Barbados’ Fintech Push

This week Barbados will the host of a global fintech conference called Fintech Islands from October 5 to 7 welcoming 300 delegates from across the world and attracting sponsorship from prominent global players like Visa, MasterCard and Delta Capital Group. The government must be given credit for being the enabler by placing emphasis on the emerging fintech sector.  Some of the initiatives the Mottley government has spearheaded include:

  • Rollout of the Regulatory sandbox in late 2019 which BU commenters will recall generated raucous discussion. 

The government has also moved quickly towards digitisation by executing the IDB Public Sector Digitisation Project which is being rolled out across all ministries at the back end, at the “front end” the rolling of the new National ID card which will have an accompanying optional Digital ID. The government must however do a better job communicating with the public about the New National ID card.   

A government’s job is to create the environment, legislative and otherwise to encourage private sector to drive economic activity. There is consensus our over-reliance on fickle tourism as a SIDs makes the economy more vulnerable to exogenous shocks. The 2007 global financial meltdown and recent experience arising from the pandemic is a sorry reminder. In 2016 late Prime Minister warned of the need for policymakers to introduce radical measures to add new earning sectors to the economy, instead the Central Bank was repurposed to be government’s ATM and as they say the rest is history after incurring 23 downgrades.

We live in a world that has transformed to digital cum services era, building new sectors to drive economic activity is not only about building physical factories. Rolling out fit for purpose regulation and other initiatives to improve business facilitation is the new alternative.

Barbados has built a reputation as an offshore financial hub, however, since the mid 2000s as Arthur mentioned in the above video, Barbados lost a lot of business to Cayman and has never fully recovered. It was one of the problems which plagued the Stuart government and as Arthur pointed out – from 2016 the country lost $259 million in foreign exchange and tax revenue which the then government sought to replace by imposing heavy domestic taxes on a shrinking economy and taxbase.  

One of the things the Mottley government seems to be trying to do is to reconfigure the business sector from which Barbados can offer modern services to replace the old tax haven model. The OECD has shown they have no problem shifting the rules of engagement ‘during the game’. It must be helpful that Barbados also added to its brand in the fintech space by being first to market with the Barbados Welcome Stamp program which allowed high net worth professionals many from the fintech world to work remotely during the pandemic.  

Quietly the Ghanaian fintech company Zeepay has setup in Barbados with plans to launch in Guyana next. Some have been asking are we there yet? This is a rhetorical question.

186 thoughts on “Barbados’ Fintech Push


  1. The video posted of Owen Arthur was actually from 2016 and not from 2013. By that time the domestic financial system was fully loan up to the government, and the downgrades meant that Barbados could no longer access foreign capital markets to borrow which lead the government to rely heavily on Central Bank financing to cover its still too large fiscal deficit (money printing). This lead to a precipitous fall in the country’s Foreign Reserves. making the fixed exchange rate uncertain in the medium term.


    • @wargeneral

      Thanks.

      We do we always have to wait until the shit hits the fan. It was inevitable where we would have landed if we did nothing but the same.


  2. Just another example of Barbados jumping an a new technology bandwagon without a REAL IMPLIMENTATION PLAN, hoping it will solve numerus unrelated problems. Underlying issue is the country has a FIXED restricted currency which government continually attempts to maintain to the detrement of economial development. Government refuses to take the necessary devaluation of the currency as they are not capable of handling the fallout. Barbados direction is well established on the financial destruction borrowing path to FAILED STATE.


  3. @David
    Somehow I got the impression (incorrect) it was a GoB initiative, the Conference

    It was your former frequent contributor Alicia N who pointed out in BT

    “three enterprising diaspora-based Barbadians – Allison Hunte, Peter Stoute-King and Curt Persaud – formulated the vision of hosting a world-class fintech event in the Caribbean drawing influential speakers and attendees from across the world. Their team was rounded out by senior advisors William ‘Billy’ Griffith and Andrew Morris.”


    • @NO

      The comment was not about the conference but about who is responsible for driving fintech business in the Barbados space through business facilitation and regulation.


  4. Where will the fintech professionals come from, UWI? Surely not, Goldman Sachs? gimme a break. UWI continues to churn out useless graduates with degrees in Management and blah blah blah. To capitalise on fintech we need: software engineers, blockchain developers, cyber security professionals, data scientists, computer scientists etc. In other words graduates from the faculty with the lowest enrolment. Making matters worse the BCC of SJPP are in no position to fill the void because of how grossly underfunded they have been over the last 20 years.
    In the 90’s UWI was perfectly positioned to support the growing offshore banking sector with its degrees in Accounts, Banking and Finance and yes also Management. Expanding enrolment and loosening entry requirements made sense. The offshore banks had a continuous flow of high quality graduates who could provide the same quality work as a local in their country for half the wages. Yes we lost business to Cayman islands and Bermuda but many of the same UWI graduates took up those jobs and either bought property here or send regular remittances. But the Government and UWI have not pivoted and there is now an oversupply of accountants and BSc management graduates. EY and PWC can pay a new graduate the same salary they did in the early 2000’s ($3000), essentially between $15 and $20 per hour.
    Now here comes the fintech train and team Mia and her fantastical thinking somehow believing marketing, holding conferences and singing kumbaya will position the island, ABSOLUTELY NOT!. Welcome Stamp will not attract quality professionals either. There is absolutely no evidence to support the statement below:
    “It must be helpful that Barbados also added to its brand in the fintech space by being first to market with the Barbados Welcome Stamp program which allowed high net worth professionals many from the fintech world to work remotely during the pandemic.”
    This is more brand and marketing nonsense not supported by evidence or facts, just whimsical thinking. You can’t brand or market when there is no substance or quality to show. Reconfigure UWI BCC and SJPP to produce graduates with the required skills then worry about branding and marketing. But because Tourism is the major player in town its methods continue to be applied in all other sectors. The administration continues to believe without evidence that branding and communication was all Barbados needed. Yet we just got our lunch taken by St. Lucia during summer but guess what our tourism experts will say, it was a fluke and St. Lucia is not on our level. Lack of accountability, incompetence and arrogance will be our down fall. The entire BTMI board should have been sacked for the Cropover fiasco. Anyway I digress.


    • @NO

      Gotcha now.

      You wouldn’t give the government credit for enabling the Barbados space to attract such a conference?


  5. Redguard October 5, 2022 9:31 AM #: “UWI continues to churn out useless graduates with degrees in Management and blah blah blah.”
    ~~~~~~~~~

    What qualifies you to determine Management graduates are “USELESS?”


  6. Here we go again ! What is wrong with a business conference or IT : Fintech conference taking place whether it is hosted by government or private enterprise.
    We are already behind in these types of industries and we need to catch up.
    Furthermore , a couple of hundred people attending any conference will certainly leave much needed foreign exchange behind.
    We need more such gatherings . Simple as that !!


  7. “We are already behind in these types of industries and we need to catch up.”

    am sure Jackass Jones must be proud..

    in 2010 the island was nearly 20 YEARS BEHIND in every level of technology, now they are nearly 30…


  8. Have to give PLT his props for working to reverse that incompetence and shortsightedness with classes…


  9. Barbados Information Technology standard is on par with their football
    But, fret not my little children and suffer no longer
    I have seen something else under the sun: The race is not to the swift or the battle to the strong, nor does food come to the wise or wealth to the brilliant or favor to the learned; but time and chance happen to them all.

