. This is a cancer which has destroyed many societies, small and large. Just look at Britain, and the US. As soon as you have more people dependent for a living than working for one you are in trouble. These parasites vote, and will ALWAYS vote for more free stuff.

    Barbados has incalculable natural assets, which have been laid waste by criminality in the political classes, tacit approval by the idling classes, and ghastly concretisation by the plundering ‘developing’ classses.

    Poor Bim.

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ David

    Barbados makes a fascinating case study in how a society with so much potential could run off the rails in such a relatively short time.

    Widespread corruption is the root cause of many (not all) of the ills. The small individual-level “micro-corruptions” like pilfering from the job, disrespecting traffic rules, etc. – which many are happy to ignore – over time add up to macro level societal dysfunction like what we are seeing now unfold.

    “A model island operating above its weight class” makes for a nice sound bite but though perhaps true in the early days Barbados performance has been mostly par, and now sub par. These types of sound bites have led to hubris and misplaced pride with the belief that we have all the answers.

    Barbados also has an issue with inequality, which many prefer to ignore but will become more problematic as resources become ever more scarce.

    A. Dullard

    Liked by 2 people

  • A. Dullard,

    Very good observation. Concepts of inequality and social justice do not form part of our national conversation. It is a cultural blind spot.

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    LowIQ45…ah know ya too dim to understand, but even slave societies run their course, wuh slavery ended right?

    the population never knew they were a living slave society led by slaveminded leaders post independence, it was the perfect set up by the UK…their experiment succeeded to a point…until the minority thieves and the bribed ministers of parliament got too greedy and destroyed the very social fabric of the oppressed society. ..which was cursed and blighted anyway and for hundreds of years…finally the corrupt actions ministers and minority criminals after decades succeeded in bringing reality to the scam, exposing the scam….good riddance to all of them now that a world class spotlight has finally been shown on the criminality that lasted 52 years and the truth has finally drained out.

    Ya should be glad…again, ya too dim to understand.

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  • @A.Dullard

    Do not disagree at all. The blogmaster picked two issues that have punctured the Bajan pride, however, a serious discussion will point to many underlying reasons why we have runoff the tracks.

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  • 45Govt

    I am not black I am not Bajan.

    I must have got your back up as you are a racist white boy.

    Thank God I am not the worst like you.

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  • Many years ago, in fact more than a decade, I showed how division based on race was used for political advantage and gave an example of the House of Assembly as being a purveyor of the “racism”.

    ITAL was the name of the game back then and I showed that it was not a new concept and had been undermined from as long ago as 1975 when it was first raised in the House of Assembly.

    It isn’t a surprise that we have sunk to the depths to which we have sunk given the deliberate actions of past and present politicians to divide us!!

    Here is the example of an extract from the 1975 debate.

    John
    June 24, 2008 at 2:31 pm
    Anonymous
    Here is an extract from a debate in the House of Assembly (1975) related to ITAL:
    “Can you countenance anybody asking A.S. Bryden – he held office in the vestry – or who was so mad as to write in the newspaper asking him to declare his assets?
    THEY have lost political power now and THEY are asking every BLACK man who is holding office, so long as he can change a car three times a year, walk about looking clean and carrying a cheque book to declare his assets” said (Patsy) Springer.”
    Here was a sitting member of Parliament, (DLP) using race to justify why there should be no Integrity Legislation, a rather topical area of conversation of today!!
    Wonder if this is the hold up now!! … same party wouldn’t you know!!
    (Extracted from an article by Sanka Price entitled “All Talk on Integrity Law” – Heated House Debates over 35 years)
    … and then there is the “white shadows” speech, used in the 1981(?) election process by the Honorable “Don” Blackman who switched sides at will, …. and the “redressing past imbalances” reasoning in the award of the Highway 2A Contract that ended our country Barbados in the Privy Council and cost it a million dollars, ….. at least.
    He put The Honorable Clyde Mascoll to shame when it came to switching sides.
    Guess that’s what you do when you earn the right to carry the title “The Honorable” before your name.
    We can guage which of these two was the more “Honorable”.
    … and wasn’t it Sir COW who took our country, or was it the GOB, to the PC?!!
    All hail Sir COW!!

