St. Vincent And Domestic Abuse

Submitted by Judith

I have visited St Vincent and the Grenadines and have noticed that as a visitor from Canada that the laws surrounding domestic dispute and abuse is taken as a joke or lightly I have experience police been called in a domestic dispute but the plaintiff was scared to press charges because she was treated by her boyfriend that if she press any charges he would kill her and nothing comes out of it he would just pay some money and spend a couple of weeks and get out just like his buddy. When the police was summoned although the scares were fresh, visual and obvious she was crying but was scared to press charges. the police did nothing they just left.

In a case like that it is now out of her hands the discretion should now be left in the police hands to make an arrest. Instead The man was told to go home and love is wife. So it is evident that with all the death of all these women whose husband or spouse kill them in St Vincent the court system allow them to get off to go kill another woman and brag about it. This is so pathetic and should be stopped.

I was told so many stories how lackadaisical and how caring the police force is in St Vincent and the Grenadines, I have even seen young girls been pick up in police vehicles and dropped off with a box food and you wouldn’t want to know what I was told.

St Vincent needs to step up. They are considered to be the slackest Caribbean country in the Justice system or should I say the worst.

22 thoughts on “St. Vincent And Domestic Abuse


  1. Domestic abuse is generally not taken seriously in the West Indies.

    Some might argue that women by their passive reaction in the main to domestic abuse help to perpetuate the ‘disease’.


  2. @ David

    Women passive? Where have you been? Just ask Amused. Don’t you see how they drive? Consider AC, Random, Islandgal. Don’t you know of the number of ‘boys’ clubs being formed for mutual help and support? The number of ‘safe houses’ being sought by broken husbands?


  3. @robert

    Yes there is improvement but one senses that women who occupy the working class segment and those identified by the CALC Report remain very vulnerable and are made passive by dependence on others for financial support.


  4. I guess dependence of any kind distorts, mostly silently, all relationships where it is rooted and its manifestations are many and various. Financial dependence I doubt creates ‘passivity’ – the adult’s character is fully formed – but it is surely available and used as a strategy..


  5. A blog on Domestic Violence is worthy of serious comment however, because of the “outline” this case has hit the buffers on BU ( Barbados Underground)
    In most jurisdictions Canada included you must have evidence and often there is a need for the victim to substantiate their claim. It is stated here that :” the scares were fresh, visual and obvious she was crying but was scared to press charges, the police did nothing they left”.

    In many instances much to the dismay of the Police and Court System women refuse to give evidence against their partners, this is particularly so after a couple days have elapsed.

    We must remember the person – accused – is still innocent until he is proven guilty or evidence is given against them for immediate action to be taken – even an injunction. We cannot have a system where someone is punished because another person has bruises, there must be justice underpinned by “evidence”.

    I can understand someone being scared but to deny yourself justice on the basis that he told you his friend did this and so on and so on is not the way to go.

    Violent partners who abuse others must be punished, it is not a blame game they must be exposed with evidence and thus break the vicious cycle. If you fail to do that the suffering will continue and other women – as alleged – in this case will suffer.

    As regards the Police Force In St Vincent and the Grenadines and their alleged actions of which you speak:. . . . “young girls and boxes of food etc “hear say” that is a different matter.


    • @Yardbroom

      Thanks for your comment on this blog. If one takes the lack of interest in preference to politics etc it speaks volumes about our society.


  6. Really what are you saying David ?..Onions ain’t no buttox man yet he weighed in on BULLA BLOG….a dog luva..yet he went to town on PIT BULL…..guess this was an attention grabber..YO it WORKED..lol..bare wid us Foundations School still fresh…..DEMS now working on something ..they gotta CUM gud doa….Sarge…Ya criminal….I watch CrimeSon..last nite…shoi#e hound !


  7. Women are a problem because Society is failing to train women in the right ways. I might add that Society is failing to teach men in the right ways too.
    I will explain later but Women need to know their place and that place is by the man’s side supporting and loving him.


  8. @ David
    When Dr Hunte- Cox was getting her share of blows…..I din hear the DLP women like ac, Sen.Depieza or Garner weighing in to help the poor comrade…DEM is blows too ya know psychological and emotional blows….sometimes even more damaging than man blows….ac


  9. @Onions

    Hope for your sake Sarge does NOT read your last comment because he might (tempted to rename you politicsconverter…lol. You seem to be wired to distil almost everything to a political denominator.


  10. As a champion of women’s rights – as Senator Irene Sandiford – Garner is, it is impossible to give unfettered attention to each individual case and neither can any reasonable person expect her to do so. As a senior politician one must be fully appraised of the FACTS a duty than an ordinary blogger is not encumbered.

    It would be irresponsible of her to do so. Even in the pursuit of women’s rights, we must be cautious at the degree of freedom we exercise, justice demands that we are fair and have the FACTS . . . .a situation I am sure the Senator is fully aware.


  11. @Porter
    Yes, you will need to explain later why you think that a woman’s place is beside her man supporting and loving him. Where do they get people with your kind of thinking? Why is it not a man’s duty to be beside his wife supporting and loving her. And if he abuses her despite her loving, is it her place to put up with and support the wretch? Give me a break man, go back to the 19th century where you came from! Steupse!


  12. Why Yardie don’t stop playing midday quarter back…that one was to test “the sheltered twin”…..one came out one night get sum licks..and run back to daddy…the other one ….just like TV. and Hal sportsman Gallop…she like she ent K 2 hoots bout who win or lose she just like the BIG SCREEN….a real Mary Poppins den…sweet lookin too…


  13. Hi old onion bags
    What have you to say about domestic abuse in general and in particular the case “Judith” has brought to our attention. . . . you appear to be a man in the know, your knowledge would be of great value to “Judith’s ” friend.


  14. @ Yardbroom
    I love women and would never be of the sort…..The situation in St .Vincent is not very far from that of Barbados or any other Caribbean country. We have far to go….


  15. @Yardbroom: Violent partners who abuse others must be punished, it is not a blame game they must be exposed with evidence and thus break the vicious cycle. If you fail to do that the suffering will continue and other women – as alleged – in this case will suffer. You are correct. Very often women refuse to press charges for very many reasons: because they are scared; some say they do not wish to lock up their children’s father; some are afraid of the process which can make them victims for the second time and others are just plain embarrassed to have the fact that they have been beaten made public.
    But unless charges are pressed the cycle will continue.
    This post has taken me by surprise; was not expecting such here. Not surprised at some of the comments either. But such is the nature of a blog, I suppose. It seems to be that there is more here than meets the eye and I am forwarding this post to a fellow parliamentarian in SVG who has taken on this issue in a major way there- we were only this week together discussing numerous like matters.
    Abuse – mental, physical, verbal – of the vulnerable is a scourge which we may not be able to stamp out in our lifetime, but we can certainly keep fighting it.


  16. @ Senator
    DEM is blows too ya know psychological and emotional blows….sometimes even more damaging than man blows…
    *****************************************
    But them is blows ..not true ?


  17. Hi Irene Sandiford-Garner
    Thanks for your response @ June 15, 2012 @ 10:50 AM

    I am sure you will do all that you can to assist those involved in this situation. You appear to be a people’s person one who is genuinely interested in the welfare of others . . . . I wish you well in “all” your endeavours.

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