    Herencia Africana
    african heritage

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=872LPmM2hPY


  10. Artax nothing qualifies me, it is my opinion based on my experience and my observation of persons who undertake that degree with no work experience under their belt.
    Also the scores who I receive applications from for a position suited for BCC graduate. I ignore them all for a simple reason, the role does not require a BSc in Management, and I am not interested in giving them a chance. From my perspective the degree is USELESS and the fact they are applying for a job that does not require a degree makes the degree USELESS to me. On the one occasion I did hire one, the young lady wanted to run the business and her attitude showed no interest in learning and she said the pay was too low for a graduate.

    Mr. Skinner, nothing is wrong with the conference but the implication made in the article is this is part of a push to position the island as a hub for fintech. You cannot be a hub if you do not have the skilled professionals to work in the area and marketing and branding will not fix this. But hey if you want to major on a minor and discuss the benefit a couple hundred people attending a conference good for you.


    • @Redguard

      You have to start some where even if it means the majority of the labour pool must be given work permits to allow time to grow local supply of qualified workers. You may remember there was a company years ago that operated in Barbados named PRT with a large foreign workforce. If memory recalls correctly the company started to work with Cave Hill to add/align IT programs on the curriculum. It can be sone but it will take some planning and time.


  11. Bajans who drink rum have been talking about growing weed but to no avail
    Perhaps Barbados needs some foreign spliff and IT experts to set up industry

    Pa’ Bravo Yo

    Pa’ Bravo Yo (Dengue, Dengue, Dengue! Remix)


  12. @ Redguard
    graduate.

    Mr. Skinner, nothing is wrong with the conference but the implication made in the article is this is part of a push to position the island as a hub for fintech. “
    “You cannot be a hub if you do not have the skilled professionals to work in the area and marketing and branding will not fix this. But hey if you want to major on a minor and discuss the benefit a couple hundred people attending a conference good for you.“
    As I said we are way behind in all areas related to IT. I have long ignored the superfluous comments of those who tend to blow everything out of proportion. They always tend to believe that we can come from behind and end up with being the innovator and top dog.
    You will note that I simply said, we need these kind of conferences because we are way behind in this area; I concluded by saying such gatherings will leave some foreign exchange behind.
    I am not one of those who use words like hub lightly. We are a hub for nothing at this point.
    One swan never made a summer.
    As for the university , I have long maintained that it is not in concord with the reality of our economic circumstance.I know people with marketing degrees , who walk into people’s businesses, flash a piece of paper and believe they know everything.
    Peace.


  13. You are right David we have to start with what we have, but we have known computer science, data science software development, fintech and AI are the future for a while now, so how do you explain UWI BCC and SJPP not pivoting. Enrolment for Com Sci still remains way below what our country needs. Where is the coordinated effort like we did for Offshore banking to get us the skilled Com Sci graduates we need to attract business


    • @Redguard

      You ask a difficult question except what is obvious, we do not plan well until crisis point is in sight.


    • Many blogs ago we discussed how education strategy should be aligned with strategic national imperatives. Those who mentioned that the two should be aligned by offering financial incentives, tweaking criteria for awarding scholarships and exhibitions, bonding etc had to bear the brunt of some criticism.


  14. Mr Skinner, then we are on the same page, the country needs synergy between the Government, UWI, BCC and SJPP and the business sector, until we achieve that we will continue to produce graduates who are bored in their jobs, feel underutilised and become satisfied with partying and copious consumption.

    Barbados needs a purpose (or purposes) and it needs to cascade through all sectors of the country. We first need to find a purpose then find those with the drive, dedication, discipline and discernment to execute. Do such persons exist in Barbados, Bushman will probably say no. I believe they do but we think academics is the sole metric for identifying them. It is not and until we change that out our ass is grass


  15. I have said on this blog for years, that there can be no meaningful reform of the economy or no restructuring of anything unless there is a reform of the educational system.
    They just don’t get it ! All we do is try to reinvent the wheel and some come here completely oblivious to the role education plays in socio – economic development.
    You cannot produce a 2022 model on a 1922 platform.
    Note how every day they are coming with massive confusion in trying to maintain a proper and relevant tourism product.
    Now they want to build islands and marinas pretending that us about tourism. That’s merely an attempts at creating upmarket real estate.
    That’s is why we are so far behind with the IT and similar sectors. The world was rushing to get on the information Highway and we continued going about our businesses the same old ways.
    We have done our youth a great disservice over the last twenty plus years by refusing to prepare them for today’s world.
    I am waiting patiently to see how they are going to reform education before getting into such discussions.
    We are going no where very fast ; the same road we took five decades ago, we are on today. Change now are we will be still here 50 years from now.
    Peace.


  16. Redguard

    RE: “From my perspective the degree is USELESS and the fact they are applying for a job that does not require a degree makes the degree USELESS to me.”

    So, a BSc in Management Studies, in your opinion, is useless, SIMPLY because an unemployed graduate “with no work experience under his/her belt,” but, is ABLE and WILLING to WORK, seeks to ENTER the labour market, hoping to GAIN such EXPERIENCE, by applying for a job, for which his/her qualifications are not a prerequisite requirement.

    If I were to follow your argument, then, ALL degrees automatically BECOME USELESS, as long as they are NOT REQUIRED for any particular job.
    Or, for example, a guy with eight (8) CXC General Proficiency level certificates, applied for a gas attendant job at ESSO Black Rock.
    Based on your argument, his certificates are useless because one does not require CXCs to pump gas.

    I know a girl who has a BSc in Biochemistry and wants to become a doctor.
    She was working in a supermarket as a cashier and packing the shelves occasionally.
    Should she have been DENIED employment, because her degree is not a qualifying prerequisite for a cashier job, and therefore becomes useless as a result?

    So, does the Management degree REMAINS USELESS or BECOMES USEFUL, if the graduate applies for a supervisor or management position?

    But, as you correctly stated, it’s YOUR “perspective,” which MUST BE RESPECTED…… but, one I would not hold, because in MY opinion, it’s SILLY.


    • @Artax

      Can we give context to the label ‘useless’? What is the sense of generating people qualified in a particular discipline that does nothing to make the country competitive and productive? The blogmaster is sensitive to the other perspective that a person should be free to pursue studies that makes them actualize. Sometimes the personal pursuit of the individual does not intersect national goals.


  17. Redguard October 5, 2022 9:31 AM #: “UWI continues to churn out useless graduates with degrees in Management and blah blah blah.”

    On the one occasion I did hire one, the young lady wanted to run the business and her attitude showed no interest in learning and she said the pay was too low for a graduate.

    xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

    BOSS YOU ARE 1000 PERCENT CORRECT AND I TAUGHT MANAGEMENT IN THAT SAME DIVISION ON CAVE HILL CAMPUS SO NO ONE CAN FOOL ME WITH ANY OTHER BULLSHIT.