    Liked by 1 person

  • The main reasons for the Barbadian decline are:

    materialistic attitude of most Barbadians
    the tendency of Barbadian politicians to copy EVERY foolishness from the North. A tiny island cannot afford more ministries, agencies and state corps than big China
    bloated public sector and the very wrong belief of many BU commentators that the civil service can stay in its present size; WRONG: The size of the public sector IS the problem!
    lack of transparency and a culture of corruption: Just read the Blogs on BU where so many members of the local Establishment try to justify why the DPP and the COP should NOTHING about corruption. What a disgrace!
    dysfunctional legal system: see culture of corruption and the fact that no Barbadian lawyer obviously qualifies for the CCJ
    lack of adjustment to tropical conditions: Not enough solar energy used, lack of e-cars
    conservatism in society and economy: The average Barbadian wants to be an employed servant, not a master for himself; also the tourist products in Barbados are not innovative at all; we lack gambling, a naturist beach, and legal consumption of marijuana
    lack of work ethic in comparison to other CARICOM members.
    high import taxes and customs leading to an internal devaluation
    wrong investment of taxpayer´s money: instead flushing down billions into the sink called UWI, Barbados should invest its money into facilitating tourism and infrastructure. There are no qualified jobs for so many clueless UWI grads on the island

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  • “A model island operating above its weight class” makes for a nice sound bite but though perhaps true in the early days Barbados performance has been mostly par, and now sub par. These types of sound bites have led to hubris and misplaced pride with the belief that we have all the answers.

    @ A. Dullard August 15, 2018 4:01 AM

    I think u have hit the nail on the head. As i have said many times in different post. Our leaders are like generals leading an army that is marching into battle with an enemy. But we marching into battle backwards with our backs to he enemy and our faces looking into/at the past. Cause in the past “we punched above our weight”; and “our development was above par” etc.

    If our current generals or leader(s) don’t give the order to stop; turn around see the enemy for what it is and be prepared to fight for your life; a massacre will in the making. we will be cannon fodder for the enemy.

    To end i want o draw your attention to any company’s share prospectus. It usually states somewhere in the document. and i paraphrase. Past results have no bearing on future performance.

    If you keep one foot planted in the past and you are tip-toeing in the present; what happens to your future?

    Do we have this or does this have we? Just asking

    Liked by 1 person

  • SSDujmbShit tells us..”I am not black I am not Bajan.”

    Really? We all know what he IS.

    Liked by 1 person

  • You and Kiki have posted your pleasantries,chill.

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  • Bafflin’ Smoke Signal

    I would like to apologise for spoiling the Barbados Brand if that is the case.

    I visited BBD twice on Columbus Day weekend in 1990 and 1991. It was nice and reminded me of Sri Lanka and Africa.

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  • Tron has said it all….
    All that is missing is the REAL important reason that our ass is grass…

    We have NO idea of the true purpose and meaning of life, and we are instead chasing after meaningless albino-centric shiite… in the absence of such vital knowledge.

    The joke is…
    We don’t even know that we don’t know….

    Liked by 1 person

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ David BU

    Bajan reputation for excellent public management has taken a nose dive. Many are suffering from deflated egos. That is a good thing. Hubris goes before a fall. The only way forward is to rebuild brick by brick. If we miss this opportunity we will soon arrive at the failed state stage.
    My biggest fear is that we are going to miss the opportunity to re- build by continuing the futile exercise of allocating blame and abusing communication channels.

    @ PUDRYR

    Wuh Loss. Carry on smartly. And thanks for your advice. Walk circumspectly and do not get too involve in pubic affairs. I think the word should be public.

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  • @ David
    Thanks for the response. I still maintain that Barbados is not a failed state. There is no evidence that there is a complete break down in how government functions-there is however considerable concern as to how it functions and I say without fear that neither the Barbados Labour Party nor the Democratic Labour Party, has demonstrated , over the last four decades that they know how to correct this failure.
    Since adult suffrage, there have been three significant acts: the introduction of free education; becoming independent and the Freehhold Tenantry Act. They need no elaboration here. Our country has been on a kind of automatic pilot for most of the fifty two years of independence and has become a polarised state benefiting the : the black political class and their cronies and the white corporate and other minority elites . In all other areas the growth has been basically cosmetic and or unsustainable. We note the virtual demise of the black manufacturing sector , that sprung up during the seventies; the systematic elimination of small black businesses that once catered to the tourist industry and the planned destruction of the rural black owned agricuture sector.

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  • @William

    Barbados is not a failed state if the strict definition is applied.

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  • Failed or failing
    If the only direction is downwards
    What is the difference

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  • One is a work in progress the other is final.

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  • “We note the virtual demise of the black manufacturing sector , that sprung up during the seventies; the systematic elimination of small black businesses that once catered to the tourist industry and the planned destruction of the rural black owned agricuture sector.”

    Mr. Skinner

    In my opinion, one of the reasons that contributed to the “virtual demise of the black manufacturing sector” was low self esteem and inferiority complex.

    When I was growing up during the late 1970s, I remember many adult black Barbadians used to say that anything made locally was inferior……and they would opt to buy foreign made goods.

    Recently, I was reading a short historical document about a soft drink manufacturer by the name of Martineau (spelling under correction). From the manner and excitment in which I heard older folks talk about these soft drinks, I’m surprised that business died “a natural death.” However, on hindsight and taking into consideration the level of contempt we display towards locally manufactured goods and our preference for Coke, Pepsi and the other imported beverages, no wonder that business ceased operations.