    THE PROBLEM MOST OF THE CLASSES IS BASED ON OLD SCHOOL THEORY HOWEVER BEING A UWI GRADUATE ON THE 2X3 ISLAND FILLS WAY TOO MANY GRADUATES HEADS WITH BOTH IGNORANCE AND ARROGANCE THEY DON’T WANT TO START AT THE BOTTOM AND LEARN IN THE WORKPLACE.

    HOWEVER, FEEL ENTITLED TO BIG MONEY AND IF YOU LISTEN TO THEM WITH THEIR THEORY WILL DESTROY YOUR BUSINESS SINCE THEY DON’T HAVE THE REQUIRED KNOWLEDGEAND FEEL A SENSE OF ENTITLENT AS A UWI GRADUATE INSTEAD OF LEARNING REAL WORLD AND PROVING THEMSELVES OVER TIME.


  18. @ Artax
    I agree with you philosophically that the attainment of any level of education, even primary school can never be deemed useless . A qualification can be deemed of no intrinsic use in a particular circumstance but it can never be of no use or useless
    “The object of all true education is not to make men carpenters , it is to make carpenters of men.”( W.E.B. Dubois)
    I remember over thirty five or so years ago, a very polite young man attended me at a gas station.I complimented him on his service. He told me he was just holding on there until he found something better. The guy had seven O’ levels and two advanced certificates.
    I realised then that things were changing because years before , anybody with two O levels could probably get a “ better” job in the public service. I know some great teachers who entered the service with a two or three certificates before then , improved their qualifications and went to the top of the profession via Erdiston/UWI
    That young man was stepping into a changing society because we know that nobody with that amount of O levels and two advanced , years before that, were scarcely going to pump gas. I complimented him and told him to try and get a degree.
    Even back then the emphasis on certification was gaining pressure.
    We should perhaps have been placing more emphasis on institutions such as BIMAP.
    Peace.


  19. “I know a girl who has a BSc in Biochemistry and wants to become a doctor.
    She was working in a supermarket as a cashier and packing the shelves occasionally”

    Anecdote and a really really really ineffective use of one. Very few Biochem grads packing shelves or unemployed outside of their field. This anecdote was useless because it is clearly on outlier.

    Also my use of useless is obviously subjective. I have formed my opinion based on my experience and observations. Calling it silly is a useless conclusion. Also water off the duck’s back.

    Again majoring on a minor. The substance of my post was we have an oversupply of persons with qualifications not suited for the fintech industry and we are in no position to address in the short or medium term, but all you could focus on was my use of useless………would I be SILLY to call your contribution to this discussion useless


  20. “That’s is why we are so far behind with the IT and similar sectors. The world was rushing to get on the information Highway and we continued going about our businesses the same old ways.”

    wunna cahn come back an change nutten bout hey, wen wunna go way to Merica and Inglant wuuna duz come back mad……straight out of the foolery book of both fraud governments their fowls, imps and supporters..


  21. wunna cahn come back an change nutten bout hey, wen wunna go way to Merica and Inglant wuuna duz come back mad……straight out of the foolery book of both fraud governments their fowls, imps and supporters..

    XXXXXXXXX

    THE MORE THINGS CHANGE THE MORE THEY REMAIN THE SAME ON THE 2X3 ISLAND


  22. David
    All degrees have the potential to make us competitive. The lack of opportunities to fulfil the potential is the problem.


    • @Enuff

      The point is that 1. We don’t have the resources and market scale to satisfy a random approach to trained talent and 2. It is important for a structured approach to creating talent based on market/environment- it cannot be random.


  23. “What is the sense of generating people qualified in a particular discipline that does nothing to make the country competitive and productive?”

    David

    What do you mean by “generating people?”

    Barbados is not a dictatorship. You cannot FORCE anyone to pursue a career path, which, according to you, would “make the country competitive and productive.”

    You must understand people have a fundamental right to CHOOSE what field of study they want to undertake in pursuit of their OWN personal aspirations and development, as well as to be competitive in the labour market.

    I believe, for example, there is a glut of lawyers in Barbados.
    But, this development hasn’t deterred people from becoming lawyers.
    Every year, we’re seeing more and more students graduating from UWI’s Law Faculty and expressing their desire to attend Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad or the Norman Manley Law School in Jamaica.

    One of Barbados’ main economic drivers is tourism.
    Over the years, several Barbadians chose “to make the country competitive and productive” in this area, by pursuing tertiary level qualifications in tourism industry related disciplines.
    First, through BCC’s ‘Hotel School,’ which has since developed into the fully operational Hotel PomMarine, and UWI.
    Yet, Barbados is faced with a situation where people having been graduating annually with undergraduate and graduate degrees ranging from tourism and hospitality management to Tourism Development & Management…… and, EXPATRIATES are the PREFERRED CANDIDATES for MANAGEMENT POSITIONS.


  24. All degrees have the potential to make us competitive. The lack of opportunities to fulfil the potential is the problem.

    NAH BOSS MY FIST DEGREE IS COMPUTER SCIENCE YOU DON’T WANT PEOPLE LIKE ME I AM NEITHER DLP, BLP OR A LACKEY.


  25. Last/last

    “Anecdote and a really really really ineffective use of one. Very few Biochem grads packing shelves or unemployed outside of their field. This anecdote was useless because it is clearly on outlier.”
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    I asked ONE important question, BASED on your comments.
    Should the young lady be DENIED EMPLOYMENT because she has a degree in Biochemistry?
    Rather than answer, you responded with some IRRELEVANT nonsense about “anecdote.”

    What I purposely neglected to share, and with good reason, is the fact that she wanted to pursue graduate studies and decided to seek employment to ASSIST her mother in financing her studies.

    Omitting certain information provides an opportunity to determine how someone thinks.
    It just goes to show that some of you guys immediately hold fast to certain positions, without THINKING or taking ALL the POSSIBLE facts scenarios, etc, into CONSIDERATION.

    The reality of the situation is, ‘you are eloquently talking shiite.’


  26. William…..still no Afrikan history taught to this children about their ancient ancestor….but look what these CRIMINALS are doing…..where are the HUMAN RIGHTS LAWYERS in Slave society Barbados..

    “‘Alarming test’Article by
    Randy BennettPublished on
    October 5, 2022
    The Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training has come under fire for reportedly circulating a test to first form students which has been described as “distasteful and invasive” by some parents.

    ←→
    4 / 6

    The exam, which was administered on Monday at secondary schools across the island, was purported to be a “pre-test on Computer Science” formulated by an organisation called code.org.

    However, parents complained to Barbados TODAY that their children were quizzed on their sexuality, gender identity, substance use and abuse as well as personal information about their parents.

    The pre-test contained close to 300 questions and lasted for two hours.

    Teaching staff were notified of the test via a memorandum last week”


  27. @ WURA
    “ However, parents complained to Barbados TODAY that their children were quizzed on their sexuality, gender identity, substance use and abuse as well as personal information about their parents.“
    This is why I have repeatedly said, I am not going to get too involved in discussions pertaining to education because I don’t see as yet where we are heading.
    There are several agendas vying to control how the country should be developed socio- economically but there is a lack of transparency on all fronts. It can be tourism, education or housing, there is a deliberate attempt to create confusion and then cleverly introduce whatever they want.
    More to come .
    Peace.


  28. William Skinner October 5, 2022 2:22 PM #: “A qualification can be deemed of no intrinsic use in a particular circumstance but it can never be of no use or useless.”