    But there could be other factors that contributed to its closure, such as financial difficulties, decline in the market or the children refusing to “carry on” the business after the death of the owner……. which,in addition to lack of support from our own, is perhaps the second most popular reason why black owned businesses do not survive.

    I recall my father telling me about Garry Husbands, whom he knew….and his involvement in manufacturing wrought iron furniture, which he said was popular in the 1970s. What happened to this business?

    There was also Angelus Furniture, Mapp’s Garment Factory, Yankee Garments………which I think were all located in Grazettes Industrial Park. I remember Yankee Garments used to make school uniforms and casual shirts for men. What became of these once popular businesses?

    Now I’m seeing most of the school uniforms being manufactured by Trinidadian owned companies.

    What about Rayside Construction? CO Williams Construction was given preference over Rayside by both BLP and DLP administrations for the allocation of road repair contracts.

    Rayside became popular after it was sold to CLICO…….and we know why.

    What are your thoughts on these issues?

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  • “As soon as you have more people dependent for a living than working for one you are in trouble.”
    I cannot top that.
    And a common observation is so many struggling nations. If you want a proud, to the point of bordering on arrogant people, meet the Greeks. If you listen to many of them, they created the world. The past several years have been a tough pill for them to swallow.
    The question I ask is “where is the incentive to pay taxes and contribute in a civic way”? Instead, what is developed is a plethora of entitlements, accompanied by increased rights to personal privacy while crying out for public disclosure by others.
    One citizen, one vote. Why can that not be expanded to extra votes for those who pay taxes and make civic contributions to a maximum of X votes. Not only do those for whom we vote have a ranking, but so does every one of us. Full blown transparency.

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  • William,

    You missed one point that is relevant now – Acme. In the 1960s Acme started making buses at its Roebuck Street workshop. At a time when the Transport Board is in serious trouble, through mismanagement, what happened to Acme. We ended up importing inferior buses from Brazil.
    Then there was the Barbados Foundry, a genuine world-class engineering workshop (the Iraqi gun was started at the Barbados Foundry); central foundry, Caterpillar in Roebuck Street; the dry docks? Apart from that, we now talk about the nonsense of the blue economy: what happened to the shrimp trawlers we once had?
    Management is also a major failure in Barbados; just think of Ju-C, a firm bought out by the Trinidadians and transported lock, stock and barrel to Trinidad; it then exported the soft drinks to Barbados at a profit. We need consumer power.
    As to Barbados being a failed state, it is by any political definition. A simple test: name a state institution that works properly or to the best of its potential?.

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  • @David the blogmaster “travel first class and be accommodated in 4 and 5 star hotels, buy luxury vehicles,”

    I’d suggest no first class travel for anybody, except maybe it is a trip which takes more than 24 hours from airport to airport.

    I’d suggest no 4 or 5 star hotels for anybody. If we can afford only 2 star, then 2 star it is. Anybody who wants 4 or 5 star would be required to pay the difference upfront it out of his or her own pocket.

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  • @NorthernObserver August 15, 2018 12:36 PM “One citizen, one vote. Why can that not be expanded to extra votes for those who pay taxes and make civic contributions to a maximum of X votes.”

    Dear Northern: I am asking for a 100% Bajan friend who is both a long time unpaid ‘foster parent” and a 70+ times blood donor. Are such things considered civic contributions? Are they of any value? And if so how many votes would his civic contributions be worth?

    Thanks.

    A Simple Simon

    Liked by 1 person

  • @ Hal Austin August 15, 2018 12:58 PM

    Hal,

    You present many examples for the decline of the Barbadian industry. I would like to remind that the cost per working hour in Bim is too high in relation to other CARICOM members.

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  • Tron,

    Productivity measured as output per capita is higher in Barbados than most countries in the world. It is interesting that this was not tackled by the Arthur, Stuart and, so far, by the Mottley governments. By the way, Barbados continues to under-perform the global and regional economies. At least in one thing we are punching above our weight.

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  • NorthernObserver

    @SS
    they could certainly be considered civic contributions, their precise value would have to be incorporated into an overall list.