    Mr. Skinner

    ‘Exactly.’

    I guess your example with guy who had seven O’ levels and two advanced certificates holding on at the gas station “until he found something better,” is “anecdote and a really really really ineffective use of one,” as well.

    However, sometimes these ‘discussions’ on education are amusing.

    Allow me to give you an example.

    On one hand, we often come to this forum ‘talking’ about colonialism, the Queen etc……
    …… but, on the other, we are overly critical of CXC, preferring instead to show our love for GCE ‘O’ Levels from the University of London and University of Oxford & Cambridge.


    • Sometimes we do not take the time to read and understand the point other commenters are trying to make. In this instance Redguard. It is simple to understand the point being made. It is not that the degree is useless m, it is about how it adds material value to the big picture. Managing a country is about optimizing the talent pool to sustain productivity and competitiveness. A sensible balance must be found between personal ambitions and the needs of the state. We do not live in a perfect world.


  29. “There are several agendas vying to control how the country should be developed socio-economically but there is a lack of transparency on all fronts.”

    people keep WARNING REPEATEDLY on dozens of platforms that the negro governments in place for the better part of 100 YEARS are EXTREMELY EVIL….and are only interested in selling out THE AFRIKAN POPULATION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER…

    don’t know why anyone would accept this type of CRIMINALITY against themselves and their children and DO NOT INVOKE THEIR HUMAN RIGHTS via a lawsuit against these nasty traitor governments.


  30. William Skinner October 5, 2022 4:38 PM

    That nonsense has been going on for years.

    I remember when I was attending St. Stephen’s Primary, teachers would ask us write an essay on the type of house in which you reside, the type of jobs your parents had.
    Or, on the summer vacation.

    I believe this was done to probably get an insight into what type of environment you came from.
    Because I noticed certain children from particular backgrounds, their parents had ‘good jobs’ and drove them to school, were given preferential treatment…… who we used to ‘call’ ‘favourites’ in those days.


  31. William….i saw a sample of the questions…TOTALLY INAPPROPRIATE.

    …people in the US are CRYING MORE SHAME…


  32. @
    @ Artax
    You are correct. One of the main reasons why we never got a powerful national PTA going was there was a kind of snobbery in primary school PTAs.
    Many parents did not feel comfortable because they felt their class status was scorned.
    It seems as though in a very subtle way the society is purging itself of the over nostalgic obsession with the “good old days.”
    However, the questions about gender/ sexuality, need to be explained.
    More to come.
    Peace.


  33. It went way over the line of PERVERSION…..the lowlifes who orchestrated those questions are clearly pedophiles…


  34. and may i remind everyone, that these are not 16 and 17-year-olds who meet the criteria for sexual consent…these are 11 and 12 year olds, not teens, tweens.


  35. @David
    “You wouldn’t give the government credit for enabling the Barbados space to attract such a conference?”
    xxxxxxx
    I have no intention of taking any credit away, but am unsure exactly what was “enabled”.
    These conferences are really an extension of the Tourism product? Barbados could hold a global conference on ETFs, even though none are traded on the BSE.
    The Conference is a gathering place for persons with similar interest? Las Vegas hold a bariffle.


  36. David

    I believe you’re attempting to insult the little intelligence I have.
    The guy’s comments were clear. It just a matter of you agreeing with him.

    I’m trying to understand where you’re going with the argument that people should plan their careers to suit the needs of the state.

    You cannot in all reasonable fairness say, on one hand, “Managing a country is about optimizing the talent pool to sustain productivity and competitiveness.”
    And, then on the other suggest, “A sensible balance must be found between personal ambitions and the needs of the state.”

    You’re essentially suggesting ‘government’ should manage its human resources, while citizens should neglect their ambitions to concentrate on the needs of the state.

    My friend, as I mentioned previously, we’re not a dictatorship.
    And, perhaps that’s one of the reasons why, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain UNALIENABLE RIGHTS, that among these are Life, Liberty and the PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS,”…… is INCLUDED in the USA’s Declaration of Independence.

    Some people set goals in life to charter a course towards the fulfillment of their personal ambitions, which, in many cases, were developed since childhood.

    So, if your son, for example, had childhood dreams of becoming an electrical engineer, would you ask him to forget about his personal ambitions because Barbados ‘government’ is venturing into fintech, and encourage him to pursue studies in computer science instead?

    However, similarly to how some people want to become, police, immigration, customs and fire officers, soldiers, politicians because they’re desirous of serving their country, people will find new areas interesting and seek to pursuing them as a career.


    • @Artax

      Is that what the blogmaster is suggesting? Let’s be clear to avoid the pedantry. Individuals can study what they want BUT the state has a responsibility to allocate resources that will incentivize citizens to acquire training that aligns with national goals. There must be leadership demonstrated therefore by government to ensure that while individuals have the opportunity to follow their passion, there is focus to encourage training in areas that facilitates the country being competitive. We have to eat and pay bills. What is so difficult to understand about the point?


  37. @Mr Blogmaster, you have been exceptionally succinct but also absolutely clear and purposeful re this matter of educational degrees outta UWI! …. I agree with your analysis ALTHOUGH the obvious point made by @Artax (“people have a fundamental right to CHOOSE …“) is a problem!

    You and others like the Bushman Griot have been making the argument for some time that the gov’t of the day need to incentivize students towards science, comp. sci. and technical studies pursuits even as they de-emphasize humanities, law and such! It’s a blunt truism and yes it’s possible and can be achieved but requires purposeful intent from primary school right up.

    And @Artax and @Skinner that’s one way to look at that request (re “teachers would ask us write an essay on the type of house in which you reside, the type of jobs your parents had….Or, on the summer vacation.”) … but there are other quite beneficial reasons too.

    At that level we can more readily write on matters close to us and surely ‘family affairs’ is an explorative topic on which to open up the writing skillset. I too recall writing such vacation/family stories maybe 15 years prior to you and undoubtedly students at St. Stephens or Wesley Hall or Ebenezer still make their initial writing trials on those subjects … and now too “their sexuality, gender identity, substance use and abuse”!

    Amazing and amusing that parents would NOT expect these areas of writing ‘introspection’ although their children so comprehensively consume them from dusk to dawn! Do we want them to write about Putin or Trump or Caricom or maybe the WI cricket woes ..of which they are not consumers!!!

    We need to get a GRIP on reality here. As parents if we are NOT focused enough to talk to our children and tell them 1) that they can write about whatever they are keen about, or 2) whatever they have read about and as importantly 3) that they DO NOT have to write about very personal or private matters then the PROBLEM is us, in my view!

    And oh BTW the really GOOD and practical teachers also use those family affairs essays to better understand their student as it puts very clearly into perspective the behaviors displayed in the class room. Based on the feedback I get from teaching friends they often need to sit with their more troubled students to discuss these family life issues IN ORDER to guide and help them navigate their school life issues.

    There is often good where only bad may be perceived! … Anyhow, just saying.


    • @Dee Word

      You nailed it.

      There is also the elephant in the room.

      Uwi has become a mill. Many young people grind out a soci degree to check that 1st degree box because it is an easy path to take. We have to be honest if we want to move the needle with education reform.