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  • @ Artaxerxes
    1.Martineau : I think that business would have declined as the push toward modernisation became more evident. I drank many as a youngster and like most have fine memories of its taste
    2.Gary Husbands ( Muhumad Nasser: This was a shining star. Mr. Nasser often blames , failure to get his products into the then blooming hotel sector. Also had issues with getting export markets and claims racism was a part of its demise.
    3.Angelus Furniture, Mapps Garment Factory, Yankee garments. Not making excuses because there are always some personal reasons involved.However, as the economy rapidly expanded and business models changed, I don’t think, that successive governments were helpful , in giving them the type of incentives necessary.
    4.Rayside Construction : Apparently internal family issues played a part. However, it seems to be still active , since being acquired by CLICO
    5. There were others such as Pierce Furniture and Hampdens Furniture, that I had the pleasure of knowing. I have never met any who were suffering from any low self esteem or inferiority complex. Quite the opposite. My friend Trevor “Job’ Clarke was one who fought down to the end. I have heard Rawle Branker talk about the way banks treated black business persons. Not very positive treatment.
    Hal Austin just reminded me about ACME engineering. If that business had serious government help , we would probably have more buses than we need today. There was also BIM Beverages, that was bought by a young black business man and had a very good run.
    At the end of the day, the black political managerial class must carry a considerable portion of the blame for the demise of black manufacturers. Just imagine what incentives like the ones given to hoteliers and those who ruined the agriculture sector, would have done if we had more visionary people running our country. Destroying perceived political enemies also contributed. We made a complete mess of what independence means and the weak political underlings spout forth from Parliament but never had the collective will to truly develop their own people but spent time sucking up to Massa , in more ways than one.
    We spend so much time looking for failures among our own people than we do trying to understand what it takes for any black business person to survive in what remains a difficult business environment.
    Note , there has been no significant retail black business near or on Broad Street, since Rollock and N E Wilson.
    Just talk to any very successful black business person and they will tell you the horror stories. I know of them. From Husbands Wrought Iron to the beach vendors…..I know of what I write and speak.

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  • @45govt August 15, 2018 2:25 AM “As soon as you have more people dependent for a living than working for one you are in trouble. These parasites vote, and will ALWAYS vote for more free stuff.”

    Dependency ratios are a measure of the age structure of a population. They relate the number of individuals that are likely to be economically “dependent” on the support of others. Dependency ratios contrast the ratio of youths (ages 0-14) and the elderly (ages 65+) to the number of those in the working-age group (ages 15-64). Changes in the dependency ratio provide an indication of potential social support requirements resulting from changes in population age structures. As fertility levels decline, the dependency ratio initially falls because the proportion of youths decreases while the proportion of the population of working age increases. As fertility levels continue to decline, dependency ratios eventually increase because the proportion of the population of working age starts to decline and the proportion of elderly persons continues to increase.
    Total dependency ratio – The total dependency ratio is the ratio of combined youth population (ages 0-14) and elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high total dependency ratio indicates that the working-age population and the overall economy face a greater burden to support and provide social services for youth and elderly persons, who are often economically dependent.

    Antigua’s dependency ratio: 45.2
    Barbados’ dependency ratio: 50.4
    Grenada’s dependency ratio: 50.7
    Jamaica’s dependency ratio: 48.7
    St. Lucia’s dependency ratio: 41.1
    St. Vincent’s dependency ratio: 46.8
    Trinidad’s dependency ratio: 43.2
    Uganda’s dependency ratio: 101.6
    United Arab Emirates dependency ratio: 17.4
    United Kingdom’s dependency ratio: 55.5
    United States dependency ratio: 51.2

    Source: CIA World Factbook
    MORE here: https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/resources/the-world-factbook/fields/2261.html

    Liked by 1 person

  • I am not sure if 45govt is suggesting that we send our child “parasites” aged 0-14 out to work; and if we should do the same to our elderly “parasites” aged 65 and older, and most of whom have already worked hard for 40-50 or more years.

    Waiting on your suggestions 45govt.

    Liked by 1 person

  • William,

    Trevor Clarke spent over 20 years trying to get his case heard against the Nation. Sadly he died without settlement. It was while helping Trevor that I first came across the apparent discrepancy in Sir Fred Gollop’s UK qualifications.

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  • NorthernObserver

    @SS
    being ‘dependent’ is not the same as a dependency ratio.

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  • @William

    Yankee Garments still operate from Newton Industrial Park.

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  • PoorPeacefulandPolite

    Barbados started running off the tracks when the beneficiaries of free tertiary education came of age !!

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  • @William

    Keith Rayside had another problem caused by frequent deposits to hairy banks.

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  • During the mid 1950s until around the early 1970s, Barbados imported buses from the UK with bodies.

    In 1959, a new fleet of 28 buses were ordered from Leyland Motors, Ltd., and Albion Motors. Ltd., Glasgow, for the Barbados Transport Board, at a cost of more than £100,000. The buses were the Leyland Tiger Cub (PSUC 1.4) and Albion Victor (VT 1 7N) models.

    Six (6) of the 14 AEC Reliance buses, 30ft long and 7ft 6in wide……fitted with metal-framed bodies made by Thomas Harrington Ltd., were shipped to the Transport Board during May 1960.

    23 Seddon Pennine MK IV buses were delivered to TB between August and October 1971. However, after 1971, TB ordered over 80 Seddon Pennine V chassis and the 1972 to1974 bodies were built by ACME.

    In April 22, 1977…… The then government ordered 60 Leyland Albion Viking bus chassis for the Transport Board, worth £1M, from MOSELY (Scotland) Ltd. ACME made the bodies for these chassis.

    ACME also built the bodies for the 1971, 78, 81 (82) Leyland Albion Viking…… the Leyland Tiger Cub……1982 Mercedes OH.