  38. Bread and Butter
    “These are 11-year-old students and some of these questions in my opinion, planted seeds in their heads.”
    Does anyone have a copy of the questionnaire?


  39. William…..keep your eyes on this, there is a video where it was said by a professional that letters were sent across the region warning these criminals not to push this IPPF agenda, …since June…where the parents are totally excluded and they ignored them and only answered the letter in October by giving the children the test they were warned NOT TO…

    ……..now we are hearing that code.org said the test should not be administered to children UNDER 13…..but here is Slave society Barbados pushing this agenda on 11 and 12-year-olds….

    ….and it’s said they are selling their asses and the children for funding..

    the frog in hot water analogy was brought up..

    and also said that some pedophiles with agendas are planning to push these crimes on children from as young as 3 years old..

    there is advocacy about this in Jamaica to stop this evil before it kills children across the region.

    ABOMINATION…


  40. So glad to see the apologists and supporters are living to see the gates of hell swing WIDE OPEN….

    …cahn wait to hear their spin..

    let’s see if they can do better than lettered professionals..

    ah take it, it was TOO LATE to jump our with a stammering press conference, but there is always tomorrow….ah cahn wait……this one should have cameras, lights and action…


  41. dpD

    Some people look for conspiracies in every situation, even when it’s obvious there aren’t any.

    Whether we agree or not, we’re living in societies where some men and women are identifying as female and male respectively.

    Recall on September 5, 2019, officials at a private institution, Providence Secondary School, were accused of discriminating against a 14 year old transgender student.
    According to media reports, the Canadian mother of the male student, who identified as female, launched an online petition after the school insisted ‘he’ had to wear the male school uniform.

    The Ministry of Education’s refusal to intervene in what it perceived to be a private matter, prompted Alexa Hoffman, who is male and also identifies as female, to warn ‘government’ it was not an isolated case.

    Members of the LGBTQ community all over the world, are fighting for their civil rights to live openly without discrimination and enjoy equal rights, personal autonomy, and freedom of expression and association.
    LGBT people are regularly subjected to discrimination and violence in Barbados.

    The following excerpt was taken from Amnesty International Submission to the UN Universal Periodic Review, January-February 2013:

    “In this submission, prepared for the UN Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of Barbados in January-February 2013, Amnesty International comments on the response of the Barbadian government to recommendations made to it during its previous review.
    Particular attention is paid to recommendations regarding international standards, children, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people.”
    “Additionally, Amnesty International notes concerns about the entrenchment of discrimination against LGBT people in Barbadian law. The organization expresses its concern about the criminalization of same sex relations and its effect on the LGBT community’s reluctance to access health services and treatment.”

    Taking the above information into consideration, for someone who has, on several occasions, ‘talked’ about human rights in this forum, to suggest the questionnaire was prepared by pedophiles, is a ‘monstrous perversion of commonsense.’


  42. @Artax
    What qualifies you to determine (UWI) Management graduates are “USELESS?”
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    How about the fact that they don’t ‘manage’ one shiite in Barbados…?!
    …but instead look for work from foreigners who simply went into the family business after O’ levels in Trinidad or China?

    LOL


  43. @Artax and @The Blogmaster; it’s quite surprising that this govt is taking a hands-off approach to the bothersome transgender issue … shocking even.

    How can the PM and her Education Ministry perceive such “to be a private matter”. This is not an issue that will diminish over time …. rather just the opposite, so avoiding it is nonsensical.

    In the US particularly but in UK, Canada, Europe and certainly in Russia, Australia et al this is a massive social issue and is leading to the type of civil unrest that causes deaths… In US, it pits parents at PTA meetings against each and of course is leading to some draconian legislation, books bans, teacher law suits and the like.

    All of that will not happen here in lil Bim but surely there will be some serious problems nonetheless. Why
    should our proudly out PM and folks like her senior adviser Dr. Walcott be avoiding this issue ???

    One does not have to agree with the choices people make but we do have to respect them. School officials may be rightly concerned that a biological male using the facilities for females at the school could be a cause for concern but making her/him use the rest-rooms for the boys is just as problematic.

    The ministry (and or the courts) needs to settle these matters locally if Barbados does not intend to follow the international standards … as none of us have the magical wand to wish these problems away!


  44. LOL … for the grammarians out there …. just reread “none of us have” and said OMG … that’s wrong!

    It should be_ “none of us has”_.

    But, in keeping with accepted social media and modern customs read the plural form although it should be singular … it’s like this modern thing called ‘Alternative Facts’: See it and accept it for what’s its not!🤣😎


  45. Bush Tea October 5, 2022 10:30 PM

    What TOOK you so LONG?

    Knowing certain NAMES are involved, I was actually EXPECTING you to ‘show up’ SEVERAL HOURS ago…… and anticipated your comments as well.

    However, yuh done know a light weight like me ain’t want nuttun wid de members of BU’s intelligentsia.

    But, are you suggesting management degrees from universities OTHER than UWI are USEFUL?

    And, persons receiving those degrees, for example, from St George’s University in Grenada, University of Guyana, University of the Southern Caribbean – St. Lucia Campus…… or from foreign universities in countries such a America, Australia, Britain, Canada or China….. whether online or ‘face to face’……

    …… are GIVEN the OPPORTUNITY to “manage EVERY shiite in Barbados?”

    That they are FORTUNATE to “look for work from foreigners who simply went into the family business after completing UNDERGRADUATE and GRADUATE DEGREE programs in Trinidad or China?”

    Or, from Barbadians, especially minorities, who simply went into the family business after O’ levels from Presentation College, St. Winifred’s or Al Falah الفلاح School in Passage Road?”


  46. William……they are pulling the survey AFTER the children answered these sleazy questions, these dangerous questions….what does a bank have any right setting out this for minor children, underage children EVEN AFTER the ministries across the Caribbean WERE WARNED since June by educators, professionals….NOT TO PROCEED WITH THOSE QUESTIONS on minors, not only are they inappropriate for 11 and 12-year-olds, but ILLEGAL, code.org CANNOT LEGALLY determine that 13 years meet the criteria for sexual consent…..

    can’t hear anything about this from the cowardly, yellow bellied frauds who have talk for everyone…

    these children have no one but their parents to protect them from PEDOPHILES……..remove the power of parents and the SLEAZY DISGUSTING lowlifes hiding amongst populations will be in control of their lives to do whatever when these world stage runners want attention and money..

    and just check out WHO the SPONSORS of code.org are…

    MAY the WRATH OF RA come DOWN ON THEM.

    MAY FIRE and BRIMSTONE RAIN DOWN on EVERYONE OF THEM AND NEVER END.

    “The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) has accepted full responsibility for the controversial Computer Science test that was recently taken by first form students.

    ←→
    5 / 6

    The parents of some of the students who took the test on Monday told Barbados TODAY that their children were subjected to “distasteful and invasive” questions in the Computer Science pre-test, including some that quizzed them on their sexuality, gender identity, substance use and abuse as well as personal information about their parents.

    Below is the full statement from the Inter-American Development Bank

    The Inter-American Development Bank expresses regret that a survey administered by the
    Bank to children in the Barbados secondary school system has offended many Barbadians.
    The Bank sincerely apologises, but stresses that no offence was intended.