    ACME’s building bus bodies decreased when TB imported the 1989 Mercedes CAIO Vitoria and the 1990 Leyland DAF….. which came with bodies……and all the buses that came there after.

    The last bus bodies ACME built for TB were for the 1977 HINO Road Runner and the 2000 HINO Road Ranger “mini buses.”

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  • That should be 1997 HINO Road Runner.

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  • “I have never met any who were suffering from any low self esteem or inferiority complex.”

    Mr. Skinner

    My comment was NOT a reference businessman……

    ……but to how the general public viewed products that were manufactured in Barbados as being inferior.

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    Told yall lowIQ45 is soft in the head.

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    “At a time when the Transport Board is in serious trouble, through mismanagement, what happened to Acme. ”

    Seems like no one kept it going after Mr. Butcher.

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  • @NorthernObserver August 15, 2018 2:12 PM “@SS being ‘dependent’ is not the same as a dependency ratio.”

    Canada’s dependency ratio: 47.3

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  • NorthernObserver

    and Cuba is 43.3, Eritrea is 85.0, so????

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  • Artaxerxes
    My apologies. I really don’t think it is an inferior complex or low self esteem on the part of the consumers. It’s a failure to incorporate a national economic policy underlined by an equally well planned national education policy.
    It’s the old story of “ graduating from salt fish to steak” Not being proud of our own ingenuity and our childrens’
    children remaining unexposed to the more enlightened aspects of our culture such as craftsmen and cuisine.
    We essentially remain an unelightened people in many respects. We have successfully turned our indigenous culture into a nothingness. Note Crop Over has become the festival of flesh. We seem at times to be afraid of ourselves and having two essentially backward political parties determining our fate, makes it worst.
    There is a reason , we are making a third trip to the IMF.
    However all is far from lost , in today’s Nation, there is a young man, who has embraced modern agriculture techniques and there is an abundance of positive energy in our youth that can be harnessed.
    Let us hope they do not suffer the same fate of those we are discussing here.
    By the way , a great post on the ACME and the buses.
    Where there is no vision, we the people , will continue to perish.

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  • The importation of inferior buses from Brazil does not have anything to do with ACME.

    As far back as 1977, when ACME was manufacturing bus bodies, the TB bought Leyland Albion Viking Willowbrook buses from the UK with bodies.

    The Transport Board recommenced the importation of buses with bodies in 1989 when they bought the 1989 Mercedes Benz with Jonckheere bodies.

    1990 saw the importation of the Mercedes Benz CAIO Vitoria.

    In 1992, the then Minister of Transport imported approximately 25 Leyland DAF with Utic bodies from Brazil and within a few months the company closed. One, BM228 spent over a year in the yard of Service Motors, when it was located in Fairchild Street.

    I have always held the opinion…..and will continue to so until it can be proven otherwise……..that the demise of the TB began in May 1975 when Barrow abolished the stage fare system and reduced bus fare to 25¢ to all destinations.

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  • “It’s a failure to incorporate a national economic policy underlined by an equally well planned national education policy.’

    Mr. Skinner

    Excellent idea.

    Instead of political parties developing social policies similar to what you outlined above……we have the BLP and DLP jousting and bragging about who could give away the most “freeness”…….. in the guise of providing social services (which the recent economic crisis EXPOSED as UNSUSTAINABLE)……while creating a mendicant society in the process.

    Now the BLP has “recreated” a situation where the children of COW, Bizzy, Maloney, the rich Indians, Pakistani, Arabs and all other rich people who could AFFORD to pay tuition fees at UWI……will be allowed to attend that institution ….FREE……at the expense of those tax payers that cannot afford to pay.

    As it relates to Crop Over, Stephen Lashley should be locked up for signing silly agreements with Trinidad…..and allowing people from other islands to come in during our festival and organise events that clash with national events such as j’ouvert morning.

    Although SVG incorporates people and entertainment from other islands, Vincy Mas remains an indigenous festival.

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  • Acme started manufacturing buses in the 1960s and was threatened then with imports from Brazil. In the mid to late 1960s Acme moved from Roebuck Street.

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  • If ACME began manufacturing buses in the 1960s……it was not for the Transport Board.

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  • What you should do is present the proof to this forum to substantiate your claim…….

    …….and while you’re at it, tell us the make of the buses from Brazil that threatened the closure of ACME.

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  • Easy. I left Barbados in the 1960s and Acme was already making buses. At the time there was talk of a threat from Brazil. I did not visit Barbados in the 1970s and at the time the only local newspapers we got were if friends or relatives sent them to you.
    One of the gaps in our history is a proper social and business history. I do not know anything about makes and sizes of Brazilian buses, all people talked about then was the importation of buses from Brazil. It was a big political issue in the PPM. Nor have I said they threatened closure of Acme. The firm did more than making buses, in fact in the 1960s that was a sideline. Acme was a small competitor with the two foundries.

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  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    What nonsense, in the 70s ACME was still next door to the Globe Theatre.

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  • was that the old tuk tuk shop

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  • @ Simon The Simpleton – “I am not sure if 45govt is suggesting that we send our child “parasites” aged 0-14 out to work; and if we should do the same to our elderly “parasites” aged 65 and older, and most of whom have already worked hard for 40-50 or more years.”

    You really work at this simple business don’t you? Neither children (who incidentally cannot vote) nor retirees are parasites – but far too many of working age are.

    Try and grow up, strive to be just Simon, without the Simple.

    Like

  • Well Well & Cut N' Paste At Your Service

    You should know what you used to tuk in there.

    Like

  • The TB is just like the BWA. No one really cares if they got oit wrong or didn’t do what they were paid to do.

    The second tank at the Bridgetown sewerage plant grew trees. The TB has buses sitting in its yard collecting dust with the prospect of grow trees eventually.

    I dont blame the respect line ministers; but the GM at the SOEs must be examined. if they are not held accountable for their non-actions and something put in place to stop it from reoccuring. When i say something put in place i mean something that we the tax payers can examine to see; not just the line minster making promises to do such and nothing really happening afterwards.

    We lack real enforcement or verification of govt SOE and agencies. The needs to change..

    Liked by 1 person

  • It will continue as long as the practice of appointing one of the boys or girls. Until we get to a point where competence trumps cronyism we will repeat the approach of the past.

    Liked by 1 person

  • I meant DOCUMENTED proof…….anyone can say anything in attempting to prove they’re correct.

    I’m not disputing if ACME manufactured buses. They may have manufactured buses for the remaining private concessionaires, i.e. Rocklyn Bus Company and Elite Bus Company.

    However, my question is…… did ACME manufactured buses for the Transport Board?

    Government took over the operations and 116 buses from 8 private concessionaires in September 1955 to establish the Transport Board.

    As I mentioned previously, in 1959, a new fleet of 28 buses were ordered from Leyland Motors, Ltd., and Albion Motors. Ltd., Glasgow, for the Barbados Transport Board, at a cost of more than £100,000. The buses were the Leyland Tiger Cub (PSUC 1.4) and Albion Victor (VT 1 7N) models. These buses arrived in Barbados in 1960. (Page 25 of the June 12th, 1959 edition of Commercial Motors).

    In the early 1960s government bought a number of Mercedes Benz O321H buses;

    14 AEC Reliance buses with Harrington bodies were ordered in 1960 (page 66 of the May 20th edition of Commercial Motors).

    Between August and October 1971, 23 Seddon Pennine MK IV buses were delivered to TB. These buses were registered from MF1 to MF23.

    It is important to note that all the omnibuses mentioned above came with bodies. A shipment of Seddon Pennine MK IV chassis were imported subsequently, but this time, the bodies were built by ACME. These included M7497, M7499 and M5722.

    I have done a comprehensive research of transport in Barbados, with photographs……….of horse drawn carriages that used to park where the Montefiore Fountain was located in lower Broad Street…..the railway, trams……..to modern day omibuses.

    Like

  • If I’m not mistaken, ACME was located in Grazettes Industrial Park during the 1970s. I remember, at a very young age, see bus chassis being driven pass my great grandmother’s house in Grazettes……on their way to ACME.

    Like

  • Senator et al

    Is there any reason why a salary increase for parliamentarians must be hitched to public workers at this time? The blogmaster accepts that the BLP people have agreed to donate to a charity but wouldn’t the optics be better if it was legislated for them not to benefit at this time from an ncrease? This is what leadership is about right?

    Like

  • Where will I get documented proof from? As I said, I left the country in the 1960s and Acme was already making buses as a sideline. or non core activity. Its main business was making the big tanks used by the sugar factories and welding, for which it competed with the two foundries. . Again, it moved out of Roebuck Street before I left the country. Unless you are suggesting I am telling an untruth.
    I am sure the Transport Board’s minutes of meetings and the records of Acme will testify to this. I am equally sure there are people alive who worked at Acme, or at Atwell’s Supermarket, the Modern High School or the petrol station in the vicinity. The Advocate newspaper’s files should confirm this, rather than Google.

    Like

  • “The blogmaster accepts that the BLP people have agreed to donate to a charity…”

    Better check out these charities David.

    Like

  • “Again, it moved out of Roebuck Street before I left the country. Unless you are suggesting I am telling an untruth.”

    You’re shifting the argument. ACME being located in Roebuck Street and its subsequent relocation before or after you left Barbados was never the point of contention.

    The building is still there on Roebuck Street and now houses Motor City Auto Parts (I think that’s its name).

    “I am sure the Transport Board’s minutes of meetings and the records of Acme will testify to this.”

    Will testify to what……..that ACME manufactured buses for the Transport Board during the 1960s?