    The questions at the centre of concern, to which the Ministry of Education had objected prior to the administering of
    the survey and which were inadvertently left in the paper, have been removed.”


  47. @NO

    Note the last sentence in the article.

    PM: Look out for vulnerable in fintech

    COMPANIES SEEKING ENTRANCE into Barbados’ fintech (financial technology) market are being put on notice that it is not going to be a space where anything goes.
    This position was made clear by Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley yesterday, who said while Barbados stands ready to welcome all players, there must be rules to protect the most vulnerable smaller and less financially literate investors in the sector.
    However, at the same time, she gave the assurance that all regulations will be in accordance with the level of risk associated, promising there would be no profiling of businesses under her watch. She also promised that Government will not be going the route of adopting rigid rules to govern the sector, instead stating that a principle-based approach offered the flexibility to regulate in accordance with the changing needs of the market.
    Delivering remarks at the opening Fintech Island Conference at Hilton Barbados, Mottley pointed out that given the complexities of the relatively new digital finance market, Government also had a duty to look out for those who might be just learning the ropes of the sector. She reminded those in attendance of the 1928 Great Depression, during which many people lost their life savings during a crash of the stock markets in the United States.
    “The public space exists not to maximise profit. Rather, we exist to help you maximise profit. However, we also exist to protect the vulnerable and we also exist to protect those who cannot themselves be in a position to advise themselves. This is why the protection of the vulnerable remains one
    of the key aspects of our approach. Regulation could either be rules-based or it can be principles-based,” she said.
    “When it is rules-based, then people will tell you that you can’t do X and you can’t do Y because the rules say so . . . . What matters most in all of this is the principles because it is in this approach that we find what is fair to you and what is fair to those with whom you are seeking to do business. If we follow that principlebased approach as a regulator, then we would be in a far better position to answer questions driven by innovation that nobody thought of.”
    The Prime Minister said her administration was excited about the prospects of leveraging financial technology to address a number of issues as it related to the threats of unbanking that faced several sectors. Among those mentioned was the burgeoning cannabis sector and gambling.
    “My Government is, therefore, looking at how we can put a regulatory framework in place, recognising that the very people who we say are risky are placed more at risk because of the blanket ban. At the same time, we have to ensure that we don’t believe that things must happen as a right and that there can be no regulation whatsoever in the systems we are putting in place to support Fintech,” said Mottley, who emphasised her point with the analogy of the anarchy that existed in the Hollywood depiction of the Wild West.
    More than 300 delegates from across the globe and varying sectors within the fintech industry are expected for the three-day event, the first global fintech conference in the Caribbean.


    Source: Nation


  48. Delta Services takes over Massy Card

    MASSY CARD (BARBADOS) LIMITED (MCBL) has sold its credit card portfolio to Delta Payments Services (Barbados) Ltd.
    Delta, a fintech company incorporated in Barbados, is wholly owned by the private equity firm, Delta Capital Partners Ltd.
    A release yesterday stated customers will shortly receive letters from MCBL with the relevant information regarding their accounts with the company, but there will be a transition period when things will look the same to customers and partners.
    This period will allow the two companies time to execute a smooth handover. Essentially, MCBL will continue to service and support the credit card portfolio in its current form during that time and critical elements of the business will not change.
    The Massy brand and cards will continue to be used during the transition
    period and all current marketing promotions, as well as reward programmes, will continue as at present, the release added.
    The Massy Loyalty Card, which shares the same brand mark as the Massy Credit Card, will continue to operate as normal during the transition period.
    Going into greater detail about the venture during the opening of Fintech Islands Conference at Hilton Barbados yesterday, chief executive officer of Delta, Ivan Carter, said that the company intends to add several additional services to the platform. He also revealed that the card will be eventually rebranded as a Mastercard under the name Delta Pay. Once this transition takes place, the company will be branching into areas such as microfinancing, he added.
    “At the right time we will introduce a number of other products such as digital currencies, US dollar currencies, digital cards, digital
    gift cards. One of our strengths is the use of digital technology to solve issues,” he said. (CLM)

    Source: Nation


  49. IDB apologises
    by MARIA BRADSHAW mariabradshaw@nationnews.com

    THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB) has apologised for a survey it administered to schoolchildren that offended many Barbadians.
    The survey, part of the Code Caribbean project was administered by a United States-based organisation code.org which promotes the learning of computer science in schools. It was given to first formers on Monday at three secondary schools, which parents said contained inappropriate and invasive questions.
    It asked questions such as: Do you think about sex a lot? Do you purposely try to harm yourself? Do you think about killing yourself? and Do you do drugs?
    A release from the IDB last night stated: “The bank sincerely apologises, but stresses that no offence was intended. The questions at the centre of concern, to which the Ministry of Education had objected prior to the administering of the survey and which were inadvertently left in the paper, have been removed.
    “The IDB recognises its position as a development partner with the Government of Barbados, with a long and mutually respectful relationship, and assures Barbadians it would not deliberately engage in
    any practice that would harm that relationship.”
    Up to press time the ministry had not publicly addressed the controversial test. It is understood officials were locked in meetings yesterday and efforts to reach Minister Kay McConney and Chief Education Officer Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw were futile.
    An upset parent told the DAILY NATION yesterday that another parent reported that when she called the ministry’s offices at Constitution Road, St Michael, an official informed her that the ministry had nothing to do with administration of the test.
    “Nobody has responded to our queries. We have not heard anything official from the Ministry of Education. How can they say that the ministry is not involved when the memo stated that the test was sanctioned by the Ministry of Education?”
    In the memo which was sent to all teaching staff on September 29, by a principal of one of the schools involved, it noted: “Please be informed that all first formers will take the pre-test in computer science organised by code.org. The proposed date is Monday, October 3rd, 2022, at 9:30 a.m. This session will run for two hours.
    “This process has been sanctioned by the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training and code.org will provide the personnel to supervise the examination.”
    BUT wants answers
    Yesterday, president of the Barbados Union of
    Teachers Rudy Lovell called on the ministry to explain the rationale behind the test.
    “Today I have been inundated with phone calls and messages on this issue. I have not seen the test, I am going by what was reported in the media. The report suggest that some of the questions were inappropriate and it would be good to know the rationale for the questions and information from this cohort of students. The Ministry of Education . . . needs to clear the air on this administered test. As a parent I understand the frustration of those aggrieved parents and I do hope that their concerns can be speedily addressed,” he said.
    The test was also a hot talking point yesterday across social media platforms, on several blogs and school WhatsApp groups.
    In one school group a teacher wrote that she queried the appropriateness of the questions and asked that some of them be pulled, but this did not happen.
    Reports also indicate that some students told an invigilator they felt uncomfortable about answering some of the questions but were assured it was confidential and their parents would not know their answers.
    However, a parent charged that the test could not be confidential when children had to write their names on the exam.
    It is understood that a principal at one of the schools involved has organised a meeting with the parents to shed light on the situation.

    Source: Nation


  50. “The questions at the centre of concern, to which the Ministry of Education had objected prior to the administering of
    the survey and which were inadvertently left in the paper, have been removed.”

    Min Ed should try to get copies of the test in all formats that they exist and destroy them.

    Min Ed needs to be firm and in control, don’t just object on item like these, firmly state if tests should be administered or not.