    And why do you always assume people, (EXCLUDING YOU), use “Google” to get ALL their information? Why could I not have talked to retired employees of the TB or ACME……or refer to old newspapers for information? It just goes to indicate the level of contempt you hold for contributors to this forum.

    However, as it relates to your comment re: “unless you are suggesting I am telling an untruth,”……….. far from it, my friend……it would be presumptuous of me to make such a suggestion……

    ……… especially when I know it’s impossible for anyone who promotes himself as being perfect and knowledgeable about everything…….to tell an untruth……..(or be incorrect about any issue).

    Liked by 1 person

  • “Where will I get documented proof from?”

    Hmmmmmmmm

    Perhaps you could source “The Advocate newspaper’s files (to) confirm this, rather than Google.”

    Like

  • It is interesting the power of culture. I have worked in a culture where if people disagreed, but had no empirical evidence to prove the other side wrong, would say rather graciously: “I accept what you say until I can prove otherwise”, or something along those lines.
    It is a culture that recognises the conflicting moral choices that people have to make, that decisions are not always binary. For example, we may support the right of pregnant women to have abortions, while also supporting reluctant fathers when would-be mothers want to have unplanned children.
    I also have an affiliation with a culture which is uncompromising, unforgiveable, an issue of spiritual and cultural isolation which both Hannah Arendt, in her The Origins of Totalitarianism, and Simon Weil, in her The Need for Roots, deal with. They both believe we have moral duties.
    In moral philosophical discourse, the key principle is to challenge oneself: I believe X and B believes Y, but is it an all or nothing proposition? Or is X partly right and so is Y?
    To be abused, the more foul-mouthed the better, is an easy way of not having to undergo the stress of thinking. But challenging discussions say as much about the participants in the discussion as what is said. It does not take an algorithm to determine cognitive dysfunction.
    It is also the case when it comes to preferring anecdotal claims, whatever their veracity, and the factual. Discussion should be about opening up of tribal boundaries, a free market of ideas, a process of forever learning. In one of the local secondary schools in my area a teacher deals with classroom conflict by getting children to take positions opposed to theirs when having classroom discussions. It works.
    I will end on this: one of the reasons why I think the chairman should try to be a band conductor and not an instrumentalist is that the role of the conductor is to make sure the band plays in harmony, rather than celebrate a single instrumentalist.
    If you run a blog in which people shout and scream and do very little listening, all that happens if that you make a lot of noise, which may satisfy a deep, psychological hunger. Nothing else.

    Like

  • Why don’t you leave?

    Liked by 1 person

  • @Bushie

    Did you have a quiet word with Lisa Gale? She still holds some flawed positions like the usefulness of the Upper House, however, one senses an edge to her moderating that is refreshing.

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Hal A

    “The stress of thinking”? One is required to think, if one intends to make a meaningful contribution to the debate. There should be no stress.

    Like

  • @David
    Is there any reason why a salary increase for parliamentarians must be hitched to public workers at this time?

    ++++++++++++
    Did I miss something? Are the Parliamentarians getting an increase along with the public sector? I thought salaries for parliamentarians were negotiated separately I didn’t know they were tied to any increase for public sector workers.

    Once again Bajans get the wool pulled over their eyes.

    Fool me once……..

    Like

  • Bernard Codrington

    @ Sergeant

    Some decades ago,in Tom Adams regime, it was decided to tag public service increases to Parliamentary increases in order to avoid unseemly wrangling and to maintain the relativity between PS salaries and ministers’. It is just a contrivance that was accepted and satisficing.

    Like

  • Thanks BC

    Like

  • @ Sargeant,

    I wonder how many of our BU bloggers read your post in the Diaspora corner ?

    Any of you knew that the sparrow is unique to Barbados ?

    ” The Barbados Bullfinch has only recently been separated as a species different from the Lesser Antillean Bullfinch (Loxigilla noctis), and this change in taxonomy makes it the only bird species endemic to Barbados”

    Like

  • Bushie

    I often thought about that.

    Why would any sensible individual remain in a forum where he believes the contributors are abusive…..and devoid of the ability to think and debate rationally?

    What is amazing is this same individual usually begins his response by referring to other contributors as “silly” or some other derogatory term….and describe their contributions as “waffle.” And I can post excerpts from his contributions to substantiate my claims.

    But when those contributors respond accordingly, he cries “foul.”

    There isn’t anyone who feels the “wrath of his writing” other than David BU.

    However, if anyone ventured to describe him in similar terms, you can expect a “long winded” contribution, similar to the one above, in which he tries to belittle others, while promoting himself.

    Like

  • “It is interesting the power of culture. I have worked in a culture where if people disagreed, but had no empirical evidence to prove the other side wrong, would say rather graciously: “I accept what you say until I can prove otherwise”, or something along those lines.”

    Interesting!!!!

    So, we should accept what Mr. Austin says until we can prove otherwise……

    ……..but for him the gesture is not reciprocal.