    • @Kiki

      A good observation. It is very disrespectful because of the frequency. Because of the repetitive nature of some commenters. On an on …


  51. There are some ads on youtube
    that say “Are you Gay”
    take this test to find out
    they are many unnecessary apps


  52. It would be useful and transparent if we could see a copy of the survey / questionnaire. But an escape clause would be to claim some kind of proprietary rights prevents sharing of the questionnaire.

    What became of those trucks that things used to fall off of? Even the trucks are partisan 😄

    We should hear in mind controls in the US or Europe are open weakened when outside of those regions. For those who like to point out it happen elsewhere add this to your mantra ‘if it can’t happen there, it shouldn’t happen here’


  53. Don’t water down the discussion.
    This involves the Min of Ed.
    It’s more than a Google search or random app.

    You are going down the click avenue..
    Less may be more. Too great a knowledge of IT may make a person lose contact with the bread and butter issue.


  54. “300 questions”
    That’s a lot of questions to give to 11-year old children.
    A good reporter would ask the following:
    (1) Were the question asked identical to those seen by the Min Ed
    (2) What area of ‘society’ was explored by these questions
    (3) Who will see the responses and the final report. GoRoB police officers (insert conspiracy here) or CIA officers in the US Embassy.
    (4) How long will this information be kept.
    (5) What was the (true) purposes of these questions and what will they be used for.


  55. The computer decides
    My brother completed some ESTA forms online for his family to travel to USA
    but inadvertently checked the wrong box for his daughter on the question
    “Are you a terrorist” and she was denied entry to USA so they had to cancel their trip
    They later went to an interview to US Embassy where a person asked her if she was a terrorist
    so she confirmed “No” and the interviewer smiled a little and then validated her application


  56. Have you noticed that I have not touched the Fintech issue. I have to wait and see what comes out of the meetings.


    • The blogmaster saw some of the questions and agree they are inappropriate for young children. The intent of the survey may have been honourable but one must be culturally sensitive. The MoE should have intervened and they say they did but the original format was released anyway.


  57. They could dance around with ENDLESS LIES as much as they want…..but the EVIDENCE is very clear…

    if you as a ministry of MISEDUCATION objected to a CRIMINAL survey that came VIA A BANK and directed at the region’s children….and YOU STILL ADMINISTER the perverted test to 11 and 12-year-olds VOLUNTARILY while knowing that it’s legally and MORALLY WRONG…

    ..hello, you are EQUALLY as culpable, complicit and IN COLLUSION against the island and region’s children..in that CONSPIRACY…


  58. Theo…trust me, you DO NOT WANT TO SEE THOSE QUESTIONS if you have children or grandchildren…

    the sample was EVIL PERSONIFIED…

    the ministry of miseducation should tell the PUBLIC…why they “objected” to the survey in the first place, but proceeded with the PERVERTED PEDOPHILE TEST anyway….

    but, please do not hold your breath THAT THESE well known LIARS and PRETENDERS WILL EVER ADMIT TO ANYTHING…especially now they were caught red-handed and OUTED everywhere….and the usual frauds could not jump out with another LYING coverup press conference…..they were trapped with their HOT POTATO burning holes in them and did the only thing they could….throw it right back at the source/conduit in hopes they could stop the fallout…that is what they should have done BEFORE when they claimed they “objected” but the greedy bitches could only see paper money…..prostituting children..

    AND they ALL GOT BURNT ANY WAY.


  59. “Don’t water down the discussion.
    This involves the Min of Ed.”

    You sound scolding

    the thread is about fin tech
    the questionnaire with questionable questions is a tangent

    My first comment today on 6th was about the former
    My second comment was about the latter

    USA has some weird rules in IT recruitment selection where nerds are required
    Emotion and Logic are separated

    Banana Freak Out

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcuD9rq1XVU


  60. “Don’t water down the discussion.
    This involves the Min of Ed.”

    You sound scolding

    the thread is about fin tech
    the questionnaire with questionable questions is a tangent

    My first comment today on 6th was about the former
    My second comment was about the latter

    USA has some weird rules in IT recruitment selection where nerds are required
    Emotion and Logic are separated

    Banana Freak Out

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcuD9rq1XVU


  61. “The blogmaster saw some of the questions and agree they are appropriate for young children. ”

    you really want to hold that position.


  62. Am being fair and believe it’s a typo i make them all the time..


  63. are yall even trying to understand what’s going on in the REAL WORLD YET….the fantasy island fake paradise shit IS OVER…

    “Customers Storm At Least Four Lebanese Banks Demanding Money

    After a week-long closure of banks ended Tuesday, enraged depositors stormed at least four banks in Lebanon demanding full access to their funds as partial withdrawal limits remain.

    The World Bank calls the current economic crisis – which has plunged three-quarters of the population into poverty – as one of the worst in over a century as the Lebanese pound has lost 90% of its value to the US dollar.

    One of the bank raiders, a former police officer, is heard in footage he recorded shouting “count the money, before one of you dies” as he demanded $24,000-worth of savings, having reportedly tried to sell his own kidney previously.”


  64. There are gays in IT
    people in the autism spectrum
    disabled people
    drug users in Silicon Valley
    people with social issues
    minorities
    women
    people from all social classes
    Convicted Hackers
    Asians are assumed more mathematical
    In the West IT development work has been replaced by India which is deemed much cheaper
    and better, some work has also been outsourced to eastern Europe
    Lazy Boogaloo


  65. @Bush Tea
    “@ Artax
    Bushie is just keeping you on your toes until ac comes back to put the real licks in your donkey..”

    I miss that part of BU. where ac was just throwing stuff on the wall. Sometimes it stuck.

    –xx–
    Tha actual quote used the word ‘inappropriate,’


  66. “It is not that the degree is useless”

    Having a degree is better than not having one and you are a person with a degree
    When you have a degree no one can take it away from you

    In the work environment old people see young people and foreigners as a threat as everyone is dispensable and replaceable, Companies prefer younger workers who have more energy and ambition.

    Qualifications are always necessary for minorities to get a foot in the door
    In the West whites do not need qualifications and are fast tracked to management
    Minorities are the workers whites are Managers who get the credit for the workers being productive


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akq4zHC69qY


  67. William…Theo……guidance counselors are advising that they had this same sex test forced on the children earlier in the year, so this is NOT THE FIRST TIME…. so the miseducation FRAUD MINISTRY IS LYING…

    the ministry is a co-consipirator..

    this is NOT OVER…


  68. @David
    A promising turnout for a first time event.
    I am somewhat ignorant of the overall Fintech space, yet the speakers/panel participants suggest ‘disruptive’, meaning few ‘traditional players’.
    There are many angles to play ‘Fintech’.


    • @NO

      Barbados is not there yet. The government will have to lead the transformation given it owns a large bloc of the way business is done in Barbados. The Blogmaster expects to see many PPPs and MOUs to give impetus to the new sector. We have to continue to intertwine our strategies with traditional, new, emerging and nascent.


  69. “William….i saw a sample of the questions…TOTALLY INAPPROPRIATE.”