    Like

  • I was employed by the Transport Board as a mechanic in the 1960’s. In 1967 I left Barbados to work with London Transport. Before leaving the Barbados Transport Board a number of Leyland Power-Plus Chassis had arrived at the Transport Board, to be fitted later with bodies manufactured by ACME. I came back on leave in 1973 and paid a visit to the Transport Board workshop, and on enquiring about the buses made by ACME, I was informed that I was standing next to one.
    Those 1960’s AEC Reliances which the Transport Board was operating developed a defect after about 5 years in service. The cross members which supported the body, were fracturing, due most likely to the unevenness of our roads and/or overloading. These cross members were made of Aluminium. ACME Engineering undertook the job of replacing, quite successfully these aluminium cross members with some made of steel.
    A point to note, ACME Engineering from way back until its demise operated from Roebuck Street, whereas ACME Manufacturing, a sister company was formed in the late 1960’s specialising in the manufacturing of Bus Bodies as well as Utility truck bodies.

    Like

  • Artax August 15, 2018 7:46 PM

    I have done a comprehensive research of transport in Barbados, with photographs……….of horse drawn carriages that used to park where the Montefiore Fountain was located in lower Broad Street…..the railway, trams……..to modern day omibuses.
    ……………………………………………………..
    I’ve done a similar project, which I had intended to publish under the title Barbados Transport, through the Ages. Perhaps someday I’ll get around to it.
    PS. Around early 1967 , the Transport Board also brought in a fleet of Bedford Cambrigians.

    Like

  • Kaspar,

    Many thanks. It shows that we cannot depend on the accuracy of Google.

    Like

  • “Before leaving the Barbados Transport Board a number of Leyland Power-Plus Chassis had arrived at the Transport Board, to be fitted later with bodies manufactured by ACME.”

    Kaspar Coward

    Then I stand corrected…… you’re the first person I’ve known to ever mention the TB bought Leyland Power-Plus chassis that were fitted with bodies manufactured by ACME…….and my father was a bus driver.

    Thanks for the information.

    I believe I have read your contributions on forum such as Photobucket.

    I have seen a number of discussion forum with a few individuals that posted contributions about TB’s early operations……and it seems as though some of them were mechanics who subsequently migrated to the UK after stints at TB.

    But I’ve never read anything written by them or heard from anyone I spoke to that mentioned the Leyland you referred to.

    Many of the people I spoke with all recalled the Leyland Albion Victor, which, based on information received…….were fitted with Weymann bodies…….

    ………..and Leyland Tiger Cub (Weymann bodies) that were ordered in 1959 and arrived here in 1960.

    The Bedford SB was fitted with Marshall bodies.

    Are you also suggesting the 1960 models of Mercedes O321H, Leyland Tiger Cub and AEC Reliance buses were fitted with bodies that were not manufactured by ACME?

    ACME moved to Cane Garden, St. Thomas……at the site where L & N Workshop is now located. You can this information.

    Despite what Hal Austin seems to be sarcastically implying, you can’t get much information on the modern day operations of TB via Google……..and far less what occurred with that entity during the 1950s and 1960s.

    Additionally, there is very little information on line about the private concessionaires, such as the ones that operated from where Rubis Barbarees Hill is now located and Yonkers in Eagle Hall……. as well as National, Central and the more recent Elite and Rocklyn Bus Companies.

    I also learnt that there was a bus station that serviced the northern parishes, which operated from Lone Star Garage in the Gardens, St. James.

    So……..under these circumstances, why on earth would anyone want to rely on Google for any information on this topic?

    But we are all aware of Austin’s particular agenda.

    Ironically, the name of my project is similarly called “Barbados Transport Through the Ages” as well……….and I have several articles and photos of buses, trains, trams etc I sourced from old newspaper clippings and people who were willing to share information with me.

    It would be enlightening if you could share bit more information on TB’s early operations.

    Like

  • Artax’
    In 2005 the Transport Board published a magazine called Transport Board:50 years of service 1955-2005. It is possible that they still have some copies. It contains a lot of interesting information.
    An interesting piece in this magazine,which was not known to many .” On May 18 ,1956 ,the bus fleet of 116 was reduce to 106 when 10 buses were returned to concessionaire Mr Birch of Progressive Bus Company”. Apparently Mr Birch had paid a visit to the Transport Board’s Weymouth Compound one night after his buses were taken over,and was abhorred at the sight of his “birds sleeping in the open” and requested their return.They were eventually retaken sometime in the mid-60’s.
    I suspect that in the first instance the Transport Board was glad to get shot of them as they included some heavy Bedford SB steel bodied buses with big gas guzzling engines. These were changed out to diesel engines after the second take over.
    Some of the first buses to arrive in Barbados with enclosed steel bodies make bu Duple in the UK were on Bedford OB chassis and were operated by Tudor of the National Bus Company (?). They were quickly phased out .When I went to the Transport Board in the early 60’s the patent body was being removed from the last one to be replaced by an old wooden body.

    Like

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