    Really? Please tell BU how you saw a sample of the questions and give us an example of some you saw.🤣


  70. From BT
    “the IDB admitted that even though the Ministry of Education, Technological and Vocational Training objected to certain questions being included on the test, the test was still disseminated to students in its original format.”
    Sources close to the situation told Barbados TODAY an apology was demanded by Minister of Education Kay McConney this evening during a meeting with officials from the IDB at the ministry’s Constitution Road headquarters.”

    “The source said an initial apology in which the IDB sought to explain its reasons for including the controversial questions was rejected by the ministry.”

    Forget apology. Demand that all copies of the responses in all format be destroyed. As long as they are allowed to keep and analyze the data an apology means nothing. Refusing one apology and accepting another is a sign of weakness (here)

    This story is worthy of its own blog. Are we beholden to the IADB?


    • The data has been collected analyzes and conclusions from the sample size known. Deletions will solve nothing. It is too late. What remains to be solve is a strong message the covert and surreptitious way the survey was administered will not be repeated by asking those responsible to be held accountable. We must know it is not our culture to expect follow through. The blogmaster however is hopeful.


  71. They know the fake apology don’t mean shit, the agenda is still in place and ready to launch…..the only thing that can stop it is a CLASS ACTION LAWSUIT for violating these children and their parents international human rights…

    no long talk..

    begging borrowers…after TIEFING BILLIONS of Afrikan people’s tax, vat, and pension money ….are BEHOLDEN TO EVERYONE…


  72. Let’s not make this a BDLP thing. This is a national issue.

    If strangers can walk into our schools and ask/do what the hell they want to do, then what use is the teachers/Ministry of Education.

    A whole island with just two balls and they are on a woman.


  73. This story is worthy of its own blog. Are we beholden to the IADB?

    xxxxXXXXXXXXXXXX

    WHEN ALL YOU DO IS TRAVEL, COMPLAIN, BEG, BORROW AND SIPHON OFF WHAT DO YOU THINK IS THE ANSWER.

    WHETHER IT BE IADB, CCB, CHINA IMF ETC THE 2X3 ISLAND CONTINUES TO BURY ITSELF IN FILTH STARTING FROM AT THE TOP.


  74. Begging borrowers…..FRAUDS…

    “Amongst her other pertinent questions that she wishes to hear or see answered speedily, Savoury-Gittens asked where were the permission slips for guardians before the survey was given? Why was the Ministry not privy to seeing the final copy with the questions removed as requested before it was administered? Why call it a test and not a survey? Will students be disadvantaged according to the responses? Will the data collected be used still? Is the data being sold internationally? Will nothing happen to the IDB? Is this story going to blow over in a few days and nothing is done? Is this data collection part of the exchange between government and the IDB for the $40 million loan for education?”


  75. Just went to listen to Brasstacks.
    Glad that I did.
    Bajans are on the ball.
    Faith in my countrymen has been partially restored.


  76. Theo…the island’s people are very capable…they just have to STAY STRONG…and STAND THEIR GROUND against criminals and their political minions, imps, pimps and fowls…who drive FEAR as a weapon….THAT IS HOW THEY STAY IN CONTROL…through fear..

    ya int see the fowls are always trying to push it on here, but i would WRING THEIR SCRAWNY NECKS FOR THEM and feed them to my pitbull..


  77. Watching a next chat and the topic got hijacked. Now discussing the shuttle Challenger O-rings. At least there is no mention of Trump, Putin Ukraine, big deckie and posts written whilst hallucinating


  78. These are good questions
    where were the permission slips for guardians before the survey was given?

    Why was the Ministry not privy to seeing the final copy with the questions removed as requested before it was administered?

    Why call it a test and not a survey?

    Will students be disadvantaged according to the responses?

    Will the data collected be used still?

    Over to you Min Ed. Here are the next steps

    10-15 question need to be answered. The survey must be made public
    The responses trashed/permanently erased
    Apologies made to parents by IDB and Min Ed.
    Announce how this will be prevented from happening in the future.

    Anything less is a joke. Our children are not for sale.


    • Does anybody believe an independent agency would have been allowed to visit schools to conduct a survey and the top people at the ministry of education be unaware?


  79. If you cannot protect children sitting in a classroom, how are you going to protect citizens in a ‘Fintech’ world.
    GTFOH.


  80. Psychometric Testing
    A psychometric test is an assessment designed to measure cognitive ability, personality or work behaviour, to indicate the potential of a job candidate
    Questions are answered, speed, logic and personal bias are factors for consideration
    Those who get stuck on questions they find offensive will not be given the job


  81. If you cannot protect children sitting in a classroom, how are you going to protect citizens in a ‘Fintech’ world.
    GTFOH.

    XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

    WELL OBSERVED.

    FINTECH ALL SMOKE AND MIRRORS.

    LAWYERS ON THE 2X3 ISLAND WHO ARE KNOWN AS CROOKS, BEING INCOMPETENT WILL NOW BE ABLE OVERNIGHT TO DRAFT FINTECH LEGISLATION IN CAHOOTS WITH WHO MARK MALONE, ALIBABA AND THE NEXT 40 THIEVES.


  82. “how are you going to protect citizens in a ‘Fintech’ world.
    GTFOH.”

    these have no clue, only interested in how they look and sound, all they do is talk slick, tell nuf, nufff lies, feed fowls froth and wash, rinse, repeat.


  83. Theo……that’s exactly what it was meant to do.

    “Savoury-Gittens said that for the six hours daily that students are in the care of the MOE at school, parents want to know their children’s best interests are at heart. They wish to know that no harm will befall their child. They wish to know their children will not be traumatised. She said, “supposed this was a food programme and it contained poison, how could ‘Sorry’ be enough?” She said these questions about sexuality, gender identity, depression, self-harm and even suicide could have poisoned children’s minds and attitudes and have lasting repercussions depending on their personalities.”


  84. Calentura
    Cuban fever or sexual arousal.

    Fintech Jobs
    is primarily training people to implement configure and use financial software packages
    or sales and authorised dealership of financial packages to businesses


  85. HOW HAS KNOWN CONSULTANTS LIKE CLIVE MASCOLL AND BAG MAN AVANISH PERSAUD HELPED THE GOVERNMENT IN ABOUT 4 YEARS.

    THIS FINTECH LEGISLATION IS ONE BIG LAUGHING JOKE FOR 2022 AND BEYOND.


  86. man dey famous enuff…every platform got their number…

    be careful what ya wish for……ya getting it..

    and we already know that 40 million the begging borrowers got was NOT MEANT TO RECONNECT these children to their Afrikan ancestry, history, education, languages, culture,. traditions etc…NOTHING PROGRESSIVE…

    at least three years ago, .they were WARNED TO LET THE PEOPLE GO….but they are still holding on to commit their generational crimes…


  87. Politicians and Government have Personal Assistants, Teams of Staff, Consultants, Spokespeople, Campaign Managers and plethora of others who do their work


  88. Baje
    What has any of them done for Bim in the last 4 years? You don’t have to look very far to come up with nothing. We are on the brink in this country and everything that has a nice ring and a bit of shine attracting these folks like magpies.


  89. “The data has been collected analyzed and conclusions from the sample size known.”

    Truly, I thought this was a ‘breaking’ story. But even if the test was done on Monday, a thorough analysis and a sound report should take a few working days.

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